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meaningless

  • 1 absurdo

    adj.
    absurd, nonsensical, irrational, meaningless.
    m.
    1 absurdity, nonsense, folly, aberration.
    2 absurd act, absurdity.
    * * *
    1 absurd
    1 absurdity, nonsense
    ————————
    1 absurdity, nonsense
    * * *
    (f. - absurda)
    adj.
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ absurd

    lo absurdo es que... — the ridiculous thing is that...

    teatro del absurdotheatre o (EEUU) theater of the absurd

    2.
    SM absurdity, (piece of) nonsense
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo absurd, ridiculous

    lo más absurdo de todo es... — the ridiculous thing about it all is...

    II
    * * *
    = foolish, incongruous, ludicrous, absurd, farcical, meaningless, nonsensical.
    Ex. It would be uneconomic and foolish to persevere with human assignment of controlled-language terms.
    Ex. The idea is incongruous in our general catalogs where a publication is to be represented by a main entry as an edition of a particular work by a particular author.
    Ex. Hernandez described the encounter as futile and ludicrous, and concluded that it tallied entirely with Lespran's expectation of it..
    Ex. Too frequently absurd errors creep past the abstractor who does not know the field.
    Ex. There is considerable interest in picture books from the social realism of the 70s to the growing interest in fantasy, myth, legend, science fiction and the emphasis on the farcical and absurd aspects of life in the 80s.
    Ex. Although the isolate numbers for the concepts are correct, these mistakes in the use of facet indicators render this class number meaningless.
    Ex. Parental protectiveness of children is surely a good thing if sensibly applied, but this nonsensical double standard doesn't help anyone.
    ----
    * algo absurdo = nonsense.
    * lo absurdo = ridiculousness.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo absurd, ridiculous

    lo más absurdo de todo es... — the ridiculous thing about it all is...

    II
    * * *
    = foolish, incongruous, ludicrous, absurd, farcical, meaningless, nonsensical.

    Ex: It would be uneconomic and foolish to persevere with human assignment of controlled-language terms.

    Ex: The idea is incongruous in our general catalogs where a publication is to be represented by a main entry as an edition of a particular work by a particular author.
    Ex: Hernandez described the encounter as futile and ludicrous, and concluded that it tallied entirely with Lespran's expectation of it..
    Ex: Too frequently absurd errors creep past the abstractor who does not know the field.
    Ex: There is considerable interest in picture books from the social realism of the 70s to the growing interest in fantasy, myth, legend, science fiction and the emphasis on the farcical and absurd aspects of life in the 80s.
    Ex: Although the isolate numbers for the concepts are correct, these mistakes in the use of facet indicators render this class number meaningless.
    Ex: Parental protectiveness of children is surely a good thing if sensibly applied, but this nonsensical double standard doesn't help anyone.
    * algo absurdo = nonsense.
    * lo absurdo = ridiculousness.

    * * *
    absurdo1 -da
    absurd, ridiculous
    eso es a todas luces absurdo that is absolutely preposterous o absurd o ridiculous
    esto es el colmo de lo absurdo this is totally absurd o the height of absurdity
    es absurdo que te comportes así it's ridiculous o absurd of you to behave like that
    1
    (absurdez): es un absurdo que trates de ocultarlo it's ridiculous o absurd (of you) to try to hide it
    2 ( Fil, Mat):
    un absurdo an absurdity
    reducción al absurdo reductio ad absurdum
    * * *

    absurdo
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    absurd, ridiculous
    absurdo,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 absurd: es un argumento completamente absurdo, it's an absolutely absurd line of argument
    2 (cosa ridícula) ludicrous: llevaba puesto un absurdo sombrero, she was wearing a ridiculous hat
    II sustantivo masculino absurdity, absurd thing

    ' absurdo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    absurda
    - baremo
    - mamarrachada
    - me
    - perfectamente
    English:
    absurd
    - all
    - farcical
    - ludicrous
    - mindless
    - nonsensical
    - preposterous
    - senseless
    - sound
    - to
    - wacky
    - absurdity
    - fantastic
    - wild
    * * *
    absurdo, -a
    adj
    absurd;
    lo absurdo sería que no lo hicieras it would be absurd for you not to do it
    nm
    decir/hacer un absurdo to say/do something ridiculous o idiotic;
    reducción al absurdo reductio ad absurdum;
    el teatro del absurdo the Theatre of the Absurd
    * * *
    I adj absurd
    II m
    1 absurdity;
    es un absurdo que it’s absurd that
    2
    :
    teatro del absurdo theater o Br theatre of the absurd
    * * *
    absurdo, -da adj
    disparatado, ridículo: absurd, ridiculous
    absurdamente adv
    : absurdity
    * * *
    absurdo adj absurd

