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minging

  • 1 asqueroso

    adj.
    loathsome, repugnant, nauseating, filthy.
    m.
    creep, unpleasant person, scuzz.
    * * *
    1 (sucio) dirty, filthy
    2 (desagradable) disgusting, revolting, foul
    3 (que siente asco) squeamish
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (sucio) filthy person, revolting person
    2 (que siente asco) squeamish person
    * * *
    (f. - asquerosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=repugnante) disgusting, revolting; [condición] squalid; (=sucio) filthy
    2) (=de gusto delicado) squeamish
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    1)
    a) <libro/película> digusting, filthy
    b) <olor/comida/costumbre> disgusting, revolting
    2)
    a) (fam) (malo, egoísta) mean (colloq), horrible (BrE colloq)
    b) ( lascivo)
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino
    1) ( sucio)
    2) (fam) (malo, egoísta) meany (colloq)
    * * *
    = filthy [filthier -comp, filthiest -sup.], revolting, foul [fouler -comp., foulest -sup.], repulsive, disgusting, grungy, squalid, minger, minging, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], appalling, mucky [muckier -comp., muckiest -sup.], icky [ickier -comp., ickiest -sup.], yucky [yuckier -comp., yuckiest -sup.], creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.], creep, lowdown.
    Ex. Printing houses -- apart from the few that had been built for the purpose rather than converted from something else -- were generally filthy and badly ventilated.
    Ex. This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex. Well, we non-smokers also like to put our feet up and relax, too; but we have to breathe in their foul fumes = Pues bien, a nosotros los no fumadores también nos gusta poner los pies en alto y relajarnos pero tenemos que respirar su repugnante humo.
    Ex. A new indicator, representing the asymmetry of coauthorship links, was used to reveal the main 'attractive' and ' repulsive' centres of cooperation.
    Ex. I find it disgusting but I guess that's human nature.
    Ex. It is primarily a story about a girl who, pregnant, flees her disapproving family to search for the father of her child in the grungy and sinister Midlands of England.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. His article, 'The skeleton in the our closet: public libraries art collections suffer appalling losses,' examines the problem of theft and mutilation of art materials in public libraries.
    Ex. Bulrush prefers full or partial sun, wet conditions, and soil that is mucky or sandy.
    Ex. Neck buffs and balaclava's get the most icky, because you're usually breathing against them, and they tend to get a bit moist.
    Ex. I saw Gina's post the other day where she said she feels 'fat and frumpish and yucky'.
    Ex. Today I got followed home by a creepy man with a high-pitched voice.
    Ex. The main character, Tom Johnson, realizes that no girls go out with creeps like him so he quickly changes and buys a guitar and learns how to play one.
    Ex. The board clearly didn't care if its commissioner was a lowdown, lying, corrupt and untrustworthy creep, likely because that is the nature of the entire organization.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    1)
    a) <libro/película> digusting, filthy
    b) <olor/comida/costumbre> disgusting, revolting
    2)
    a) (fam) (malo, egoísta) mean (colloq), horrible (BrE colloq)
    b) ( lascivo)
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino
    1) ( sucio)
    2) (fam) (malo, egoísta) meany (colloq)
    * * *
    = filthy [filthier -comp, filthiest -sup.], revolting, foul [fouler -comp., foulest -sup.], repulsive, disgusting, grungy, squalid, minger, minging, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], appalling, mucky [muckier -comp., muckiest -sup.], icky [ickier -comp., ickiest -sup.], yucky [yuckier -comp., yuckiest -sup.], creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.], creep, lowdown.

    Ex: Printing houses -- apart from the few that had been built for the purpose rather than converted from something else -- were generally filthy and badly ventilated.

    Ex: This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex: Well, we non-smokers also like to put our feet up and relax, too; but we have to breathe in their foul fumes = Pues bien, a nosotros los no fumadores también nos gusta poner los pies en alto y relajarnos pero tenemos que respirar su repugnante humo.
    Ex: A new indicator, representing the asymmetry of coauthorship links, was used to reveal the main 'attractive' and ' repulsive' centres of cooperation.
    Ex: I find it disgusting but I guess that's human nature.
    Ex: It is primarily a story about a girl who, pregnant, flees her disapproving family to search for the father of her child in the grungy and sinister Midlands of England.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: His article, 'The skeleton in the our closet: public libraries art collections suffer appalling losses,' examines the problem of theft and mutilation of art materials in public libraries.
    Ex: Bulrush prefers full or partial sun, wet conditions, and soil that is mucky or sandy.
    Ex: Neck buffs and balaclava's get the most icky, because you're usually breathing against them, and they tend to get a bit moist.
    Ex: I saw Gina's post the other day where she said she feels 'fat and frumpish and yucky'.
    Ex: Today I got followed home by a creepy man with a high-pitched voice.
    Ex: The main character, Tom Johnson, realizes that no girls go out with creeps like him so he quickly changes and buys a guitar and learns how to play one.
    Ex: The board clearly didn't care if its commissioner was a lowdown, lying, corrupt and untrustworthy creep, likely because that is the nature of the entire organization.

