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Untruth

  • 1 causar

    v.
    1 to cause.
    el accidente le causó graves lesiones he was seriously injured in the accident
    el huracán causó estragos en la costa the hurricane wreaked havoc on the coast
    el terremotó causó dos mil muertos two thousand people died in the earthquake, the earthquake killed two thousand people
    El ácido úrico causa la gota Uric acid causes gout.
    Ella causó que eso ocurriese She caused that to happen.
    2 to be caused to.
    Se nos causó un gran daño A great damage was caused to us.
    * * *
    1 (provocar) to cause, bring about
    2 (proporcionar) to make, give
    * * *
    verb
    2) make
    * * *
    VT [+ problema, consecuencia, víctima] to cause; [+ impresión] to make

    la explosión causó heridas a dos personas — the explosion injured two people, the explosion left two people injured

    causar asombro a algn — to amaze sb

    causar emoción a algn — to move sb

    causar extrañeza a algn — to puzzle sb

    causar risa a algn — to make sb laugh

    * * *
    verbo transitivo <daños/problema/sufrimiento> to cause; < indignación> to cause, arouse; < alarma> to cause, provoke; < placer> to give
    * * *
    = cause, result (in), spark off, inflict, evoke, bring on, bring about, precipitate, give + cause to, give + rise to, give + occasion to.
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex. Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex. This article discusses the budget cuts inflicted on Australian libraries.
    Ex. It is known that in ancient Rome the complexity of the administrative job evoked considerable development of management techniques.
    Ex. In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    ----
    * causar ansiedad = cause + anxiety.
    * causar buena impresión = impress, come across.
    * causar confusión = wreak + confusion, cause + confusion.
    * causar conmoción = cause + a ripple.
    * causar consternación = cause + consternation.
    * causar daño = do + harm, be injurious, cause + damage, cause + harm, cause + hurt, bring + harm, inflict + damage.
    * causar daño corporal = cause + injury.
    * causar daño material = cause + material injury.
    * causar daños = cause + erosion.
    * causar desórdenes = riot.
    * causar destrozos = wreak + devastation.
    * causar destrucción = wreak + destruction.
    * causar dificultad = cause + difficulty.
    * causar disturbios = riot.
    * causar estragos = wreak + havoc, ravage, run + amok, cause + havoc, create + havoc, play + havoc with.
    * causar graves daños a = bring + ruin to.
    * causar impresión = make + impression.
    * causar molestias = cause + disruption, inconvenience, cause + inconvenience.
    * causar muchas víctimas = take + a toll on life.
    * causar muertos = take + a toll on life.
    * causar pena = cause + hurt.
    * causar pérdidas = cause + losses.
    * causar perjuicio = bring + harm.
    * causar preocupación = evoke + concern, cause + concern.
    * causar problemas = cause + problems, cause + trouble, make + trouble.
    * causar revuelo = cause + a stir, create + a stir.
    * causar ruina a = bring + ruin to.
    * causarse daño = bring + disaster on.
    * causar sensación = be a sensation, cut + a swath(e), cut + a dash, make + heads turn, make + a big noise, cause + a sensation.
    * causar sensación en el mundo = make + a big noise in the world.
    * causar sorpresa = cause + an eyelid to bat.
    * causar una buena primera impresión = make + a good first impression.
    * causar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * causar una gran sensación = make + a splash.
    * causar una guerra = precipitate + war.
    * causar una impresión = leave + an impression, make + an impression.
    * causar una primera impresión = make + a first impression.
    * causar una reacción = cause + reaction.
    * causar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * causar un gran revuelo = set + the cat among the pigeons, put + the cat among the pigeons, make + a splash.
    * que puede causar detención = arrestable.
    * sin causar daño = harmlessly.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <daños/problema/sufrimiento> to cause; < indignación> to cause, arouse; < alarma> to cause, provoke; < placer> to give
    * * *
    = cause, result (in), spark off, inflict, evoke, bring on, bring about, precipitate, give + cause to, give + rise to, give + occasion to.

    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.

    Ex: Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex: Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex: This article discusses the budget cuts inflicted on Australian libraries.
    Ex: It is known that in ancient Rome the complexity of the administrative job evoked considerable development of management techniques.
    Ex: In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * causar ansiedad = cause + anxiety.
    * causar buena impresión = impress, come across.
    * causar confusión = wreak + confusion, cause + confusion.
    * causar conmoción = cause + a ripple.
    * causar consternación = cause + consternation.
    * causar daño = do + harm, be injurious, cause + damage, cause + harm, cause + hurt, bring + harm, inflict + damage.
    * causar daño corporal = cause + injury.
    * causar daño material = cause + material injury.
    * causar daños = cause + erosion.
    * causar desórdenes = riot.
    * causar destrozos = wreak + devastation.
    * causar destrucción = wreak + destruction.
    * causar dificultad = cause + difficulty.
    * causar disturbios = riot.
    * causar estragos = wreak + havoc, ravage, run + amok, cause + havoc, create + havoc, play + havoc with.
    * causar graves daños a = bring + ruin to.
    * causar impresión = make + impression.
    * causar molestias = cause + disruption, inconvenience, cause + inconvenience.
    * causar muchas víctimas = take + a toll on life.
    * causar muertos = take + a toll on life.
    * causar pena = cause + hurt.
    * causar pérdidas = cause + losses.
    * causar perjuicio = bring + harm.
    * causar preocupación = evoke + concern, cause + concern.
    * causar problemas = cause + problems, cause + trouble, make + trouble.
    * causar revuelo = cause + a stir, create + a stir.
    * causar ruina a = bring + ruin to.
    * causarse daño = bring + disaster on.
    * causar sensación = be a sensation, cut + a swath(e), cut + a dash, make + heads turn, make + a big noise, cause + a sensation.
    * causar sensación en el mundo = make + a big noise in the world.
    * causar sorpresa = cause + an eyelid to bat.
    * causar una buena primera impresión = make + a good first impression.
    * causar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * causar una gran sensación = make + a splash.
    * causar una guerra = precipitate + war.
    * causar una impresión = leave + an impression, make + an impression.
    * causar una primera impresión = make + a first impression.
    * causar una reacción = cause + reaction.
    * causar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * causar un gran revuelo = set + the cat among the pigeons, put + the cat among the pigeons, make + a splash.
    * que puede causar detención = arrestable.
    * sin causar daño = harmlessly.

    * * *
    causar [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹daños/problema› to cause; ‹indignación› to cause, arouse
    el incidente causó gran inquietud the incident caused great unease
    verlo así me causa gran tristeza it makes me very sad o it causes me great sadness o it fills me with sadness to see him like that
    me causó muy buena impresión I was very impressed with her, she made a very good impression on me
    este premio me causa gran satisfacción ( frml); I am delighted to receive this prize
    me causó mucha gracia que dijera eso I thought it was o I found it very funny that she should say that
    * * *

     

    causar ( conjugate causar) verbo transitivodaños/problema/sufrimiento to cause;
    indignación to cause, arouse;
    alarma to cause, provoke;
    placer to give;

    me causó muy buena impresión I was very impressed with her
    causar verbo transitivo to cause, bring about: el desaliño causa mala impresión, untidiness makes a bad impression
    le causó buena impresión, he was very impressed by him
    me causó mucha alegría, it made me very happy

    ' causar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    admirar
    - alborotar
    - caer
    - cobrarse
    - dar
    - darse
    - deslumbrar
    - determinar
    - embarazar
    - embriagar
    - emocionar
    - encandilar
    - engordar
    - espantar
    - estragos
    - estropear
    - fastidiar
    - hacer
    - ilusionar
    - impresión
    - impresionar
    - incomodar
    - meter
    - molestar
    - molestia
    - montar
    - obrar
    - parecer
    - pesar
    - plantear
    - producir
    - provocar
    - repeler
    - repercutir
    - revolver
    - salar
    - sembrar
    - traer
    - trastornar
    - turbar
    - furor
    - motivar
    - propiciar
    - saber
    English:
    bother
    - cause
    - derive
    - foul up
    - impression
    - inflict
    - painlessly
    - riot
    - sensation
    - set
    - start
    - trouble
    - wreak
    - fire
    - mischief
    - rise
    * * *
    causar vt
    [daños, problemas] to cause; [placer, satisfacción] to give;
    el huracán causó estragos en la costa the hurricane wreaked havoc on the coast;
    el terremoto causó dos mil muertos two thousand people died in the earthquake, the earthquake killed two thousand people;
    el accidente le causó graves lesiones he was seriously injured in the accident;
    causar (una) buena/mala impresión to make a good/bad impression;
    me causa mucha felicidad saber que se hayan reconciliado it makes me very happy to know they've made up with one another;
    esta crema a veces causa una sensación de picor this cream sometimes causes an itching sensation
    * * *
    v/t daño cause; placer provide, give
    * * *
    causar vt
    1) : to cause
    2) : to provoke, to arouse
    eso me causa gracia: that strikes me as being funny
    * * *
    causar vb
    1. (provocar) to cause
    2. (proporcionar) to make

