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greater

  • 1 > (símbolo de mayor-que)

    = greater-than symbol (>), right angled bracket (>).
    Ex. Discontinued search results are reported, preceded by a 'greater-than' symbol (>).
    Ex. If the reference heading consists of a variant heading, each uniform heading is preceded by a greater-than sign or right angled bracket (>).
    ----
    = greater-than sign (>).
    Ex. If the reference heading consist of a variant heading, each uniform heading is preceded by a greater-than sign or right angled bracket (>).

    Spanish-English dictionary > > (símbolo de mayor-que)

  • 2 Antillas

    f.pl.
    West Indies, WI, Antilles.
    * * *
    1 West Indies, Antilles
    \
    Grandes Antillas Greater Antilles
    Pequeñas Antillas Lesser Antilles
    * * *
    SFPL Antilles, West Indies

    el mar de las Antillas — the Caribbean, the Caribbean Sea

    * * *
    femenino plural
    * * *
    ----
    * Antillas, Las = West Indies, the.
    * * *
    femenino plural
    * * *
    * Antillas, Las = West Indies, the.
    * * *
    las Antillas the West Indies
    Compuesto:
    Antillas Mayores/Menores
    Greater/Lesser Antilles
    * * *

    Antillas sustantivo femenino plural:

    Antillas fpl West Indies

    ' Antillas' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    mar
    English:
    Antilles
    - West Indies
    - Caribbean
    - west
    * * *
    Antillas nfpl
    las Antillas the West Indies
    las Antillas Holandesas the Dutch Antilles
    * * *
    fpl West Indies;
    Grandes/Pequeñas Antillas Greater/Lesser Antilles

    Spanish-English dictionary > Antillas

  • 3 Gigabytes

    Ex. Data storage for microcomputers will be raised to greater heights by the development of the video disc, and particularly the digital optical disc, which can store up to 2 Gigabytes, or 2 thousand million characters.
    * * *

    Ex: Data storage for microcomputers will be raised to greater heights by the development of the video disc, and particularly the digital optical disc, which can store up to 2 Gigabytes, or 2 thousand million characters.

    Spanish-English dictionary > Gigabytes

  • 4 Inglaterra

    f.
    England.
    * * *
    1 England
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino England
    * * *
    = England, south of the border.
    Ex. The London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER) is an organisation for library co-operation within Greater London, and various counties in the South East of England.
    Ex. Scots living in England and Wales are twice as likely to die of alcohol-related conditions as those born south of the border.
    ----
    * Iglesia de Inglaterra, la = Church of England, the.
    * Inglaterra de la época victoriana = Victorian England.
    * Inglaterra del período Isabelino = Elizabethan England.
    * Inglaterra victoriana = Victorian England.
    * Nueva Inglaterra = New England.
    * * *
    femenino England
    * * *
    = England, south of the border.

    Ex: The London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER) is an organisation for library co-operation within Greater London, and various counties in the South East of England.

    Ex: Scots living in England and Wales are twice as likely to die of alcohol-related conditions as those born south of the border.
    * Iglesia de Inglaterra, la = Church of England, the.
    * Inglaterra de la época victoriana = Victorian England.
    * Inglaterra del período Isabelino = Elizabethan England.
    * Inglaterra victoriana = Victorian England.
    * Nueva Inglaterra = New England.

    * * *
    England
    * * *

    Inglaterra sustantivo femenino
    England
    Inglaterra sustantivo femenino England
    ' Inglaterra' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    inglés
    English:
    all
    - common
    - England
    - long
    - opposing
    - versus
    - behind
    - eastern
    - glimpse
    - Lake District
    - northern
    - pilgrim
    * * *
    England
    * * *
    f England

    Spanish-English dictionary > Inglaterra

  • 5 LASER2 (Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste)

    Ex. The London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER) is an organisation for library co-operation within Greater London, and various counties in the South East of England.