    * * *
    asqueroso1 -sa
    A
    1 ‹libro/película› digusting, filthy
    2 ‹olor/comida/costumbre› disgusting, revolting, horrible
    el baño estaba asqueroso de sucio the bath was absolutely filthy
    ¡mira qué asquerosas tienes las manos! look at the state of your hands! ( colloq), look how filthy your hands are!
    B ( fam) (malo, egoísta) mean ( colloq), horrible ( BrE colloq)
    préstamelo, no seas asqueroso let me borrow it, don't be so mean o horrible
    asqueroso2 -sa
    masculine, feminine
    A
    (sucio): es un asqueroso he's disgusting, he's a filthy pig ( colloq)
    B ( fam) (malo, egoísta) meany ( colloq)
    es un asqueroso, no me quiere prestar la bici he's so mean, o he's such a meany, he won't lend me his bike
    * * *

     

    asqueroso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    1
    a)libro/película digusting, filthy

    b)olor/comida/costumbre disgusting, revolting


    2 ( lascivo):
    ¡viejo asqueroso! you dirty old man!

    asqueroso,-a
    I adj (sucio) filthy
    (repulsivo) revolting, disgusting
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino disgusting o filthy o revolting person
    ' asqueroso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    asquerosa
    - pequeña
    - pequeño
    - asquiento
    English:
    creepy
    - disgusting
    - filthy
    - foul
    - gross
    - icky
    - nasty
    - revolting
    - scummy
    - sickening
    - squalid
    - vile
    - yukky
    - creep
    - lousy
    - sickly
    * * *
    asqueroso, -a
    adj
    1. [que da asco] disgusting, revolting;
    una película asquerosa a revolting film;
    tu cuarto está asqueroso your room is filthy;
    es un cerdo asqueroso he's a disgusting pig
    2. [malo] mean;
    no seas asqueroso y devuélvele el juguete don't be so mean and give her the toy back
    nm,f
    1. [que da asco] disgusting o revolting person;
    es un asqueroso he's disgusting o revolting
    2. [mala persona] mean person;
    es un asqueroso, no me quiso prestar dinero he's so mean, he wouldn't lend me any money
    * * *
    I adj
    1 ( sucio) filthy
    2 ( repugnante) revolting, disgusting
    II m, asquerosa f creep
    * * *
    asqueroso, -sa adj
    : disgusting, sickening, repulsive
    * * *
    1. (repugnante) disgusting
    ¡qué perro más asqueroso! what a disgusting dog!
    2. (sucio) filthy [comp. filthier; superl. filthiest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > asqueroso

  • 2 desagradable

    adj.
    1 unpleasant.
    2 disagreeable, distasteful, unpleasant, displeasing.
    * * *
    1 disagreeable, unpleasant
    * * *
    adj.
    unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    ADJ unpleasant, disagreeable más frm
    * * *
    adjetivo <respuesta/comentario> unkind; <ruido/sensación> unpleasant, disagreeable; <escena/sorpresa> unpleasant; <tiempo/clima> unpleasant, horrible
    * * *
    = off-putting, unwelcome, unpleasant, disagreeable, unkind, obnoxious, peevish, distasteful, unappealing, seamy [seamier -comp., seamiest -sup.], unsavoury [unsavory, -USA], unpalatable, unsightly, minging, abrasive, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unwholesome, insalubrious, invidious, ill-natured.
    Ex. Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex. The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex. And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex. Then I came within this disagreeable person's atmosphere, and lo! before I know what's happened I'm involved in an unpleasant altercation.
    Ex. The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex. During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex. In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex. The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex. In addition, it is pointed out that tourists often have a strange fascination for tragic, macabre or other equally unappealing historical sights.
    Ex. In general, the writer explains, crimes are depicted in such a way that they are associated with seamy characters who have little regard for conventional morality.
    Ex. Despite the unsavory characters, bawdiness, and amorality in several of his plays, Middleton was more committed to a single theological system than, for example, Shakespeare.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Spam is unpalatable any way it's served up: things you can do to reduce the amount of unwanted e-mail'.
    Ex. He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. The text raises the possibility that there might be something unwholesome in the Buddhist obsession with hell.
    Ex. Specific actions are those which are intended to reinforce the fight against specific medical conditions related to insalubrious living.
    Ex. Within the ranks of authorship therefore there are many types of author and it is invidious to claim that one sort is necessarily 'better' than another.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    ----
    * algo desagradable a la vista = a blot on the landscape.
    * darle a Uno escalofríos por Algo desagradable = make + Nombre + flinch.
    * de sabor desagradable = unpalatable.
    * desagradable a la vista = eyesore.
    * encontrarse con una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * esperar una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * lo desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * situación desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening.
    * * *
    adjetivo <respuesta/comentario> unkind; <ruido/sensación> unpleasant, disagreeable; <escena/sorpresa> unpleasant; <tiempo/clima> unpleasant, horrible
    * * *
    = off-putting, unwelcome, unpleasant, disagreeable, unkind, obnoxious, peevish, distasteful, unappealing, seamy [seamier -comp., seamiest -sup.], unsavoury [unsavory, -USA], unpalatable, unsightly, minging, abrasive, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unwholesome, insalubrious, invidious, ill-natured.

    Ex: Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.

    Ex: The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex: And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex: Then I came within this disagreeable person's atmosphere, and lo! before I know what's happened I'm involved in an unpleasant altercation.
    Ex: The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex: During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex: In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex: The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex: In addition, it is pointed out that tourists often have a strange fascination for tragic, macabre or other equally unappealing historical sights.
    Ex: In general, the writer explains, crimes are depicted in such a way that they are associated with seamy characters who have little regard for conventional morality.
    Ex: Despite the unsavory characters, bawdiness, and amorality in several of his plays, Middleton was more committed to a single theological system than, for example, Shakespeare.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Spam is unpalatable any way it's served up: things you can do to reduce the amount of unwanted e-mail'.
    Ex: He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: The text raises the possibility that there might be something unwholesome in the Buddhist obsession with hell.
    Ex: Specific actions are those which are intended to reinforce the fight against specific medical conditions related to insalubrious living.
    Ex: Within the ranks of authorship therefore there are many types of author and it is invidious to claim that one sort is necessarily 'better' than another.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    * algo desagradable a la vista = a blot on the landscape.
    * darle a Uno escalofríos por Algo desagradable = make + Nombre + flinch.
    * de sabor desagradable = unpalatable.
    * desagradable a la vista = eyesore.
    * encontrarse con una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * esperar una sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening + be in store, be in for a rude awakening.
    * lo desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * situación desagradable = unpleasantness.
    * sorpresa desagradable = rude awakening.