    Spanish-English dictionary > causar

  • 2 dar lugar a

    to give rise to
    * * *
    (v.) = cause, generate, give + rise to, mean, result (in), leave + room for, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. These changes have meant modifications, some very time-consuming, to serials catalogues in libraries.
    Ex. Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex. Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * * *
    (v.) = cause, generate, give + rise to, mean, result (in), leave + room for, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to

    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.

    Ex: Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: These changes have meant modifications, some very time-consuming, to serials catalogues in libraries.
    Ex: Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex: Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex: Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar lugar a

  • 3 dar origen a

    to give rise to
    * * *
    (v.) = give + rise to, bring about, lead to, give + cause to, give + occasion to
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * * *
    (v.) = give + rise to, bring about, lead to, give + cause to, give + occasion to

    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.

    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar origen a

  • 4 dar pie a

    to give occasion for
    * * *
    (v.) = spark off, give + rise to, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to
    Ex. Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * * *
    (v.) = spark off, give + rise to, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to

    Ex: Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.

    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex: Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar pie a

  • 5 falacia

    f.
    1 lie, untruth (mentira).
    eso es una falacia that's a lie, that's not true
    2 fallacy, illusion, take-in, absurdity.
    * * *
    1 (error) fallacy
    2 (engaño) deceit, trick
    3 (hábito de engañar) deceitfulness
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=engaño) deceit, fraud; (=error) fallacy
    2) (=falsedad) deceitfulness
    * * *
    femenino fallacy
    * * *
    = fallacy, factoid.
    Ex. The article was titled 'Serial pricing and copyrights: prophecies, strategies and fallacies'.
    Ex. Most of the textbooks contain catalogues of decontextualized cultural factoids rather than strategies for identifying and understanding cultural differences.
    * * *
    femenino fallacy
    * * *
    = fallacy, factoid.

    Ex: The article was titled 'Serial pricing and copyrights: prophecies, strategies and fallacies'.

    Ex: Most of the textbooks contain catalogues of decontextualized cultural factoids rather than strategies for identifying and understanding cultural differences.

    * * *
    fallacy
    ese argumento es una falacia that is a fallacious argument
    Compuesto:
    pathetic fallacy
    * * *

    falacia sustantivo femenino fallacy
    ' falacia' also found in these entries:
    English:
    fallacy
    * * *
    1. [mentira] lie, untruth;
    eso es una falacia that's a lie, that's not true
    2. [concepción errónea] fallacy
    * * *
    f
    1 fallacy
    2 ( engaño) fraud
    * * *
    : fallacy

    Spanish-English dictionary > falacia

  • 6 falsedad

    f.
    1 falseness.
    2 falsehood, lie (mentira).
    * * *
    1 (hipocresía) falseness, hypocrisy; (doblez) duplicity
    2 (mentira) falsehood, lie
    * * *
    noun f.
    2) lie
    * * *
    SF
    1) [de acusación, teoría] falseness, falsity; [de persona] falseness, insincerity
    2) (=mentira) lie, falsehood frm
    * * *
    a) ( de afirmación) falseness; ( de persona) insincerity, falseness
    b) ( mentira) lie, falsehood (frml)
    * * *
    = falsehood, factoid, inauthencity, falsity, fallacy, mendacity, untruth, deceptiveness.
    Ex. If one probes more deeply into the question of truth and falsehood, one gets into difficult philosophical issues, which we prefer to leave to others.
    Ex. Most of the textbooks contain catalogues of decontextualized cultural factoids rather than strategies for identifying and understanding cultural differences.
    Ex. Critics of the digital world show fear of depersonalization, inauthenticty, subjugation to the mechanical and the substitution of quantity over quality.
    Ex. Although the legal profession intuitively knows the falsity of this assumption, researchers are still confident in implementing systems that use only the text of laws as their main source of knowledge.
    Ex. The article was titled 'Serial pricing and copyrights: prophecies, strategies and fallacies'.
    Ex. In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. In some cases, public figures are famous because of their lies; in other cases, their renown obscures the universality of deceptiveness.
    * * *
    a) ( de afirmación) falseness; ( de persona) insincerity, falseness
    b) ( mentira) lie, falsehood (frml)
    * * *
    = falsehood, factoid, inauthencity, falsity, fallacy, mendacity, untruth, deceptiveness.

    Ex: If one probes more deeply into the question of truth and falsehood, one gets into difficult philosophical issues, which we prefer to leave to others.

    Ex: Most of the textbooks contain catalogues of decontextualized cultural factoids rather than strategies for identifying and understanding cultural differences.
    Ex: Critics of the digital world show fear of depersonalization, inauthenticty, subjugation to the mechanical and the substitution of quantity over quality.
    Ex: Although the legal profession intuitively knows the falsity of this assumption, researchers are still confident in implementing systems that use only the text of laws as their main source of knowledge.
    Ex: The article was titled 'Serial pricing and copyrights: prophecies, strategies and fallacies'.
    Ex: In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: In some cases, public figures are famous because of their lies; in other cases, their renown obscures the universality of deceptiveness.

    * * *
    1 (de una afirmación) falseness; (de una persona) insincerity, falseness, hypocrisy
    2 (mentira) lie, falsehood ( frml)
    * * *

    falsedad sustantivo femenino

    ( de persona) insincerity, falseness
    b) ( mentira) lie

    falsedad sustantivo femenino
    1 falseness, (insinceridad) hypocrisy
    2 (mentira) lie: su declaración estaba llena de falsedades, his declaration was riddled with lies
    ' falsedad' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    supuesta
    - supuesto
    - doblez
    English:
    falsehood
    - spuriousness
    - untruthfulness
    - dishonesty
    * * *
    1. [falta de verdad, autenticidad] falseness
    2. [mentira] falsehood, lie
    * * *
    f
    1 falseness
    2 ( mentira) lie
    * * *
    1) : falseness, hypocrisy
    2) mentira: falsehood, lie
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > falsedad

  • 7 mala fama

    f.
    ill repute, disrepute, bad name, bad reputation.
    * * *
    (n.) = ill-repute, bad repute, bad reputation, ill reputation
    Ex. In olden days, women of ill-repute would put a red light bulb in their front porch light socket.
    Ex. If you want to see a public institution in bad repute, look at the data on how the public views the press.
    Ex. While it is much better to get off to a good start to begin with, there are things that can be done to clean up a bad reputation.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    * * *
    (n.) = ill-repute, bad repute, bad reputation, ill reputation

    Ex: In olden days, women of ill-repute would put a red light bulb in their front porch light socket.

    Ex: If you want to see a public institution in bad repute, look at the data on how the public views the press.
    Ex: While it is much better to get off to a good start to begin with, there are things that can be done to clean up a bad reputation.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mala fama

  • 8 mala reputación

    f.
    bad name, disrepute, ill fame, bad reputation.
    * * *
    (n.) = ill-repute, bad repute, bad reputation, ill reputation
    Ex. In olden days, women of ill-repute would put a red light bulb in their front porch light socket.
    Ex. If you want to see a public institution in bad repute, look at the data on how the public views the press.
    Ex. While it is much better to get off to a good start to begin with, there are things that can be done to clean up a bad reputation.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    * * *
    (n.) = ill-repute, bad repute, bad reputation, ill reputation

    Ex: In olden days, women of ill-repute would put a red light bulb in their front porch light socket.

