Перевод: с испанского на все языки

fatiguing

  • 1 agotador

    adj.
    exhausting, backbreaking, burdensome, fatiguing.
    * * *
    1 exhausting
    * * *
    (f. - agotadora)
    adj.
    * * *
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo exhausting
    * * *
    = taxing, tiring, grinding, strenuous, backbreaking [back-breaking], fatiguing, gruelling [grueling, -USA].
    Ex. It is difficult to remember the special interests of more than a few people, and hence rather taxing to provide SDI manually to more than a handful of users.
    Ex. Upper case can be more tiring to scan than text displayed in both upper and lower case.
    Ex. Their response to the grinding monotony of repetitive labour and over-long hours was frequent absenteeism.
    Ex. This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).
    Ex. His book plumbs the elusive depths of slaves' resistance by showing how they created opportunities for autonomy even while immersed in backbreaking work.
    Ex. These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.
    Ex. He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo exhausting
    * * *
    = taxing, tiring, grinding, strenuous, backbreaking [back-breaking], fatiguing, gruelling [grueling, -USA].

    Ex: It is difficult to remember the special interests of more than a few people, and hence rather taxing to provide SDI manually to more than a handful of users.

    Ex: Upper case can be more tiring to scan than text displayed in both upper and lower case.
    Ex: Their response to the grinding monotony of repetitive labour and over-long hours was frequent absenteeism.
    Ex: This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).
    Ex: His book plumbs the elusive depths of slaves' resistance by showing how they created opportunities for autonomy even while immersed in backbreaking work.
    Ex: These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.
    Ex: He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.

    * * *
    exhausting
    * * *

    agotador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    exhausting
    agotador,-ora adjetivo exhausting

    ' agotador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    agotadora
    - cambio
    English:
    demanding
    - exhausting
    - grueling
    - gruelling
    - hard
    - punishing
    - strenuous
    - hectic
    * * *
    agotador, -ora adj
    exhausting
    * * *
    adj exhausting
    * * *
    agotador, - dora adj
    : exhausting
    * * *
    agotador adj exhausting

    Spanish-English dictionary > agotador

  • 2 cansar

    v.
    1 to tire (out).
    me cansa mucho leer sin gafas I get very tired if I read without my glasses
    El relato cansa a la audiencia The story tired the audience.
    2 to be tiring.
    esta tarea cansa mucho it's a very tiring job o task
    3 to be tiresome, to get tedious, to bore, to get tiresome.
    Su actitud cansa His attitude is tiresome.
    4 to get tired of.
    Me cansa trabajar hasta tarde I get tired of working late.
    5 to be tiresome to.
    Cansa trabajar tanto It is tiresome to work so much.
    * * *
    1 (causar cansancio) to tire, tire out, make tired
    2 (molestar) to annoy; (aburrir) to tire, bore
    ¿no te cansa ver la televisión cada día? don't you get tired of watching TV every day?
    3 (tierra) to exhaust
    1 (causar cansancio) to be tiring
    2 (aburrir) to be boring
    ¡cómo cansan esas clases! those clases bore me stiff!
    1 (padecer cansancio) to get tired, tire
    2 figurado (hartarse) to get tired (de, of), get fed up (de, with)
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=fatigar) to tire, tire out

    me cansa mucho trabajar en el jardín — I get really tired working in the garden, working in the garden really tires me out, I find working in the garden really tiring

    cansar la vista — to strain one's eyes, make one's eyes tired

    2) (=aburrir)

    me cansa ir siempre a los mismos baresI get tired of o bored with always going to the same old bars, it's boring always going to the same old bars

    3) (Agr) [+ tierra] to exhaust
    2. VI
    1) (=fatigar) to be tiring
    2) (=hartar)
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( fatigar) to tire, tire... out, make... tired

    le cansa la vista — it makes her eyes tired, it strains her eyes

    b) (aburrir, hartar)

    ¿no te cansa oír siempre la misma música? — don't you get tired of listening to the same music all the time?