    * * *
    ‹respuesta/comentario› unkind; ‹sabor/ruido/sensación› unpleasant, disagreeable; ‹escena› horrible
    estuvo realmente desagradable conmigo he was really unpleasant to me
    ¡no seas tan desagradable! dale una oportunidad don't be so mean o unkind! give him a chance
    ¡qué tiempo más desagradable! what nasty o horrible weather
    hacía un día bastante desagradable the weather was rather unpleasant, it was a rather unpleasant day
    se llevó una sorpresa desagradable she got a nasty o an unpleasant surprise
    * * *

     

    desagradable adjetivo
    unpleasant;
    respuesta/comentario unkind
    desagradable adjetivo unpleasant, disagreeable: hay un olor desagradable, there's an unpleasant smell
    es una persona muy desagradable, he's really disagreeable
    ' desagradable' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    escopetazo
    - fresca
    - fresco
    - graznido
    - grosera
    - grosero
    - gustillo
    - horrorosa
    - horroroso
    - impresión
    - marrón
    - palma
    - sensación
    - terrible
    - terrorífica
    - terrorífico
    - chocante
    - ingrato
    - mal
    - shock
    English:
    bullet
    - business
    - creep
    - dirty
    - disagreeable
    - distasteful
    - emptiness
    - filthy
    - hard
    - ill-natured
    - miserable
    - nasty
    - off
    - off-putting
    - rude
    - thankless
    - ugly
    - unkind
    - unpleasant
    - unsavory
    - unsavoury
    - unwelcome
    - why
    - home
    - objectionable
    - offensive
    - painful
    - peevish
    - unpalatable
    - unwholesome
    * * *
    adj
    1. [sensación, tiempo, escena] unpleasant;
    no voy a salir, la tarde está muy desagradable I'm not going to go out, the weather's turned quite nasty this afternoon;
    una desagradable sorpresa an unpleasant o a nasty surprise
    2. [persona, comentario, contestación] unpleasant;
    está muy desagradable con su familia he's very unpleasant to his family;
    no seas desagradable y ven con nosotros al cine don't be unsociable, come to the cinema with us
    nmf
    son unos desagradables they're unpleasant people
    * * *
    adj unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    : unpleasant, disagreeable
    * * *
    desagradable adj unpleasant

    Spanish-English dictionary > desagradable

  • 3 engendro

    m.
    1 freak, deformed creature (ser deforme).
    2 monstrosity (ugly or poor work).
    3 badly conceived plan.
    4 fetus, foetus.
    5 monster, deformed child.
    6 abortus.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: engendrar.
    * * *
    1 (feto) foetus (US fetus)
    2 (ser informe) malformed child
    4 figurado (cosa) monstrosity
    * * *
    SM
    1) * (=ser deforme) freak

    ¡mal engendro!, ¡engendro del diablo! — little monster!

    2) (=feto) foetus, fetus (EEUU)
    3) (=invención) idiotic scheme, impossible plan
    * * *
    a) ( feto) fetus*
    b) ( criatura malformada) malformed creature
    c) ( creación monstruosa) freak, monster
    * * *
    = minger.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    * * *
    a) ( feto) fetus*
    b) ( criatura malformada) malformed creature
    c) ( creación monstruosa) freak, monster
    * * *

    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.

    * * *
    1 (feto) fetus*
    2 (criatura malformada) malformed creature
    3 (creación monstruosa) freak, monster
    ese tipo es un engendro ( fam); he's ugly as sin, he looks like a freak
    * * *

    Del verbo engendrar: ( conjugate engendrar)

    engendro es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    engendró es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    engendrar    
    engendro
    engendrar ( conjugate engendrar) verbo transitivo hijos to father;
    odio/sospecha to breed, engender (frml)
    engendro sustantivo masculino
    a) ( feto) fetus( conjugate fetus)



    engendrar verbo transitivo
    1 Biol to engender
    2 (dar lugar, provocar) to give rise to, cause: la mentira engendra otros males, lying only makes things worse
    engendro m pey monstrosity
    ' engendro' also found in these entries:
    English:
    eyesore
    * * *
    1. [ser deforme] freak, deformed creature;
    [niño] malformed child
    2. [obra fea o mala] monstrosity
    * * *
    m
    1 ( persona fea) freak, monster
    2 fig
    eyesore;
    esa estatua es un engendro that statue is a monstrosity

    Spanish-English dictionary > engendro

  • 4 espantajo

    m.
    1 scarecrow.
    2 fright, sight (persona fea).
    3 phantom, scarecrow, bird scarer, bogy.
    4 frump.
    * * *
    1 (muñeco) scarecrow
    2 figurado (cosa) sight, fright
    3 figurado (persona) sight, fright; (coco) bogeyman
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=espantapájaros) scarecrow
    2) (=persona) sight *, fright *
    * * *
    masculino scarecrow
    * * *
    = minger, stooge.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. Iraqis recognize a hand-picked council of stooges when they see it.
    * * *
    masculino scarecrow
    * * *
    = minger, stooge.

    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.

    Ex: Iraqis recognize a hand-picked council of stooges when they see it.