    Spanish-English dictionary > LASER2 (Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste)

  • 6 Londres

    m.
    1 London.
    2 Outer London.
    * * *
    1 London
    * * *
    * * *
    masculino London
    * * *
    = London.
    Ex. French technology was inadequate for the further development of Robert's machine, however, and Didot, who had an English brother-in-law, brought the model to London in 1801, where he secured the backing of the brothers Henry and Sealy Fourdrinier, wholesale stationers.
    ----
    * área metropolitana de Londres, el = Greater London.
    * centro de Londres = Inner London.
    * City de Londres, la = the City.
    * condados de alrededor de Londres, los = home counties, the.
    * conurbación de Londres, la = Greater London.
    * Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste (LASER) = London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER).
    * * *
    masculino London
    * * *

    Ex: French technology was inadequate for the further development of Robert's machine, however, and Didot, who had an English brother-in-law, brought the model to London in 1801, where he secured the backing of the brothers Henry and Sealy Fourdrinier, wholesale stationers.

    * área metropolitana de Londres, el = Greater London.
    * centro de Londres = Inner London.
    * City de Londres, la = the City.
    * condados de alrededor de Londres, los = home counties, the.
    * conurbación de Londres, la = Greater London.
    * Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste (LASER) = London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER).

    * * *
    London
    * * *

    Londres sustantivo masculino
    London
    Londres sustantivo femenino London
    ' Londres' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ir
    - tirarse
    - andar
    - distancia
    - domicilio
    - estar
    - propiamente
    - telefonear
    English:
    central
    - city
    - Cockney
    - connected
    - flat
    - go
    - have
    - leave behind
    - LIBOR
    - lie
    - London
    - previous
    - pros and cons
    - put in
    - should
    - some
    - west
    - Downing Street
    - east
    - ever
    - home
    - not
    - other
    - outside
    - since
    - when
    * * *
    London
    * * *
    m London

    Spanish-English dictionary > Londres

  • 7 Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste (LASER)

    Ex. The London and South Eastern Library Region (LASER) is an organisation for library co-operation within Greater London, and various counties in the South East of England.

    Spanish-English dictionary > Región Bibliotecaria de Londres y el Sudeste (LASER)

  • 8 Santiago

    m.
    1 St.
    2 A middling sort of linen manufactured in Santiago.
    3 James, Saint James the Apostle.
    * * *
    * * *
    I Santiago (de Chile)
    masculino Santiago
    II Santiago (de Compostela)
    masculino Santiago (de Compostela)
    * * *
    ----
    * remover Roma con Santiago = move + heaven and earth.
    * * *
    I Santiago (de Chile)
    masculino Santiago
    II Santiago (de Compostela)
    masculino Santiago (de Compostela)
    * * *
    * remover Roma con Santiago = move + heaven and earth.
    * * *
    ( Bib) James
    Compuesto:
    Santiago Apóstol or el Mayor
    St James (the Greater)
    Santiago
    Santiago de Compostela, Santiago camino
    * * *
    Santiago1 n pr
    St James
    Santiago de Chile Santiago;
    Santiago de Compostela Santiago de Compostela;
    Santiago de Cuba Santiago de Cuba

    Spanish-English dictionary > Santiago

  • 9 a ambos lados de + Lugar

    = on both sides of + Lugar
    Ex. This goal was achieved to a greater or a lesser extent on both sides of the Alps.
    * * *
    = on both sides of + Lugar

    Ex: This goal was achieved to a greater or a lesser extent on both sides of the Alps.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a ambos lados de + Lugar

  • 10 a la larga

    in the long run
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    = in the long term, over the long term, in the end, eventually, for the long pull, over a period of time, over the long haul, in the far term, ultimately, by and by
    Ex. For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.
    Ex. This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex. This is time well invested since it saves money in the end and leads to a higher success rate in providing information = Éste es tiempo bien invertido ya que ahorra dinero en última instancia y permite ofrecer una información mucho más pertinente para el usuario.
    Ex. Eventually this work on citation orders came to fruition in the rather unlikely context of a new indexing systems, PRECIS.
    Ex. Thus, the public library in this country for the next few years and for the long pull may be presented with a first-rate opportunity for greater service to its community by defining its service with reference to some qualitative standards.
    Ex. The vibration may cause the chips to work loose over a period of time, and if they have to be pushed back into their sockets, it is very easy to bend or break one of the 'legs'.
    Ex. But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex. In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex. Moreover, these entries must ultimately direct the searcher to his desired specific subject in the classified file.
    Ex. By and by Tom's reading and dreaming about princely life wrought such a strong effect upon him that he began to act the prince unconsciously.
    * * *
    = in the long term, over the long term, in the end, eventually, for the long pull, over a period of time, over the long haul, in the far term, ultimately, by and by

    Ex: For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.