    Ex: If you want to see a public institution in bad repute, look at the data on how the public views the press.
    Ex: While it is much better to get off to a good start to begin with, there are things that can be done to clean up a bad reputation.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mala reputación

  • 9 mendacidad

    f.
    mendacity, untruthfulness (Formal).
    * * *
    1 literal mendacity
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=cualidad) untruthfulness, mendacity frm
    2) (=mentira) untruth
    * * *
    femenino (frml) lying, mendacity (frml)
    * * *
    Ex. In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.
    * * *
    femenino (frml) lying, mendacity (frml)
    * * *

    Ex: In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.

    * * *
    ( frml)
    lying, mendacity ( frml)
    * * *

    mendacidad sustantivo femenino mendacity
    * * *
    Formal mendacity, untruthfulness

    Spanish-English dictionary > mendacidad

  • 10 mentira

    intj.
    that's not true.
    f.
    1 lie.
    es mentira it's not true, it's a lie
    aunque parezca mentira strange as it may seem
    parece mentira que lo hayamos conseguido I can hardly believe we've done it
    parece mentira que te creas una cosa así how can you possibly believe a thing like that?
    ¡parece mentira, las cinco y todavía no ha llegado! can you believe it, it's five o'clock and she's still hasn't arrived!
    de mentira pretend, false
    dinero de mentira pretend money
    una mentira como una casa a whopping great lie
    mentira piadosa white lie
    2 lying, falsehood, unsoundness.
    * * *
    1 lie
    \
    aunque parezca mentira strange though it may seem
    de mentira (en broma) for a laugh, as a joke 2 (artificial) false
    decir mentiras to tell lies
    parece mentira it's unbelievable
    mentira piadosa white lie
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=embuste) lie

    ¡mentira! — it's a lie!

    de mentira, una pistola de mentira — a toy pistol

    parecer mentira, aunque parezca mentira — however incredible it seems, strange though it may seem

    ¡parece mentira! — it's unbelievable!, I can't o don't believe it!

    mentira caritativa, mentira oficiosa Cono Sur

    mentira piadosa, mentira reverenda — Cono Sur white lie

    2) [en uñas] white mark ( on fingernail)
    3) (=errata) erratum
    * * *
    1) lie

    mentira! yo no le pegué — that's a lie, I didn't hit him!

    ya lo he agarrado or pillado en una mentira en varias ocasiones — I've caught him lying to me several times

    una araña de mentira or (Méx) de mentiras — (leng infantil) a toy spider

    una mentira como una casa or catedral or un templo — (fam) a whopping great lie (colloq), a whopper (colloq)

    2) (Esp fam) ( en la uña) white mark
    * * *
    = lie, fabrication, mendacity, fib, fibbing, untruth, false pretence, deceptiveness.
    Ex. Just because the facts don't support his views, he threatens, slanders, lies, obfuscates and charges ' lies, hypocrisy and cruelty'.
    Ex. The author looks at fabrication, falsification and plagiarism in scientific research.
    Ex. In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.
    Ex. Democracy's most acute failures tend to result from power brokers who tell big fibs about the distribution of power.
    Ex. When it comes to fibbing, women are far ahead of their male counterparts, a new survey has revealed.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. That is what he does now, only now there is a lot of palaver and humbug and pretense of deliberation, which the bill proposes to continue, but which everybody can see would be a false pretense.
    Ex. In some cases, public figures are famous because of their lies; in other cases, their renown obscures the universality of deceptiveness.
    ----
    * aunque parezca mentira = amazingly enough, believe it or not, incredibly, incredible though it may seem, incredibly enough, incredible as it may seem, strange though it may seem, strange as it may seem, although it may seem strange, although it may seem incredible.
    * de mentira = make-believe.
    * detector de mentiras = polygraph, lie detector.
    * difundir mentiras = spread + lies.
    * gran mentira = big fat lie.
    * la mentira = lying.
    * maraña de mentiras = web of lies, web of deception.
    * mentira descarada = blatant lie, bare-faced lie.
    * mentira gorda = big fat lie.
    * mentira histórica = historical fabrication.
    * mentira inocente = white lie.
    * mentira piadosa = white lie.
    * por muy mentira que parezca = incredibly, incredible though it may seem, strangely enough, incredibly enough, incredible as it may seem, strange though it may seem, strange as it may seem, although it may seem strange, although it may seem incredible.
    * propagar mentiras = spread + lies.
    * trama de mentiras = tissue of lies.
    * una sarta de mentiras = a sackful of lies, a pack of lies.
    * * *
    1) lie

    mentira! yo no le pegué — that's a lie, I didn't hit him!

    ya lo he agarrado or pillado en una mentira en varias ocasiones — I've caught him lying to me several times

    una araña de mentira or (Méx) de mentiras — (leng infantil) a toy spider

    una mentira como una casa or catedral or un templo — (fam) a whopping great lie (colloq), a whopper (colloq)

    2) (Esp fam) ( en la uña) white mark
    * * *
    = lie, fabrication, mendacity, fib, fibbing, untruth, false pretence, deceptiveness.

    Ex: Just because the facts don't support his views, he threatens, slanders, lies, obfuscates and charges ' lies, hypocrisy and cruelty'.

    Ex: The author looks at fabrication, falsification and plagiarism in scientific research.
    Ex: In light of his ongoing record of mendacity, it is puzzling why anyone would continue to take him seriously.
    Ex: Democracy's most acute failures tend to result from power brokers who tell big fibs about the distribution of power.
    Ex: When it comes to fibbing, women are far ahead of their male counterparts, a new survey has revealed.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: That is what he does now, only now there is a lot of palaver and humbug and pretense of deliberation, which the bill proposes to continue, but which everybody can see would be a false pretense.
    Ex: In some cases, public figures are famous because of their lies; in other cases, their renown obscures the universality of deceptiveness.
    * aunque parezca mentira = amazingly enough, believe it or not, incredibly, incredible though it may seem, incredibly enough, incredible as it may seem, strange though it may seem, strange as it may seem, although it may seem strange, although it may seem incredible.
    * de mentira = make-believe.
    * detector de mentiras = polygraph, lie detector.
    * difundir mentiras = spread + lies.
    * gran mentira = big fat lie.
    * la mentira = lying.
    * maraña de mentiras = web of lies, web of deception.
    * mentira descarada = blatant lie, bare-faced lie.
    * mentira gorda = big fat lie.
    * mentira histórica = historical fabrication.
    * mentira inocente = white lie.
    * mentira piadosa = white lie.
    * por muy mentira que parezca = incredibly, incredible though it may seem, strangely enough, incredibly enough, incredible as it may seem, strange though it may seem, strange as it may seem, although it may seem strange, although it may seem incredible.
    * propagar mentiras = spread + lies.
    * trama de mentiras = tissue of lies.
    * una sarta de mentiras = a sackful of lies, a pack of lies.

    * * *
    A lie
    eso es mentira that's a lie
    ¡mentira! yo no le pegué that's a lie, I didn't hit him!
    estoy harto de tus mentiras I'm tired of your lying o lies
    ¿por qué dices tantas mentiras? why do you tell so many lies?, why do you lie so much?
    ya lo he agarrado or cogido en una mentira en varias ocasiones he's lied to me on several occasions, I've caught him lying several times
    parece mentira que a tu edad te dé por hacer esas tonterías I'm amazed at you getting up to such silly antics at your age
    parece mentira que no haya venido a verme I can't believe that he hasn't been to see me
    llevan casados once años — ¡parece mentira! ¡cómo pasa el tiempo! they've been married eleven years — isn't it incredible! o it hardly seems possible! doesn't time fly!
    aunque parezca mentira tiene 50 años you may find it hard to believe but she's 50
    no quiero seguir viviendo en la mentira I don't want to go on living a lie
    una araña de mentira or ( Méx) de mentiras ( leng infantil); a toy spider
    me ha llamado tonta — ¡pero se lo dije de mentira! or ¡pero fue de mentira! he said I was stupid — I was only joking! o I didn't mean it!
    una mentira como una casa or catedral or un templo ( fam); a whopping great lie ( colloq), a whopper ( colloq)
    Compuesto:
    white lie
    B ( fam) (en la uña) white mark
    * * *

     

