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portrayal

  • 1 aburrido

    adj.
    1 boring, dull, humdrum, uninteresting.
    2 bored, tired.
    f. & m.
    bore, boring person, tiresome person.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: aburrir.
    * * *
    1→ link=aburrir aburrir
    1 (ser aburrido) boring, tedious; (monótono) dull, dreary
    2 (estar aburrido) bored, weary; (cansado) tired of; (harto) fed up with
    * * *
    (f. - aburrida)
    adj.
    1) boring, tedious
    2) bored, fed up
    * * *
    ADJ (=que aburre) boring, tedious; (=que siente aburrimiento) bored

    ¡estoy aburrido de decírtelo! — I'm tired of telling you!

    ABURRIDO ¿"Bored" o "boring"? Usamos bored para referirnos al hecho de {estar} aburrido, es decir, de sentir aburrimiento: Si estás aburrida podrías ayudarme con este trabajo If you're bored you could help me with this work ► Usamos boring con personas, actividades y cosas para indicar que alguien o algo {es} aburrido, es decir, que produce aburrimiento: ¡Qué novela más aburrida! What a boring novel! No me gusta salir con él; es muy aburrido I don't like going out with him; he's very boring
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    1) < persona>
    a) [estar] ( sin entretenimiento) bored
    b) [estar] ( harto) fed up

    aburrido de algo — tired of something, fed up with something

    aburrido de + inf — tired of -ing

    2) [ser] <película/persona> boring; < trabajo> boring, tedious
    II
    - da masculino, femenino bore
    * * *
    = tedious, deadly [deadlier -comp., deadliest -sup.], drab, stodgy, unexciting, uninteresting, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], bored, boring, wearying, dreary [drearier -comp., dreariest -sup.], uninspiring, unmoving, dull, cut and dried [cut and dry].
    Ex. In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.
    Ex. Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).
    Ex. Have reading foisted on you as a duty, a task to be put up with, from which you expect no delight, and it can appear a drab business gladly to be given up.
    Ex. One could easily prefer the convenience of the stodgy single-volume work.
    Ex. The author argues that the advantages for higher education are unclear, and rather unexciting.
    Ex. There is no such thing on earth as an uninteresting subject; the only thing that can exist is an uninterested person.
    Ex. The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex. Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex. One should answer the telephone clearly and pleasantly -- not in a bored voice or in slurred haste.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex. The city was considered to be seedy (decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex. Though the novel begins like a house ablaze, it later thickens slightly into an acceptable if uninspiring finale.
    Ex. The outcome is strangely unmoving.
    Ex. These librarians are given Haykin upon the day of their arrival and are expected to read the entire dull document and use it as a guideline in establishing subject headings.
    Ex. I don't like to hear cut-and-dried sermons -- when I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.
    ----
    * de un modo aburrido y pesado = tediously, ponderously, boringly.
    * día aburrido = dull day.
    * estar aburrido como una ostra = be bored stiff.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    1) < persona>
    a) [estar] ( sin entretenimiento) bored
    b) [estar] ( harto) fed up

    aburrido de algo — tired of something, fed up with something

    aburrido de + inf — tired of -ing

    2) [ser] <película/persona> boring; < trabajo> boring, tedious
    II
    - da masculino, femenino bore
    * * *
    = tedious, deadly [deadlier -comp., deadliest -sup.], drab, stodgy, unexciting, uninteresting, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], bored, boring, wearying, dreary [drearier -comp., dreariest -sup.], uninspiring, unmoving, dull, cut and dried [cut and dry].

    Ex: In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.

    Ex: Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).
    Ex: Have reading foisted on you as a duty, a task to be put up with, from which you expect no delight, and it can appear a drab business gladly to be given up.
    Ex: One could easily prefer the convenience of the stodgy single-volume work.
    Ex: The author argues that the advantages for higher education are unclear, and rather unexciting.
    Ex: There is no such thing on earth as an uninteresting subject; the only thing that can exist is an uninterested person.
    Ex: The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex: Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex: One should answer the telephone clearly and pleasantly -- not in a bored voice or in slurred haste.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex: The city was considered to be seedy (decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex: Though the novel begins like a house ablaze, it later thickens slightly into an acceptable if uninspiring finale.
    Ex: The outcome is strangely unmoving.
    Ex: These librarians are given Haykin upon the day of their arrival and are expected to read the entire dull document and use it as a guideline in establishing subject headings.
    Ex: I don't like to hear cut-and-dried sermons -- when I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.
    * de un modo aburrido y pesado = tediously, ponderously, boringly.
    * día aburrido = dull day.
    * estar aburrido como una ostra = be bored stiff.

    * * *
    aburrido1 -da
    A ‹persona›
    1 [ ESTAR] (sin entretenimiento) bored
    estoy muy aburrido I'm bored stiff
    2 [ ESTAR] (harto) fed up
    me tienes aburrido con tus quejas I'm fed up with your complaints
    aburrido DE algo tired OF sth, fed up WITH sth
    estoy aburrido de sus bromas I'm tired of o fed up with her jokes
    aburrido DE + INF tired of -ING
    estoy aburrido de pedírselo I'm tired of asking him for it
    B [ SER] ‹película/persona› boring
    es un trabajo muy aburrido it's a really boring o tedious job
    la conferencia fue aburridísima the lecture was really boring
    aburrido2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    bore
    * * *

     

    Del verbo aburrir: ( conjugate aburrir)

    aburrido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    aburrido    
    aburrir
    aburrido
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    1 [estar] ‹ persona


    b) ( harto) fed up;

    aburrido de algo tired of sth, fed up with sth;
    aburrido de hacer algo tired of doing sth
    2 [ser] ‹película/persona boring;
    trabajo boring, tedious
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    bore
    aburrir ( conjugate aburrir) verbo transitivo
    to bore
    aburrirse verbo pronominal

    b) ( hartarse) aburridose de algo/algn to get tired of o fed up with sth/sb;

    aburridose de hacer algo to get tired of doing sth
    aburrido,-a adjetivo
    1 (cargante, tedioso) tu hermano es aburrido, your brother's boring
    2 (que no se divierte) tu hermano está aburrido, your brother's bored
    (cansado, hastiado) estoy aburrido de tus quejas, I'm tired of your complaints
    aburrir verbo transitivo to bore
    ♦ Locuciones: aburrir a las ovejas, to be incredibly boring
    ' aburrido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aburrida
    - acto
    - amargada
    - amargado
    - harta
    - harto
    - insípida
    - insípido
    - ladrillo
    - pesada
    - pesado
    - petardo
    - plomo
    - sopa
    - tostón
    - aburridor
    - aguado
    - bastante
    - cansado
    - de
    - enojoso
    - latoso
    - mamado
    - podrido
    English:
    bored
    - boring
    - dreary
    - dull
    - grind
    - plough through
    - quiet
    - shade
    - stiff
    - tedious
    - tediously
    - uninspiring
    - especially
    - staid
    - wade
    * * *
    aburrido, -a
    adj
    1. [harto, fastidiado] bored;
    estar aburrido de hacer algo to be fed up with doing sth;
    estoy aburrido de esperar I'm fed up with o tired of waiting;
    me tiene muy aburrido con sus constantes protestas I'm fed up with her constant complaining;
    Fam
    2. [que aburre] boring;
    este libro es muy aburrido this book is very boring;
    la fiesta está muy aburrida it's a very boring party
    nm,f
    bore;
    ¡eres un aburrido! you're so boring!
    * * *
    adj que aburre boring; que se aburre bored;
    aburrido de algo bored o fed up fam with sth
    * * *
    aburrido, -da adj
    1) : bored, tired, fed up
    2) tedioso: boring, tedious
    * * *
    aburrido1 adj
    2. (tedioso, pesado) boring
    ¡qué programa más aburrido! what a boring programme!