    Spanish-English dictionary > absurdo

  • 2 adular

    v.
    1 to flatter.
    2 to cajole, to buff up, to be a toady to, to apple-polish.
    * * *
    1 to adulate, flatter, soft-soap
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to flatter
    * * *
    = flatter, butter + Nombre + up, toady, fawn (on/upon/over).
    Ex. Library readers are not always flattered to think that their problems are so simple that the librarian can produce the answers out of his head.
    Ex. This may seem surprising, but complimenting a co-worker can seem like you are buttering them up for something you need.
    Ex. The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.
    Ex. Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to flatter
    * * *
    = flatter, butter + Nombre + up, toady, fawn (on/upon/over).

    Ex: Library readers are not always flattered to think that their problems are so simple that the librarian can produce the answers out of his head.

    Ex: This may seem surprising, but complimenting a co-worker can seem like you are buttering them up for something you need.
    Ex: The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.
    Ex: Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.

    * * *
    adular [A1 ]
    vt
    to flatter
    me da asco cómo adulan al jefe it's revolting how they crawl to o suck up to the boss ( colloq)
    * * *

    adular ( conjugate adular) verbo transitivo
    to flatter
    adular verbo transitivo to adulate
    ' adular' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    coba
    - sobar
    English:
    butter
    - fawn
    - flatter
    * * *
    adular vt
    to flatter
    * * *
    v/t flatter
    * * *
    adular vt
    lisonjear: to flatter

    Spanish-English dictionary > adular

  • 3 alabar

    v.
    to praise.
    ¡alabado sea (el Señor)! (informal) thank heavens!
    * * *
    1 (elogiar) to praise
    1 (jactarse) to boast
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.

    alabar a algn de o por algo — to praise sb for sth

    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to praise
    * * *
    = worship, laud, hold + Nombre + up for praise, praise, sing + Posesivo + praises, toady, fawn (on/upon/over).
    Ex. The article concludes that librarians should not worship communication but they should practice it.
    Ex. Libraries are also lauded for providing other public services with economic benefits.
    Ex. Politicians give us many reasons to worry, and I don't usually hold them up for public praise.
    Ex. In spite of their protestations to the contrary, most bosses prefer subordinates whom they get along with, who cause them no anxiety, who quietly accept their decisions, who praise them.
    Ex. Frustrated devotees had been singing his praises for years, to no avail.
    Ex. The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.
    Ex. Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.
    ----
    * alabar de boquilla = give + lip service.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to praise
    * * *
    = worship, laud, hold + Nombre + up for praise, praise, sing + Posesivo + praises, toady, fawn (on/upon/over).

    Ex: The article concludes that librarians should not worship communication but they should practice it.

    Ex: Libraries are also lauded for providing other public services with economic benefits.
    Ex: Politicians give us many reasons to worry, and I don't usually hold them up for public praise.
    Ex: In spite of their protestations to the contrary, most bosses prefer subordinates whom they get along with, who cause them no anxiety, who quietly accept their decisions, who praise them.
    Ex: Frustrated devotees had been singing his praises for years, to no avail.
    Ex: The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.
    Ex: Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.
    * alabar de boquilla = give + lip service.

    * * *
    alabar [A1 ]
    vt
    to praise
    ¡alabado sea Dios! praise be to God!
    su gesto fue muy alabado his gesture was widely praised
    siempre la está alabando he's always singing her praises
    * * *

    alabar ( conjugate alabar) verbo transitivo
    to praise
    alabar verbo transitivo to praise
    ' alabar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cacarear
    - ensalzar
    - ponderar
    - exaltar
    English:
    praise
    * * *
    vt
    to praise;
    Fam
    ¡alabado sea Dios! [expresa sorpresa] good heavens!
    * * *
    v/t praise, acclaim
    * * *
    alabar vt
    : to praise
    * * *
    alabar vb to praise

    Spanish-English dictionary > alabar

  • 4 amputar

    v.
    1 to amputate.
    El hacha cercenó la mano de Ricardo The axe amputated John's finger.
    2 to suppress, to curtail.
    * * *
    1 to amputate
    2 figurado to cut out
    * * *
    VT to amputate, cut off
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <brazo/pierna> to amputate; < texto> to cut (out)
    * * *
    = amputate, excise.
    Ex. Are we not perhaps then amputating our human faculties by limiting ourselves to the kind of meaningless cacophonation of symbols with which computers deal?.
    Ex. Once a new digitized system has been introduced irrelevancies and redundant features can more easily be seen and excised.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <brazo/pierna> to amputate; < texto> to cut (out)
    * * *
    = amputate, excise.

