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hijacked

  • 1 absorber

    v.
    1 to absorb.
    esta aspiradora no absorbe el polvo muy bien this vacuum doesn't pick up dust very well
    esta crema se absorbe muy bien this cream works into the skin very well
    La esponja absorbe agua y fluidos The sponge absorbs water and fluids.
    La película absorbe a María The film absorbs=captivates Mary.
    El amortiguador absorbe energía The shock absorber absorbs energy.
    El tema absorbe a Pedro The topic absorbs=engrosses Peter.
    2 to take up, to soak up.
    esta tarea absorbe mucho tiempo this task takes up a lot of time
    3 to absorb by merger (empresa).
    4 to assimilate.
    El estómago absorbe los nutrientes The stomach assimilates nutrients.
    * * *
    1 (líquidos) to absorb, soak up
    3 figurado (consumir) to use up
    4 figurado (cautivar) to captivate
    * * *
    verb
    to absorb, soak up
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ líquido] to absorb, soak up
    2) [+ información] to absorb, take in; [+ recursos] to use up; [+ energías] to take up; [+ atención] to command
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) <líquido/ruido/calor> to absorb
    b) < tiempo> to occupy, take up; <recursos/energía> to absorb
    2) < empresa> to take over
    * * *
    = absorb, steep + Reflexivo + in, take up, hijack, take in, soak in, co-opt, soak up, sop up, pick up, suck up.
    Ex. For the majority, however, IT was regarded as simply another topic to absorb into syllabuses.
    Ex. The great storyteller, FC Sayers, having advised the beginner to ' steep himself in folklore until the elemental themes are part of himself,' explains how best to get command of a tale.
    Ex. The rows over Britain's contributions to the Community budget and runaway spending on the the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), which took up two thirds of the budget, were documented blow by blow in the press.
    Ex. Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex. People like to browse the books and magazines, take in the ambiance, and be seen and perceived as a patron of the arts and literature.
    Ex. Among the visual attributes found to be most useful were: absorption ( soaks in, sits on top), luster (shiny, dull), flakiness (doesn't flake off, flakes off), and thickness (thin, thick).
    Ex. Social workers accused librarians of moving into their territory, of co-opting their activity, of doing social work without training, of being representative of establishment interests.
    Ex. They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex. Here are activities to sop up those extra minutes by reinforcing what you're taught.
    Ex. Then these suggestion can be picked up by the editor, and communicated to the author.
    Ex. Cinder blocks do suck up paint quickly but mine are light because I only used the left over paint from the walls.
    ----
    * absorber tiempo = absorb + time.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) <líquido/ruido/calor> to absorb
    b) < tiempo> to occupy, take up; <recursos/energía> to absorb
    2) < empresa> to take over
    * * *
    = absorb, steep + Reflexivo + in, take up, hijack, take in, soak in, co-opt, soak up, sop up, pick up, suck up.

    Ex: For the majority, however, IT was regarded as simply another topic to absorb into syllabuses.

    Ex: The great storyteller, FC Sayers, having advised the beginner to ' steep himself in folklore until the elemental themes are part of himself,' explains how best to get command of a tale.
    Ex: The rows over Britain's contributions to the Community budget and runaway spending on the the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), which took up two thirds of the budget, were documented blow by blow in the press.
    Ex: Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex: People like to browse the books and magazines, take in the ambiance, and be seen and perceived as a patron of the arts and literature.
    Ex: Among the visual attributes found to be most useful were: absorption ( soaks in, sits on top), luster (shiny, dull), flakiness (doesn't flake off, flakes off), and thickness (thin, thick).
    Ex: Social workers accused librarians of moving into their territory, of co-opting their activity, of doing social work without training, of being representative of establishment interests.
    Ex: They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex: Here are activities to sop up those extra minutes by reinforcing what you're taught.
    Ex: Then these suggestion can be picked up by the editor, and communicated to the author.
    Ex: Cinder blocks do suck up paint quickly but mine are light because I only used the left over paint from the walls.
    * absorber tiempo = absorb + time.