    Spanish-English dictionary > aburrido

  • 2 anticuado

    adj.
    old-fashioned, archaic, out-of-date, antiquated.
    f. & m.
    old-fashioned person, fuddy-duddy, fuddy, lame.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: anticuar.
    * * *
    1 antiquated, old-fashioned, obsolete, out-of-date
    * * *
    (f. - anticuada)
    adj.
    old-fashioned, outdated
    * * *
    ADJ [maquinaria, infraestructura, tecnología] antiquated; [moda] old-fashioned, out-of-date; [técnica] obsolete
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.
    Ex. Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.
    Ex. When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex. It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex. For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex. Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex. Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex. Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex. The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex. By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex. Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex. He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex. So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex. What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex. Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    ----
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.

    Ex: Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.

    Ex: When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex: It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex: For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex: Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex: Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex: Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex: The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex: By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex: Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex: He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex: So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex: What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex: Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.

    * * *
    anticuado1 -da
    ‹persona/ideas› old-fashioned, antiquated; ‹ropa› old-fashioned; ‹sistema/aparato› antiquated
    anticuado2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    * * *

    Del verbo anticuarse: ( conjugate anticuarse)

    anticuado es:

    el participio

    anticuado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    old-fashioned
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino: eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    anticuado,-a adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino old-fashioned, antiquated

    ' anticuado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    anticuada
    - apolillada
    - apolillado
    - antiguo
    - atrasado
    - pasado
    - zanahoria
    English:
    antiquated
    - date
    - fuddy-duddy
    - old
    - old-fashioned
    - outdated
    - outmoded
    - dated
    - out
    - time
    * * *
    anticuado, -a
    adj
    [persona, ropa] old-fashioned;
    esa técnica está anticuada that method is out of date;
    mi módem se ha quedado anticuado my modem is out of date
    nm,f
    old-fashioned person;
    mi madre es una anticuada my mother is very old-fashioned
    * * *
    adj antiquated
    * * *
    anticuado, -da adj
    : antiquated, outdated
    * * *
    anticuado adj old fashioned

    Spanish-English dictionary > anticuado

  • 3 aspereza

    f.
    1 roughness.
    limar asperezas to smooth things over
    2 asperity, abrasiveness, roughness, coarseness.
    3 harsh remark, sour remark.
    * * *
    1 roughness, coarseness, asperity
    * * *
    SF [de terreno] roughness, ruggedness; (=acidez) sourness, tartness; [de carácter] surliness
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( al tacto) roughness; ( de terreno) roughness, unevenness
    b) ( de sabor) sharpness; (de voz, clima) harshness

    un terreno lleno de asperezasa very uneven o rough piece of ground

    limar asperezas: el tiempo limó las asperezas de su personalidad time knocked the rough edges off her; en un intento de limar asperezas — in an attempt to iron out their differences

    3) ( brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *
    = roughness, harshness.
    Ex. In practice, we find that antonyms often fall into the category of quasi-synonyms which represent points on the same continuum, eg roughness -- smoothness.
    Ex. Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    ----
    * limar asperezas = iron out + the bugs, knock + the rough edges off.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( al tacto) roughness; ( de terreno) roughness, unevenness
    b) ( de sabor) sharpness; (de voz, clima) harshness

    un terreno lleno de asperezasa very uneven o rough piece of ground

    limar asperezas: el tiempo limó las asperezas de su personalidad time knocked the rough edges off her; en un intento de limar asperezas — in an attempt to iron out their differences

    3) ( brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *
    = roughness, harshness.

    Ex: In practice, we find that antonyms often fall into the category of quasi-synonyms which represent points on the same continuum, eg roughness -- smoothness.

    Ex: Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    * limar asperezas = iron out + the bugs, knock + the rough edges off.

    * * *
    1 (al tacto) roughness
    2 (del terreno) roughness, unevenness
    3 (de un sabor) sharpness
    4 (de la voz) harshness
    5 (del clima) harshness
    B
    (parte áspera): usar papel de lija para quitar las asperezas use sandpaper to remove any roughness o rough patches ( o parts etc)
    quitar las asperezas con una lima file off the rough edges
    un terreno lleno de asperezas a very uneven o rough piece of ground
    limar asperezas: el tiempo ha limado las asperezas de su personalidad time has knocked the rough edges off her, she has mellowed with age
    en un intento de limar asperezas in an attempt to iron out their differences/problems
    C (brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *

    aspereza sustantivo femenino
    1
    a) (de superficie, piel) roughness


    (de voz, clima) harshness
    2 ( parte áspera):

    limar asperezas to smooth things over
    aspereza sustantivo femenino roughness
    ♦ Locuciones: figurado limar asperezas, to smooth things over
    ' aspereza' also found in these entries:
    English:
    abruptly
    - ruggedness
    * * *
    1. [al tacto] roughness
    2. [de terreno] ruggedness, roughness
    3. [de sabor] sharpness, sourness
    4. [de clima] harshness
    5. [de voz] harshness
    6. [rudeza] [de persona] abruptness;
    decir algo con aspereza to say something sharply o abruptly
    * * *
    f roughness, unevenness;
    limar asperezas knock the rough edges off
    * * *
    rudeza: roughness, coarseness

    Spanish-English dictionary > aspereza

  • 4 besuquearse

    1 (uso recíproco) to smooch, neck, snog
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VPR (=besarse) to kiss (each other) a lot; (=magrearse) to neck *, smooch *
    * * *
    (v.) = snog, neck
    Ex. The portrayal of gay people is usually sexual and lewd and this film is a good example where men are having quickies and snogging in public.
    Ex. If we caught them necking, we'd give them a verbal warning and send them on their way.
    * * *
    (v.) = snog, neck

    Ex: The portrayal of gay people is usually sexual and lewd and this film is a good example where men are having quickies and snogging in public.

    Ex: If we caught them necking, we'd give them a verbal warning and send them on their way.