    * * *
    1 (espantapájaros) scarecrow
    * * *
    1. [espantapájaros] scarecrow
    2. [persona mal vestida] scarecrow;
    [persona fea] fright, sight
    * * *
    m scarecrow; fig
    sight
    * * *
    : scarecrow

    Spanish-English dictionary > espantajo

  • 5 esperpento

    m.
    1 grotesque sight (person).
    2 fright.
    * * *
    1 familiar (cosa, persona) fright, sight
    2 familiar (absurdo) absurdity, piece of nonsense
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=persona fea) fright *, sight *
    2) (=disparate) nonsense
    3) (Teat) play which focuses on the grotesque
    4) (=cuento) macabre story, grotesque tale
    ESPERPENTO Esperpento is a type of theatre developed by Ramón del Valle-Inclán (1869-1936) focusing on characters whose physical and psychological characteristics have been deliberately deformed and warped to the point where they become grotesque caricatures. Valle-Inclán used this esperpento as a vehicle for social and political satire.
    * * *
    a) (Lit) theater* of the grotesque ( created by Valle Inclán)
    b) (fam) ( mamarracho)

    ¿quién es ese esperpento? — who's that weird-looking guy? (colloq)

    * * *
    = minger.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    * * *
    a) (Lit) theater* of the grotesque ( created by Valle Inclán)
    b) (fam) ( mamarracho)

    ¿quién es ese esperpento? — who's that weird-looking guy? (colloq)

    * * *

    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.

    * * *
    1 ( Lit) theater* of the grotesque ( created by Valle Inclán)
    2 ( fam)
    (mamarracho): ¿quién es ese esperpento? who's that weird-looking guy? ( colloq)
    ¡vas hecha un esperpento! you look a real sight! ( colloq)
    * * *

    esperpento sustantivo masculino
    1 pey (feo, ridículo) strange-looking, a real sight
    2 Lit dramatic genre devised by Valle-Inclán
    * * *
    1. [persona] grotesque sight;
    vestido así pareces un esperpento you look a sight dressed like that
    2. [cosa] absurdity, piece of nonsense
    3. Lit [género] = style of writing created by the Spanish dramatist and novelist Ramón María del Valle-Inclán (1866-1936), which consists of deforming reality to intensify its grotesque and absurd characteristics
    * * *
    m fig
    sight
    * * *
    esperpento nm, fam mamarracho: sight, fright
    voy hecha un esperpento: I really look a sight

    Spanish-English dictionary > esperpento

  • 6 feo

    adj.
    1 ugly, homely, bad-looking, ill-favored.
    2 ugly.
    * * *
    2 (aspecto, situación, tiempo, etc) nasty, horrible, unpleasant, awful
    3 (acción) horrible, awful
    4 (indigno) rude, not nice, improper
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 ugly person
    1 (ofensa) slight, snub
    \
    hacerle un feo a alguien to slight somebody, snub somebody
    ser más feo que Picio to be as ugly as sin
    siempre me (te, etc) toca bailar con la más fea I (you, etc) always get the short end of the stick
    ————————
    1 (ofensa) slight, snub
    * * *
    = fea, adj.
    1) ugly
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=sin belleza) [persona, casa, ropa] ugly

    bailar con la más fea —

    2) (=desagradable) [asunto, tiempo] nasty, unpleasant; [jugada] dirty
    3) (=de mala educación)

    está muy feo contestarle así a tu madreit's very rude o it's not nice to answer your mother like that

    está o queda feo comerse las uñas en público — it's bad manners to bite your nails in public

    4) LAm [olor, comida] nasty, unpleasant
    2. SM
    1) (=desaire)

    -no puedo ir a tu boda -¿me vas a hacer ese feo? — "I can't come to your wedding" - "but you can't refuse!" o "how can you refuse!"

    2) * (=fealdad)

    hoy está con el feo o de feo subido — he's looking really ugly today

    3.
    ADV LAm * bad, badly

    oler feo — to smell bad, have a nasty smell

    * * *
    I
    fea adjetivo
    a) <persona/edificio> ugly; < peinado> unflattering

    es un barrio/color feo — it's not a very nice neighborhood/color

    ser más feo que Picio or que un pecado — to be as ugly as sin (colloq)

    b) <asunto/situación> unpleasant; <olor/sabor> (esp AmL) unpleasant

    es or (Esp) está muy feo hablar así — it's not nice to talk like that

    II
    adverbio (AmL) <oler/saber> bad

    sentir feo — (Méx) to feel terrible

    III
    masculino (fam) ( desaire)

    vamos, acéptalo, no me hagas ese feo — oh go on take it, I'll be hurt if you don't

    es de un feo... — (Esp) he's as ugly as they come (colloq)

    * * *
    = ugly [uglier -comp., ugliest -sup.], unsightly, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unlovely, minging, nasty looking, shanky [shankier -comp., shankiest -sup.].
    Ex. This is not to say that the library should be cluttered with ugly signs; all notices should be carefully contrived and aesthetically pleasing.
    Ex. He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. The article 'Lovely idea, but unlovely pricing' criticizes the pricing level of a new service aimed at research scientists in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and biotechnology companies.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. It's more advisable to have a cheap and skanky bike for pootling around town, the idea being that no-one would want to nick a nasty looking bike.
    Ex. It's more advisable to have a cheap and skanky bike for pootling around town, the idea being that no-one would want to nick a nasty looking bike.
    ----
    * cosas + ponerse feas = things + get rough.
    * grotescamente feo = grotesquely ugly.
    * patito feo = ugly duckling.
    * Patito Feo, el = Ugly Duckling, the.
    * vieja fea = old hag, old bag, old crone, old bat.
    * * *
    I
    fea adjetivo
    a) <persona/edificio> ugly; < peinado> unflattering

    es un barrio/color feo — it's not a very nice neighborhood/color

    ser más feo que Picio or que un pecado — to be as ugly as sin (colloq)

    b) <asunto/situación> unpleasant; <olor/sabor> (esp AmL) unpleasant

    es or (Esp) está muy feo hablar así — it's not nice to talk like that

    II
    adverbio (AmL) <oler/saber> bad

    sentir feo — (Méx) to feel terrible

    III
    masculino (fam) ( desaire)

    vamos, acéptalo, no me hagas ese feo — oh go on take it, I'll be hurt if you don't

    es de un feo... — (Esp) he's as ugly as they come (colloq)