    * * *
    absorber [E1 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹líquido› to absorb, soak up; ‹humedad› to absorb; ‹ruido/calor/luz› to absorb
    la vitamina D ayuda a que se absorba el calcio vitamin D helps to absorb calcium
    las plantas absorben el oxígeno del aire plants take in o absorb oxygen from the air
    2 ‹tiempo› to occupy, take up; ‹recursos/energía› to absorb
    absorben un tercio del total de nuestras exportaciones they take o absorb a third of our total exports
    es un tipo de actividad que te absorbe totalmente it's the sort of activity that takes up all your time and energy
    los salarios absorben un 70% del presupuesto salaries take up o swallow up 70% of the budget
    B ‹empresa› to take over
    * * *

     

    absorber ( conjugate absorber) verbo transitivo
    a)líquido/ruido/calor to absorb


    recursos/energía to absorb
    absorber verbo transitivo to absorb
    ' absorber' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    amortiguador
    - aspirar
    - chupar
    - sorber
    English:
    absorb
    - grip
    - shock absorber
    - soak up
    - suck
    - suck up
    - take over
    - engross
    - shock
    - soak
    - take
    * * *
    1. [líquido, gas, calor] to absorb;
    esta aspiradora no absorbe el polvo muy bien this vacuum doesn't pick up dust very well;
    absorbió el refresco con la pajita he sucked the soft drink through a straw;
    esta crema se absorbe muy bien this cream works into the skin very well
    2. [consumir] to take up, to soak up;
    esta tarea absorbe mucho tiempo this task takes up a lot of time
    3. [atraer, dominar]
    este trabajo me absorbe mucho this job takes up a lot of my time;
    su mujer lo absorbe mucho his wife is very demanding;
    la televisión los absorbe television dominates their lives
    4. [empresa] to take over;
    Roma Inc. absorbió a su mayor competidor Roma Inc. took over its biggest rival
    * * *
    v/t
    1 absorb
    2 ( consumir) take (up)
    3 ( cautivar) absorb
    4 COM take over
    * * *
    1) : to absorb, to soak up
    2) : to occupy, to take up, to engross
    * * *
    absorber vb to absorb

    Spanish-English dictionary > absorber

  • 2 arrojado

    adj.
    brave, aggressive, bold, courageous.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: arrojar.
    * * *
    1→ link=arrojar arrojar
    1 thrown, thrown out
    2 (osado) bold, fearless, daring
    * * *
    ADJ (=valiente) daring, dashing; (=temerario) reckless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo brave, daring
    * * *
    = valiant, plucky [pluckier -comp., pluckiest -sup.], fearless, dauntless, audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. Manchester Public Libraries are making a valiant attempt to offer a suitable facility despite over-crowding and lack of space.
    Ex. Steel's book exemplifies what might be termed the subgenre of 'Mutiny novel,' using such conventional characters as the plucky Englishwoman, the unflappable English gentleman-spy, and the crazed religious zealot.
    Ex. He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex. He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo brave, daring
    * * *
    = valiant, plucky [pluckier -comp., pluckiest -sup.], fearless, dauntless, audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: Manchester Public Libraries are making a valiant attempt to offer a suitable facility despite over-crowding and lack of space.

    Ex: Steel's book exemplifies what might be termed the subgenre of 'Mutiny novel,' using such conventional characters as the plucky Englishwoman, the unflappable English gentleman-spy, and the crazed religious zealot.
    Ex: He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex: He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.