    Del verbo mentir: ( conjugate mentir)

    mentirá es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) futuro indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    mentir    
    mentira
    mentir ( conjugate mentir) verbo intransitivo
    to lie;

    mentira sustantivo femenino
    lie;
    eso es mentira that's a lie;
    ¡mentira! yo no le pegué that's a lie, I didn't hit him!;
    ¡parece mentira! ¡cómo pasa el tiempo! isn't it incredible! doesn't time fly!;
    mentira piadosa white lie;
    una araña de mentira or (Méx) de mentiras (leng infantil) a toy spider;
    una mentira como una casa or un templo (fam) a whopping great lie (colloq), a whopper (colloq)
    mentir verbo intransitivo to lie, tell lies
    miente como un bellaco, he's a real liar ➣ Ver nota en lie
    mentira sustantivo femenino lie: mentira piadosa, white lie
    ♦ Locuciones: parecer mentira: aunque parezca mentira, strange as it may seem
    parece mentira que tenga esa edad, it is incredible that he is that old

    ' mentira' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bola
    - camelo
    - decir
    - descarada
    - descarado
    - engaño
    - engendrar
    - falsedad
    - invención
    - inventar
    - novela
    - oír
    - pegote
    - piadosa
    - piadoso
    - tamaña
    - tamaño
    - transparente
    - burdo
    - chiva
    - coba
    - cuento
    - fábula
    - flagrante
    - grande
    - macana
    - mito
    - parecer
    - que
    - rollo
    - solemne
    English:
    barefaced
    - blatant
    - blatantly
    - deceit
    - downright
    - fabrication
    - fall for
    - invention
    - lie
    - lying
    - oddly
    - out-and-out
    - outright
    - story
    - transparent
    - white lie
    - whopper
    - make
    - pretend
    - strangely
    - white
    * * *
    1. [falsedad] lie;
    una mentira como una casa o [m5] una catedral a whopping great lie;
    ¡mentira cochina! that's a filthy lie!;
    siempre soy yo el que tiene que lavar los platos – ¡mentira! I'm always the one who has to wash the dishes – that's not true! o that's a lie!;
    es mentira it's a lie, it's not true;
    decir mentiras to tell lies;
    de mentira pretend, false;
    parecer mentira: aunque parezca mentira strange as it may seem;
    parece mentira que lo hayamos conseguido I can hardly believe we've done it;
    parece mentira que te creas una cosa así how can you possibly believe a thing like that?;
    ¡parece mentira, las cinco y todavía no ha llegado! can you believe it, it's five o'clock and she still hasn't arrived!
    mentira piadosa white lie
    2. Fam [en la uña] white mark
    * * *
    f lie;
    ¡parece mentira! that’s incredible!
    * * *
    : lie
    * * *
    mentira n lie
    de mentira pretend / toy

    Spanish-English dictionary > mentira

  • 11 ocasionar

    v.
    to cause.
    El ácido úrico causa la gota Uric acid causes gout.
    * * *
    1 (causar) to cause, bring about
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to cause
    * * *
    = cause, occasion, precipitate, trigger, bring about, give + cause to, give + rise to, give + occasion to.
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. It was 'exceedingly inconvenient' because placing the books where they are increases the bulk of the catalogue by occasioning a multitude of long crossreferences.
    Ex. What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex. Nevertheless, the fact that these general lists cannot serve for every application has triggered a search for more consistent approaches.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    ----
    * ocasionar estragos = wreak + havoc.
    * ocasionar molestias = cause + disruption.
    * ocasionar problemas = cause + problems.
    * ocasionar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * ocasionar una guerra = precipitate + war.
    * ocasionar un cambio = bring about + change, trigger + change.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to cause
    * * *
    = cause, occasion, precipitate, trigger, bring about, give + cause to, give + rise to, give + occasion to.

    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.

    Ex: It was 'exceedingly inconvenient' because placing the books where they are increases the bulk of the catalogue by occasioning a multitude of long crossreferences.
    Ex: What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex: Nevertheless, the fact that these general lists cannot serve for every application has triggered a search for more consistent approaches.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * ocasionar estragos = wreak + havoc.
    * ocasionar molestias = cause + disruption.
    * ocasionar problemas = cause + problems.
    * ocasionar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * ocasionar una guerra = precipitate + war.
    * ocasionar un cambio = bring about + change, trigger + change.

    * * *
    ocasionar [A1 ]
    vt
    to cause
    su comportamiento me ocasionó grandes problemas his behavior caused o brought me a lot of problems
    espero no ocasionarle demasiadas molestias I do hope it doesn't put you to o cause you too much trouble
    el incendio ocasionó grandes pérdidas the fire caused o ( frml) occasioned severe losses
    * * *

     

    ocasionar ( conjugate ocasionar) verbo transitivo
    to cause
    ocasionar verbo transitivo to cause, bring about
    ' ocasionar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    producir
    - traer
    English:
    bring about
    - inflict
    - occasion
    - rise
    - result
    * * *
    to cause;
    los rumores ocasionaron su dimisión the rumours brought about his resignation;
    no quiero ocasionar molestias I don't want to put you to any trouble
    * * *
    v/t cause
    * * *
    causar: to cause, to occasion
    * * *
    ocasionar vb to cause

    Spanish-English dictionary > ocasionar

  • 12 producir

    v.
    1 to produce (producto, sonido).
    Los carbohidratos producen energía Carbohydrates produce energy.
    Los golpes producen lesiones The blows produce injury.
    Ellos producen galletas They produce cookies.
    El campo produce manzanas The field produces apples.
    2 to cause, to give rise to.
    tu actuación me produce tristeza your conduct makes me very sad
    3 to yield, to bear.
    este negocio produce grandes pérdidas this business is making huge losses
    4 to produce (Cine & television).
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ CONDUCIR], like link=conducir conducir
    1 (gen) to produce
    2 (causar) to cause
    3 (cosecha, fruto) to yield
    1 to happen
    \
    producir en cadena to mass-produce
    * * *
    verb
    1) to produce, yield
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ cereales, fruta, petróleo] to produce
    2) (=fabricar) [+ aceite, coche] to produce, make; [+ electricidad, energía] to produce, generate

    esta factoría ha producido cinco mil vehículos en un mesthis factory has turned out o produced o made five thousand vehicles in a month

    3) [+ cambio, efecto, herida, daños] to cause

    ¿qué impresión te produjo? — what impression did it make on you?

    4) (Econ) [+ interés] to yield; [+ beneficio] to yield, generate

    mis ahorros me producen un interés anual del 5% — my savings yield an annual interest of 5%

    5) (=crear) [+ novela, cuadro] to produce
    6) (Cine, TV) to produce
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) región/país <trigo/tomates/vino> to produce; < petróleo> to produce; persona <trigo/tomates> to produce, grow; <aceite/vino> to produce, make
    b) ( manufacturar) to produce, make
    c) <electricidad/calor/energía> to produce, generate
    d) < sonido> to cause, generate
    2) (Com, Fin) < beneficios> to produce, generate, yield; < pérdidas> to cause, result in
    3) <película/programa> to produce
    4) ( causar) <conmoción/reacción/explosión> to cause
    2.
    producirse v pron
    1) (frml) ( tener lugar) accidente/explosión to occur (frml), to take place; cambio to occur (frml), to happen