    2.
    cansar vi
    a) ( fatigar) to be tiring
    b) (aburrir, hartar) to get tiresome
    3.
    cansarse v pron
    a) ( fatigarse) to tire oneself out
    b) (aburrirse, hartarse) to get bored

    cansarse de algo/alguien — to get tired of something/somebody, get bored with something/somebody

    cansarse de + inf — to get tired of -ing

    * * *
    = wear + a little thin, fatigue, weary.
    Ex. His jauntiness can wear a little thin, and the buff will be sorry there is no index, but there is much to be grateful for in this book.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. She wearies of the constant procession of visitors, and the round of invitations and commissions, which swallow up her time.
    ----
    * cansar la vista = cause + eyestrain.
    * cansarse = tire, get + tired.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( fatigar) to tire, tire... out, make... tired

    le cansa la vista — it makes her eyes tired, it strains her eyes

    b) (aburrir, hartar)

    ¿no te cansa oír siempre la misma música? — don't you get tired of listening to the same music all the time?

    2.
    cansar vi
    a) ( fatigar) to be tiring
    b) (aburrir, hartar) to get tiresome
    3.
    cansarse v pron
    a) ( fatigarse) to tire oneself out
    b) (aburrirse, hartarse) to get bored

    cansarse de algo/alguien — to get tired of something/somebody, get bored with something/somebody

    cansarse de + inf — to get tired of -ing

    * * *
    = wear + a little thin, fatigue, weary.

    Ex: His jauntiness can wear a little thin, and the buff will be sorry there is no index, but there is much to be grateful for in this book.

    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: She wearies of the constant procession of visitors, and the round of invitations and commissions, which swallow up her time.
    * cansar la vista = cause + eyestrain.
    * cansarse = tire, get + tired.

    * * *
    cansar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 (fatigar) to tire, tire … out, make … tired
    dar clase me cansa mucho I find teaching really tiring, teaching really tires me out
    le cansa la vista it makes her eyes tired o it strains her eyes
    2
    (aburrir, hartar): ¿no te cansa oír siempre la misma música? don't you get tired of listening to the same music all the time?
    3 ‹tierra› to exhaust
    ■ cansar
    vi
    1 (fatigar) to be tiring
    un trabajo que cansa mentalmente a job which is mentally tiring
    2 (aburrir, hartar) to get tiresome
    1 (fatigarse) to tire oneself out
    se le cansa la vista her eyes get tired
    2 (aburrirse, hartarse) to get bored
    se cansó y dejó de asistir a las clases she got bored and stopped going to the classes o she got tired of the classes and stopped going
    cansarse DE algo/algn to get tired OF sth/sb, get bored WITH sth/sb, tire OF sth/sb cansarse DE + INF to get tired OF -ING, tire OF -ING
    * * *

    cansar ( conjugate cansar) verbo transitivo
    a) ( fatigar) to tire, tire … out;


    b) ( aburrir):

    ¿no te cansa oír la misma música? don't you get tired of listening to the same music?

    verbo intransitivo


    cansarse verbo pronominal



    cansarse de algo/algn to get tired of sth/sb, get bored with sth/sb, cansarse de hacer algo to get tired of doing sth
    cansar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 to tire
    2 (hartar, aburrir) to get tired: tus quejas me cansan, I'm getting tired of your complaints
    II verbo intransitivo
    1 (agotar las fuerzas) to be tiring
    2 (hartar, aburrir) to get tiresome
    ' cansar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    hartar
    - machacar
    - agotar
    English:
    pall
    - strain
    - tire
    - weary
    * * *
    vt
    1. [producir cansancio] to tire (out);
    me cansa mucho leer sin gafas I get very tired if I read without my glasses
    2. [tierra] to exhaust
    vi
    to be tiring;
    esta tarea cansa mucho it's a very tiring job o task;
    la misma música todos los días acaba por cansar the same music every day gets a bit wearying, you get tired of hearing the same music every day
    * * *
    v/t
    1 tire
    2 ( aburrir) bore
    * * *
    cansar vt
    fatigar: to wear out, to tire
    cansar vi
    : to be tiresome
    * * *
    cansar vb
    1. (fatigar) to tire / to tire out
    2. (causar cansancio) to be tiring
    3. (aburrir) to tire / to bore

