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dastardly

  • 1 bellaquería

    f.
    1 fiendish trick, knavery, dirty trick, mean trick.
    2 rascality, knavery, roguery.
    * * *
    1 wickedness, roguery
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=acto) dirty trick
    2) (=cualidad) (=maldad) wickedness; (=astucia) cunning, slyness
    * * *
    Ex. The end of one-party rule has brought chaos to Mexico as three political parties jockey for power in an atmosphere rife with recriminations and dirty tricks.
    * * *

    Ex: The end of one-party rule has brought chaos to Mexico as three political parties jockey for power in an atmosphere rife with recriminations and dirty tricks.

    * * *
    villainy, scoundrelly act
    es incapaz de una bellaquería así he's incapable of such villainy o such a scoundrelly act
    * * *
    Literario
    1. [cualidad] wickedness, villainy
    2. [acto]
    hacerte eso fue una bellaquería that was a dastardly thing for him to do to you
    * * *
    f rascally trick

    Spanish-English dictionary > bellaquería

  • 2 cobarde

    adj.
    1 cowardly.
    2 coward, overly submissive.
    f. & m.
    coward.
    * * *
    1 cowardly
    1 coward
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ [en lucha, aventura] cowardly; [ante sangre, alturas] faint-hearted; (=tímido) timid
    2.
    SMF coward
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo cowardly
    II
    masculino y femenino coward
    * * *
    = coward, wuss, cowardly, wussy [wussier -comp., wussiest -sup.], quitter, dastardly, puss.
    Ex. The violence was committed by a wide range of ordinary citizens, including psychopaths, conformists, fanatics, opportunists, & cowards.
    Ex. He goes on to state that liberals are wusses for claiming 'I support the troops but not the war'.
    Ex. Tachers found girls more virile, obtrusive, mischievous, sharing, straightforward, careless, dependent, quiet, and cowardly.
    Ex. And being against the war and saying you support the troops is one of the wussiest positions the pacifists have ever taken.
    Ex. Here are a few examples of some famous quitters, people who didn't always stick it out.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. Kyle is not a puss -- he is one of the tougher players on our team.
    ----
    * no ser cobarde = be no chicken.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo cowardly
    II
    masculino y femenino coward
    * * *
    = coward, wuss, cowardly, wussy [wussier -comp., wussiest -sup.], quitter, dastardly, puss.

    Ex: The violence was committed by a wide range of ordinary citizens, including psychopaths, conformists, fanatics, opportunists, & cowards.

    Ex: He goes on to state that liberals are wusses for claiming 'I support the troops but not the war'.
    Ex: Tachers found girls more virile, obtrusive, mischievous, sharing, straightforward, careless, dependent, quiet, and cowardly.
    Ex: And being against the war and saying you support the troops is one of the wussiest positions the pacifists have ever taken.
    Ex: Here are a few examples of some famous quitters, people who didn't always stick it out.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: Kyle is not a puss -- he is one of the tougher players on our team.
    * no ser cobarde = be no chicken.

    * * *
    cowardly
    coward
    * * *

     

    cobarde adjetivo
    cowardly
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino
    coward
    cobarde
    I adjetivo cowardly: fue un gesto cobarde, it was a cowardly gesture
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino coward
    ' cobarde' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cagada
    - cagado
    - conformista
    - tildar
    - gallina
    - maricón
    - palabra
    English:
    brand
    - chicken
    - coward
    - cowardly
    - yellow
    * * *
    adj
    cowardly
    nmf
    coward
    * * *
    I adj cowardly
    II m/f coward
    * * *
    cobarde adj
    : cowardly
    cobarde nmf
    : coward
    * * *
    cobarde1 adj cowardly
    cobarde2 n coward