    Ex: Are we not perhaps then amputating our human faculties by limiting ourselves to the kind of meaningless cacophonation of symbols with which computers deal?.

    Ex: Once a new digitized system has been introduced irrelevancies and redundant features can more easily be seen and excised.

    * * *
    amputar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹brazo/pierna› to amputate
    2 ‹texto› to cut (out)
    * * *

    amputar ( conjugate amputar) verbo transitivobrazo/pierna to amputate
    amputar vtr Med to amputate
    fig (una película, un texto) to cut out
    ' amputar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cortar
    English:
    amputate
    - sever
    * * *
    1. [miembro] to amputate;
    le amputaron un brazo one of his arms was amputated
    2. [libro, película] to mutilate
    * * *
    v/t brazo, pierna amputate
    * * *
    : to amputate

    Spanish-English dictionary > amputar

  • 5 anticuado

    adj.
    old-fashioned, archaic, out-of-date, antiquated.
    f. & m.
    old-fashioned person, fuddy-duddy, fuddy, lame.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: anticuar.
    * * *
    1 antiquated, old-fashioned, obsolete, out-of-date
    * * *
    (f. - anticuada)
    adj.
    old-fashioned, outdated
    * * *
    ADJ [maquinaria, infraestructura, tecnología] antiquated; [moda] old-fashioned, out-of-date; [técnica] obsolete
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.
    Ex. Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.
    Ex. When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex. It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex. For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex. Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex. Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex. Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex. The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex. By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex. Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex. He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex. So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex. What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex. Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    ----
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.

    Ex: Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.

    Ex: When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex: It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex: For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex: Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex: Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex: Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex: The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex: By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex: Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex: He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex: So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex: What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex: Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.

    * * *
    anticuado1 -da
    ‹persona/ideas› old-fashioned, antiquated; ‹ropa› old-fashioned; ‹sistema/aparato› antiquated
    anticuado2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    * * *

    Del verbo anticuarse: ( conjugate anticuarse)

    anticuado es:

    el participio

    anticuado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    old-fashioned
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino: eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    anticuado,-a adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino old-fashioned, antiquated

    ' anticuado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    anticuada
    - apolillada
    - apolillado
    - antiguo
    - atrasado
    - pasado
    - zanahoria
    English:
    antiquated
    - date
    - fuddy-duddy
    - old
    - old-fashioned
    - outdated
    - outmoded
    - dated
    - out
    - time
    * * *
    anticuado, -a
    adj
    [persona, ropa] old-fashioned;
    esa técnica está anticuada that method is out of date;
    mi módem se ha quedado anticuado my modem is out of date
    nm,f
    old-fashioned person;
    mi madre es una anticuada my mother is very old-fashioned
    * * *
    adj antiquated
    * * *
    anticuado, -da adj
    : antiquated, outdated
    * * *
    anticuado adj old fashioned

    Spanish-English dictionary > anticuado

  • 6 cacofonía

    f.
    cacophony.
    * * *
    1 cacophony
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino cacophony
    * * *
    = cacophonation, cacophony.
    Ex. Are we not perhaps then amputating our human faculties by limiting ourselves to the kind of meaningless cacophonation of symbols with which computers deal?.
    Ex. The book contributors have produced a work that is intricate and persuasive, and they have also produced a deafening cacophony of concepts.
    * * *
    femenino cacophony
    * * *
    = cacophonation, cacophony.

    Ex: Are we not perhaps then amputating our human faculties by limiting ourselves to the kind of meaningless cacophonation of symbols with which computers deal?.

    Ex: The book contributors have produced a work that is intricate and persuasive, and they have also produced a deafening cacophony of concepts.