    * * *

    ■besuquearse verbo reflexivo to smooch, pet
    ' besuquearse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    besuquear
    English:
    canoodle
    - neck
    - pet
    * * *
    vpr
    to smooch
    * * *
    vr fam : to neck, to smooch

    Spanish-English dictionary > besuquearse

  • 5 brocha

    f.
    1 brush.
    brocha de afeitar shaving brush
    2 cajoler, soft-soaper.
    * * *
    1 brush, paintbrush
    \
    brocha de afeitar shaving brush
    * * *
    1. SF
    1) (=para pintar) paintbrush, large paintbrush

    pintor de brocha gorda — (lit) painter and decorator; (fig) bad painter

    2)
    3) Cono Sur skewer, spit
    4) CAm * (=zalamero) creep **
    2.
    ADJ CAm meddling, creeping *, servile
    * * *
    femenino ( de pintor) paintbrush, brush; ( de afeitar) shaving brush; ( en cosmética) blusher brush
    * * *
    = brush, paint brush.
    Ex. The artist then drew, sketched or painted on the grained surface using greasy crayon, pen, brush, or even a finger.
    Ex. Pictorial sources are created by the portrayal of historical events or subjects using, inter alia, a paint brush, drawing-pen, or pencil, graphic techniques or the camera.
    ----
    * aplicar con brocha = brush.
    * * *
    femenino ( de pintor) paintbrush, brush; ( de afeitar) shaving brush; ( en cosmética) blusher brush
    * * *
    = brush, paint brush.

    Ex: The artist then drew, sketched or painted on the grained surface using greasy crayon, pen, brush, or even a finger.

    Ex: Pictorial sources are created by the portrayal of historical events or subjects using, inter alia, a paint brush, drawing-pen, or pencil, graphic techniques or the camera.
    * aplicar con brocha = brush.

    * * *
    (de pintor) paintbrush, brush; (de afeitar) shaving brush; (en cosmética) blusher brush pintor
    * * *

    brocha sustantivo femenino ( de pintor) paintbrush, brush;
    ( de afeitar) shaving brush;
    ( en cosmética) blusher brush
    brocha sustantivo femenino
    1 (para pintar) paintbrush
    2 brocha de afeitar, shaving brush
    brocha de maquillar, blusher brush
    ' brocha' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    pintor
    English:
    brush
    - paintbrush
    - shaving brush
    - paint
    - shaving
    * * *
    brocha nf
    [de pintor] brush; [de maquillaje] make-up brush;
    de brocha gorda [basto] broad, vulgar;
    pintor de brocha gorda painter and decorator
    brocha de afeitar shaving brush
    * * *
    f brush
    * * *
    brocha nf
    : paintbrush
    * * *
    brocha n brush [pl. brushes]

    Spanish-English dictionary > brocha

  • 6 caracterización

    f.
    characterization.
    * * *
    1 characterization
    * * *
    * * *
    a) ( descripción) description
    b) (Teatr) ( por el actor) portrayal; ( por el autor) characterization
    * * *
    = characterisation [characterization, -USA].
    Ex. His work is criticized for its triviality, quantity, linguistically impoverished style, anemia of characterization, and cliched, stereotyped ideas and plots.
    * * *
    a) ( descripción) description
    b) (Teatr) ( por el actor) portrayal; ( por el autor) characterization
    * * *
    = characterisation [characterization, -USA].

    Ex: His work is criticized for its triviality, quantity, linguistically impoverished style, anemia of characterization, and cliched, stereotyped ideas and plots.

    * * *
    1 (descripción) description
    hizo una excelente caracterización del acusado she drew an excellent character sketch of the defendant
    2 ( Teatr) (por el actor) portrayal; (por el autor) characterization
    * * *

    caracterización sustantivo femenino
    1 Teat Cine portrayal: su caracterización como guerrero medieval está logradísima, his portrayal of a medieval warrior is very convincing
    el autor hace una caracterización minuciosa de los personajes, the author has carried out a very detailed description of the characters
    2 (descripción) description
    * * *
    1. [descripción] description
    2. [de personaje] characterization
    3. [maquillaje] make-up
    * * *
    f characterization; TEA portrayal

    Spanish-English dictionary > caracterización

  • 7 conservador

    adj.
    1 conservative, discreet, moderate, restrained.
    2 conservative, orthodox, rightist, right-wing.
    3 Conservative.
    m.
    1 conservative, praetorian, rightist, right-winger.
    2 preservative, preserver.
    3 Conservative.
    4 curator.
    * * *
    1 PLÍTICA conservative
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 PLÍTICA conservative
    2 (de museos) curator
    * * *
    1. (f. - conservadora)
    noun
    2. (f. - conservadora)
    adj.
    * * *
    conservador, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (Pol) conservative, Tory
    2) (Culin) preservative
    2. SM / F
    1) (Pol) conservative, Tory
    2) [de museo] curator, keeper
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo conservative
    II
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative
    b) ( de museo) curator
    * * *
    = conservative, conservator, curator, custodian, standpatter, preserver, ingrown, old-fashioned, backward-looking, keeper, custodial, Luddite, laggard, conservationist, conservative, illiberal, risk-averse, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], safekeeper [sake-keeper], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], straitlaced [strait-laced].
    Ex. There is a tendency to advance propositions premised upon the assumption that SLIS are staffed by inherently conservative, where they are not simply obtuse, individuals.
    Ex. The benefits of an on-site conservation laboratory and conservator are underlined.
    Ex. In her previous vocation she served as curator of History at the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences and later as Assistant to the Director of Johns Hopkins University, Institute of History and Medicine.
    Ex. This article maintains that archivists as custodians of the records have an ethical obligation to support the freest possible access to public records.
    Ex. The 'standpatters' have seen power shift away from themselves to the newcomers and other lifelong 'progressive' Junctionvillers, who were muted under previous administrations.
    Ex. He also lumps himself and librarians together as 'devoted and in some instances veteran pursuers, preservers, and disseminators of truth'.
    Ex. Book clubs need not be enclosed, much less ingrown = Los clubs de lectores no deben ser cerrados y mucho menos conservadores.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. The book is essentially backward-looking rather than forward-looking in content.
    Ex. Vervliet's involvement with books began with his appointment in 1949 as keeper at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp, where he acquired a wide knowledge of the history of printing in the Low Countries.
    Ex. Broadly, one can distinguish, then, between what one might call the ' custodial' or 'warehouse' aspects of the librarian's task, and the 'communications' aspect.
    Ex. Librarians who have reservations about the spread of electronically based services are not Luddites.
    Ex. Individuals are distributed along a normal bell-shaped curve, with the majority in the large center and innovators and laggards a the the two extremes.
    Ex. The present conservationist approach to librarianship reflects Victorian priorities.
    Ex. He ends his book with a discussion of the politicizing effects of the actions of conservatives and loyalists at the end of the century.
    Ex. It is argued that Israel, in spite of its free elections, is an illiberal democracy.
    Ex. This is typical of the old corporate forms of hierarchy-based processes and of the ' risk-averse systems that crush new ideas'.
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. Libraries find themselves frustrated in their role as safekeepers of science: how can they ensure optimal access and availability if they do not control the access systems?.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. Three years later, when he was fifteen, he slipped into Rachel's bedroom and her straitlaced mother caught them petting and giggling on the side of the bed.
    ----
    * conservador de documentos = records custodian.
    * conservador del archivo = archives custodian.
    * de un modo conservador = conservatively.
    * neoconservador = neoconservative [neo-conservative], neoconservative [neo-conservative].
    * partido conservador = conservative party.
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo conservative
    II
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative
    b) ( de museo) curator
    * * *
    = conservative, conservator, curator, custodian, standpatter, preserver, ingrown, old-fashioned, backward-looking, keeper, custodial, Luddite, laggard, conservationist, conservative, illiberal, risk-averse, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], safekeeper [sake-keeper], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], straitlaced [strait-laced].