    Spanish-English dictionary > cobarde

  • 3 infame

    adj.
    1 vile, base.
    2 infamous, wicked.
    pres.subj.
    3rd person singular (él/ella/ello) Present Subjunctive of Spanish verb: infamar.
    * * *
    1 (vil) despicable, vile
    2 (muy malo) awful, terrible
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ (=odioso) [persona] odious; [tarea] thankless
    2.
    SMF vile person, villain
    * * *
    I
    a) (vil, cruel) < persona> loathsome, despicable; <acción/comportamiento> unspeakable, disgraceful
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) horrible, terrible
    II
    masculino y femenino loathsome o despicable person
    * * *
    = slanderous, infamous, despicable, unholy, notorious, dastardly, beyond evil, loathsome.
    Ex. That's slanderous; they're not the names of the people.
    Ex. The Matsukawa Materials Room at Fukushima University, Japan, contains items relating to the Matsukawa Incident, an infamous miscarriage of justice in Aug 1949.
    Ex. Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.
    Ex. The unholy and more holy sources of community information are mentioned from pimps and prostitutes to the preacher and the policeman.
    Ex. Iraqi secret police believed that the notorious Palestinian assassin Abu Nidal was working for the Americans as well as Egypt and Kuwait.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. What his brother did was beyond evil, they should've finished him off with the death sentence.
    Ex. It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.
    ----
    * coalición infame = unholy alliance.
    * * *
    I
    a) (vil, cruel) < persona> loathsome, despicable; <acción/comportamiento> unspeakable, disgraceful
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) horrible, terrible
    II
    masculino y femenino loathsome o despicable person
    * * *
    = slanderous, infamous, despicable, unholy, notorious, dastardly, beyond evil, loathsome.

    Ex: That's slanderous; they're not the names of the people.

    Ex: The Matsukawa Materials Room at Fukushima University, Japan, contains items relating to the Matsukawa Incident, an infamous miscarriage of justice in Aug 1949.
    Ex: Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.
    Ex: The unholy and more holy sources of community information are mentioned from pimps and prostitutes to the preacher and the policeman.
    Ex: Iraqi secret police believed that the notorious Palestinian assassin Abu Nidal was working for the Americans as well as Egypt and Kuwait.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: What his brother did was beyond evil, they should've finished him off with the death sentence.
    Ex: It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.
    * coalición infame = unholy alliance.

    * * *
    1 (vil, cruel) ‹persona› loathsome, despicable; ‹acción/comportamiento› monstrous, unspeakable, disgraceful
    2 ( fam) (uso hiperbólico) horrible, terrible
    hizo un tiempo infame we had foul o terrible o vile o horrible weather ( colloq)
    loathsome o despicable person
    * * *

    Del verbo infamar: ( conjugate infamar)

    infamé es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) pretérito indicativo

    infame es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente subjuntivo

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) presente subjuntivo

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) imperativo

    Multiple Entries:
    infamar    
    infame
    infame
    I adjetivo
    1 (pésimo, horrible) dreadful, awful
    una obra de teatro infame, a dreadful play
    2 (persona) infamous, vile
    II mf vile person
    ' infame' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    indigna
    - indigno
    English:
    base
    - infamous
    - vile
    - wicked
    * * *
    infame adj
    1. [persona] vile, base
    2. Fam [libro, película] dire, dreadful;
    vivían en una casa infame they lived in a dreadful house
    * * *
    adj vile, loathsome; ( terrible) dreadful, awful
    * * *
    infame adj
    1) : infamous
    2) : loathsome, vile
    tiempo infame: terrible weather