    Spanish-English dictionary > cansar

  • 3 de mal carácter

    (adj.) = ill-natured
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    * * *
    (adj.) = ill-natured

    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de mal carácter

  • 4 de mal genio

    (adj.) = bad-tempered, grumpy [grumpier -comp., grumpiest -sup.], curmudgeonly, crusty [crustier -comp., crustiest -sup.], irascible, shrewish, short-tempered, ill-natured
    Ex. He was a brave novelist but also bad-tempered, churlish and subject to fits of rage.
    Ex. That's despite grumpy comments like those of William Hartston who said it was 'surely one of the ugliest words ever to slither its way into our dictionaries'.
    Ex. Offended by the idea of an addict selling sneakers to kids, he launched into a curmudgeonly rant.
    Ex. For this crusty author as well as for that young one having fun being famous is what matters = Tanto para este autor hosco como para aquel autor joven, ser famoso es lo que importa.
    Ex. He was a rag-and-bone man living with his irascible father in a junkyard with only their horse for company.
    Ex. He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    * * *
    (adj.) = bad-tempered, grumpy [grumpier -comp., grumpiest -sup.], curmudgeonly, crusty [crustier -comp., crustiest -sup.], irascible, shrewish, short-tempered, ill-natured

    Ex: He was a brave novelist but also bad-tempered, churlish and subject to fits of rage.

    Ex: That's despite grumpy comments like those of William Hartston who said it was 'surely one of the ugliest words ever to slither its way into our dictionaries'.
    Ex: Offended by the idea of an addict selling sneakers to kids, he launched into a curmudgeonly rant.
    Ex: For this crusty author as well as for that young one having fun being famous is what matters = Tanto para este autor hosco como para aquel autor joven, ser famoso es lo que importa.
    Ex: He was a rag-and-bone man living with his irascible father in a junkyard with only their horse for company.
    Ex: He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de mal genio

  • 5 desagradable

    adj.
    1 unpleasant.
    2 disagreeable, distasteful, unpleasant, displeasing.
    * * *
    1 disagreeable, unpleasant
    * * *
    adj.
    unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    ADJ unpleasant, disagreeable más frm
    * * *
    adjetivo <respuesta/comentario> unkind; <ruido/sensación> unpleasant, disagreeable; <escena/sorpresa> unpleasant; <tiempo/clima> unpleasant, horrible
    * * *
    = off-putting, unwelcome, unpleasant, disagreeable, unkind, obnoxious, peevish, distasteful, unappealing, seamy [seamier -comp., seamiest -sup.], unsavoury [unsavory, -USA], unpalatable, unsightly, minging, abrasive, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unwholesome, insalubrious, invidious, ill-natured.
    Ex. Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex. The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex. And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex. Then I came within this disagreeable person's atmosphere, and lo! before I know what's happened I'm involved in an unpleasant altercation.
    Ex. The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex. During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex. In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex. The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex. In addition, it is pointed out that tourists often have a strange fascination for tragic, macabre or other equally unappealing historical sights.
    Ex. In general, the writer explains, crimes are depicted in such a way that they are associated with seamy characters who have little regard for conventional morality.
    Ex. Despite the unsavory characters, bawdiness, and amorality in several of his plays, Middleton was more committed to a single theological system than, for example, Shakespeare.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Spam is unpalatable any way it's served up: things you can do to reduce the amount of unwanted e-mail'.
    Ex. He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. The text raises the possibility that there might be something unwholesome in the Buddhist obsession with hell.
    Ex. Specific actions are those which are intended to reinforce the fight against specific medical conditions related to insalubrious living.
    Ex. Within the ranks of authorship therefore there are many types of author and it is invidious to claim that one sort is necessarily 'better' than another.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    ----
    * algo desagradable a la vista = a blot on the landscape.
    * darle a Uno escalofríos por Algo desagradable = make + Nombre + flinch.
    * de sabor desagradable = unpalatable.
    * desagradable a la vista = eyesore.
    * encontrarse con una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * esperar una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * lo desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * situación desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening.
    * * *
    adjetivo <respuesta/comentario> unkind; <ruido/sensación> unpleasant, disagreeable; <escena/sorpresa> unpleasant; <tiempo/clima> unpleasant, horrible
    * * *
    = off-putting, unwelcome, unpleasant, disagreeable, unkind, obnoxious, peevish, distasteful, unappealing, seamy [seamier -comp., seamiest -sup.], unsavoury [unsavory, -USA], unpalatable, unsightly, minging, abrasive, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unwholesome, insalubrious, invidious, ill-natured.