    * * *
    = ugly [uglier -comp., ugliest -sup.], unsightly, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unlovely, minging, nasty looking, shanky [shankier -comp., shankiest -sup.].

    Ex: This is not to say that the library should be cluttered with ugly signs; all notices should be carefully contrived and aesthetically pleasing.

    Ex: He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: The article 'Lovely idea, but unlovely pricing' criticizes the pricing level of a new service aimed at research scientists in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and biotechnology companies.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: It's more advisable to have a cheap and skanky bike for pootling around town, the idea being that no-one would want to nick a nasty looking bike.
    Ex: It's more advisable to have a cheap and skanky bike for pootling around town, the idea being that no-one would want to nick a nasty looking bike.
    * cosas + ponerse feas = things + get rough.
    * grotescamente feo = grotesquely ugly.
    * patito feo = ugly duckling.
    * Patito Feo, el = Ugly Duckling, the.
    * vieja fea = old hag, old bag, old crone, old bat.

    * * *
    1 ‹persona/animal/edificio› ugly; ‹peinado› unflattering
    es fea de cara she's not at all pretty, she has a very plain face
    es feo con ganas he's as ugly as sin ( colloq)
    la pobre chica es feíta or feúcha the poor girl is rather plain o ( AmE colloq) homely
    es un barrio feo it's not a very nice neighborhood
    es un color bastante feo it isn't a very attractive o nice color
    llevaba una corbata feísima he was wearing the most awful tie
    ser más feo que Picio or que un pecado or que pegarle a Dios or que pegarle a la madre ( fam); to be as ugly as sin ( colloq)
    siempre me toca bailar con la más fea ( fam); I always get the short end of the stick o draw the short straw ( colloq)
    2 ‹asunto/situación› unpleasant; ‹olor/sabor› ( esp AmL) unpleasant
    ¡qué feo está el día! ( AmL); what an awful day!
    me has dado cartas muy feas you've dealt me horrible cards
    la cosa se está poniendo fea, vámonos things are getting nasty o ugly o this is getting unpleasant, let's go
    es or ( Esp) está muy feo hablar así de los amigos it's not nice to talk about your friends like that
    tiene la fea costumbre de contestar he has an unpleasant habit of answering back
    feo2
    ( AmL) ‹oler/saber› bad
    me miró feo she gave me a dirty look
    sentir feo ( Méx); to feel terrible
    se siente feo que te traten así it's really terrible to be treated like that
    feo3
    ( fam)
    1
    (desaire): hacerle un feo a algn to snub sb
    2 ( fam)
    (fealdad): es encantador, pero es de un feo … he's charming, but boy, is he (ever) ugly! ( AmE), he's charming but he isn't half ugly! ( BrE colloq)
    es de un feo que asusta he's as ugly as sin o as ugly as they come ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    feo 1,
    fea adjetivo

    a)persona/edificio ugly;

    peinado unflattering;

    es un barrio feo it's not a very nice neighborhood
    b)asunto/situación unpleasant;

    olor/sabor› (esp AmL) unpleasant;
    ¡qué feo está el día! what an awful day!;

    la cosa se está poniendo fea things are getting nasty o ugly;
    es or (Esp) está muy feo hablar así it's not nice to talk like that
    feo 2 adverbio (AmL) ‹oler/saber bad;

    feo,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (carente de belleza) ugly
    2 (turbio) nasty: esto se pone feo, this is looking bad
    una herida fea, a bad wound
    II m (desaire, descortesía) snub: no le hagas ese feo, don't snub him
    ♦ Locuciones: ser más feo que Picio, to be as ugly as sin

    ' feo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    espantosa
    - espantoso
    - esperpento
    - fea
    - horrorosa
    - horroroso
    - monstruosa
    - monstruoso
    - encima
    - espantar
    - feroz
    - gana
    - horrible
    English:
    hideous
    - nasty
    - ugly
    - ugly duckling
    - unsightly
    - dull
    - homely
    - nice
    - plain
    * * *
    feo, -a
    adj
    1. [persona, animal, traje] ugly;
    es un pueblo muy feo it's a very ugly town;
    es fea con ganas she's as ugly as sin;
    ser más feo que Picio to be as ugly as sin;
    Fam
    2. [aspecto, herida] nasty;
    [tiempo] foul, horrible; [color] unpleasant;
    está metido en un asunto muy feo he's mixed up in some really nasty business;
    ponerse feo [situación, tiempo] to turn nasty;
    la cosa está fea things are looking bad
    3. [desagradable] unpleasant;
    [ofensivo] rude;
    es o [m5] está feo escupir it's rude to spit;
    cuando me vio me hizo un gesto feo when she saw me she made a rude gesture;
    lo que hiciste quedó feo that wasn't a very nice thing to do
    4. Am [olor, sabor] unpleasant
    nm,f
    [persona] ugly person; Fam
    le tocó bailar con la más fea he drew the short straw
    nm
    [desaire]
    hacer un feo a alguien to offend o slight sb;
    le hizo el feo de no saludarla he snubbed her by not saying hello
    adv
    Am [oler, saber] bad;
    tus zapatos huelen muy feo your shoes smell awful
    * * *
    I adj ugly; fig
    nasty;
    la(s) cosa(s) se pone(n) feo(s) fig things are looking grim
    II m
    :
    hacer un feo a alguien fam snub s.o.
    III adv Méx
    oler, saber bad
    * * *
    feo adv
    : badly, bad
    feo, fea adj
    1) : ugly
    2) : unpleasant, nasty
    * * *
    feo adj
    1. (en general) ugly [comp. uglier; superl. ugliest]
    2. (malo) unpleasant / nasty [comp. nastier; superl. nastiest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > feo