    Spanish-English dictionary > infame

  • 4 malicioso

    adj.
    1 malicious, wrongful, tortious.
    2 malicious, sly, bitchy, catty.
    3 suspicious.
    4 evil-minded, dirty.
    m.
    maliciously-minded person.
    * * *
    1 (malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    2 (malpensado) suspicious-minded
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (malicioso) malicious person
    2 (malpensado) person with a suspicious mind
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    2) (=pícaro) mischievous
    3) (=astuto) sly, crafty
    4) (=malo) wicked, evil
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    b) ( pícaro) mischievous
    * * *
    = malicious, vicious, spiteful, devious, bitchy [bitchier -comp., bitchiest -sup.], ill-natured, dastardly.
    Ex. Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.
    Ex. For in the eyes of many, even the most desultory reading of fiction was preferable to the ' vicious' entertainments designed to satisfy the 'lower impulses in human nature'.
    Ex. Selection of books for review sometimes causes controversy as to why some are reviewed and others not and the reviews themselves can create minor storms in the book world if it is felt they are prejudiced or spiteful.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex. She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex. Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    ----
    * intención maliciosa = malicious intent.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( malintencionado) malicious, spiteful
    b) ( pícaro) mischievous
    * * *
    = malicious, vicious, spiteful, devious, bitchy [bitchier -comp., bitchiest -sup.], ill-natured, dastardly.

    Ex: Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.

    Ex: For in the eyes of many, even the most desultory reading of fiction was preferable to the ' vicious' entertainments designed to satisfy the 'lower impulses in human nature'.
    Ex: Selection of books for review sometimes causes controversy as to why some are reviewed and others not and the reviews themselves can create minor storms in the book world if it is felt they are prejudiced or spiteful.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex: She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex: Always snivelling, coughing, spitting; a stupid, tedious, ill-natured fellow, who was for ever fatiguing people.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    * intención maliciosa = malicious intent.

    * * *
    1 (malintencionado) ‹persona/comentario› malicious, spiteful
    2 (pícaro) ‹comentario/mirada/sonrisa› mischievous
    * * *

    malicioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo



    malicioso,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (pícaro) mischievous
    2 (malintencionado) malicious
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino malicious person
    ' malicioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    maliciosa
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - pícaro
    English:
    bitchy
    - catty
    - ill-natured
    - mischievous
    - spiteful
    - cunning
    - malicious
    - sly
    - vicious
    * * *
    malicioso, -a adj
    1. [malintencionado] malicious
    2. [astuto, agudo] cunning, crafty
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( malintencionado) malicious
    2 ( astuto) cunning, sly
    * * *
    malicioso, -sa adj
    1) : malicious
    2) pícaro: mischievous
    * * *
    malicioso adj spiteful

    Spanish-English dictionary > malicioso

  • 5 malévolo

    adj.
    malevolent, malignant, evil, black.
    * * *
    1 malevolent
    * * *
    - la adjetivo malevolent, malicious
    * * *
    = malevolent, malicious, ill-willed, waspish, dastardly.
    Ex. There was nothing malevolent in her response or in her look; she simply stated it as if it was the most natural thing in the world, not in the least abnormal.
    Ex. Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.
    Ex. We wish to mention that there can never be such matters as ethnic cleansing, license to rape, or other ill-willed behavior on the government's part.
    Ex. Harwood is excellent -- saucy and coquettish and really waspish in her subsequent vitriolic exchanges with the irate Marcello.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    * * *
    - la adjetivo malevolent, malicious
    * * *
    = malevolent, malicious, ill-willed, waspish, dastardly.

    Ex: There was nothing malevolent in her response or in her look; she simply stated it as if it was the most natural thing in the world, not in the least abnormal.

    Ex: Perhaps the major problem will be the malicious attempt to cause confusion.
    Ex: We wish to mention that there can never be such matters as ethnic cleansing, license to rape, or other ill-willed behavior on the government's part.
    Ex: Harwood is excellent -- saucy and coquettish and really waspish in her subsequent vitriolic exchanges with the irate Marcello.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.