    Ex: Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.

    Ex: The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex: And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex: Then I came within this disagreeable person's atmosphere, and lo! before I know what's happened I'm involved in an unpleasant altercation.
    Ex: The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex: During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex: In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex: The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex: In addition, it is pointed out that tourists often have a strange fascination for tragic, macabre or other equally unappealing historical sights.
    Ex: In general, the writer explains, crimes are depicted in such a way that they are associated with seamy characters who have little regard for conventional morality.
    Ex: Despite the unsavory characters, bawdiness, and amorality in several of his plays, Middleton was more committed to a single theological system than, for example, Shakespeare.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Spam is unpalatable any way it's served up: things you can do to reduce the amount of unwanted e-mail'.
    Ex: He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: The text raises the possibility that there might be something unwholesome in the Buddhist obsession with hell.
    Ex: Specific actions are those which are intended to reinforce the fight against specific medical conditions related to insalubrious living.
    Ex: Within the ranks of authorship therefore there are many types of author and it is invidious to claim that one sort is necessarily 'better' than another.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    * algo desagradable a la vista = a blot on the landscape.
    * darle a Uno escalofríos por Algo desagradable = make + Nombre + flinch.
    * de sabor desagradable = unpalatable.
    * desagradable a la vista = eyesore.
    * encontrarse con una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * esperar una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * lo desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * situación desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening.

    * * *
    ‹respuesta/comentario› unkind; ‹sabor/ruido/sensación› unpleasant, disagreeable; ‹escena› horrible
    estuvo realmente desagradable conmigo he was really unpleasant to me
    ¡no seas tan desagradable! dale una oportunidad don't be so mean o unkind! give him a chance
    ¡qué tiempo más desagradable! what nasty o horrible weather
    hacía un día bastante desagradable the weather was rather unpleasant, it was a rather unpleasant day
    se llevó una sorpresa desagradable she got a nasty o an unpleasant surprise
    * * *

     

    desagradable adjetivo
    unpleasant;
    respuesta/comentario unkind
    desagradable adjetivo unpleasant, disagreeable: hay un olor desagradable, there's an unpleasant smell
    es una persona muy desagradable, he's really disagreeable
    ' desagradable' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    escopetazo
    - fresca
    - fresco
    - graznido
    - grosera
    - grosero
    - gustillo
    - horrorosa
    - horroroso
    - impresión
    - marrón
    - palma
    - sensación
    - terrible
    - terrorífica
    - terrorífico
    - chocante
    - ingrato
    - mal
    - shock
    English:
    bullet
    - business
    - creep
    - dirty
    - disagreeable
    - distasteful
    - emptiness
    - filthy
    - hard
    - ill-natured
    - miserable
    - nasty
    - off
    - off-putting
    - rude
    - thankless
    - ugly
    - unkind
    - unpleasant
    - unsavory
    - unsavoury
    - unwelcome
    - why
    - home
    - objectionable
    - offensive
    - painful
    - peevish
    - unpalatable
    - unwholesome
    * * *
    adj
    1. [sensación, tiempo, escena] unpleasant;
    no voy a salir, la tarde está muy desagradable I'm not going to go out, the weather's turned quite nasty this afternoon;
    una desagradable sorpresa an unpleasant o a nasty surprise
    2. [persona, comentario, contestación] unpleasant;
    está muy desagradable con su familia he's very unpleasant to his family;
    no seas desagradable y ven con nosotros al cine don't be unsociable, come to the cinema with us
    nmf
    son unos desagradables they're unpleasant people
    * * *
    adj unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    : unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    desagradable adj unpleasant