  • 7 repugnante

    adj.
    disgusting.
    f. & m.
    loathsome person, repulsive person.
    * * *
    1 repugnant, repulsive, disgusting, revolting
    * * *
    adj.
    repugnant, disgusting
    * * *
    ADJ disgusting, revolting
    * * *
    adjetivo < olor> disgusting, revolting; < crimen> abhorrent, repugnant; < persona> ( físicamente) repulsive, revolting; ( moralmente) repugnant
    * * *
    = filthy [filthier -comp, filthiest -sup.], rank, repellent, revolting, repulsive, obnoxious, disgusting, rebarbative, abhorrent, minging, gross [grosser -comp., grossest -sup.], gruesome, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], icky [ickier -comp., ickiest -sup.], creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.], loathsome.
    Ex. Printing houses -- apart from the few that had been built for the purpose rather than converted from something else -- were generally filthy and badly ventilated.
    Ex. And what I'm trying to suggest is that there's something shameful about a profession that has allowed this kind of blatant and rank ethnocentrism, racism, chauvinism, the whole schmier, to persist this long.
    Ex. But, in the main, I find it often boring and sometimes repellent.
    Ex. This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex. A new indicator, representing the asymmetry of coauthorship links, was used to reveal the main 'attractive' and ' repulsive' centres of cooperation.
    Ex. During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex. I find it disgusting but I guess that's human nature.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. He debates what should the librarian's attitude be to materials considered personally abhorrent.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. Janell has always had a soft spot in her heart for animals most people might find gross.
    Ex. We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. Neck buffs and balaclava's get the most icky, because you're usually breathing against them, and they tend to get a bit moist.
    Ex. Today I got followed home by a creepy man with a high-pitched voice.
    Ex. It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.
    * * *
    adjetivo < olor> disgusting, revolting; < crimen> abhorrent, repugnant; < persona> ( físicamente) repulsive, revolting; ( moralmente) repugnant
    * * *
    = filthy [filthier -comp, filthiest -sup.], rank, repellent, revolting, repulsive, obnoxious, disgusting, rebarbative, abhorrent, minging, gross [grosser -comp., grossest -sup.], gruesome, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], icky [ickier -comp., ickiest -sup.], creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.], loathsome.

    Ex: Printing houses -- apart from the few that had been built for the purpose rather than converted from something else -- were generally filthy and badly ventilated.

    Ex: And what I'm trying to suggest is that there's something shameful about a profession that has allowed this kind of blatant and rank ethnocentrism, racism, chauvinism, the whole schmier, to persist this long.
    Ex: But, in the main, I find it often boring and sometimes repellent.
    Ex: This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex: A new indicator, representing the asymmetry of coauthorship links, was used to reveal the main 'attractive' and ' repulsive' centres of cooperation.
    Ex: During the war a law was passed to limit the consumption of newsprint by ' obnoxious newspapers' and even reducing it to nil = Durante la guerra se aprobó una ley para limitar el consumo de papel de periódico por los llamados "periódicos detestables" e incluso reducirlo a cero.
    Ex: I find it disgusting but I guess that's human nature.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: He debates what should the librarian's attitude be to materials considered personally abhorrent.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: Janell has always had a soft spot in her heart for animals most people might find gross.
    Ex: We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: Neck buffs and balaclava's get the most icky, because you're usually breathing against them, and they tend to get a bit moist.
    Ex: Today I got followed home by a creepy man with a high-pitched voice.
    Ex: It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.

    * * *
    1 ‹olor› disgusting, revolting
    2 ‹crimen› abhorrent, repugnant
    3 ‹persona› (físicamente) repulsive, revolting, repellent; (moralmente) repugnant
    * * *

    repugnante adjetivo ‹ olor disgusting, revolting;
    crimen abhorrent, repugnant;
    persona› ( físicamente) repulsive, revolting;
    ( moralmente) repugnant
    repugnante adjetivo
    1 (físicamente) disgusting, revolting, repulsive
    2 (moralmente) repugnant
    ' repugnante' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    repelente
    - asco
    English:
    abhorrent
    - disgusting
    - loathsome
    - obnoxious
    - offensive
    - repugnant
    - revolting
    - foul
    - nauseating
    - repulsive
    * * *
    1. [sabor, olor] disgusting, revolting
    2. [acción, comportamiento] disgusting
    * * *
    adj disgusting, repugnant
    * * *
    : repulsive, repugnant, revolting
    * * *
    repugnante adj revolting