    * * *
    malevolent, malicious
    * * *

    malévolo
    ◊ -la adjetivo

    malevolent, malicious
    malévolo,-a adjetivo malevolent

    ' malévolo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    malévola
    English:
    diabolic
    - diabolical
    - malevolent
    - malicious
    - maliciously
    * * *
    malévolo, -a adj
    malevolent, wicked
    * * *
    adj malevolent
    * * *
    malévolo, -la adj
    : malevolent, wicked

    Spanish-English dictionary > malévolo

  • 6 miserable

    adj.
    1 poor (pobre).
    2 miserable (penoso, insuficiente).
    3 contemptible, base (vil).
    4 mean (tacaño).
    5 miserly, mean, stingy.
    6 meager, scant.
    f. & m.
    1 wretch, vile person (persona vil).
    2 mean person, miser (tacaño).
    * * *
    1 (desdichado) miserable
    2 (insignificante) miserly; (tacaño) mean
    3 (malvado) wretched
    1 (malvado) wretch
    2 (tacaño) miser
    * * *
    adj.
    1) miserable, wretched
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=tacaño) mean, stingy; (=avaro) miserly
    2) [sueldo] miserable, paltry
    3) (=vil) vile, despicable
    4) [lugar, habitación] squalid, wretched
    5) (=desdichado) wretched
    2. SMF
    1) (=desgraciado) wretch
    2) (=canalla) swine, wretch

    ¡miserable! — you miserable wretch!

    * * *
    I
    a) ( pobre) < vivienda> miserable, wretched; < sueldo> paltry, miserable
    b) ( avaro) mean, stingy (colloq)
    c) ( malvado) malicious, nasty
    II
    masculino y femenino wretch, scoundrel
    * * *
    = mean [meaner -comp., meanest -sup.], miserable, squalid, mean-spirited, paltry [paltrier -comp., paltriest -sup.], measly [measlier -comp., measliest -sup.], dastardly, cheapskate.
    Ex. Whereas in most European countries during this period welfare provision continued to develop, in Australia it languished at a level which, with the exception of Japan, was the meanest of the developed countries.
    Ex. Sometimes of an evening, after my miserable journeyings through the day, I would stand for hours in the Strand, leaning against the shutters of a closed shop, and watching the compositors at work by gaslight on the opposite side of the way, upon a morning paper.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Don't waste your time on this mean-spirited little film of no consequence.
    Ex. And there is no guarantee that any of the paltry sums of extra money available will actually benefit the workers in the recipient countries.
    Ex. Despite the Bank of England's base rate having risen by a full percentage point, the average savings rate is still ' measly'.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. Most of these cheapskates will not come right out and tell you that they don't want to pay anything for your software.
    ----
    * fracaso miserable = miserable failure.
    * llevar una vida miserable = live + wretched existence.
    * * *
    I
    a) ( pobre) < vivienda> miserable, wretched; < sueldo> paltry, miserable
    b) ( avaro) mean, stingy (colloq)
    c) ( malvado) malicious, nasty
    II
    masculino y femenino wretch, scoundrel
    * * *
    = mean [meaner -comp., meanest -sup.], miserable, squalid, mean-spirited, paltry [paltrier -comp., paltriest -sup.], measly [measlier -comp., measliest -sup.], dastardly, cheapskate.

    Ex: Whereas in most European countries during this period welfare provision continued to develop, in Australia it languished at a level which, with the exception of Japan, was the meanest of the developed countries.

    Ex: Sometimes of an evening, after my miserable journeyings through the day, I would stand for hours in the Strand, leaning against the shutters of a closed shop, and watching the compositors at work by gaslight on the opposite side of the way, upon a morning paper.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Don't waste your time on this mean-spirited little film of no consequence.
    Ex: And there is no guarantee that any of the paltry sums of extra money available will actually benefit the workers in the recipient countries.
    Ex: Despite the Bank of England's base rate having risen by a full percentage point, the average savings rate is still ' measly'.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: Most of these cheapskates will not come right out and tell you that they don't want to pay anything for your software.
    * fracaso miserable = miserable failure.
    * llevar una vida miserable = live + wretched existence.