    Spanish-English dictionary > desagradable

  • 6 extenuante

    adj.
    completely exhausting, draining.
    * * *
    1 exhausting
    * * *
    adjetivo exhausting
    * * *
    = strenuous, backbreaking [back-breaking], fatiguing, gruelling [grueling, -USA].
    Ex. This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).
    Ex. His book plumbs the elusive depths of slaves' resistance by showing how they created opportunities for autonomy even while immersed in backbreaking work.
    Ex. These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.
    Ex. He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.
    * * *
    adjetivo exhausting
    * * *
    = strenuous, backbreaking [back-breaking], fatiguing, gruelling [grueling, -USA].

    Ex: This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).

    Ex: His book plumbs the elusive depths of slaves' resistance by showing how they created opportunities for autonomy even while immersed in backbreaking work.
    Ex: These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.
    Ex: He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.

    * * *
    exhausting
    * * *
    completely exhausting, draining
    * * *
    adj exhausting

    Spanish-English dictionary > extenuante

  • 7 fatigar

    v.
    1 to tire, to weary.
    la televisión me fatiga mucho la vista my eyes get very tired watching television
    2 to fatigue, to exhaust, to tire, to overwork.
    Fatigamos a nuestros empleados We fatigue our employees.
    El sol fatiga los materiales The sun fatigues the materials.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ LLEGAR], like link=llegar llegar
    1 (cansar) to wear out, tire
    2 (molestar) to annoy
    1 to tire, get tired
    * * *
    verb
    to fatigue, tire
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=cansar) to tire
    2) (=molestar) to annoy
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo ( físicamente) to tire... out; ( mentalmente) to tire
    2.
    fatigarse v pron
    a) ( cansarse) to get tired, wear oneself out (colloq)
    b) ( ahogarse) to get breathless
    * * *
    = exhaust, fatigue, weary.
    Ex. The potential areas of application of PRECIS are far from being exhausted.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. She wearies of the constant procession of visitors, and the round of invitations and commissions, which swallow up her time.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo ( físicamente) to tire... out; ( mentalmente) to tire
    2.
    fatigarse v pron
    a) ( cansarse) to get tired, wear oneself out (colloq)
    b) ( ahogarse) to get breathless
    * * *
    = exhaust, fatigue, weary.

    Ex: The potential areas of application of PRECIS are far from being exhausted.

    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: She wearies of the constant procession of visitors, and the round of invitations and commissions, which swallow up her time.

    * * *
    fatigar [A3 ]
    vt
    (físicamente) to tire … out; (mentalmente) to tire
    tanto subir y bajar me fatiga all this going up and down stairs tires me out o ( colloq) takes it out of me
    1 (cansarse) to get tired, wear oneself out ( colloq)
    2 (ahogarse) to get breathless
    se fatiga subiendo las escaleras she gets breathless o out of breath climbing stairs
    * * *

    fatigar ( conjugate fatigar) verbo transitivo ( físicamente) to tire … out;
    ( mentalmente) to tire
    fatigarse verbo pronominal


    fatigar verbo transitivo to tire, weary
    ' fatigar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cansar
    * * *
    vt
    to tire, to weary;
    el abuelo fatiga a todos con sus historias grandad tires us all with his stories;
    la televisión me fatiga mucho la vista my eyes get very tired watching television
    * * *
    v/t tire
    * * *
    fatigar {52} vt
    cansar: to fatigue, to tire
    * * *
    fatigar vb to tire out

    Spanish-English dictionary > fatigar

  • 8 fatigoso

    adj.
    tiring, exhausting, burdensome, fatiguing.
    * * *
    1 (cansado) tiring, exhausting
    2 (respiración) laboured (US labored)
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=cansado) tiring, exhausting
    2) (Med) painful, difficult

    respiración fatigosalaboured o (EEUU) labored breathing

    3) (=fastidioso) trying, tiresome
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < trabajo> tiring, exhausting
    * * *
    = strenuous, fatiguing.
    Ex. This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).
    Ex. These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < trabajo> tiring, exhausting
    * * *
    = strenuous, fatiguing.