    * * *
    cacophony
    * * *

    cacofonía sustantivo femenino cacophony
    * * *
    Ling cacophony
    * * *
    f cacophony
    * * *
    : cacophony

    Spanish-English dictionary > cacofonía

  • 7 carecer

    v.
    to lack, to be deficient.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ AGRADECER], like link=agradecer agradecer
    1 to lack (de, -)
    el pueblo carecía de alumbrado público the village lacked street lighting, the village had no street lighting
    * * *
    VI
    1)

    carece de talento — he lacks talent, he has no talent

    no carecemos de dinero — we don't lack for money, we're not short of money

    2) Cono Sur (=hacer falta)

    carece hacerlo — we/you have to do it, it is necessary to do it

    * * *
    verbo intransitivo (frml)

    carece de interés — it is lacking in interest, it lacks interest

    carece de valor — it has no value, it is worthless

    * * *
    Ex. One user might have extensive subject expertise when approaching, for example, a tool covering the literature of biology, another user might be lacking such subject expertise.
    ----
    * carecer de = be deficient in, lack.
    * carecer de sentido = be meaningless.
    * carecer de valor = have + a hollow ring.
    * carecer de versatilidad = be a one-trip pony.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo (frml)

    carece de interés — it is lacking in interest, it lacks interest

    carece de valor — it has no value, it is worthless

    * * *

    Ex: One user might have extensive subject expertise when approaching, for example, a tool covering the literature of biology, another user might be lacking such subject expertise.

    * carecer de = be deficient in, lack.
    * carecer de sentido = be meaningless.
    * carecer de valor = have + a hollow ring.
    * carecer de versatilidad = be a one-trip pony.

    * * *
    carecer [E3 ]
    vi
    ( frml) carecer DE algo to lack sth
    carecemos de los medios económicos necesarios we lack o do not have the necessary financial means
    el documento carece de interés the document is lacking in interest, the document lacks o is without o has no interest
    carece de valor it has no value, it is worthless
    sus palabras carecen de todo sentido her words mean absolutely nothing o make no sense at all
    * * *

     

    carecer ( conjugate carecer) verbo intransitivo (frml) carecer de algo to lack sth;

    carece de valor it has no value, it is worthless
    carecer verbo intransitivo carecer de algo, to lack sthg

    ' carecer' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    adolecer
    - braga
    - última
    - último
    English:
    lack
    - devoid
    - lacking
    * * *
    carecer de algo to lack sth;
    una casa que carece de agua corriente a house with no running water;
    * * *
    v/i
    :
    carecer de algo lack sth;
    carecer de interés not be interesting, be lacking in interest
    * * *
    carecer {53} vi
    carecer de : to lack
    el cheque carecía de fondos: the check lacked funds
    * * *
    carecer vb to lack / not to have

    Spanish-English dictionary > carecer

  • 8 carecer de sentido

    Ex. If you do not observe this rule, the resulting class number will be either meaningless or, at least, have the wrong meaning.
    * * *

    Ex: If you do not observe this rule, the resulting class number will be either meaningless or, at least, have the wrong meaning.

    Spanish-English dictionary > carecer de sentido

  • 9 chorradas

    f.pl.
    nonsense, baloney, meaningless stuff, hogwash.
    * * *
    = baloney, blather, piffle, bollocks, crap, nonsense, claptrap, buncombe, bunkum, bunk, hogwash, shite, bullshit.
    Ex. The author characterises the strategic plan as baloney carefully crafted to conceal the real problem.
    Ex. The article 'Information science: blather and piffle?' points out that the term 'Information science' is used in a variety of ways often to mean quite different things.
    Ex. The article 'Information science: blather and piffle?' points out that the term 'Information science' is used in a variety of ways often to mean quite different things.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Celebration, caring or bollocks: some thoughts on the Branch and Mobile Libraries Group Weekend Summer School'.
    Ex. This is Archie Bunker crap, right? = Estas son las gilipolleces de Archie Bunker, ¿verdad?.
    Ex. Since 'added entry' maps to 'access point' and 'main entry' maps to 'access point', some curious, but harmless non-sense results.
    Ex. Such antediluvian claptrap has every appearance of using a presumed hurt to military effectiveness as a shield for prejudice.
    Ex. The word ' buncombe,' often misspelled as 'bunkum,' soon came to refer to any sort of spurious or questionable statement.
    Ex. The word 'buncombe,' often misspelled as ' bunkum,' soon came to refer to any sort of spurious or questionable statement.
    Ex. Henry Ford is often quoted as saying 'History is bunk'.
    Ex. The film proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that the official story is hogwash and that all the evidence points towards an inside job.
    Ex. Picture quality is utterly shite due to use of a cameraphone.
    Ex. For a majority of likely voters, meaningless bullshit will be the most important factor in deciding who they will vote for in 2008.
    ----
    * chorradas al cuadrado = nonsense on stilts.
    * decir chorradas = bullshit.
    * * *
    = baloney, blather, piffle, bollocks, crap, nonsense, claptrap, buncombe, bunkum, bunk, hogwash, shite, bullshit.