    se produjeron 85 muertes — there were 85 deaths, 85 people died o were killed

    2) (refl) (frml) < heridas> to inflict... on oneself (frml)
    * * *
    = author, breed, deliver, generate, get out, give + birth to, output, produce, result (in), spawn, turn out, yield, throw up, effect, realise [realize, -USA], put out, crank out, bring about.
    Ex. Note that these provisions do not include research reports which have been prepared within a government agency but specifically authored by an individual = Nótese que estas disposiciones no afectan a informes de investigaciones procedentes de una agencia gubernamental aunque realizados concretamente por un individuo.
    Ex. The dependence on bosses for recognition, rewards, and advancement breeds an artificiality of relationship, a need to be polite and agreeable.
    Ex. The result could be termed a full-provision data base -- a data base including both text and reference, and delivering much more than the 2 added together.
    Ex. Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex. I suspect that this emphasis reflects the desire to have a simple rule that everybody can apply and therefore get out cataloging data quickly and cheaply.
    Ex. By way of illustration: it is the machine's habit to perform remarkable feats, such as augmenting western musical heritage with the discovery that the eighteenth century gave birth to two contemporary composers.
    Ex. The search profile will only be modified periodically as the quality of the set of notifications output from the search drops to unacceptable levels.
    Ex. The present OCLC system does not produce catalog cards in sets, but if it did it could produce over 6,000 different sets for one title.
    Ex. Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex. Both the original production and revision of STC spawned a large crop of such items which are worth following up.
    Ex. Once it is available, duplicates in large quantities could probably be turned out for a cent apiece beyond the cost of materials.
    Ex. This mixture of approaches is designed to yield maximum retrieval for as many users as possible by combining the different strengths of controlled and natural language indexing.
    Ex. Demands from clients will often throw up an occurrence of similar problems, revealing perhaps the operation of an injustice, the lack of an amenity in the neighbourhood, or simply bureaucratic inefficiency.
    Ex. Historically, the main reasons for unionization have been to effect better wages, fringe benefits, and working conditions.
    Ex. Librarians, information scientists, and keepers of the archives have to realise the meaning of the so-called electronic library (e-library).
    Ex. When such a happy occurrence takes place the publisher can put out extra impressions and can publish (or sell the rights for) a paperback edition for a larger market.
    Ex. Because we have an automated system we can crank out weeding lists on different criteria.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    ----
    * cambio + producirse = change + come about.
    * catástrofe + producirse = disaster + strike.
    * hacer que se produzca una situación = bring about + situation.
    * hacer que se produzca un resultado = bring about + result.
    * producir aglomeraciones = cause + crowding.
    * producir beneficios = reap + dividends, render + returns, achieve + returns, pay + dividends, return + dividends.
    * producir caos = cause + chaos.
    * producir con gran destreza = craft.
    * producir desesperación = yield + despair.
    * producir dividendos = pay + dividends, return + dividends.
    * producir dudas = make + Nombre + doubt.
    * producir el rendimiento máximo = come into + Posesivo + own.
    * producir en abundancia = churn out, knock out.
    * producir hostilidad = arouse + hostility.
    * producir resultado = yield + result.
    * producir resultados = produce + results, bring + results.
    * producirse caos = chaos + result, chaos + arise.
    * producirse un cúmulo de circunstancias que = circumstances + converge.
    * producir un cambio = effect + change, produce + change, trigger + change.
    * que produce ansiedad = anxiety-producing.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) región/país <trigo/tomates/vino> to produce; < petróleo> to produce; persona <trigo/tomates> to produce, grow; <aceite/vino> to produce, make
    b) ( manufacturar) to produce, make
    c) <electricidad/calor/energía> to produce, generate
    d) < sonido> to cause, generate
    2) (Com, Fin) < beneficios> to produce, generate, yield; < pérdidas> to cause, result in
    3) <película/programa> to produce
    4) ( causar) <conmoción/reacción/explosión> to cause
    2.
    producirse v pron
    1) (frml) ( tener lugar) accidente/explosión to occur (frml), to take place; cambio to occur (frml), to happen

    se produjeron 85 muertes — there were 85 deaths, 85 people died o were killed

    2) (refl) (frml) < heridas> to inflict... on oneself (frml)
    * * *
    = author, breed, deliver, generate, get out, give + birth to, output, produce, result (in), spawn, turn out, yield, throw up, effect, realise [realize, -USA], put out, crank out, bring about.

    Ex: Note that these provisions do not include research reports which have been prepared within a government agency but specifically authored by an individual = Nótese que estas disposiciones no afectan a informes de investigaciones procedentes de una agencia gubernamental aunque realizados concretamente por un individuo.

    Ex: The dependence on bosses for recognition, rewards, and advancement breeds an artificiality of relationship, a need to be polite and agreeable.
    Ex: The result could be termed a full-provision data base -- a data base including both text and reference, and delivering much more than the 2 added together.
    Ex: Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex: I suspect that this emphasis reflects the desire to have a simple rule that everybody can apply and therefore get out cataloging data quickly and cheaply.
    Ex: By way of illustration: it is the machine's habit to perform remarkable feats, such as augmenting western musical heritage with the discovery that the eighteenth century gave birth to two contemporary composers.
    Ex: The search profile will only be modified periodically as the quality of the set of notifications output from the search drops to unacceptable levels.
    Ex: The present OCLC system does not produce catalog cards in sets, but if it did it could produce over 6,000 different sets for one title.
    Ex: Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex: Both the original production and revision of STC spawned a large crop of such items which are worth following up.
    Ex: Once it is available, duplicates in large quantities could probably be turned out for a cent apiece beyond the cost of materials.
    Ex: This mixture of approaches is designed to yield maximum retrieval for as many users as possible by combining the different strengths of controlled and natural language indexing.
    Ex: Demands from clients will often throw up an occurrence of similar problems, revealing perhaps the operation of an injustice, the lack of an amenity in the neighbourhood, or simply bureaucratic inefficiency.
    Ex: Historically, the main reasons for unionization have been to effect better wages, fringe benefits, and working conditions.
    Ex: Librarians, information scientists, and keepers of the archives have to realise the meaning of the so-called electronic library (e-library).
    Ex: When such a happy occurrence takes place the publisher can put out extra impressions and can publish (or sell the rights for) a paperback edition for a larger market.
    Ex: Because we have an automated system we can crank out weeding lists on different criteria.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    * cambio + producirse = change + come about.
    * catástrofe + producirse = disaster + strike.
    * hacer que se produzca una situación = bring about + situation.
    * hacer que se produzca un resultado = bring about + result.
    * producir aglomeraciones = cause + crowding.
    * producir beneficios = reap + dividends, render + returns, achieve + returns, pay + dividends, return + dividends.
    * producir caos = cause + chaos.
    * producir con gran destreza = craft.
    * producir desesperación = yield + despair.
    * producir dividendos = pay + dividends, return + dividends.
    * producir dudas = make + Nombre + doubt.
    * producir el rendimiento máximo = come into + Posesivo + own.
    * producir en abundancia = churn out, knock out.
    * producir hostilidad = arouse + hostility.
    * producir resultado = yield + result.
    * producir resultados = produce + results, bring + results.
    * producirse caos = chaos + result, chaos + arise.
    * producirse un cúmulo de circunstancias que = circumstances + converge.
    * producir un cambio = effect + change, produce + change, trigger + change.
    * que produce ansiedad = anxiety-producing.

    * * *
    producir [I6 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹trigo/tomates› to produce, grow; ‹petróleo› to produce; ‹aceite/vino› to produce, make
    2 (manufacturar) to produce, make
    esta fábrica produce 300 coches a la semana this factory produces o makes o manufactures o turns out 300 cars a week
    3 ‹electricidad/calor/energía› to produce, generate
    4 ‹sonido› to produce, cause, generate
    B
    1 ( Com, Fin) ‹beneficios› to produce, generate, yield; ‹pérdidas› to cause, give rise to, result in
    2 «país/club» ‹artista/deportista› to produce
    C ‹película/programa› to produce
    D
    (causar): estas declaraciones produjeron una gran conmoción these statements caused a great stir
    le produjo una gran alegría it made her very happy
    me produjo muy buena impresión I was very impressed with her
    la pomada le produjo un sarpullido the ointment caused a rash o brought her out in a rash
    ver cómo la trata me produce náuseas it makes me sick to see how he treats her
    A ( frml) (tener lugar) «accidente/explosión» to occur ( frml), to take place; «cambio» to occur ( frml), to happen
    se produjeron varios incidentes several incidents occurred o took place
    se produjeron 85 muertes there were 85 deaths, 85 people died o were killed
    durante la operación de rescate se produjeron momentos de histerismo there were moments of panic during the rescue operation
    se ha producido una notable mejora there has been a great improvement
    B ( refl) ( frml); ‹heridas› to inflict … on oneself ( frml)
    se produjo heridas con un objeto cortante she cut herself with o she inflicted wounds on herself with a sharp object
    disparó el arma produciéndose la muerte instantánea he fired the gun, killing himself instantly
    se produjo varias fracturas al caerse he broke several bones o ( frml) incurred several fractures when he fell
    * * *