    Ex: This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex: This is time well invested since it saves money in the end and leads to a higher success rate in providing information = Éste es tiempo bien invertido ya que ahorra dinero en última instancia y permite ofrecer una información mucho más pertinente para el usuario.
    Ex: Eventually this work on citation orders came to fruition in the rather unlikely context of a new indexing systems, PRECIS.
    Ex: Thus, the public library in this country for the next few years and for the long pull may be presented with a first-rate opportunity for greater service to its community by defining its service with reference to some qualitative standards.
    Ex: The vibration may cause the chips to work loose over a period of time, and if they have to be pushed back into their sockets, it is very easy to bend or break one of the 'legs'.
    Ex: But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex: In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex: Moreover, these entries must ultimately direct the searcher to his desired specific subject in the classified file.
    Ex: By and by Tom's reading and dreaming about princely life wrought such a
    strong effect upon him that he began to act the prince unconsciously
    .

    Spanish-English dictionary > a la larga

  • 11 a su vez

    in turn
    * * *
    = Verbo + further, in turn, in its/their turn
    Ex. Main classes are divided into subclasses which are further subdivided into form, place, time and subject aspects.
    Ex. However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.
    Ex. And because the teller is sharing something of himself, the children in their turn respond by wanting to share something of themselves in the same way.
    * * *
    = Verbo + further, in turn, in its/their turn

    Ex: Main classes are divided into subclasses which are further subdivided into form, place, time and subject aspects.

    Ex: However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.
    Ex: And because the teller is sharing something of himself, the children in their turn respond by wanting to share something of themselves in the same way.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a su vez

  • 12 abolir

    v.
    to abolish.
    * * *
    1 to abolish Table 1 NOTA Used only in forms which include the letter i in their endings: abolía, aboliré, aboliendo, etc /Table 1
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to abolish
    * * *
    = overturn, abolish, sunset.
    Ex. However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.
    Ex. Who knows? If we can abolish the card catalogue and replace it with some form more acceptable to library users, they may even begin to use library catalogues!.
    Ex. It's instructive to remember just how passionately the media hyped the dangers of ' sunsetting' the ban.
    ----
    * abolir la segregación racial = desegregate.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to abolish
    * * *
    = overturn, abolish, sunset.

    Ex: However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.

    Ex: Who knows? If we can abolish the card catalogue and replace it with some form more acceptable to library users, they may even begin to use library catalogues!.
    Ex: It's instructive to remember just how passionately the media hyped the dangers of ' sunsetting' the ban.
    * abolir la segregación racial = desegregate.

    * * *
    abolir [ I32 ]
    vt
    to abolish
    * * *

    abolir ( conjugate abolir) verbo transitivo
    to abolish
    abolir vtr defect to abolish
    ' abolir' also found in these entries:
    English:
    abolish
    - do away with
    - do
    * * *
    abolir vt
    to abolish
    * * *
    v/t abolish
    * * *
    abolir {1} vt
    derogar: to abolish, to repeal
    * * *
    abolir vb to abolish

    Spanish-English dictionary > abolir

  • 13 abrir la boca

    (v.) = open + Posesivo + mouth
    Ex. These people usually do not realize that it often takes greater strength of character and heroic self-discipline to refrain from changing feet every time one opens one's mouth.
    * * *
    (v.) = open + Posesivo + mouth

    Ex: These people usually do not realize that it often takes greater strength of character and heroic self-discipline to refrain from changing feet every time one opens one's mouth.