    Ex: The author characterises the strategic plan as baloney carefully crafted to conceal the real problem.

    Ex: The article 'Information science: blather and piffle?' points out that the term 'Information science' is used in a variety of ways often to mean quite different things.
    Ex: The article 'Information science: blather and piffle?' points out that the term 'Information science' is used in a variety of ways often to mean quite different things.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Celebration, caring or bollocks: some thoughts on the Branch and Mobile Libraries Group Weekend Summer School'.
    Ex: This is Archie Bunker crap, right? = Estas son las gilipolleces de Archie Bunker, ¿verdad?.
    Ex: Since 'added entry' maps to 'access point' and 'main entry' maps to 'access point', some curious, but harmless non-sense results.
    Ex: Such antediluvian claptrap has every appearance of using a presumed hurt to military effectiveness as a shield for prejudice.
    Ex: The word ' buncombe,' often misspelled as 'bunkum,' soon came to refer to any sort of spurious or questionable statement.
    Ex: The word 'buncombe,' often misspelled as ' bunkum,' soon came to refer to any sort of spurious or questionable statement.
    Ex: Henry Ford is often quoted as saying 'History is bunk'.
    Ex: The film proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that the official story is hogwash and that all the evidence points towards an inside job.
    Ex: Picture quality is utterly shite due to use of a cameraphone.
    Ex: For a majority of likely voters, meaningless bullshit will be the most important factor in deciding who they will vote for in 2008.
    * chorradas al cuadrado = nonsense on stilts.
    * decir chorradas = bullshit.

    Spanish-English dictionary > chorradas

  • 10 chupao

    = easy peasy, easy peasy lemon squeezy, easy peasy japanesey.
    Ex. It was easy peasy to set-up and has been very easy to use ever since.
    Ex. Anyway, it works like a charm and was easy peasy lemon squeezy to install -- as easy as squeezing lemon on a lobster.
    Ex. Words to that effect are meaningless in any debate as he may as well just say it was ' easy peasy japanesey'.
    * * *
    = easy peasy, easy peasy lemon squeezy, easy peasy japanesey.

    Ex: It was easy peasy to set-up and has been very easy to use ever since.

    Ex: Anyway, it works like a charm and was easy peasy lemon squeezy to install -- as easy as squeezing lemon on a lobster.
    Ex: Words to that effect are meaningless in any debate as he may as well just say it was ' easy peasy japanesey'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > chupao

  • 11 comentarista deportivo

    (n.) = sportscaster, sports broadcaster
    Ex. Results showed that male broadcast commentators also significantly monopolized airtime, even in the presence of female sportscasters, across men's & women's games.
    Ex. Although women have made great strides in sport, their achievements will continue to be meaningless as long as sports broadcasters undermine, trivialize, & minimize their performances through biased commentaries.
    * * *
    (n.) = sportscaster, sports broadcaster

    Ex: Results showed that male broadcast commentators also significantly monopolized airtime, even in the presence of female sportscasters, across men's & women's games.

    Ex: Although women have made great strides in sport, their achievements will continue to be meaningless as long as sports broadcasters undermine, trivialize, & minimize their performances through biased commentaries.

    Spanish-English dictionary > comentarista deportivo

  • 12 con furia

    = with a vengeance, furiously
    Ex. However, as we shall see, the public librarian's dedication to his civilizing and stabilizing role in society was to surface with a vengeance in those times when the nation appeared threatened.
    Ex. A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.
    * * *
    = with a vengeance, furiously

    Ex: However, as we shall see, the public librarian's dedication to his civilizing and stabilizing role in society was to surface with a vengeance in those times when the nation appeared threatened.

    Ex: A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > con furia

  • 13 cumplir un requisito

    (v.) = match + criterion, meet + criterion, meet + specification, satisfy + requirement, fill + requirement
    Ex. It should be possible to search for a set of records that match certain criteria.
    Ex. Quite frequently a user will be satisfied with a few items on a topic, as long as they are relevant, and meet other criteria such as language, date and level.
    Ex. A thesaurus is normally tailored to meet the specification of a particular application.
    Ex. No one catalogue can satisfy all the requirements of all users simultaneously.
    Ex. A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.
    * * *
    (v.) = match + criterion, meet + criterion, meet + specification, satisfy + requirement, fill + requirement

    Ex: It should be possible to search for a set of records that match certain criteria.