     

    producir ( conjugate producir) verbo transitivo
    1


    2 ( causar) ‹conmoción/reacción/explosión to cause;

    producirse verbo pronominal
    1 (frml) ( tener lugar) [accidente/explosión] to occur (frml), to take place;
    [ cambio] to occur (frml), to happen;
    se produjeron 85 muertes there were 85 deaths, 85 people died o were killed

    2 ( refl) (frml) ‹ heridasto inflict … on oneself (frml)
    producir verbo transitivo
    1 (bienes) to produce: las vacas producen leche, cows give milk
    2 (ocasionar, causar) el golpe le produjo una sordera crónica, he became chronically deaf as a result of the blow
    (sensaciones, efectos) to cause, generate: la noticia le produjo tristeza, the news made him sad
    3 (una obra artística o audiovisual) to produce
    ' producir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    anquilosar
    - conmocionar
    - criar
    - dar
    - dejar
    - desencadenar
    - embotellar
    - hacer
    - marear
    - sacar
    - saber
    - surtir
    - traer
    - beneficio
    - descomponer
    - echar
    - picar
    - produje
    - rendir
    - serie
    English:
    bash out
    - breed
    - churn out
    - discontinue
    - emit
    - give
    - induce
    - nauseate
    - produce
    - throw up
    - turn out
    - yield
    - back
    - churn
    - commotion
    - create
    - net
    - phase
    - put
    - spawn
    * * *
    vt
    1. [productos agrícolas, recursos naturales] to produce;
    las abejas producen miel bees produce honey
    2. [manufacturar] to produce
    3. [generar] [calor, sonido] to produce
    4. [artista, campeón] to produce;
    un país que ha producido varios campeones mundiales a country which has produced several world champions
    5. [ocasionar] to cause, to give rise to;
    tu actuación me produce tristeza your conduct makes me very sad;
    un medicamento que produce náuseas a medicine which causes nausea;
    no me produjo muy buena impresión it didn't make a very good impression on me
    6. [interés] to yield, to bear;
    este negocio produce grandes pérdidas this business is making huge losses;
    la operación produjo muchas ganancias para el banco the transaction yielded substantial profits for the bank
    7. [en cine, televisión] to produce
    * * *
    v/t
    1 ( crear) produce
    2 ( causar) cause
    * * *
    producir {61} vt
    1) : to produce, to make, to manufacture
    2) : to cause, to bring about
    3) : to bear (interest)
    * * *
    1. (elaborar) to produce
    2. (causar) to cause / to make

    Spanish-English dictionary > producir

  • 13 provocar

    v.
    1 to provoke.
    El golpe provocó su muerte The blow brought about her death.
    Sus comentarios provocaron al borracho His comments provoked the drunk.
    2 to cause, to bring about (causar) (accidente, muerte).
    provocar las iras de alguien to anger somebody
    provocó las risas de todos he made everyone laugh
    el polvo me provoca estornudos dust makes me sneeze
    3 to lead on (excitar sexualmente).
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SACAR], like link=sacar sacar
    1 to provoke
    \
    provocar el parto to induce birth
    provocar un incendio (con intención) to commit arson 2 (sin intención) to cause a fire
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=causar) [+ protesta, explosión] to cause, spark off; [+ fuego] to cause, start (deliberately); [+ cambio] to bring about, lead to; [+ proceso] to promote
    2) [+ parto] to induce, bring on
    3) [+ persona] [gen] to provoke; (=incitar) to rouse, stir up (to anger); (=tentar) to tempt, invite

    ¡no me provoques! — don't start me!

    provocar a algn a cólera o indignación — to rouse sb to fury

    4) [sexualmente] to rouse
    2. VI
    1) LAm (=gustar, apetecer)

    ¿te provoca un café? — would you like a coffee?, do you fancy a coffee?

    ¿qué le provoca? — what would you like?, what do you fancy?

    no me provoca la idea — the idea doesn't appeal to me, I don't fancy the idea

    -¿por qué no vas? -no me provoca — "why aren't you going?" - "I don't feel like it"

    no me provoca estudiar hoy — I'm not in the mood for studying today, I don't feel like studying today

    2) * (=vomitar) to be sick, throw up *
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < explosión> to cause; < incendio> to start; < polémica> to spark off, prompt
    b) (Med)

    provocar el parto — to induce labor*

    2) < persona> ( al enfado) to provoke; ( sexualmente) to lead... on
    2.
    provocar vi (Andes) ( apetecer)

    ¿le provoca un traguito? — do you want a drink?, do you fancy a drink? (BrE colloq)

    * * *
    = provoke, spark off, trigger, induce, bring on, elicit, instigate, tease, evoke, titillate, ignite, rouse, stir up, spark, twit, taunt, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], touch off, set off, hit + a (raw) nerve, strike + a nerve, bring about, precipitate, incite, touch + a (raw) nerve, give + rise to, give + cause to, give + occasion to.
    Ex. 3 different kinds of paper were deacidified by different aqueous and nonaqueous methods, and then treated to provoke accelerated attack of air pollutants.
    Ex. Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex. Nevertheless, the fact that these general lists cannot serve for every application has triggered a search for more consistent approaches.
    Ex. Then, the reference librarian has better justification to buy and perhaps to induce others to contribute to the purchase.
    Ex. In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.
    Ex. This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex. The first mass removal of material was instigated by the trade unions and although admitted in 1932 to have been a mistake, the purges proved difficult to stop.
    Ex. I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex. It is known that in ancient Rome the complexity of the administrative job evoked considerable development of management techniques.
    Ex. However, some of the central premises of the film are flawed, and the risqué touches, whether racial or erotic innuendo, are primarily there to titillate and make the film seem hot and controversial.
    Ex. In turn, that change ignited a body of literature that discussed those cataloguers' future roles.
    Ex. The spirit, if not the content, of Marx can be the joust to rouse the sleepy theory of academic sociology.
    Ex. The goal of this guidebook is to help writers activate their brains to stir up more and better ideas and details.
    Ex. The nineteenth century was, quite rightly, fearful of any system of spreading knowledge which might spark the tinder box of unrest.
    Ex. Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex. The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex. He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex. This decision touched off a battle of wills between the library and the government as well as a blitz of media publicity.
    Ex. The dollar has been losing value, weakening its status as the world's major currency and setting off jitters in the international financial system.
    Ex. Based on their account, it seems obvious that Beauperthuy hit a raw nerve among some of the medical research leaders of the day.
    Ex. His plethoric prose produced by a prodigious placement of words struck a nerve.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex. It is illegal to operate websites inciting terrorism under the Terrorism Act.
    Ex. Obama's election seems to have touched a raw nerve in conservative white America, unleashing a torrent of right-wing rage unseen in this country.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    ----
    * provocar cambios = wreak + changes.
    * provocar controversia = arouse + controversy.
    * provocar el debate = prompt + discussion, spark + debate, stir + debate.
    * provocar escarnio = evoke + response.
    * provocar estragos = create + havoc, wreak + havoc, cause + havoc.
    * provocar estragos en = play + havoc with.
    * provocar la controversia = court + controversy.
    * provocar la ira de Alguien = incur + Posesivo + wrath.
    * provocar menosprecio = evoke + scorn.
    * provocar sospechas = stir + suspicion.
    * provocar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * provocar una guerra = ignite + war, precipitate + war.
    * provocar una protesta = call forth + protest.
    * provocar una reacción = cause + reaction, provoke + reaction.
    * provocar un ataque = provoke + attack.
    * provocar un cambio = bring about + change.
    * provocar un debate = ignite + debate.
    * provocar un diálogo = elicit + dialogue.
    * provocar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * provocar un gran revuelo = set + the cat among the pigeons, put + the cat among the pigeons.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < explosión> to cause; < incendio> to start; < polémica> to spark off, prompt
    b) (Med)

    provocar el parto — to induce labor*

    2) < persona> ( al enfado) to provoke; ( sexualmente) to lead... on
    2.
    provocar vi (Andes) ( apetecer)

    ¿le provoca un traguito? — do you want a drink?, do you fancy a drink? (BrE colloq)

    * * *
    = provoke, spark off, trigger, induce, bring on, elicit, instigate, tease, evoke, titillate, ignite, rouse, stir up, spark, twit, taunt, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], touch off, set off, hit + a (raw) nerve, strike + a nerve, bring about, precipitate, incite, touch + a (raw) nerve, give + rise to, give + cause to, give + occasion to.