    * * *
    1 (pobre) ‹vivienda› miserable, wretched; ‹sueldo› paltry, miserable
    2 (avaro) mean, stingy ( colloq)
    3 (malvado) malicious, nasty
    wretch, scoundrel, nasty piece of work ( colloq)
    * * *

    miserable adjetivo

    sueldo paltry, miserable
    b) ( avaro) mean, stingy (colloq)


    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino
    wretch, scoundrel
    miserable
    I adjetivo
    1 (lástimoso, pobre) wretched, poor: gana un sueldo miserable, she earns a miserable salary
    2 (malvado, ruin) despicable
    un comportamiento miserable, despicable behaviour
    3 (avariento) mean
    II mf
    1 (mezquino) miser
    2 (canalla) wretch, scoundrel: un miserable le robó la bicicleta, some scoundrel stole his bicycle
    ' miserable' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    astrosa
    - astroso
    - escoria
    - mezquina
    - mezquino
    - mísera
    - miseria
    - mísero
    - pajolera
    - pajolero
    - chancho
    - triste
    English:
    abject
    - miser
    - miserable
    - niggardly
    - skimpy
    - squalid
    - stingy
    - bleak
    - sorry
    * * *
    adj
    1. [pobre] poor;
    [vivienda] wretched, squalid
    2. [penoso, insuficiente] miserable
    3. [vil] contemptible, base
    4. [tacaño] mean
    nmf
    1. [persona vil] wretch, vile person
    2. [tacaño] mean person, miser
    * * *
    I adj wretched
    II m/f
    1 ( tacaño) skinflint
    2 ( canalla) swine
    * * *
    1) lastimoso: miserable, wretched
    2) : paltry, meager
    3) mezquino: stingy, miserly
    4) : despicable, vile

    Spanish-English dictionary > miserable

  • 7 nefasto

    adj.
    unlucky, ill-fated, unfortunate, fateful.
    * * *
    1 (desgraciado) unlucky, ill-fated, bad
    2 (perjudicial) harmful, fatal
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=funesto) [viaje] ill-fated; [año] unlucky; [resultado] unfortunate; [influencia] pernicious; [corrupción] harmful, damaging; [alcohol, ácido] harmful
    2) LAm (=atroz) dreadful, terrible
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo < consecuencias> disastrous; < influencia> harmful; <tiempo/fiesta> (fam) awful (colloq)
    * * *
    = dire, nefarious, heinous, dastardly, loathsome.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. The Internet is in the midst of a new wave of global resistance to its nefarious effects.
    Ex. There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.
    ----
    * consecuencia nefasta = disastrous effect.
    * efecto nefasto = deleterious effect.
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo < consecuencias> disastrous; < influencia> harmful; <tiempo/fiesta> (fam) awful (colloq)
    * * *
    = dire, nefarious, heinous, dastardly, loathsome.

    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.

    Ex: The Internet is in the midst of a new wave of global resistance to its nefarious effects.
    Ex: There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: It is loathsome and grotesquely hypocritical that pro-lifers oppose abortion, but are unconcerned about the mistreatment of animals used in the food industry.
    * consecuencia nefasta = disastrous effect.
    * efecto nefasto = deleterious effect.

    * * *
    nefasto -ta
    1 ‹consecuencias› disastrous
    una influencia nefasta a harmful influence
    un día nefasto para nuestro país a sad day for our country
    2 ( fam); ‹tiempo/fiesta› awful ( colloq), terrible ( colloq)
    * * *

    nefasto
    ◊ -ta adjetivo ‹ consecuencias disastrous;


    influencia harmful;
    tiempo/fiesta› (fam) awful (colloq)
    nefasto,-a adj (funesto) unlucky, ill-fated: su intervención fue nefasta, her intervention did a lot of harm
    ' nefasto' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    nefasta
    English:
    evil
    - fatal
    - painful
    - dire
    - grim
    * * *
    nefasto, -a adj
    [funesto] ill-fated; [dañino] bad, harmful; [pésimo] terrible, awful
    * * *
    adj harmful
    * * *
    nefasto, -ta adj
    1) : ill-fated, unlucky
    2) : disastrous, terrible