    Ex: This article outlines the strenuous efforts to renew the library after the books had been destroyed by enemy action during World War II (the periodicals had already been evacuated).

    Ex: These fatiguing illnesses were similarly distributed in the four regions, being somewhat more common in rural than in urban areas.

    * * *
    ‹trabajo› tiring, exhausting
    respiración fatigosa labored breathing
    * * *

    fatigoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo ‹ trabajo tiring, exhausting

    fatigoso,-a adjetivo
    1 (que produce cansancio) tiring, exhausting
    2 (respiración) laboured

    ' fatigoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    fatigosa
    English:
    laboured
    - tiring
    - labored
    * * *
    fatigoso, -a adj
    tiring, fatiguing
    * * *
    fatigoso, -sa adj
    : fatiguing, tiring
    * * *
    fatigoso adj tiring / exhausting

    Spanish-English dictionary > fatigoso

  • 9 gemir

    v.
    1 to moan, to groan (person).
    El fantasma gime The ghost moans.
    El viento gime The wind moans.
    2 to howl (viento).
    3 to moan at.
    Me gime Ricardo Ricardo moans at me.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SERVIR], like link=servir servir
    1 (quejarse) to moan, groan
    2 figurado (aullar) to whimper
    * * *
    verb
    to groan, moan
    * * *
    VI (=quejarse) to groan, moan; (=lamentarse) to wail, howl; [animal] to whine; [viento] to howl, wail

    - sí -dijo gimiendo — "yes," he groaned

    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    a) persona to moan, groan
    b) animal to whine
    c) (liter) viento to moan
    * * *
    = moan, whine, groan, wail, blubber, snivel, bay, whimper.
    Ex. The article 'Don't you weep, don't you moan: a sermon on entrepreneurship for acquisitions librarians' urges librarians to become entrepreneurial, to market their services, and to become visible.
    Ex. Nothing you can do about that so no use whining.
    Ex. Young kids like listening to these shaggy dog stories, but don't usually 'get it', while parents generally groan over the punch lines.
    Ex. At this the Queen wept and wailed; but being a clever woman she thought out a plan whereby to save her son.
    Ex. 'I hate you!' were the only words that stumbled from his trembling mouth as he blubbered and stomped away.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. If the Holocaust cannot be discussed freely then stop baying about freedom of speech.
    Ex. My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.
    ----
    * gemir como alma en pena = wail like + a banshee.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    a) persona to moan, groan
    b) animal to whine
    c) (liter) viento to moan
    * * *
    = moan, whine, groan, wail, blubber, snivel, bay, whimper.

    Ex: The article 'Don't you weep, don't you moan: a sermon on entrepreneurship for acquisitions librarians' urges librarians to become entrepreneurial, to market their services, and to become visible.

    Ex: Nothing you can do about that so no use whining.
    Ex: Young kids like listening to these shaggy dog stories, but don't usually 'get it', while parents generally groan over the punch lines.
    Ex: At this the Queen wept and wailed; but being a clever woman she thought out a plan whereby to save her son.
    Ex: 'I hate you!' were the only words that stumbled from his trembling mouth as he blubbered and stomped away.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: If the Holocaust cannot be discussed freely then stop baying about freedom of speech.
    Ex: My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.
    * gemir como alma en pena = wail like + a banshee.