    Spanish-English dictionary > abrir la boca

  • 14 acicalar

    v.
    1 to do up.
    2 to embellish, to dress, to brush up, to adorn.
    * * *
    1 to smarten up
    1 to dress up, smarten up
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ persona] to dress up, bedeck
    2) [+ metal] to polish, burnish, shine
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    = spruce up, embellish, tart up, groom, smarten up, smarten.
    Ex. The city itself has also been spruced up for the centenary, with in particular a thorough refurbishment of the city's main street = A la propia ciudad se le ha dado un lavado de cara para el centenario, especialmente con una completa remodelación de la avenida principal.
    Ex. In industrial societies even the poorest people acquire artefacts to embellish their surroundings; such 'bric-a-brac' may in some cases be the detritus of a previous age or a more affluent environment, and in some cases is destined to become 'collectable' in time to come.
    Ex. Car manufacturers are also tarting up their vehicles with all sorts of things that distract you from watching the road.
    Ex. Never has there been a greater interest in grooming pubic hair than there is today.
    Ex. Smarten up your kitchen with this handy wooden kitchen roll holder.
    Ex. Whereas a couple of generations ago an antique chair might have been smartened by the addition of yet another coat of paint, now those same layers of paint are being removed.
    * * *
    = spruce up, embellish, tart up, groom, smarten up, smarten.

    Ex: The city itself has also been spruced up for the centenary, with in particular a thorough refurbishment of the city's main street = A la propia ciudad se le ha dado un lavado de cara para el centenario, especialmente con una completa remodelación de la avenida principal.

    Ex: In industrial societies even the poorest people acquire artefacts to embellish their surroundings; such 'bric-a-brac' may in some cases be the detritus of a previous age or a more affluent environment, and in some cases is destined to become 'collectable' in time to come.
    Ex: Car manufacturers are also tarting up their vehicles with all sorts of things that distract you from watching the road.
    Ex: Never has there been a greater interest in grooming pubic hair than there is today.
    Ex: Smarten up your kitchen with this handy wooden kitchen roll holder.
    Ex: Whereas a couple of generations ago an antique chair might have been smartened by the addition of yet another coat of paint, now those same layers of paint are being removed.

    * * *
    vt
    to do up, to spruce up
    * * *
    1) pulir: to polish
    2) : to dress up, to adorn

    Spanish-English dictionary > acicalar

  • 15 acosar

    v.
    1 to pursue relentlessly.
    2 to harass.
    3 to besiege, to irritate, to nag, to accost.
    El policía persigue a Ricardo The policeman persecutes=harasses Richard.
    * * *
    1 to pursue, chase
    \
    acosar a preguntas to bombard with questions
    * * *
    verb
    to harass, hound
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=atosigar) to hound, harass

    ser acosado sexualmente — to suffer (from) sexual harassment, be sexually harassed

    2) (=perseguir) to pursue relentlessly; [+ animal] to urge on
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
    Ex. For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex. I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex. Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex. The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex. The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex. Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex. Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex. This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex. Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex. And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    ----
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.

    Ex: For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex: I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex: Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex: The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex: The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex: Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex: Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex: This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex: Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex: And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex: So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.

    * * *
    acosar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to hound
    lo acosan sus acreedores his creditors are hounding him o are after him
    un compañero que la acosaba sexualmente a colleague who was sexually harassing her
    se ven acosados por el hambre y las enfermedades they are beset by hunger and disease
    me acosaron con preguntas sobre su paradero they plagued o bombarded me with questions regarding his whereabouts
    2 ‹presa› to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *

     

    acosar ( conjugate acosar) verbo transitivo
    a) persona to hound;