    Spanish-English dictionary > nefasto

  • 8 ruin

    adj.
    1 low, contemptible (vil).
    2 mean (avaro).
    3 vile, base, perverse, wicked.
    * * *
    1 peyorativo (vil) mean, base, despicable, vile
    2 (pequeño) petty, insignificant
    3 (tacaño) stingy, mean
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=vil) [persona] contemptible, mean
    2) [trato] (=injusto) mean, shabby; (=cruel) heartless, callous
    3) (=tacaño) mean, stingy
    4) (=pequeño) small, weak
    5) [animal] vicious
    * * *
    a) (mezquino, vil) despicable, contemptible; ( avaro) miserly, mean (BrE)
    b) < animal> bad-tempered
    * * *
    = stingy [stingier -comp., stingies -sup.], tight-fisted, miser, skinflint, penny-pinching, tightwad, despicable, mean [meaner -comp., meanest -sup.], dastardly.
    Ex. All subjects completed a four-page questionnaire in which they rated Americans on six bipolar adjective dimensions: friendly/unfriendly, polite/impolite, industrious/lazy, religious/anti-religious, generous/ stingy, and patriotic/not patriotic.
    Ex. The money for modernizing Indian towns will have to come out of the pockets of leading merchants, men stereotyped as tight-fisted scrooges.
    Ex. If one were to think of an analogue outside the library situation, one would conjure up the image of a miser cackling with delight as he counts and recounts his beloved coins.
    Ex. He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex. He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex. He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex. Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.
    Ex. Whereas in most European countries during this period welfare provision continued to develop, in Australia it languished at a level which, with the exception of Japan, was the meanest of the developed countries.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    * * *
    a) (mezquino, vil) despicable, contemptible; ( avaro) miserly, mean (BrE)
    b) < animal> bad-tempered
    * * *
    = stingy [stingier -comp., stingies -sup.], tight-fisted, miser, skinflint, penny-pinching, tightwad, despicable, mean [meaner -comp., meanest -sup.], dastardly.

    Ex: All subjects completed a four-page questionnaire in which they rated Americans on six bipolar adjective dimensions: friendly/unfriendly, polite/impolite, industrious/lazy, religious/anti-religious, generous/ stingy, and patriotic/not patriotic.

    Ex: The money for modernizing Indian towns will have to come out of the pockets of leading merchants, men stereotyped as tight-fisted scrooges.
    Ex: If one were to think of an analogue outside the library situation, one would conjure up the image of a miser cackling with delight as he counts and recounts his beloved coins.
    Ex: He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex: He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex: He is been described as a penny-pinching skinflint tightwad who would sooner die than part with a dollar.
    Ex: Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.
    Ex: Whereas in most European countries during this period welfare provision continued to develop, in Australia it languished at a level which, with the exception of Japan, was the meanest of the developed countries.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.

    * * *
    1 (mezquino, vil) ‹persona› despicable, contemptible; ‹acción› despicable, contemptible, base ( liter)
    sus ruines intenciones his despicable o base intentions
    2 (avaro) miserly, mean ( BrE)
    3 ‹animal› bad-tempered, mean ( colloq)
    * * *

    ruin adjetivo (mezquino, vil) despicable, contemptible;
    ( avaro) miserly, mean (BrE)
    ruin adjetivo
    1 (despreciable, vil) mean, despicable, stingy
    2 (avariento, tacaño) stingy, miserly: era ruin con su familia y generoso consigo mismo, he was stingy to his family but generous to himself
    ' ruin' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abismo
    - abocada
    - abocado
    - arruinar
    - baja
    - bajo
    - cagar
    - cargarse
    - castigar
    - chafar
    - dar
    - desbaratar
    - deshacer
    - destrozar
    - dinamitar
    - ser
    - estropear
    - extemporánea
    - extemporáneo
    - fastidiar
    - jorobar
    - miserable
    - pasar
    - perder
    - perderse
    - polvo
    - ruina
    - salar
    - significar
    - tierra
    - acabar
    - chancho
    - consumir
    - destruir
    - echar
    - embromar
    - fregar
    - malograr
    - perdición
    - villano
    English:
    rack
    - ruin
    - ancient
    - break
    - destroy
    - doom
    - murder
    - wreck
    * * *
    ruin adj
    1. [vil] contemptible
    2. [avaro] mean
    3. Cuba [en celo] Br on heat, US in heat
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( despreciable) despicable, mean
    2 ( tacaño) mean, miserly
    * * *
    ruin adj
    1) : base, despicable
    2) : mean, stingy