    Ex: Quite frequently a user will be satisfied with a few items on a topic, as long as they are relevant, and meet other criteria such as language, date and level.
    Ex: A thesaurus is normally tailored to meet the specification of a particular application.
    Ex: No one catalogue can satisfy all the requirements of all users simultaneously.
    Ex: A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cumplir un requisito

  • 14 cumplir una condición

    (v.) = meet + condition, satisfy + condition, fill + requirement
    Ex. DOBIS/LIBIS searches through the order file for orders meeting these conditions and reports its progress through the file with a screen like that shown in Figure 148 on page 138.
    Ex. This article outlines the advantages of logical programming or defining all relevant knowledge to satisfy logical conditions or IF-THEN rules, instead of a traditional algorithmic programming language.
    Ex. A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.
    * * *
    (v.) = meet + condition, satisfy + condition, fill + requirement

    Ex: DOBIS/LIBIS searches through the order file for orders meeting these conditions and reports its progress through the file with a screen like that shown in Figure 148 on page 138.

    Ex: This article outlines the advantages of logical programming or defining all relevant knowledge to satisfy logical conditions or IF-THEN rules, instead of a traditional algorithmic programming language.
    Ex: A sentence may fill every requirement of syntax and be meaningless: Austin cites Chomsky's example 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cumplir una condición

  • 15 cumplir una regla

    (v.) = observe + rule, comply with + rule
    Ex. If you do not observe this rule, the resulting class number will be either meaningless or, at least, have the wrong meaning.
    Ex. Besides the lending of materials, most libraries offer a photocopying service and in this connection definite rules must be complied with.
    * * *
    (v.) = observe + rule, comply with + rule

    Ex: If you do not observe this rule, the resulting class number will be either meaningless or, at least, have the wrong meaning.

    Ex: Besides the lending of materials, most libraries offer a photocopying service and in this connection definite rules must be complied with.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cumplir una regla

  • 16 dar coba

    v.
    to blarney, to flatter, to soft-soap.
    * * *
    (v.) = toady, fawn (on/upon/over)
    Ex. The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.
    Ex. Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.
    * * *
    (v.) = toady, fawn (on/upon/over)

    Ex: The function of journalism is not to toady to those in power but to challenge them.

    Ex: Presumably they do so in the hope of being tossed some meaningless bauble of an honour when they have fawned enough.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar coba

  • 17 decisión arbitraria

    Ex. It is concluded that the choice of citation and co-citation thresholds can be influenced by formal considerations which ensure statistically meaningful partitions rather than arbitrary decision which can produce meaningless interpretations.
    * * *

    Ex: It is concluded that the choice of citation and co-citation thresholds can be influenced by formal considerations which ensure statistically meaningful partitions rather than arbitrary decision which can produce meaningless interpretations.

    Spanish-English dictionary > decisión arbitraria

  • 18 descuento1

    1 = discount, deduction, rebate, trade-in allowance, discount ticket, reduced rate, special rate, reduced fee, discounted price, discount price, marked-down price, mark-down.
    Ex. The price, discount, and postage information is used to update the fund and vendor files and to pay the invoice.
    Ex. Each man took an equal share of the payment, regardless of how many pages he had set; deductions were made only for failings such as unpunctuality.
    Ex. The amount of rebate is three percentage points per year for the first five years of the loan.
    Ex. The company also offers a flat $50 trade-in allowance on major encyclopedias from other publishers.
    Ex. All employees can access the intranet where they can find information on the company fitness centre, employee anniversaries, and discount tickets to local attractions.
    Ex. Subscription price is 55 pounds (103 dollars) with reduced rates for members of the Institute of Information Scientists.
    Ex. Availability is by means of a monthly subscription of 34.95 dollars with special rates for doctors' groups.
    Ex. We have exetended the registration deadline for reduced fee of 300 EUR instead of 350 EUR until April, 17th.
    Ex. In fact, the discounted prices for large consortia are meaningless; probably not a single buyer has actually paid the undiscounted price.
    Ex. After February 24, the discount price is $495 and $595 until the day before the event, a savings of up to $900 off onsite registration.
    Ex. Instead of keeping such items in our warehouse collecting dust, we are placing them here for a clearance sale at significantly marked-down prices.
    Ex. Customers will be charged either a mark-up or a mark-down, depending on whether they are buying or selling.
    ----
    * con descuento = at a discount, discounted, cut-price, cut-rate.
    * descuento por compra al por mayor = bulk deal, bulk rate, bulk rate discount.
    * descuento por inscripción anticipada = early bird registration, early bird price, early bird price, early-bird discount, early bird rate, early bird registration rate.
    * descuento por reserva anticipada = early booking discount.
    * descuento por ser estudiante = student rate.
    * hacer descuento = discount.
    * hacer un descuento = give + discount.
    * ofrecer descuento = offer + discount.
    * período de descuento por inscripción anticipada = early bird period.
    * precio con descuento = discounted price, discount price.
    * sin descuento = undiscounted.
    * vale de descuento = coupon.