    Ex: There is a tendency to advance propositions premised upon the assumption that SLIS are staffed by inherently conservative, where they are not simply obtuse, individuals.

    Ex: The benefits of an on-site conservation laboratory and conservator are underlined.
    Ex: In her previous vocation she served as curator of History at the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences and later as Assistant to the Director of Johns Hopkins University, Institute of History and Medicine.
    Ex: This article maintains that archivists as custodians of the records have an ethical obligation to support the freest possible access to public records.
    Ex: The 'standpatters' have seen power shift away from themselves to the newcomers and other lifelong 'progressive' Junctionvillers, who were muted under previous administrations.
    Ex: He also lumps himself and librarians together as 'devoted and in some instances veteran pursuers, preservers, and disseminators of truth'.
    Ex: Book clubs need not be enclosed, much less ingrown = Los clubs de lectores no deben ser cerrados y mucho menos conservadores.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: The book is essentially backward-looking rather than forward-looking in content.
    Ex: Vervliet's involvement with books began with his appointment in 1949 as keeper at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp, where he acquired a wide knowledge of the history of printing in the Low Countries.
    Ex: Broadly, one can distinguish, then, between what one might call the ' custodial' or 'warehouse' aspects of the librarian's task, and the 'communications' aspect.
    Ex: Librarians who have reservations about the spread of electronically based services are not Luddites.
    Ex: Individuals are distributed along a normal bell-shaped curve, with the majority in the large center and innovators and laggards a the the two extremes.
    Ex: The present conservationist approach to librarianship reflects Victorian priorities.
    Ex: He ends his book with a discussion of the politicizing effects of the actions of conservatives and loyalists at the end of the century.
    Ex: It is argued that Israel, in spite of its free elections, is an illiberal democracy.
    Ex: This is typical of the old corporate forms of hierarchy-based processes and of the ' risk-averse systems that crush new ideas'.
    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex: Libraries find themselves frustrated in their role as safekeepers of science: how can they ensure optimal access and availability if they do not control the access systems?.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: Three years later, when he was fifteen, he slipped into Rachel's bedroom and her straitlaced mother caught them petting and giggling on the side of the bed.
    * conservador de documentos = records custodian.
    * conservador del archivo = archives custodian.
    * de un modo conservador = conservatively.
    * neoconservador = neoconservative [neo-conservative], neoconservative [neo-conservative].
    * partido conservador = conservative party.

    * * *
    1 ( Pol) ‹partido/gobierno› conservative
    2 (tradicional) ‹persona/ideas› conservative
    es muy conservador en sus gustos he's very conservative in his tastes
    masculine, feminine
    1 ( Pol) conservative
    2 (de un museo) curator
    3
    conservador masculine ( Coc) preservative
    * * *

    conservador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    conservative
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative


    conservador,-ora
    I adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino conservative
    Pol Conservative
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino
    1 Pol Conservative
    2 (de un museo, una biblioteca) curator
    ' conservador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    barrer
    - bloque
    - conservadora
    - europeísta
    English:
    conservative
    - keeper
    - seat
    - Tory
    - wet
    - Conservative
    - curator
    - custodian
    - round
    * * *
    conservador, -ora
    adj
    1. [tradicionalista] conservative;
    es un entrenador muy conservador he's a very conservative manager
    2. [del partido conservador] Conservative
    nm,f
    1. [tradicionalista] conservative
    2. [miembro del partido conservador] Conservative
    3. [de museo] curator;
    [de biblioteca] librarian; [de parque natural] keeper
    * * *
    I adj conservative
    II m, conservadora f
    1 de museo curator
    2 POL conservative
    * * *
    conservador, - dora adj & n
    : conservative
    : preservative
    * * *
    conservador adj n conservative

    Spanish-English dictionary > conservador

  • 8 contaminar

    v.
    1 to contaminate.
    La fábrica contamina el aire The factory contaminates the air.
    El viejo contaminó a la muchacha The old man contaminated the girl.
    2 to corrupt.
    * * *
    1 to contaminate (agua, aire) to pollute
    2 figurado to contaminate, corrupt
    1 to become contaminated (agua, aire) to become polluted
    2 figurado to be infected, be corrupted
    * * *
    verb
    to contaminate, pollute
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ aire, mar] to pollute; [+ alimentos, agua potable] to contaminate; [+ ropa] to soil
    2) [+ texto] to corrupt; (Literat) to influence, affect
    3) (Rel) to profane
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) <mar/atmósfera> to pollute; <agua potable/comida> to contaminate; ( por radiactividad) to contaminate
    b) <lengua/cultura> to corrupt
    * * *
    = contaminate, corrupt, pollute, foul, taint, defile.
    Ex. The cellulose fibres used in the manufacture of paper for books readily become contaminated with radioactive materials through their ecological cycle.
    Ex. Libraries which have public access computers should take precautions to prevent their systems being corrupted.
    Ex. Bugeja investigates the impact and motives of media ecosystems that have polluted the Internet and other digital devices with marketing ploys.
    Ex. For the past five years, large quantities of decaying algae have been fouling Lake Michigan shoreline.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    ----
    * sin contaminar = untainted, uncontaminated.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) <mar/atmósfera> to pollute; <agua potable/comida> to contaminate; ( por radiactividad) to contaminate
    b) <lengua/cultura> to corrupt
    * * *
    = contaminate, corrupt, pollute, foul, taint, defile.

    Ex: The cellulose fibres used in the manufacture of paper for books readily become contaminated with radioactive materials through their ecological cycle.

    Ex: Libraries which have public access computers should take precautions to prevent their systems being corrupted.
    Ex: Bugeja investigates the impact and motives of media ecosystems that have polluted the Internet and other digital devices with marketing ploys.
    Ex: For the past five years, large quantities of decaying algae have been fouling Lake Michigan shoreline.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    * sin contaminar = untainted, uncontaminated.