    Ex: 3 different kinds of paper were deacidified by different aqueous and nonaqueous methods, and then treated to provoke accelerated attack of air pollutants.

    Ex: Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex: Nevertheless, the fact that these general lists cannot serve for every application has triggered a search for more consistent approaches.
    Ex: Then, the reference librarian has better justification to buy and perhaps to induce others to contribute to the purchase.
    Ex: In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.
    Ex: This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex: The first mass removal of material was instigated by the trade unions and although admitted in 1932 to have been a mistake, the purges proved difficult to stop.
    Ex: I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex: It is known that in ancient Rome the complexity of the administrative job evoked considerable development of management techniques.
    Ex: However, some of the central premises of the film are flawed, and the risqué touches, whether racial or erotic innuendo, are primarily there to titillate and make the film seem hot and controversial.
    Ex: In turn, that change ignited a body of literature that discussed those cataloguers' future roles.
    Ex: The spirit, if not the content, of Marx can be the joust to rouse the sleepy theory of academic sociology.
    Ex: The goal of this guidebook is to help writers activate their brains to stir up more and better ideas and details.
    Ex: The nineteenth century was, quite rightly, fearful of any system of spreading knowledge which might spark the tinder box of unrest.
    Ex: Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex: The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex: He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex: This decision touched off a battle of wills between the library and the government as well as a blitz of media publicity.
    Ex: The dollar has been losing value, weakening its status as the world's major currency and setting off jitters in the international financial system.
    Ex: Based on their account, it seems obvious that Beauperthuy hit a raw nerve among some of the medical research leaders of the day.
    Ex: His plethoric prose produced by a prodigious placement of words struck a nerve.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex: It is illegal to operate websites inciting terrorism under the Terrorism Act.
    Ex: Obama's election seems to have touched a raw nerve in conservative white America, unleashing a torrent of right-wing rage unseen in this country.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * provocar cambios = wreak + changes.
    * provocar controversia = arouse + controversy.
    * provocar el debate = prompt + discussion, spark + debate, stir + debate.
    * provocar escarnio = evoke + response.
    * provocar estragos = create + havoc, wreak + havoc, cause + havoc.
    * provocar estragos en = play + havoc with.
    * provocar la controversia = court + controversy.
    * provocar la ira de Alguien = incur + Posesivo + wrath.
    * provocar menosprecio = evoke + scorn.
    * provocar sospechas = stir + suspicion.
    * provocar una crisis = precipitate + crisis.
    * provocar una guerra = ignite + war, precipitate + war.
    * provocar una protesta = call forth + protest.
    * provocar una reacción = cause + reaction, provoke + reaction.
    * provocar un ataque = provoke + attack.
    * provocar un cambio = bring about + change.
    * provocar un debate = ignite + debate.
    * provocar un diálogo = elicit + dialogue.
    * provocar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * provocar un gran revuelo = set + the cat among the pigeons, put + the cat among the pigeons.

    * * *
    provocar [A2 ]
    vt
    A
    1 (causar, ocasionar) to cause
    un cigarrillo pudo provocar la explosión the explosion may have been caused by a cigarette
    una decisión que ha provocado violentas polémicas a decision which has sparked off o prompted violent controversy
    no se sabe qué provocó el incendio it is not known what started the fire
    2 ( Med):
    provocar el parto to induce labor*
    las pastillas le provocaron una reacción cutánea the pills caused o brought on a skin reaction
    el antígeno provoca la formación de anticuerpos the antigen stimulates the production of antibodies
    B ‹persona›
    1 (al enfado) to provoke
    2 (en sentido sexual) to lead … on
    ■ provocar
    vi
    ( Andes) (apetecer): ¿le provoca un traguito? do you want a drink?, do you fancy a drink? ( BrE colloq)
    ( refl):
    se disparó un tiro provocándose la muerte he shot (and killed) himself
    * * *

     

    provocar ( conjugate provocar) verbo transitivo
    1
    a) explosión to cause;

    incendio to start;
    polémica to spark off, prompt;
    reacción to cause
    b) (Med) ‹ parto to induce

    2 persona› ( al enfado) to provoke;
    ( sexualmente) to lead … on
    verbo intransitivo (Andes) ( apetecer):
    ¿le provoca un traguito? do you want a drink?, do you fancy a drink? (BrE colloq)

    provocar verbo transitivo
    1 (causar) to cause: su decisión fue provocada por..., his decision was prompted by..., provocar un incendio, to start a fire
    2 (un parto, etc) to induce: tuvieron que provocarle el vómito, they had to make her vomit
    3 (irritar, enfadar) to provoke: no lo provoques, don't provoke him
    4 (la ira, etc) to rouse
    (un aplauso) to provoke
    5 (excitar el deseo sexual) to arouse, provoke

    ' provocar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    campanada
    - desatar
    - engendrar
    - hacer
    - motivar
    - organizar
    - pinchar
    - chulear
    - dar
    - meter
    - parto
    - reclamo
    - torear
    English:
    bait
    - bring
    - bring about
    - bring on
    - cause
    - excite
    - fight
    - incur
    - induce
    - instigate
    - invite
    - prompt
    - provoke
    - raise
    - rouse
    - roust
    - short-circuit
    - spark off
    - start
    - stir up
    - tease
    - trigger
    - disturbance
    - draw
    - elicit
    - evoke
    - short
    - spark
    - stir
    - taunt
    - whip
    - wreck
    * * *
    vt
    1. [incitar] to provoke;
    ¡no me provoques! don't provoke me!
    2. [causar] [accidente, muerte] to cause;
    [incendio, rebelión] to start; [sonrisa, burla] to elicit;
    una placa de hielo provocó el accidente the accident was caused by a sheet of black ice;
    provocó las risas de todos he made everyone laugh;
    el polvo me provoca estornudos dust makes me sneeze;
    su actitud me provoca más lástima que otra cosa her attitude makes me pity her more than anything else
    3. [excitar sexualmente] to lead on;
    le gusta provocar a los chicos con su ropa she likes to tease the boys with her clothes
    vi
    Carib, Col, Méx Fam [apetecer]
    ¿te provoca ir al cine? would you like to go to the movies?, Br do you fancy going to the cinema?;
    ¿te provoca un vaso de vino? would you like a glass of wine?, Br do you fancy a glass of wine?;
    ¿qué te provoca? what would you like to do?, Br what do you fancy doing?
    * * *
    v/t
    1 cause
    2 el enfado provoke
    3 sexualmente lead on
    4 parto induce
    5
    :
    ¿te provoca un café? S.Am. how about a coffee?
    * * *
    provocar {72} vt
    1) causar: to provoke, to cause
    2) irritar: to provoke, to pique
    * * *
    1. (en general) to cause
    2. (incendio) to start
    3. (una persona) to provoke