    ( sexualmente) to harass;
    me acosaron con preguntas they plagued o bombarded me with questions


    acosar verbo transitivo
    1 to harass
    2 fig (asediar) to pester: la oposición acosó al Presidente del Gobierno con sus preguntas, the opposition pestered the Prime Minister with questions
    ' acosar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arrinconar
    - asediar
    - hostigar
    English:
    assault
    - beset
    - harass
    - hound
    - mob
    - molest
    - persecute
    - plague
    - ply
    - stalk
    - bait
    - goad
    - harry
    - worry
    * * *
    acosar, Méx acosijar vt
    1. [perseguir] to pursue relentlessly
    2. [hostigar] to harass;
    lo acosaron a o [m5] con preguntas they fired questions at him;
    fue acosada sexualmente en el trabajo she was sexually harassed at work
    * * *
    v/t hound, pursue;
    me acosaron a preguntas they bombarded me with questions
    * * *
    acosar vt
    perseguir: to pursue, to hound, to harass

    Spanish-English dictionary > acosar

  • 16 adaptabilidad

    f.
    1 adaptability, adjustment to environmental conditions.
    2 adjustability.
    3 compliance, distensibility of a hollow organ.
    * * *
    1 adaptability
    * * *
    SF adaptability, versatility
    * * *
    femenino adaptability
    * * *
    = adaptability, versatility, flexibility.
    Ex. The duration of the cycle varies markedly from institution to institution, dependent upon the adaptability of the institutional structure to challenge and change.
    Ex. In our fascination with the versatility of certain tools, we should not forget the ends to which they are to be applied.
    Ex. New automated production systems allow greater flexibility, more economic throughput.
    * * *
    femenino adaptability
    * * *
    = adaptability, versatility, flexibility.

    Ex: The duration of the cycle varies markedly from institution to institution, dependent upon the adaptability of the institutional structure to challenge and change.

    Ex: In our fascination with the versatility of certain tools, we should not forget the ends to which they are to be applied.
    Ex: New automated production systems allow greater flexibility, more economic throughput.

    * * *
    adaptability
    * * *
    adaptability
    * * *
    f adaptability

    Spanish-English dictionary > adaptabilidad

  • 17 adentrarse

    pron.v.
    to penetrate, to enter, to get inside, to go inside.
    El grupo se internó en la selva The group penetrated into the jungle.
    * * *
    1 (penetrar) to penetrate (en, into), enter deep (en, into)
    2 figurado (profundizar) to go deeply (en, into), study thoroughly (en, -), delve (en, into)
    * * *
    VPR

    adentrarse en — to go into, get inside; (=penetrar) to penetrate into

    * * *
    verbo pronominal

    adentrarse en algoen el mar/túnel to go deep into something; en tema/materia to go into something in more depth

    * * *
    (v.) = tread into
    Ex. This seems to suggest that Schopenhauer may have trodden much further into the mystics' domain than he is willing to admit.
    * * *
    verbo pronominal

    adentrarse en algoen el mar/túnel to go deep into something; en tema/materia to go into something in more depth

    * * *
    (v.) = tread into

    Ex: This seems to suggest that Schopenhauer may have trodden much further into the mystics' domain than he is willing to admit.

    * * *
    adentrarse [A1 ]
    adentrarse EN algo:
    a medida que la carretera se adentra en las montañas as the road goes up into the mountains
    según nos adentrábamos en la selva as we went deeper into the jungle
    nos adentraremos en este tema más tarde we will go into this subject in more depth o in greater detail later
    intentar adentrarse en las profundidades de la mente humana to try to penetrate the recesses of the human mind
    * * *

    adentrarse verbo reflexivo
    1 (internarse en un bosque, etc) to go deep [en, into]
    2 (profundizar en un tema) to go into, to study thoroughly [en, -]
    ' adentrarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    internar
    English:
    penetrate
    * * *
    1.
    adentrarse en [jungla, barrio] to go deep into;
    se adentraron en el laberinto they went further o deeper inside the labyrinth
    2.
    adentrarse en [asunto] to study in depth;
    en su estudio intenta adentrarse en la mentalidad del criminal in her study she attempts to get inside the mind of the criminal;
    prefiero no adentrarme en un asunto tan polémico I'd rather not go into such a controversial issue
    * * *
    v/r tb fig
    go deep (en into); en tema go into (in depth)
    * * *
    adentrarse en : to go into, to penetrate