    * * *
    contaminar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹mar/atmósfera› to pollute; ‹agua potable/comida› to contaminate; (por radiactividad) to contaminate
    2 ‹lengua/cultura› to corrupt
    * * *

    contaminar ( conjugate contaminar) verbo transitivomar/atmósfera to pollute;
    agua potable/comida to contaminate;
    ( por radiactividad) to contaminate
    contaminar verbo transitivo
    1 (la atmósfera) to pollute
    2 (un alimento, etc) to contaminate
    3 (una cultura, lengua) to corrupt
    ' contaminar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    contaminate
    - foul
    - infect
    - pollute
    - taint
    - poison
    * * *
    vt
    1. [alimento] to contaminate
    2. [medio ambiente] to pollute
    3. [pervertir] to corrupt
    4. [texto] to corrupt
    vi
    to pollute;
    el que contamine que pague the polluter pays
    * * *
    v/t agua etc contaminate; río, medio ambiente pollute; fig
    corrupt
    * * *
    : to contaminate, to pollute
    * * *
    contaminar vb (agua, aire) to pollute

    Spanish-English dictionary > contaminar

  • 9 culpabilidad

    f.
    guilt.
    * * *
    1 guilt, culpabilility
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=culpa) guilt, culpability frm

    admitió su culpabilidad públicamente — he made a public admission of his guilt, he admitted his guilt publicly

    sentimiento de culpabilidadguilt feelings pl, feelings of guilt pl

    2) (Jur) guilt
    3) (=responsabilidad) responsibility
    * * *
    femenino (Der,Psic) guilt
    * * *
    = guilt, culpability.
    Ex. She wrote a paper with the title 'Incendiary guilt: when your labels go up in smoke'.
    Ex. The author examines how the physically disabled have been depicted over the years, from the association of disability with moral culpability to the more recent portrayal of the cripple as survivor and hero.
    ----
    * compensación sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault compensation.
    * declaración de culpabilidad = guilty plea.
    * divorcio sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault divorce.
    * presunción de culpabilidad = presumed guilty.
    * seguro de coche sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault auto insurance.
    * seguro sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault insurance.
    * sentimiento de culpabilidad = guilty conscience, twinge of guilt.
    * sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault.
    * * *
    femenino (Der,Psic) guilt
    * * *
    = guilt, culpability.

    Ex: She wrote a paper with the title 'Incendiary guilt: when your labels go up in smoke'.

    Ex: The author examines how the physically disabled have been depicted over the years, from the association of disability with moral culpability to the more recent portrayal of the cripple as survivor and hero.
    * compensación sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault compensation.
    * declaración de culpabilidad = guilty plea.
    * divorcio sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault divorce.
    * presunción de culpabilidad = presumed guilty.
    * seguro de coche sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault auto insurance.
    * seguro sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault insurance.
    * sentimiento de culpabilidad = guilty conscience, twinge of guilt.
    * sin determinación de culpabilidad = no-fault.

    * * *
    1 ( Der) guilt
    2 ( Psic) guilt
    * * *

    culpabilidad sustantivo femenino (Der,Psic) guilt
    culpabilidad sustantivo femenino guilt
    ' culpabilidad' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    culpa
    - complejo
    - confesar
    English:
    admission
    - admit
    - compelling
    - guilt
    - verdict
    * * *
    guilt
    * * *
    f guilt
    * * *
    : guilt
    * * *
    culpabilidad n guilt

    Spanish-English dictionary > culpabilidad

  • 10 darse el lote

    familiar to pet
    * * *
    (v.) = snog, neck
    Ex. The portrayal of gay people is usually sexual and lewd and this film is a good example where men are having quickies and snogging in public.
    Ex. If we caught them necking, we'd give them a verbal warning and send them on their way.
    * * *
    (v.) = snog, neck

    Ex: The portrayal of gay people is usually sexual and lewd and this film is a good example where men are having quickies and snogging in public.

    Ex: If we caught them necking, we'd give them a verbal warning and send them on their way.

    Spanish-English dictionary > darse el lote

  • 11 desacreditar

    v.
    to discredit.
    Ella desacredita a Ricardo She discredits Richard.
    Ella desacreditó a su amiga She discredited=debunked her friend.
    El político desacreditó al oponente The politician discredited his opponent
    * * *
    1 to discredit, bring discredit on, bring into discredit
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    VT [+ político, gobierno] to discredit
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to discredit; <buen nombre/institución> to discredit, bring... into disrepute
    b) < teoría> to discredit
    2.
    desacreditarse v pron (refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *
    = discredit, denigrate, debunk, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, taint.
    Ex. Such circulation may contribute little to the creation of whole personalities but it may do much to discredit the circulators.
    Ex. This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex. Process reengineering is in the debunking phase of its life cycle - an evolutionary pattern in which management ideas and techniques are first presented as panaceas for business success and subsequently debunked as worthless.
    Ex. This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    ----
    * desacreditarse = come into + disrepute, fall into + disrepute.
    * desacreditar un mito = debunk + a myth.
    * estar desacreditado = hold in + disrepute.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to discredit; <buen nombre/institución> to discredit, bring... into disrepute
    b) < teoría> to discredit
    2.
    desacreditarse v pron (refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *
    = discredit, denigrate, debunk, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, taint.

    Ex: Such circulation may contribute little to the creation of whole personalities but it may do much to discredit the circulators.

    Ex: This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex: Process reengineering is in the debunking phase of its life cycle - an evolutionary pattern in which management ideas and techniques are first presented as panaceas for business success and subsequently debunked as worthless.
    Ex: This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    * desacreditarse = come into + disrepute, fall into + disrepute.
    * desacreditar un mito = debunk + a myth.
    * estar desacreditado = hold in + disrepute.

    * * *
    vt
    esos rumores lo han desacreditado mucho those rumors have done his reputation a great deal of harm o have seriously damaged his reputation
    la oposición intentó desacreditarlo the opposition tried to discredit him
    ( refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *

    desacreditar ( conjugate desacreditar) verbo transitivo
    to discredit
    desacreditarse verbo pronominal ( refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    desacreditar verbo transitivo (desprestigiar) to discredit, bring into discredit
    ' desacreditar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    descalificar
    English:
    discredit
    - disgrace
    - disparage
    - debunk
    - disrepute
    * * *
    vt
    to discredit;
    hubo una campaña para desacreditarla there was a campaign to discredit her;
    este nuevo fracaso lo desacredita como político this latest failure has destroyed his credibility as a politician;
    su actuación ha desacreditado al partido his behaviour has brought the party into disrepute
    * * *
    v/t discredit
    * * *
    desprestigiar: to discredit, to disgrace