    Spanish-English dictionary > ruin

  • 9 taxista

    adj.
    taxi.
    f. & m.
    taxi driver.
    * * *
    1 taxi driver
    * * *
    SMF taxi driver, cabby *, cab driver (EEUU)
    * * *
    masculino y femenino taxi driver, cabdriver
    * * *
    = cab driver, gruelling [grueling, -USA], livery driver, cabbie [cabby].
    Ex. Like many whose vocation is to serve their fellow-man, from New York cab drivers to Parisian cafe waiters, they do not always feel like smiling.
    Ex. He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. He heard her cheerful 'Good-night, cabbie,' as she ran up the steps and opened the door with a latchkey.
    * * *
    masculino y femenino taxi driver, cabdriver
    * * *
    = cab driver, gruelling [grueling, -USA], livery driver, cabbie [cabby].

    Ex: Like many whose vocation is to serve their fellow-man, from New York cab drivers to Parisian cafe waiters, they do not always feel like smiling.

    Ex: He has become one of the first people in the world to complete a gruelling foot race involving four deserts on four different continents.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: He heard her cheerful 'Good-night, cabbie,' as she ran up the steps and opened the door with a latchkey.

    * * *
    taxi driver, cabdriver
    * * *

    taxista sustantivo masculino y femenino
    taxi driver, cabdriver
    taxista mf taxi driver, familiar cab driver
    ' taxista' also found in these entries:
    English:
    taxi driver
    - cab
    - hack
    - moonlight
    - taxi
    * * *
    taxista nmf
    taxi driver
    * * *
    m/f cab o
    taxi driver
    * * *
    taxista nmf
    : taxi driver
    * * *
    taxista n taxi driver

    Spanish-English dictionary > taxista

  • 10 vil

    adj.
    1 vile, despicable.
    2 base, wicked, dastardly, despicable.
    3 low.
    * * *
    1 vile, base, despicable
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] low, villainous; [acto] vile, rotten; [conducta] despicable, mean; [trato] unjust, shabby
    * * *
    adjetivo (liter) <acto/persona> vile, despicable
    * * *
    = despicable, poison-pen, dastardly, beyond evil, lowdown, ignoble.
    Ex. Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.
    Ex. The writer explains how he earned a poison-pen reputation as dance and music critic at the Los Angeles Times.
    Ex. A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex. What his brother did was beyond evil, they should've finished him off with the death sentence.
    Ex. The board clearly didn't care if its commissioner was a lowdown, lying, corrupt and untrustworthy creep, likely because that is the nature of the entire organization.
    Ex. Some religions (e.g. Judaism) explicitly demand ignoble attitudes in their followers.
    * * *
    adjetivo (liter) <acto/persona> vile, despicable
    * * *
    = despicable, poison-pen, dastardly, beyond evil, lowdown, ignoble.

    Ex: Gestation, menstruation, & pregnancy were often considered shameful and despicable.

    Ex: The writer explains how he earned a poison-pen reputation as dance and music critic at the Los Angeles Times.
    Ex: A dastardly livery driver raped a 30-year-old woman passenger on Jan. 31, cops said.
    Ex: What his brother did was beyond evil, they should've finished him off with the death sentence.
    Ex: The board clearly didn't care if its commissioner was a lowdown, lying, corrupt and untrustworthy creep, likely because that is the nature of the entire organization.
    Ex: Some religions (e.g. Judaism) explicitly demand ignoble attitudes in their followers.