    Spanish-English dictionary > repugnante

  • 8 sucio

    adj.
    1 dirty, messy, filthy, nasty.
    2 dirty.
    3 dirty, evil-minded.
    * * *
    1 (con manchas) dirty, filthy
    2 (que se ensucia fácilmente) which dirties easily, which shows the dirt
    3 figurado (deshonesto) shady, underhand
    5 DEPORTE figurado foul, dirty, unfair
    6 figurado (trabajo, lenguaje) dirty, filthy
    1 figurado in an underhand way, dirty
    \
    en sucio in rough
    tener una lengua sucia to be foul-mouthed
    ————————
    1 figurado in an underhand way, dirty
    * * *
    (f. - sucia)
    adj.
    dirty, filthy, messy
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=manchado) [cara, ropa, suelo] dirty

    hazlo primero en sucio — make a rough draft first, do it in rough first

    2) [color] dirty
    3) (=fácil de manchar)

    los pantalones blancos son muy sucios — white trousers show the dirt, white trousers get dirty very easily

    4) (=obsceno) dirty, filthy

    palabras sucias — dirty words, filthy words

    5) (=deshonesto) [jugada] foul, dirty; [táctica] dirty; [negocio] shady
    6) [conciencia] bad
    7) [lengua] coated, furred
    2.
    ADV
    3.
    SM And bit of dirt
    * * *
    I
    - cia adjetivo
    1)
    a) [ESTAR] <ropa/casa/vaso> dirty

    ¿de quién es este cuaderno tan sucio? — whose is this grubby exercise book?

    hacer algo en sucioto do a rough draft of something (AmE), do something in rough (BrE)

    b) < lengua> furred, coated
    2) [SER]
    b) < color> dirty (before n)
    c) < trabajo> dirty; <dinero/negocio/juego> dirty
    d) < lenguaje> filthy; < mente> dirty
    II
    masculino (Ven fam) dirty mark
    * * *
    = brown, dingy [dingier -comp., dingiest -sup.], dirty [dirtier -comp., dirtiest -sup.], murky [murkier -comp., murkiest -sup.], grubby, dirty [dirtier -comp., dirtiest -sup.], messy [messier -comp., messiest -sup.], soiled, grungy, unclean, squalid, minging, mucky [muckier -comp., muckiest -sup.], tarnished, unwashed.
    Ex. The horrid thing broke out with a screeching laugh, and pointed his brown finger at me.
    Ex. Shortly after he began as director, he moved the library from a dingy Carnegie mausoleum to a downtown department store that had become vacant.
    Ex. An authority file can also be used to clean up an inconsistent, dirty data base.
    Ex. There are extraordinary uncertainties in the murky future of higher education and to change the character of our library at this stage would be too extreme a measure.
    Ex. The copy was grubby from use, a paperback with a photographically realistic full-color painting on its cover of an early teenage boy slumped in what looked to me like a corner of a very dirty back alley, a can of Coke in his hand.
    Ex. The copy was grubby from use, a paperback with a photographically realistic full-color painting on its cover of an early teenage boy slumped in what looked to me like a corner of a very dirty back alley, a can of Coke in his hand.
    Ex. The author discusses current attempts to organize electronic information objects in a world that is messy, volatile and uncontrolled.
    Ex. The painting is a still life depiction of a soiled tablecloth on a table.
    Ex. It is primarily a story about a girl who, pregnant, flees her disapproving family to search for the father of her child in the grungy and sinister Midlands of England.
    Ex. The causes were accumulated dust on the books and an influx of unprocessed and unclean materials into the room.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex. Bulrush prefers full or partial sun, wet conditions, and soil that is mucky or sandy.
    Ex. Coca-Cola appears to be taking pains to buff up its tarnished image -- a controversy continues to brew over pesticides found in its soda products.
    Ex. It was Burke who first called the mob 'the great unwashed,' but the term ' unwashed' had been applied to them before.
    ----
    * blanquear dinero sucio = launder + dirty money.
    * capa de espuma sucia = scum.
    * cesta de la ropa sucia = linen basket, wash basket.
    * cesto de la ropa sucia = linen basket, wash basket.
    * conciencia sucia = guilty conscience.
    * dinero sucio = dirty money.
    * guerra sucia = dirty war.
    * persona encargada de hacer los trabajos sucios = hatchetman.
    * sacar a relucir los trapos sucios delante de otros = wash + dirty linen in front of others.
    * sacar a relucir los trapos sucios en público = air + dirty linen in public.
    * trabajo en sucio = rough work.
    * * *
    I
    - cia adjetivo
    1)
    a) [ESTAR] <ropa/casa/vaso> dirty

    ¿de quién es este cuaderno tan sucio? — whose is this grubby exercise book?

    hacer algo en sucioto do a rough draft of something (AmE), do something in rough (BrE)

    b) < lengua> furred, coated
    2) [SER]
    b) < color> dirty (before n)
    c) < trabajo> dirty; <dinero/negocio/juego> dirty
    d) < lenguaje> filthy; < mente> dirty
    II
    masculino (Ven fam) dirty mark
    * * *
    = brown, dingy [dingier -comp., dingiest -sup.], dirty [dirtier -comp., dirtiest -sup.], murky [murkier -comp., murkiest -sup.], grubby, dirty [dirtier -comp., dirtiest -sup.], messy [messier -comp., messiest -sup.], soiled, grungy, unclean, squalid, minging, mucky [muckier -comp., muckiest -sup.], tarnished, unwashed.

    Ex: The horrid thing broke out with a screeching laugh, and pointed his brown finger at me.