    Spanish-English dictionary > descuento1

  • 19 desfasado

    adj.
    out of phase, out of place, off-time.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: desfasar.
    * * *
    1→ link=desfasar desfasar
    1 outdated, out of date (persona) old-fashioned, behind the times
    ¡eres un desfasado! you're just not with it!
    * * *
    (f. - desfasada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=anticuado) behind the times
    2) (Téc) out of phase
    3)

    estar desfasado — (Aer) to be suffering from jetlag

    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) (Fís) out of phase; <mecanismo/ritmo> out of sync; <planes/etapas> out of step
    b) <ideas/persona> old-fashioned
    * * *
    = out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], outmoded, superseded, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], out of sync, overaged, out of touch with + reality, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], byzantine, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], stale, long in the tooth.
    Ex. It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex. For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex. With computerization some libraries took the opportunity to replace outmoded abstracts bulletins with SDI services.
    Ex. Nonetheless, shelves fill up and eventually must be relieved of duplicated, superseded or obsolete books.
    Ex. This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex. Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex. The article 'Reading: an activity out of sync' emphasizes the need for the librarian and the teacher to work together to ensure that pupils are taught about a wide range of quality literature titles and authors.
    Ex. Bielefeld University is replacing its overaged mainframe data processing systems in the library.
    Ex. Some librarians seem to be out of touch with reality.
    Ex. The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex. Those elderly bureaucrats and their byzantine procedures are cherished by the customers, who tend to be uninterested in the arcane details of 'digital,' and so are relentlessly passé themselves.
    Ex. He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex. So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex. Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex. Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) (Fís) out of phase; <mecanismo/ritmo> out of sync; <planes/etapas> out of step
    b) <ideas/persona> old-fashioned
    * * *
    = out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], outmoded, superseded, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], out of sync, overaged, out of touch with + reality, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], byzantine, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], stale, long in the tooth.

    Ex: It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.

    Ex: For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex: With computerization some libraries took the opportunity to replace outmoded abstracts bulletins with SDI services.
    Ex: Nonetheless, shelves fill up and eventually must be relieved of duplicated, superseded or obsolete books.
    Ex: This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex: Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex: The article 'Reading: an activity out of sync' emphasizes the need for the librarian and the teacher to work together to ensure that pupils are taught about a wide range of quality literature titles and authors.
    Ex: Bielefeld University is replacing its overaged mainframe data processing systems in the library.
    Ex: Some librarians seem to be out of touch with reality.
    Ex: The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex: Those elderly bureaucrats and their byzantine procedures are cherished by the customers, who tend to be uninterested in the arcane details of 'digital,' and so are relentlessly passé themselves.
    Ex: He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex: So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex: Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex: Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.

    * * *
    1 ( Fís) out of phase
    2 ‹mecanismo/ritmo› out of sync; ‹planes/etapas› out of step
    3 ‹ideas/persona› old-fashioned
    está algo desfasado it's a little behind the times o old-fashioned
    * * *

    Del verbo desfasarse: ( conjugate desfasarse)

    desfasado es:

    el participio

    desfasado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ideas/persona old-fashioned

    desfasado,-a adjetivo
    1 (objeto, moda, etc) outdated
    2 (persona) old-fashioned, behind the times
    3 Téc out of phase

    ' desfasado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    desfasada
    - atrasado
    English:
    time
    - out
    * * *
    desfasado, -a adj
    1. [desincronizado] out of synch o sync
    2. [persona] out of touch;
    [libro, moda] old-fashioned; [ideas] old-fashioned, out of date
    * * *
    adj fig
    old-fashioned
    * * *
    desfasado, -da adj
    1) : out of sync
    2) : out of step, behind the times
    * * *
    desfasado adj out of date