    Spanish-English dictionary > provocar

  • 14 suscitar

    v.
    1 to give rise to.
    2 to provoke, to bring about, to arouse, to cause to happen.
    * * *
    1 (gen) to cause, provoke
    2 (rebelión) to stir up, arouse; (discusión) to start; (problemas) to cause, raise; (interés) to arouse
    * * *
    verb
    to provoke, arise
    * * *
    VT [+ rebelión] to stir up; [+ escándalo, conflicto] to cause, provoke; [+ discusión] to start; [+ duda, problema] to raise; [+ interés, sospechas] to arouse; [+ consecuencia] to cause, give rise to, bring with it
    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml) <curiosidad/interés> to arouse; < dudas> to raise; <escándalo/polémica> to provoke, cause; < debate> to give rise to
    * * *
    = fuel, spark off, whip up, elicit, spark, give + rise to, conjure up, arouse, bring about, give + cause to, give + occasion to.
    Ex. This is in line with recent trends in the historical sciences generally fuelled by the feeling that in the past historians did not pay enough attention to what is, after all, the majority of humanity.
    Ex. Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex. The ALA and some of its members seem to have taken in upon themselves to whip up a frenzy of public relations style fantasy that market reality simply cannot match.
    Ex. This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex. The nineteenth century was, quite rightly, fearful of any system of spreading knowledge which might spark the tinder box of unrest.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex. The appearance of this volume aroused such a furor within and without the British Museum that further publication of the catalog was suspended.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    ----
    * suscitar controversia = arouse + controversy.
    * suscitar crítica = arouse + criticism, raise + criticism.
    * suscitar duda = shed + doubt.
    * suscitar dudas = raise + doubts.
    * suscitar el debate = spark + debate, spark + discussion, stir + debate.
    * suscitar el diálogo = spark + dialogue.
    * suscitar la curiosidad = excite + attention.
    * suscitar la discusión = spark + discussion.
    * suscitar la polémica = spark + controversy.
    * suscitar una cuestión = evoke + issue, open up + issue.
    * suscitar una pregunta = raise + question.
    * suscitar una respuesta = evoke + response, elicit + response.
    * suscitar una sugerencia = elicit + suggestion.
    * suscitar un comentario = elicit + comment.
    * suscitar un debate = arouse + discussion, debate + surface, raise + debate.
    * suscitar un diálogo = elicit + dialogue.
    * suscitar un problema = provoke + problem, raise + problem, raise + concern.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml) <curiosidad/interés> to arouse; < dudas> to raise; <escándalo/polémica> to provoke, cause; < debate> to give rise to
    * * *
    = fuel, spark off, whip up, elicit, spark, give + rise to, conjure up, arouse, bring about, give + cause to, give + occasion to.

    Ex: This is in line with recent trends in the historical sciences generally fuelled by the feeling that in the past historians did not pay enough attention to what is, after all, the majority of humanity.

    Ex: Like the librarians and the bookshop staff, the club members are catalysts who spark off that fission which will spread from child to child an awareness of books and the habit of reading them.
    Ex: The ALA and some of its members seem to have taken in upon themselves to whip up a frenzy of public relations style fantasy that market reality simply cannot match.
    Ex: This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex: The nineteenth century was, quite rightly, fearful of any system of spreading knowledge which might spark the tinder box of unrest.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex: The appearance of this volume aroused such a furor within and without the British Museum that further publication of the catalog was suspended.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * suscitar controversia = arouse + controversy.
    * suscitar crítica = arouse + criticism, raise + criticism.
    * suscitar duda = shed + doubt.
    * suscitar dudas = raise + doubts.
    * suscitar el debate = spark + debate, spark + discussion, stir + debate.
    * suscitar el diálogo = spark + dialogue.
    * suscitar la curiosidad = excite + attention.
    * suscitar la discusión = spark + discussion.
    * suscitar la polémica = spark + controversy.
    * suscitar una cuestión = evoke + issue, open up + issue.
    * suscitar una pregunta = raise + question.
    * suscitar una respuesta = evoke + response, elicit + response.
    * suscitar una sugerencia = elicit + suggestion.
    * suscitar un comentario = elicit + comment.
    * suscitar un debate = arouse + discussion, debate + surface, raise + debate.
    * suscitar un diálogo = elicit + dialogue.
    * suscitar un problema = provoke + problem, raise + problem, raise + concern.

    * * *
    suscitar [A1 ]
    vt
    ( frml); ‹curiosidad/interés› to arouse; ‹dudas› to raise; ‹escándalo/polémica› to provoke, cause
    suscitó un acalorado debate it gave rise to a heated debate
    * * *

    suscitar vtr (originar) to cause, arouse: su postura suscitará polémica, his attitude will provoke controversy
    ' suscitar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    decir
    - imponer
    - infundir
    - intrigar
    - llamar
    - tinta
    - interesar
    English:
    excite
    - antagonize
    - draw
    - raise
    - rise
    - spark
    * * *
    [discusión] to give rise to; [dificultades] to cause, to create; [interés, simpatía, sospechas] to arouse; [dudas] to raise
    * * *
    v/t enojo arouse; polémica generate; escándalo provoke
    * * *
    : to provoke, to give rise to

    Spanish-English dictionary > suscitar

  • 15 infundio

    m.
    1 untruth, lie (Formal).
    2 malicious story, lie, false and ill-intentioned story, false report.
    * * *
    1 untruth
    ¡eso no son más que infundios! that is nothing but a pack of lies!
    * * *
    SM (=mentira) fib; (=cuento malicioso) malicious story
    * * *
    masculino malicious story, lie, false rumor*
    * * *
    masculino malicious story, lie, false rumor*
    * * *
    malicious story, lie, false rumor*
    * * *

    Del verbo infundir: ( conjugate infundir)

    infundió es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    infundio    
    infundir
    infundir ( conjugate infundir) verbo transitivoconfianza/respeto to inspire;
    sospechas to arouse;

    para infundioles ánimo to give them encouragement
    infundio sustantivo masculino lie, fib, malicious rumour: todo eran infundios destinados a crear un ambiente hostil hacia él, they were all malicious rumours designed to turn everyone against him
    infundir verbo transitivo (suscitar, inspirar) to instil, US to instill
    infundir valor, to instil courage

    * * *
    Formal untruth, lie
    * * *
    m unfounded rumor, Br
    unfounded rumour
    * * *
    : false story, lie, tall tale
    todo eso son infundios: that's a pack of lies

    Spanish-English dictionary > infundio

  • 16 falsedad

    • absurdity
    • deceit
    • false remark
    • falsehood
    • falseness
    • falsity
    • fraud
    • lie
    • meretriciousness
    • spuriousness
    • take in
    • truthlessness
    • unsoundness
    • untrue remark
    • untruth
    • untruthfulness

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > falsedad

  • 17 mentira

    • falsehood
    • fib
    • lie
    • that's not to say
    • that's not true at all
    • untruth

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > mentira

См. также в других словарях:

  • Untruth — Un*truth , n. 1. The quality of being untrue; contrariety to truth; want of veracity; also, treachery; faithlessness; disloyalty. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is untrue; a false assertion; a falsehood; a lie; also, an act of treachery or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • untruth — index canard, deceit, deception, defamation, dishonesty, false pretense, falsehood, fiction, figment …   Law dictionary

  • untruth — O.E. untreowþ unfaithfulness, from UN (Cf. un ) (1) not + TRUTH (Cf. truth). Cf. O.N. utrygð. Meaning falsehood is attested from mid 15c., as is that of a lie …   Etymology dictionary

  • untruth — *lie, falsehood, fib, misrepresentation, story Analogous words: mendaciousness or mendacity, dishonesty, deceit fulness (see corresponding adjectives at DISHONEST): equivocation, tergiversation (see AMBIGUITY) Antonyms: truth Contrasted words:… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • untruth — [untro͞oth′] n. [ME untrouthe < OE untreowth < un , not + treowth,TRUTH] 1. the quality or state of being untrue; falsity 2. an untrue statement; falsehood; lie 3. Obs. unfaithfulness or disloyalty …   English World dictionary

  • Untruth — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Untruth >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 untruth untruth falsehood lie story thing that is not fib bounce crammer taradiddle whopper Sgm: N 1 jhuth jhuth GRP: N 2 …   English dictionary for students

  • untruth — n. to tell an untruth * * * [ʌn truːθ] to tell an untruth …   Combinatory dictionary

  • untruth — [[t]ʌ̱ntru͟ːðz[/t]] untruths N VAR An untruth is a lie. [FORMAL] The Advertising Standards Authority accused estate agents of using blatant untruths... I have never uttered one word of untruth. Syn: falsehood, lie …   English dictionary

  • untruth — noun 1) a patent untruth Syn: lie, falsehood, fib, fabrication, invention, falsification, half truth, exaggeration; story, myth, piece of fiction; informal tall story, fairy tale, cock and bull story, whopper 2) the total unt …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • untruth — UK [ʌnˈtruːθ] / US [ʌnˈtruθ] noun [countable] Word forms untruth : singular untruth plural untruths formal a lie There are many untruths written about him …   English dictionary

  • untruth — n. (pl. untruths) 1 the state of being untrue, falsehood. 2 a false statement (told me an untruth). Etymology: OE untreowth etc. (as UN (1), TRUTH) …   Useful english dictionary

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