    * * *
    gemir [ I14 ]
    vi
    1 «persona» to moan, groan
    gemía de dolor he moaned with pain
    2 «animal» to whine
    3 ( liter); «viento» to moan
    * * *

    gemir ( conjugate gemir) verbo intransitivo


    gemir verbo intransitivo to groan: gemían de dolor, he groaned in pain
    ' gemir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    pujar
    - quejarse
    English:
    groan
    - moan
    - wail
    - whine
    * * *
    gemir vi
    1. [persona] to moan, to groan;
    gemir de placer to moan o groan with pleasure
    2. [animal] to whine
    3. [viento] to moan
    * * *
    v/i moan, groan
    * * *
    gemir {54} vi
    : to moan, to groan, to wail
    * * *
    gemir vb
    1. (persona) to groan
    2. (animal) to whine

    Spanish-English dictionary > gemir

  • 10 gimotear

    v.
    1 to whine, to whimper.
    2 to whine to, to moan to.
    María le gimotea a Pedro Mary whines to Peter.
    * * *
    1 to whine, whimper
    * * *
    VI (=gemir) to whine; (=lamentar) to wail; (=lloriquear) to snivel
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to whine, whimper
    * * *
    = snivel, whimper.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to whine, whimper
    * * *
    = snivel, whimper.

    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.

    Ex: My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.

    * * *
    gimotear [A1 ]
    vi
    to whine, whimper
    * * *

    gimotear ( conjugate gimotear) verbo intransitivo
    to whine, whimper
    gimotear verbo intransitivo to snivel, grizzle
    ' gimotear' also found in these entries:
    English:
    sniffle
    - whimper
    * * *
    to whine, to whimper
    * * *
    v/i whine, whimper
    * * *
    lloriquear: to whine, to whimper

    Spanish-English dictionary > gimotear

  • 11 lloriquear

    v.
    1 to whine, to snivel.
    2 to whimper, to snivel, to blubber, to cry.
    3 to sob out, to blubber.
    * * *
    1 to whimper, weep
    * * *
    VI to snivel, whimper
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo (fam) to whine (colloq)
    * * *
    = whine, blubber, snivel, whimper.
    Ex. Nothing you can do about that so no use whining.
    Ex. 'I hate you!' were the only words that stumbled from his trembling mouth as he blubbered and stomped away.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo (fam) to whine (colloq)
    * * *
    = whine, blubber, snivel, whimper.

    Ex: Nothing you can do about that so no use whining.

    Ex: 'I hate you!' were the only words that stumbled from his trembling mouth as he blubbered and stomped away.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: My baby is 2 months old, he spends most of his waking time either whining or whimpering, only occasionally seems content.

    * * *
    lloriquear [A1 ]
    vi
    ( fam); to whimper, to whine ( colloq), to grizzle ( BrE colloq)
    * * *

    lloriquear ( conjugate lloriquear) verbo intransitivo (fam) to whine (colloq)
    lloriquear verbo intransitivo to snivel
    ' lloriquear' also found in these entries:
    English:
    snivel
    - whimpering
    - whine
    - blubber
    * * *
    to whine, to snivel
    * * *
    v/i snivel, whine
    * * *
    : to whimper, to whine

    Spanish-English dictionary > lloriquear

  • 12 malicioso

    adj.
    1 malicious, wrongful, tortious.
    2 malicious, sly, bitchy, catty.
    3 suspicious.
    4 evil-minded, dirty.
    m.
    maliciously-minded person.
    * * *
    1 (malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    2 (malpensado) suspicious-minded
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (malicioso) malicious person
    2 (malpensado) person with a suspicious mind
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    2) (=pícaro) mischievous
    3) (=astuto) sly, crafty
    4) (=malo) wicked, evil
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    b) ( pícaro) mischievous
    * * *
    = malicious, vicious, spiteful, devious, bitchy [bitchier -comp., bitchiest -sup.], ill-natured, dastardly.
    Ex. Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.
    Ex. For in the eyes of many, even the most desultory reading of fiction was preferable to the ' vicious' entertainments designed to satisfy the 'lower impulses in human nature'.
    Ex. Selection of books for review sometimes causes controversy as to why some are reviewed and others not and the reviews themselves can create minor storms in the book world if it is felt they are prejudiced or spiteful.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex. She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    ----
    * intención maliciosa = malicious intent.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    b) ( pícaro) mischievous
    * * *
    = malicious, vicious, spiteful, devious, bitchy [bitchier -comp., bitchiest -sup.], ill-natured, dastardly.