    Spanish-English dictionary > desacreditar

  • 12 descripción

    f.
    1 description, definition, outline, describing.
    2 word picture.
    * * *
    1 description
    2 (acción de trazar) tracing, describing, description
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino description
    * * *
    = description, disclosure, identification, picture, specification, specifications, profiling, depiction, recounting, portrayal.
    Ex. The indexing process creates a description of a document or information, usually in some recognized and accepted style of format.
    Ex. The patent abstract is a concise statement of the technical disclosure of the patent and must emphasize that which is new in the context of the invention.
    Ex. The second step towards an index involves the identification of the concepts within a document which are worthy of indexing.
    Ex. No pretence is made of their being either a balanced or complete picture of the article.
    Ex. The Working Group was charged with the specification of the procedures and studies needed to undertake the tasks.
    Ex. The specifications, however, are confined to the overall structure and major functional components of the entry.
    Ex. Some excursions into cognitive science have led to the profiling of users' backgrounds, differences and immediate need.
    Ex. Miss Laski suggests that the depiction of life found in many novels is naive, over-simplified and, as a constant diet, can do more harm than good.
    Ex. This is a recounting of the technologies most likely to facilitate the sharing of resources among libraries.
    Ex. Pictorial sources are created by the portrayal of historical events or subjects using, inter alia, a paint brush, drawing-pen, or pencil, graphic techniques or the camera.
    ----
    * área de descripción = area of description.
    * área de descripción física = physical description area.
    * Centro Internacional para la Descripción Bibliográfica del UNISIST = UNIBID.
    * descripción analítica = analytical description.
    * descripción bibliográfica = bibliographic description.
    * descripción bibliográfica de primer nivel = first-level bibliographic description.
    * Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional (ISBD) = ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description).
    * Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional - material antiguo (ISBD = ISBD(A) (International Standard Bibliographic Description - Antiquarian).
    * descripción catalográfica = cataloguing description.
    * Descripción de Archivos Codificada (EAD) = Encoded Archival Description (EAD).
    * descripción de documentos de archivo = archival description.
    * descripción de las funciones = job description, job profile.
    * descripción del contenido = subject statement.
    * descripción del documento = document description.
    * descripción del puesto de trabajo = job description, position description, job profile.
    * descripción del solicitante = personnel description.
    * descripción de subcampo = subfield description.
    * descripción documental = document description.
    * descripción física = physical description, physical details.
    * descripción global = outline.
    * hacer una descripción = give + description.
    * ISBD(S) (Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional para Publicacio = ISBD(S) (International Standard Bibliographic Description - Serials).
    * Manual de Descripción de Archivos = Manual of Archival Description (MAD).
    * niveles de detalle en la descripción = levels of detail in the description.
    * Norma General Internacional para la Descripción de Archivos (ISAD-G) = General International Standard Archival Description (ISAD(G)).
    * Norma Internacional para la Descripción de Archivos (ISAD) = International Standard Archival Description (ISAD).
    * * *
    femenino description
    * * *
    = description, disclosure, identification, picture, specification, specifications, profiling, depiction, recounting, portrayal.

    Ex: The indexing process creates a description of a document or information, usually in some recognized and accepted style of format.

    Ex: The patent abstract is a concise statement of the technical disclosure of the patent and must emphasize that which is new in the context of the invention.
    Ex: The second step towards an index involves the identification of the concepts within a document which are worthy of indexing.
    Ex: No pretence is made of their being either a balanced or complete picture of the article.
    Ex: The Working Group was charged with the specification of the procedures and studies needed to undertake the tasks.
    Ex: The specifications, however, are confined to the overall structure and major functional components of the entry.
    Ex: Some excursions into cognitive science have led to the profiling of users' backgrounds, differences and immediate need.
    Ex: Miss Laski suggests that the depiction of life found in many novels is naive, over-simplified and, as a constant diet, can do more harm than good.
    Ex: This is a recounting of the technologies most likely to facilitate the sharing of resources among libraries.
    Ex: Pictorial sources are created by the portrayal of historical events or subjects using, inter alia, a paint brush, drawing-pen, or pencil, graphic techniques or the camera.
    * área de descripción = area of description.
    * área de descripción física = physical description area.
    * Centro Internacional para la Descripción Bibliográfica del UNISIST = UNIBID.
    * descripción analítica = analytical description.
    * descripción bibliográfica = bibliographic description.
    * descripción bibliográfica de primer nivel = first-level bibliographic description.
    * Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional (ISBD) = ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description).
    * Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional - material antiguo (ISBD = ISBD(A) (International Standard Bibliographic Description - Antiquarian).
    * descripción catalográfica = cataloguing description.
    * Descripción de Archivos Codificada (EAD) = Encoded Archival Description (EAD).
    * descripción de documentos de archivo = archival description.
    * descripción de las funciones = job description, job profile.
    * descripción del contenido = subject statement.
    * descripción del documento = document description.
    * descripción del puesto de trabajo = job description, position description, job profile.
    * descripción del solicitante = personnel description.
    * descripción de subcampo = subfield description.
    * descripción documental = document description.
    * descripción física = physical description, physical details.
    * descripción global = outline.
    * hacer una descripción = give + description.
    * ISBD(S) (Descripción Bibliográfica Normalizada Internacional para Publicacio = ISBD(S) (International Standard Bibliographic Description - Serials).
    * Manual de Descripción de Archivos = Manual of Archival Description (MAD).
    * niveles de detalle en la descripción = levels of detail in the description.
    * Norma General Internacional para la Descripción de Archivos (ISAD-G) = General International Standard Archival Description (ISAD(G)).
    * Norma Internacional para la Descripción de Archivos (ISAD) = International Standard Archival Description (ISAD).

    * * *
    description
    hizo una fiel descripción de los hechos she gave an accurate description o account of events
    * * *

     

    descripción sustantivo femenino
    description
    descripción sustantivo femenino description
    ' descripción' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    caracterización
    - corresponderse
    - retratar
    - retrato
    - seña
    - somera
    - somero
    - viva
    - vivo
    - calificación
    - corresponder
    - detallado
    - encajar
    - exacto
    - impresionista
    - reseña
    - responder
    - sensual
    - sensualidad
    English:
    colourful
    - delineate
    - description
    - exact
    - fit
    - full
    - job description
    - loose
    - match
    - sketch
    - sketchy
    - understatement
    - vivid
    - with
    - answer
    - depiction
    - job
    - portrayal
    * * *
    description;
    una descripción de los hechos an account of what happened
    * * *
    f description
    * * *
    descripción nf, pl - ciones : description
    * * *
    descripción n description

    Spanish-English dictionary > descripción

  • 13 deshonrar

    v.
    1 to dishonor.
    con su conducta deshonra a toda la familia he is dishonoring the entire family with his conduct
    Elsa deshonró a su familia Elsa dishonored her family.
    2 to trample on, to tread on.
    Elsa deshonró su reputación Elsa trampled on her good name.
    3 to bring shame on, to shame.
    Elsa deshonró a sus padres Elsa brought shame on her parents.
    * * *
    1 (gen) to dishonour (US dishonor), disgrace
    2 (injuriar) to insult, defame
    3 (a una mujer) to dishonour (US dishonor)
    * * *
    verb
    to dishonor, disgrace
    * * *
    VT
    1) [+ familia, compañeros] to dishonour, dishonor (EEUU), disgrace
    2) (=afrentar) to insult
    3) euf [+ mujer] to dishonour, dishonor (EEUU)
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <familia/patria> to dishonor*, disgrace; < mujer> to dishonor*
    * * *
    = taint, vilify, stigmatise [stigmatize, -USA], besmirch, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, defile.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. Robert Kent's sole agenda is to attack Cuba and vilify the Cuban library community while supporting the US government's interventionist destabilization policies.
    Ex. Findings reaffirm that television stigmatises the occupation of business, independently of economic factors.
    Ex. the gulag was an atrocious system of incarceration and forced labor that had little to do with correction, that poisoned society, and that besmirched Soviet communism.
    Ex. This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    ----
    * deshonrar la reputación = besmirch + reputation.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <familia/patria> to dishonor*, disgrace; < mujer> to dishonor*
    * * *
    = taint, vilify, stigmatise [stigmatize, -USA], besmirch, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, defile.

    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.

    Ex: Robert Kent's sole agenda is to attack Cuba and vilify the Cuban library community while supporting the US government's interventionist destabilization policies.
    Ex: Findings reaffirm that television stigmatises the occupation of business, independently of economic factors.
    Ex: the gulag was an atrocious system of incarceration and forced labor that had little to do with correction, that poisoned society, and that besmirched Soviet communism.
    Ex: This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex: No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    * deshonrar la reputación = besmirch + reputation.