    Spanish-English dictionary > adentrarse

  • 18 adquirir importancia

    (v.) = assume + importance, attain + importance, come up, take on + added weight, gain + significance, move up + the agenda, gain + importance, gain in + importance
    Ex. A topic such as metal fatigue assumed a new importance in the 1950s as the unexpected cause of at least two major disasters.
    Ex. However, it doesn't take very long before the supporting machine file attains greater importance than the manual catalog.
    Ex. Do you feel that we should stay with our old number-crunching, inefficient system or switch to voice transmission, which seems to be coming up fairly fast?.
    Ex. This basic principle of marketing takes on added weight when applied to US Federal information programmes in the light of their instrumental value = Este principio básico del marketing cobrar importancia cuando se aplica a los programas de información federal americanos a la vista de su valor instrumental.
    Ex. It was not until the 16th century that falconry and stag hunting gained the significance that it retained until 1789.
    Ex. Concerns about trafficking in arms has moved rapidly up the international agenda.
    Ex. The effective use of library resources is critical to the success of international students, a group which is gaining importance in US higher education.
    Ex. Since most of these Muslims are here to stay, the question of their integration is gaining in importance.
    * * *
    (v.) = assume + importance, attain + importance, come up, take on + added weight, gain + significance, move up + the agenda, gain + importance, gain in + importance

    Ex: A topic such as metal fatigue assumed a new importance in the 1950s as the unexpected cause of at least two major disasters.

    Ex: However, it doesn't take very long before the supporting machine file attains greater importance than the manual catalog.
    Ex: Do you feel that we should stay with our old number-crunching, inefficient system or switch to voice transmission, which seems to be coming up fairly fast?.
    Ex: This basic principle of marketing takes on added weight when applied to US Federal information programmes in the light of their instrumental value = Este principio básico del marketing cobrar importancia cuando se aplica a los programas de información federal americanos a la vista de su valor instrumental.
    Ex: It was not until the 16th century that falconry and stag hunting gained the significance that it retained until 1789.
    Ex: Concerns about trafficking in arms has moved rapidly up the international agenda.
    Ex: The effective use of library resources is critical to the success of international students, a group which is gaining importance in US higher education.
    Ex: Since most of these Muslims are here to stay, the question of their integration is gaining in importance.

    Spanish-English dictionary > adquirir importancia

  • 19 ahondar

    v.
    to deepen.
    * * *
    1 (hacer profundo) to deepen, make deeper
    1 to go deep
    2 (investigar) to examine
    * * *
    1.
    VT to deepen, make deeper
    2.
    VI

    ahondar en — to study thoroughly, explore

    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo to go into (greater) detail

    ahondar en algo< en tema> to look at something in (greater) detail o in depth; < en problema> to examine something in (greater) detail

    2.
    ahondar vt < pozo> to make... deeper
    * * *
    = dig + deep, dig + deep beneath the surface.
    Ex. Are we prepared to dig deep into our well of humanity & humility in order to uplift ourselves?.
    Ex. Her central themes are still love and sex, but she digs deeper beneath the surface to examine the gray areas of moral responsibility and gender relations.
    ----
    * ahondar en = delve into.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo to go into (greater) detail

    ahondar en algo< en tema> to look at something in (greater) detail o in depth; < en problema> to examine something in (greater) detail

    2.
    ahondar vt < pozo> to make... deeper
    * * *
    = dig + deep, dig + deep beneath the surface.

    Ex: Are we prepared to dig deep into our well of humanity & humility in order to uplift ourselves?.

    Ex: Her central themes are still love and sex, but she digs deeper beneath the surface to examine the gray areas of moral responsibility and gender relations.
    * ahondar en = delve into.