    Ex: Shortly after he began as director, he moved the library from a dingy Carnegie mausoleum to a downtown department store that had become vacant.
    Ex: An authority file can also be used to clean up an inconsistent, dirty data base.
    Ex: There are extraordinary uncertainties in the murky future of higher education and to change the character of our library at this stage would be too extreme a measure.
    Ex: The copy was grubby from use, a paperback with a photographically realistic full-color painting on its cover of an early teenage boy slumped in what looked to me like a corner of a very dirty back alley, a can of Coke in his hand.
    Ex: The copy was grubby from use, a paperback with a photographically realistic full-color painting on its cover of an early teenage boy slumped in what looked to me like a corner of a very dirty back alley, a can of Coke in his hand.
    Ex: The author discusses current attempts to organize electronic information objects in a world that is messy, volatile and uncontrolled.
    Ex: The painting is a still life depiction of a soiled tablecloth on a table.
    Ex: It is primarily a story about a girl who, pregnant, flees her disapproving family to search for the father of her child in the grungy and sinister Midlands of England.
    Ex: The causes were accumulated dust on the books and an influx of unprocessed and unclean materials into the room.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Everyone is attractive to someone, there is no such thing as a minger, but there are many people who I think are minging.
    Ex: Bulrush prefers full or partial sun, wet conditions, and soil that is mucky or sandy.
    Ex: Coca-Cola appears to be taking pains to buff up its tarnished image -- a controversy continues to brew over pesticides found in its soda products.
    Ex: It was Burke who first called the mob 'the great unwashed,' but the term ' unwashed' had been applied to them before.
    * blanquear dinero sucio = launder + dirty money.
    * capa de espuma sucia = scum.
    * cesta de la ropa sucia = linen basket, wash basket.
    * cesto de la ropa sucia = linen basket, wash basket.
    * conciencia sucia = guilty conscience.
    * dinero sucio = dirty money.
    * guerra sucia = dirty war.
    * persona encargada de hacer los trabajos sucios = hatchetman.
    * sacar a relucir los trapos sucios delante de otros = wash + dirty linen in front of others.
    * sacar a relucir los trapos sucios en público = air + dirty linen in public.
    * trabajo en sucio = rough work.

    * * *
    A
    1 [ ESTAR] ‹ropa/casa/vaso› dirty
    tengo las manos sucias my hands are dirty
    ¿de quién es este cuaderno tan sucio? whose is this grubby exercise book? ( colloq)
    la habitación está tan sucia que da asco the room is disgustingly dirty o is filthy
    en sucio in rough
    primero haz el ejercicio en sucio first do the exercise in rough
    2 ‹lengua› furred, coated, furry ( colloq)
    B [ SER]
    1
    (que se ensucia fácilmente): las alfombras tan claras son muy sucias such light carpets get very dirty o show the dirt terribly
    2 ‹verde/amarillo› dirty ( before n)
    3 ‹trabajo› dirty
    es una tarea sucia y aburrida it's a dirty, tedious job
    4 ‹dinero/negocio/juego› dirty
    5 ‹palabras/lenguaje› dirty, filthy; ‹mente› dirty
    tener la conciencia sucia to have a guilty conscience
    ( Ven fam)
    dirty mark
    * * *

     

    sucio
    ◊ - cia adjetivo

    1
    a) [ESTAR] ‹ropa/casa/vaso dirty;


    b) lengua furred, coated

    2 [SER]
    a) trabajo dirty;

    dinero/negocio/juego dirty
    b) lenguaje filthy;

    mente dirty;

    sucio,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 dirty: tienes las manos sucias, your hands are dirty
    2 (obsceno) filthy, dirty
    3 (inmoral, deshonesto) juego sucio, foul play
    una jugada sucia, a dirty trick
    negocio sucio, shady business o deal
    trabajo sucio, dirty work
    (fraudulento) underhand
    4 (que se ensucia con facilidad) el blanco es un color muy sucio para vestir, white clothes get dirty so easily
    II adverbio unfairly
    jugar sucio, to play unfairly
    ' sucio' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    asquerosa
    - asqueroso
    - cerdo
    - cochina
    - cochino
    - jugar
    - manchada
    - manchado
    - marrana
    - marrano
    - negra
    - negro
    - puerca
    - puerco
    - roñosa
    - roñoso
    - sucia
    - tinglado
    - zarrapastrosa
    - zarrapastroso
    - chancho
    - juego
    - negociado
    - piojoso
    - repugnar
    - rozado
    - tufo
    English:
    dingy
    - dirty
    - filthy
    - foul play
    - greasy
    - grimy
    - grubby
    - grungy
    - low
    - mess
    - messy
    - murky
    - play
    - soiled
    - foul
    * * *
    sucio, -a
    adj
    1. [sin limpieza] dirty;
    estar sucio to be dirty;
    tiene muy sucia la cocina his kitchen is very dirty;
    la ropa sucia the dirty clothes
    2. [al comer, trabajar] messy;
    ser sucio to be messy
    3. [que se ensucia]
    el blanco es un color muy sucio white is a colour that really shows the dirt
    4. [color] dirty;
    un pantalón de un color blanco sucio off-white Br trousers o US pants
    5. [lenguaje] dirty, filthy
    6. [conciencia] bad, guilty
    7.
    en sucio [escribir] in rough
    adv
    jugar sucio to play dirty
    nm
    Ven Fam stain, dirty mark
    * * *
    adj tb fig
    dirty;
    en sucio in rough;
    blanco sucio off-white
    * * *
    sucio, - cia adj
    : dirty, filthy
    * * *
    sucio adj dirty [comp. dirtier; superl. dirtiest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > sucio

См. также в других словарях:

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  • minging — [ mɪŋɪŋ] adjective Brit. informal foul smelling. ↘very bad or unpleasant. Origin 1970s: perh. from Scots dialect ming excrement …   English new terms dictionary

  • minging — UK [ˈmɪŋɪŋ] / US adjective informal very unpleasant, ugly, or bad …   English dictionary

  • minging — mingˈing or mingˈin adjective 1. Having an unpleasant smell, stinking 2. Dirty or unpleasant • • • Main Entry: ↑ming …   Useful english dictionary


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