    * * *
    deshonrar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹familia/patria› to dishonor*, disgrace, bring dishonor* o disgrace o shame on
    trabajar no deshonra a nadie working is nothing to be ashamed of
    2 ‹mujer› to dishonor*
    * * *

    deshonrar ( conjugate deshonrar) verbo transitivofamilia/patria› to dishonor( conjugate dishonor), disgrace;
    mujer› to dishonor( conjugate dishonor)
    deshonrar verbo transitivo
    1 to dishonour, US dishonor
    2 (a la familia, etc) to bring disgrace on
    ' deshonrar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    disgrace
    - dishonor
    - dishonour
    - shame
    - blacken
    - taint
    * * *
    1. [injuriar] to dishonour;
    con su conducta deshonra a toda la familia his behaviour is bringing disgrace upon the entire family
    2. [mujer] to dishonour
    * * *
    v/t dishonor, Br
    dishonour
    * * *
    : to dishonor, to disgrace

    Spanish-English dictionary > deshonrar

  • 14 disminuidos físicos, los

    (n.) = physically handicapped, the, physically disabled, the
    Ex. The needs of special clientele such as children and the physically handicapped must also be considered.
    Ex. The author examines how the physically disabled have been depicted over the years, from the association of disability with moral culpability to the more recent portrayal of the cripple as survivor and hero.

    Spanish-English dictionary > disminuidos físicos, los

  • 15 dureza

    f.
    1 hardness.
    2 harshness.
    3 callus, patch of hard skin.
    * * *
    1 hardness, toughness
    2 figurado (de carácter) toughness, harshness, severity
    \
    dureza de corazón hardheartedness, callousness
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=resistencia) [de mineral, roca, agua] hardness; [de carne] toughness
    2) (=agresividad) [de clima, régimen, crítica] harshness, severity; [de deporte, juego] roughness; [de ataque] fierceness; [de castigo, multa, sentencia] severity, harshness

    con dureza: los delitos serán castigados con dureza — any offence will be severely punished

    3) [de tarea, prueba, examen] hardness
    4) (=fortaleza) hardiness, strength

    la dureza de las mujeres campesinasthe hardiness o strength of country women

    5) (=callo) callus
    * * *
    1) (de mineral, del agua) hardness; ( de material) hardness, toughness; ( de la carne) toughness
    2)
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    b) ( en el deporte) roughness
    * * *
    = hardness, harshness, ruggedness.
    Ex. Hardness and the penetration of the ink layer into the paper were also measured = También se midió la solidez y la penetración de la tinta en el papel.
    Ex. Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    Ex. In the 10-year gap between the publication of her first book and her second, she stretched her imagination to match the diversity and ruggedness of America.
    ----
    * con dureza = harshly.
    * * *
    1) (de mineral, del agua) hardness; ( de material) hardness, toughness; ( de la carne) toughness
    2)
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    b) ( en el deporte) roughness
    * * *
    = hardness, harshness, ruggedness.

    Ex: Hardness and the penetration of the ink layer into the paper were also measured = También se midió la solidez y la penetración de la tinta en el papel.

    Ex: Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    Ex: In the 10-year gap between the publication of her first book and her second, she stretched her imagination to match the diversity and ruggedness of America.
    * con dureza = harshly.

    * * *
    A
    1 (de un mineral) hardness; (de un material) hardness, toughness; (de la carne) toughness
    2 (de una luz) harshness
    3 (del agua) hardness
    B (callosidad) callus
    C
    1 (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    nos trataban con dureza they treated us harshly
    fue castigado con dureza he was severely punished
    me miró con dureza he gave me a stern look
    2 (en el deporte) roughness
    * * *

    dureza sustantivo femenino
    1 ( en general) hardness;
    ( de la carne) toughness
    2
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness;


    fue castigado con dureza he was severely punished

    dureza sustantivo femenino
    1 hardness
    (de una persona) harshness, severity
    2 (en las manos, en los pies) callus
    ' dureza' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    rigor
    - tralla
    - vapulear
    - suavizar
    English:
    hardness
    - sharply
    * * *
    dureza nf
    1. [de objeto, material, superficie, colchón, cama, sofá] hardness;
    [de carne] toughness; [de pan] staleness
    2. Geol [de roca, mineral, metal] hardness
    3. [de agua] hardness
    4. [de clima, invierno] harshness, severity
    5. [severidad, aspereza] [de persona] harshness;
    [de críticas, acciones] harshness, severity; [de juego, partido] roughness;
    la criticó/reprendió con dureza he criticized/reprimanded her harshly;
    la dureza de la entrada le cortó la respiración the tackle was so hard it left him gasping for breath;
    la violencia racista debe ser castigada con dureza racist violence must be severely punished;
    el árbitro permitió demasiada dureza en el juego the referee allowed the game to get too rough
    6. [fortaleza, resistencia] strength
    7. [callosidad] callus, patch of hard skin;
    tener durezas en las manos/los pies to have calluses on the hands/feet
    * * *
    f
    1 de material hardness; de carne toughness
    2 de clima, fig
    harshness
    * * *
    dureza nf
    1) : hardness, toughness
    2) : severity, harshness

    Spanish-English dictionary > dureza

  • 16 empañar

    v.
    to cover with breadcrumbs, to bread.
    María empMaría los filetes Mary covers the fillets with breadcrumbs.
    * * *
    1 (rebozar) to coat in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT (Culin) [con masa] to cover in a pastry case ; [con pan rallado] to cook or roll in breadcrumbs or pastry
    * * *
    (Méx) empanizar verbo transitivo to coat... in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    = mist, cloud, tarnish, taint.
    Ex. The revenue-making services are glamorous, and their magic mists the fundamental democratic perspective of the free public library.
    Ex. Whilst library schools should continue to concentrate upon traditional priorities and the obsession with machines and techniques should not cloud those priorities.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'NCLIS (National Commission on Libraries and Information Science) assessment of public information dissemination: some sound ideas tarnished by defense of obsolete approaches' = El artículo se titula "Evaluación de la difusión de información pública por la NCLIS (Comisión Nacional sobre Bibliotecas y Documentación): algunas ideas acertadas deslucidas por la defensa de métodos obsoletos".
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    ----
    * empañarse = blur.
    * * *
    (Méx) empanizar verbo transitivo to coat... in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    = mist, cloud, tarnish, taint.

    Ex: The revenue-making services are glamorous, and their magic mists the fundamental democratic perspective of the free public library.

    Ex: Whilst library schools should continue to concentrate upon traditional priorities and the obsession with machines and techniques should not cloud those priorities.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'NCLIS (National Commission on Libraries and Information Science) assessment of public information dissemination: some sound ideas tarnished by defense of obsolete approaches' = El artículo se titula "Evaluación de la difusión de información pública por la NCLIS (Comisión Nacional sobre Bibliotecas y Documentación): algunas ideas acertadas deslucidas por la defensa de métodos obsoletos".
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    * empañarse = blur.