    Spanish-English dictionary > desfasado

  • 20 desvirtuar

    v.
    1 to spoil.
    su victoria quedó totalmente desvirtuada his victory was rendered meaningless
    esta actuación desvirtúa el espíritu del acuerdo this action violates the spirit of the agreement
    Ellos desvirtuaron su regalo They spoiled his gift.
    2 to distort, to misrepresent, to twist, to camouflage.
    Ricardo desvirtuó la verdad Richard distorted the truth.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ ACTUAR], like link=actuar actuar
    1 to impair, spoil, distort
    2 figurado to contradict, belie
    * * *
    1.
    VT [+ argumento, razonamiento] to detract from; [+ efecto] to counteract; [+ sentido] to distort
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <verdad/hechos> to distort
    * * *
    Ex. Commentators who assert their views premised upon a unity of aims for SLIS not only fail to appreciate existential realities, they also distort perceptions about what is the best speed of curriculum evolution.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <verdad/hechos> to distort
    * * *

    Ex: Commentators who assert their views premised upon a unity of aims for SLIS not only fail to appreciate existential realities, they also distort perceptions about what is the best speed of curriculum evolution.

    * * *
    vt
    A (tergiversar, alterar) ‹verdad/hechos› to distort
    la traducción desvirtúa totalmente el sentido del original the translation completely distorts o alters the sense of the original
    el periódico desvirtuó sus declaraciones the newspaper misrepresented what he had said o distorted his words
    B
    1 (anular) ‹argumento› to disprove; ‹sospecha› to prove … to be unfounded
    2 (debilitar) ‹argumento› to detract from
    * * *

    desvirtuar verbo transitivo to distort, adulterate: ese comunicado desvirtúa la realidad de lo que pasó, that communiqué distorts the actual facts of the incident
    * * *
    1. [estropear] to spoil;
    el comercialismo desvirtúa la producción literaria commercialism has a detrimental effect on literary writing;
    su victoria quedó totalmente desvirtuada his victory was rendered meaningless;
    esta actuación desvirtúa el espíritu del acuerdo this action violates the spirit of the agreement
    2. [distorsionar] to distort;
    la prensa ha desvirtuado mis palabras the press have twisted my words;
    desvirtuó los hechos en su declaración al juez he distorted the facts in his statement to the judge
    * * *
    v/t detract from; fig ( distorsionar) distort
    * * *
    desvirtuar {3} vt
    1) : to impair, to spoil
    2) : to detract from
    3) : to distort, to misrepresent

    Spanish-English dictionary > desvirtuar

См. также в других словарях:

  • meaningless — adj. having no meaning; of no value; as, a meaningless endeavor; a meaningless life; a meaningless explanation. Opposite of {meaningful}. [Narrower terms: {insignificant ; {mindless, unmeaning ; {nonsense(prenominal), nonsensical ; {pointless,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Meaningless — may refer to: Meaningless (album), the debut solo album of singer and songwriter Jon Brion Meaningless, a song by The Magnetic Fields from their 1999 album 69 Love Songs This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title. If… …   Wikipedia

  • meaningless — index collateral (immaterial), frivolous, immaterial, incomprehensible, inexpressive, minor, nominal, n …   Law dictionary

  • meaningless — 1730, from MEANING (Cf. meaning) + LESS (Cf. less). Related: Meaninglessly; meaninglessness …   Etymology dictionary

  • meaningless — [adj] without use, value, worth absurd, aimless, blank, doesn’t cut it*, doublespeak*, double talk*, empty, feckless, fustian, futile, good for nothing, hollow, hot air*, inane, inconsequential, insignificant, insubstantial, nonsensical, nothing …   New thesaurus

  • meaningless — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ having no meaning or significance. DERIVATIVES meaninglessly adverb meaninglessness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • meaningless — [mēn′iŋlis] adj. having no meaning; without significance or purpose; senseless meaninglessly adv. meaninglessness n …   English World dictionary

  • meaningless — [[t]mi͟ːnɪŋləs[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED If something that someone says or writes is meaningless, it has no meaning, or appears to have no meaning. The sentence kicked the ball the man is meaningless... She is fascinated by algebra while he considers it …   English dictionary

  • meaningless — mean|ing|less [ˈmi:nıŋləs] adj 1.) having no purpose or importance and therefore not worth doing or having ▪ He said a few meaningless words to his hostess and looked around the room. ▪ a repetitive and meaningless task… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • meaningless — adj. VERBS ▪ be ▪ become ▪ render sth ADVERB ▪ absolutely, quite, totally …   Collocations dictionary

  • meaningless — adjective 1 something that is meaningless has no purpose or importance and does not seem worth doing or having; futile: a meaningless existence 2 not having a meaning that you can understand or explain: To me the marks on the page were just… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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