    Ex: Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.

    Ex: For in the eyes of many, even the most desultory reading of fiction was preferable to the ' vicious' entertainments designed to satisfy the 'lower impulses in human nature'.
    Ex: Selection of books for review sometimes causes controversy as to why some are reviewed and others not and the reviews themselves can create minor storms in the book world if it is felt they are prejudiced or spiteful.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex: She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    * intención maliciosa = malicious intent.

    * * *
    1 (malintencionado) ‹persona/comentario› malicious, spiteful
    2 (pícaro) ‹comentario/mirada/sonrisa› mischievous
    * * *

    malicioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo



    malicioso,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (pícaro) mischievous
    2 (malintencionado) malicious
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino malicious person
    ' malicioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    maliciosa
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - pícaro
    English:
    bitchy
    - catty
    - ill-natured
    - mischievous
    - spiteful
    - cunning
    - malicious
    - sly
    - vicious
    * * *
    malicioso, -a adj
    1. [malintencionado] malicious
    2. [astuto, agudo] cunning, crafty
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( malintencionado) malicious
    2 ( astuto) cunning, sly
    * * *
    malicioso, -sa adj
    1) : malicious
    2) pícaro: mischievous
    * * *
    malicioso adj spiteful

    Spanish-English dictionary > malicioso

  • 13 agotador

    • burdensome
    • exhausting
    • fatiguing
    • strenuous
    • tiring
    • wearily
    • wearing apparel
    • wearisomely

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > agotador

  • 14 fatigoso

    • burdensome
    • exhausting
    • fatiguing
    • strenuous
    • tiring
    • trying

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > fatigoso

  • 15 ser fatigoso

    v.
    to be tiring, to be fatiguing.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ser fatigoso

См. также в других словарях:

  • fatiguing — index difficult, onerous, operose, oppressive Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • fatiguing — [[t]fəti͟ːgɪŋ[/t]] ADJ GRADED: usu v link ADJ Something that is fatiguing makes you feel extremely physically or mentally tired. Jet travel is undeniably fatiguing. Syn: exhausting …   English dictionary

  • Fatiguing — Fatigue Fa*tigue , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fatigued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fatiguing}, n.] [Cf. F. fatiguer. See {Fatigue}, n.] To weary with labor or any bodily or mental exertion; to harass with toil; to exhaust the strength or endurance of; to tire.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fatiguing — un·fatiguing; …   English syllables

  • fatiguing — Synonyms and related words: boresome, boring, devitalizing, draining, enervating, enfeebling, exhausting, fatiguesome, grueling, irksome, killing, punishing, sapping, straining, stressful, stupefyingly boring, stuporific, tiresome, tiring,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • fatiguing — (Roget s Thesaurus II) adjective Causing fatigue: draining, exhausting, tiring, wearing, wearying. See TIRED …   English dictionary for students

  • fatiguing — fa|tigu|ing [fəˈti:gıŋ] adj formal extremely tiring = ↑exhausting …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fatiguing — fa ti·guing || fÉ™ tɪːgɪŋ adj. tiring, exhausting, draining fa·tigue || fÉ™ tɪːg n. weariness, tiredness; extra work assigned to a soldier (Military) v. tire out, exhaust, drain, weaken …   English contemporary dictionary

  • FATIGUING — …   Useful english dictionary

  • mass production — the production or manufacture of goods in large quantities, esp. by machinery. [1915 20] * * * Application of the principles of specialization, division of labour, and standardization of parts to the manufacturing of goods on a large scale.… …   Universalium

  • Muscular system — Latin = systema musculare Muscles anterior labeled …   Wikipedia


Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное

Прямая ссылка:
Нажмите правой клавишей мыши и выберите «Копировать ссылку»

Мы используем куки для наилучшего представления нашего сайта. Продолжая использовать данный сайт, вы соглашаетесь с этим.