    * * *
    empanar [A1 ]
    vt
    to coat … in breadcrumbs
    * * *

    Multiple Entries:
    empanar    
    empañar
    empanar ( conjugate empanar), (Méx)

    to coat … in breadcrumbs
    empañar ( conjugate empañar) verbo transitivovidrio/espejo› to steam o mist up
    empañarse verbo pronominal [vidrio/espejo] to steam o mist up
    empañar verbo transitivo
    1 (con vapor de agua) to steam up: afuera hacía tanto frío que nuestro aliento empañaba los cristales, it was so cold outside that our breath left all the windows steamed up
    2 (la fama, reputación) to tarnish: sus comentarios machistas empañaron su prestigio, his sexist remarks were a blemish on his reputation

    ' empañar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    apanar
    - empanar
    English:
    mist over
    - mist up
    - taint
    - color
    - pall
    - tarnish
    * * *
    empanar, Méx empanizar vt
    Culin to coat in egg and breadcrumbs
    * * *
    v/t coat in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    : to bread

    Spanish-English dictionary > empañar

  • 17 envilecer

    v.
    1 to debase.
    2 to pervert, to corrupt, to debase, to debauch.
    3 to adulterate.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ AGRADECER], like link=agradecer agradecer
    1 to debase, degrade
    1 to lose value, be debased
    1 to debase oneself, degrade oneself
    * * *
    1.
    VT to debase, degrade
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to degrade, debase
    2.
    envilecer vi to degrade, be degrading
    3.
    envilecerse v pron to degrade o debase oneself
    * * *
    = abase, taint, defile.
    Ex. Fairy tales not abased by the 'culture industry' might save us from our present state of barbarism resulting from a capitalism run wild.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to degrade, debase
    2.
    envilecer vi to degrade, be degrading
    3.
    envilecerse v pron to degrade o debase oneself
    * * *
    = abase, taint, defile.

    Ex: Fairy tales not abased by the 'culture industry' might save us from our present state of barbarism resulting from a capitalism run wild.

    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.

    * * *
    envilecer [E3 ]
    vt
    to degrade, debase
    ■ envilecer
    vi
    to degrade, be degrading
    to degrade o debase oneself
    * * *

    envilecer verbo transitivo to degrade, debase
    ' envilecer' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    degradar
    English:
    debase
    * * *
    vt
    to debase
    vi
    to become debased
    * * *
    v/t degrade, debase
    * * *
    envilecer {53} vt
    : to degrade, to debase

    Spanish-English dictionary > envilecer

  • 18 golfillo

    m.
    street urchin, street Arab, gamin, guttersnipe.
    * * *
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 street urchin
    * * *
    SM urchin, street urchin
    * * *
    - lla masculino, femenino street urchin
    * * *
    = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, ragamuffin.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    * * *
    - lla masculino, femenino street urchin
    * * *
    = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, ragamuffin.

    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.

    Ex: Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex: This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex: Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex: He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.

    * * *
    urchin, street urchin
    * * *

    golfillo
    ◊ - lla sustantivo masculino, femenino

    street urchin

    ' golfillo' also found in these entries:
    English:
    urchin
    * * *
    urchin
    * * *
    m (street) urchin

    Spanish-English dictionary > golfillo

  • 19 golfo2

    2 = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, bum, rapscallion, ragamuffin.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. Although the results provide support for the 'drunken bum' theory of wife beating, they also demythologize the stereotype because alcohol is shown to be far from a necessary or sufficient cause of wife abuse.
    Ex. In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    ----
    * golfo de la playa = beach bum.

    Spanish-English dictionary > golfo2

  • 20 granuja

    adj.
    rascally, impish, mischievous.
    f. & m.
    1 rogue, scoundrel (pillo).
    2 rascal, little wretch, urchin, gamin.
    3 loose grape separate from the bunch.
    4 seeds of the grape and other small fruits.
    * * *
    1 (uva) grapes plural
    1 (pilluelo) ragamuffin, urchin
    2 (estafador) crook, trickster
    * * *
    1.
    SMF (=bribón) rogue; [dicho con afecto] rascal; (=pilluelo) urchin, ragamuffin
    2.
    SF (=uvas) loose grapes pl ; (=semilla) grape seed
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.
    Ex. When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.
    Ex. The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex. The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex. He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex. It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex. In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex. In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex. Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex. The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex. Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex. In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex. He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.

    Ex: When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.

    Ex: The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex: The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex: He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex: It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex: This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex: Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex: And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex: In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex: In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex: Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex: He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex: The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex: Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex: In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex: He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.

    * * *
    rascal
    ¿dónde se habrá metido este granujilla? where's that little rascal o monkey got(ten) to?
    * * *

    granuja sustantivo masculino y femenino
    rascal
    granuja sustantivo masculino
    1 (pícaro) urchin
    2 (estafador, truhán) swindler
    ' granuja' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bandida
    - bandido
    - pájaro
    - sinvergüenza
    - canalla
    - pajarraco
    - rufián
    English:
    rascal
    - rogue
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    1. [pillo] rogue, scoundrel
    2. [canalla] trickster, swindler
    * * *
    m/f rascal
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    pilluelo: rascal, urchin
    * * *
    granuja adj rascal

    Spanish-English dictionary > granuja

См. также в других словарях:

  • Portrayal — Por*tray al, n. The act or process of portraying; description; delineation. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • portrayal — index caricature, delineation, description, narration, part (role), representation (statement), st …   Law dictionary

  • portrayal — 1834, from PORTRAY (Cf. portray) + AL (Cf. al) (2) …   Etymology dictionary

  • portrayal — [pôr trā′əl] n. 1. the act of portraying 2. a portrait; description; representation …   English World dictionary

  • portrayal — [[t]pɔː(r)tre͟ɪəl[/t]] portrayals 1) N COUNT: usu sing, usu poss N of n An actor s portrayal of a character in a play or film is the way that he or she plays the character. Mr Ying is well known for his portrayal of a prison guard in the film The …   English dictionary

  • portrayal — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ accurate, realistic, vivid ▪ moving ▪ negative ▪ Much television news gives a negative portrayal of politics. ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • portrayal — por|tray|al [po:ˈtreıəl US po:r ] n [U and C] the way someone or something is described or shown in a book, film, play etc portrayal of ▪ the newspapers portrayal of Islamic culture accurate/realistic etc portrayal ▪ The film is not an accurate… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • portrayal — noun 1) a portrayal of a parrot Syn: painting, picture, portrait, drawing, sketch, representation, depiction, study 2) her portrayal of adolescence Syn: description, representation, characterization …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • portrayal — noun /ˌpɔrˈtreɪ.əl/ a) The act of portraying. He had already designed the portrayal of his father as the old white king, and himself as the young white king, in a series of woodcuts illustrating the narrative which culminated in the one romance… …   Wiktionary

  • portrayal — noun 1) her portrayal of adolescence Syn: description, representation, characterization, depiction, evocation 2) Brando s portrayal of Corleone Syn: performance as, representation, interpretation, rendering …   Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • portrayal — UK [pɔː(r)ˈtreɪəl] / US [pɔrˈtreɪəl] noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms portrayal : singular portrayal plural portrayals the way that something or someone is portrayed …   English dictionary

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