    * * *
    ( liter); ‹acto› vile, despicable, base; ‹persona› vile, despicable
    un hombre vil y despreciable a vile, despicable man ( liter)
    aquel vil asesinato that vile murder ( frml)
    * * *

    vil adjetivo (liter) ‹acto/persona vile, despicable
    vil adjetivo despicable, vile
    ' vil' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    baja
    - bajo
    - calumnia
    - metal
    - ruin
    - vileza
    - villana
    - villano
    - desgraciado
    - mezquindad
    - mezquino
    English:
    base
    - foul
    - miserable
    - nefarious
    - out-and-out
    - scummy
    - squalid
    - vile
    - cheap
    - despicable
    * * *
    vil adj
    vile, despicable;
    Hum
    el vil metal filthy lucre
    * * *
    adj vile, despicable
    * * *
    vil adj
    : vile, dispicable

    Spanish-English dictionary > vil

  • 11 tímida

    adj.
    timid, cowardly, dastardly.
    * * *
    f., (m. - tímido)
    * * *

    tímido,-a
    I adj (vergonzoso) shy
    fig (reacción) una tímida acogida, a tepid o lukewarm welcome
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino shy person
    ' tímida' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    naturaleza
    - tímido
    - tanto
    English:
    mouse
    - painfully

    Spanish-English dictionary > tímida

  • 12 cobarde

    • chicken-hearted
    • chickenhearted
    • coward
    • cowardly
    • craven
    • dastard
    • dastardly
    • fainthearted
    • gut feeling
    • gut reaction
    • gutless wonder
    • gutlessness
    • lily-livered
    • overly submissive
    • poltroon
    • pushy
    • pusillanimous person
    • quitter
    • supine
    • white-livered
    • yellow around the gills
    • yellow-billed cuckoo

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > cobarde

  • 13 innoble

    • dastardly
    • ignoble
    • unloyal

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > innoble

  • 14 vil

    • dastardly
    • despicable
    • ignoble
    • trashcan
    • trattoria
    • vile
    • villainous
    • wicked
    • yellow dog clause
    • yellow-colored

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > vil

См. также в других словарях:

  • Dastardly — Das tard*ly, a. Meanly timid; cowardly; base; as, a dastardly outrage. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dastardly — like cowardly, is often used in a manner described by Fowler (1926) as inappropriate because it describes actions that, however reprehensible and brutal they may be, at least require boldness and courage. Acts of terrorism, however despicable,… …   Modern English usage

  • dastardly — index caitiff, recreant, scandalous Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • dastardly — 1560s, showing despicable cowardice, originally dull, from M.E. DASTARD (Cf. dastard) + LY (Cf. ly) (1) …   Etymology dictionary

  • dastardly — [adj] rotten base, contemptible, cowardly, craven, despicable, low, mean, pusillanimous, underhanded, vile; concepts 404,545,570,571,574 …   New thesaurus

  • dastardly — ► ADJECTIVE dated or humorous ▪ wicked and cruel. ORIGIN from archaic dastard despicable person , probably from dazed and influenced by dotard and bastard …   English terms dictionary

  • dastardly — [das′tərdlē] adj. of or like a dastard; mean and cowardly SYN. COWARDLY dastardliness n …   English World dictionary

  • dastardly — [[t]dæ̱stə(r)dli[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: ADJ n If you describe an action as dastardly, you mean it is wicked and intended to hurt someone. [OLD FASHIONED] He described the killing as a dastardly act. ...a dastardly attack on the queen. 2) ADJ GRADED …   English dictionary

  • dastardly — adjective, dated their dastardly plan to kidnap Hayes Syn: wicked, evil, heinous, villainous, diabolical, fiendish, barbarous, cruel, black, dark, rotten, vile, monstrous, abominable, despicable, degenerate …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • dastardly — adjective Date: 1542 1. cowardly 2. characterized by underhandedness or treachery < a dastardly attack > < a dastardly villain > Synonyms: see cowardly • dastardliness noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • dastardly — dastardliness, n. /das teuhrd lee/, adj. cowardly; meanly base; sneaking: a dastardly act. [1560 70; DASTARD + LY] * * * …   Universalium

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