    * * *
    ahondar [A1 ]
    vi
    to go into (greater) detail ahondar EN algo:
    en la próxima clase ahondaremos en este tema we will look at this subject in (greater) detail o in depth in the next class
    mencionó una serie de problemas sin ahondar en ninguno he touched on a series of problems without examining any of them in detail o going into any of them in depth
    ■ ahondar
    vt
    ‹pozo› to make … deeper
    * * *

    ahondar
    I verbo transitivo to deepen
    II verbo intransitivo to go deep
    figurado ahondar en un tema, to go into a subject in depth
    ' ahondar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    deepen
    - deep
    - delve
    * * *
    vt
    [hoyo, túnel] to deepen;
    el paso del tiempo ahondó las diferencias entre los dos hermanos the differences between the two brothers grew wider as time went by
    vi
    ahondar en [penetrar] to penetrate deep into;
    [profundizar] to study in depth;
    no quiero ahondar más en esta cuestión I don't want to go into this matter any further
    * * *
    I v/i
    :
    ahondar en algo go into sth in depth
    II v/t make … deeper
    * * *
    : to deepen
    : to elaborate, to go into detail

    Spanish-English dictionary > ahondar

  • 20 ahorro de esfuerzo

    (n.) = savings in energy, savings in effort
    Ex. Some of the advantages of renovating rather than constructing a new building include considerable savings in money and energy = Algunas de las ventajas de renovar más que construir un nuevo edificio son el ahorro considerable de dinero y esfuerzo.
    Ex. Advantages include savings in time and effort for staff, instructors and students, and greater speed and range of services = Entre las ventajas están el ahorro del tiempo y del esfuerzo del personal, de los instructores y de los estudiantes y una mayor velocidad y variedad de servicios.
    * * *
    (n.) = savings in energy, savings in effort

    Ex: Some of the advantages of renovating rather than constructing a new building include considerable savings in money and energy = Algunas de las ventajas de renovar más que construir un nuevo edificio son el ahorro considerable de dinero y esfuerzo.

    Ex: Advantages include savings in time and effort for staff, instructors and students, and greater speed and range of services = Entre las ventajas están el ahorro del tiempo y del esfuerzo del personal, de los instructores y de los estudiantes y una mayor velocidad y variedad de servicios.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ahorro de esfuerzo

См. также в других словарях:

  • Greater — may refer to: *Greatness, the state of being great *Greater than, in inequality …   Wikipedia

  • greater — [grāt′ər] adj. [often G ] designating a big city and the cities and towns surrounding it, esp. such an area included in the U.S. census [Greater Cleveland] …   English World dictionary

  • greater — index best, superior (excellent), superior (higher) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • greater — O.E. gryttra, Anglian *gretra; comparative of GREAT (Cf. great) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Greater — /gray teuhr/, adj. designating a city or country and its adjacent area: Greater New York; Greater Los Angeles. [1570 80; GREAT + ER4] * * * (as used in expressions) Greater London Antilles Greater and Lesser Greater Manchester * * * …   Universalium

  • greater — [[t]gre͟ɪtə(r)[/t]] 1) Greater is the comparative of great. 2) ADJ: ADJ n Greater is used with the name of a large city to refer to the city together with the surrounding urban and suburban area. ...Greater London. 3) ADJ: ADJ n Greater is used… …   English dictionary

  • greater —    Sometimes a pointer to wordiness, as here: The cost for a 17 year old living in the greater London area ... (Times). In greater London or in the London area says the same thing as in the greater London area, but says it more simply …   Dictionary of troublesome word

  • greater — adjective greater in size or importance or degree (Freq. 46) for the greater good of the community the greater Antilles • Ant: ↑lesser …   Useful english dictionary

  • Greater — Great•er [[t]ˈgreɪ tər[/t]] adj. designating a large city and its adjacent areas: Greater New York; Greater Los Angeles[/ex] • Etymology: 1570–80 …   From formal English to slang

  • Greater — Great Great (gr[=a]t), a. [Compar. {Greater}; superl. {Greatest}.] [OE. gret, great, AS. gre[ a]t; akin to OS. & LG. gr[=o]t, D. groot, OHG. gr[=o]z, G. gross. Cf. {Groat} the coin.] 1. Large in space; of much size; big; immense; enormous;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • greater — adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: comparative of great Date: 1882 consisting of a central city together with adjacent areas that are naturally or administratively connected with it < Greater London > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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