    * * *
    brave, daring
    * * *

    Del verbo arrojar: ( conjugate arrojar)

    arrojado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    arrojado    
    arrojar
    arrojar ( conjugate arrojar) verbo transitivo
    1

    (Aviac) ‹ bomba to drop
    b) lava to spew (out);

    humo to belch out;
    luz to shed
    2 ( vomitar) to bring up, throw up
    arrojarse verbo pronominal ( refl) to throw oneself;
    arrojadose sobre algo/algn [ persona] to throw oneself onto sth/sb;
    [perro/tigre] to pounce on sth/sb
    arrojado,-a adj (atrevido) bold, daring
    arrojar verbo transitivo
    1 (lanzar) to throw, fling
    2 Com (un resultado) to show
    ' arrojado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arrojada
    - valiente
    English:
    spunky
    * * *
    arrojado, -a adj
    bold, fearless
    * * *
    I adj brave, daring
    II partarrojar
    * * *
    arrojado, -da adj
    : daring, fearless

    Spanish-English dictionary > arrojado

  • 3 atrevido

    adj.
    1 daring, adventurous, bold, brave.
    2 cheeky, brassy, bold-faced, pert.
    f. & m.
    cheeky person, insolent person.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: atreverse.
    * * *
    1→ link=atreverse atreverse
    1 (osado) daring, bold
    2 (insolente) insolent, impudent
    3 (indecoroso) daring, risqué
    * * *
    (f. - atrevida)
    adj.
    daring, bold
    * * *
    atrevido, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) [persona] (=audaz) daring, bold; (=insolente) cheeky, sassy (EEUU)
    2) [chiste] daring, risqué
    2.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( insolente) sassy (AmE colloq), cheeky (BrE colloq)
    b) ( osado) <escote/persona> daring; < chiste> risqué

    el atrevido diseño del edificiothe bold o adventurous design of the building

    c) ( valiente) brave
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( insolente)

    es un atrevido y un maleducadohe is sassy (AmE) o (BrE) cheeky and bad-mannered

    b) ( valiente)

    el mundo es de los atrevidosfortune favors the brave

    * * *
    = brave [braver -comp., bravest -sup.], presumptuous, adventurous, cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], risqué, bawdy [bawdier -comp., bawdiest -sup.], fearless, impudent, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], pert, audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. It would be a brave man who would predict that such a process will always remain clumsy, slow and faulty in detail.
    Ex. Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex. Many say the role of consumer advice centres as being simply mediators between the consumer and the retailer/manufacturer; only a few adventurous authorities encouraged the aggressive championing of consumer complaints.
    Ex. The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.
    Ex. However, some of the central premises of the film are flawed, and the risqué touches, whether racial or erotic innuendo, are primarily there to titillate and make the film seem hot and controversial.
    Ex. Their secondary aim was to print piratical, scurrilous and bawdy material for the people of Dublin.
    Ex. He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex. The Library Association is impudent in suggesting that it will impose sanctions on those who fail to keep abreast of developments in librarianship.
    Ex. 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex. He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    ----
    * ignorancia es muy atrevida, la = ignorance is very daring.
    * persona atrevida = risk taker.
    * ser atrevido = make + a bold statement.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( insolente) sassy (AmE colloq), cheeky (BrE colloq)
    b) ( osado) <escote/persona> daring; < chiste> risqué

    el atrevido diseño del edificiothe bold o adventurous design of the building

    c) ( valiente) brave
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( insolente)

    es un atrevido y un maleducadohe is sassy (AmE) o (BrE) cheeky and bad-mannered

    b) ( valiente)

    el mundo es de los atrevidosfortune favors the brave

    * * *
    = brave [braver -comp., bravest -sup.], presumptuous, adventurous, cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], risqué, bawdy [bawdier -comp., bawdiest -sup.], fearless, impudent, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], pert, audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: It would be a brave man who would predict that such a process will always remain clumsy, slow and faulty in detail.

    Ex: Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex: Many say the role of consumer advice centres as being simply mediators between the consumer and the retailer/manufacturer; only a few adventurous authorities encouraged the aggressive championing of consumer complaints.
    Ex: The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.
    Ex: However, some of the central premises of the film are flawed, and the risqué touches, whether racial or erotic innuendo, are primarily there to titillate and make the film seem hot and controversial.
    Ex: Their secondary aim was to print piratical, scurrilous and bawdy material for the people of Dublin.
    Ex: He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex: The Library Association is impudent in suggesting that it will impose sanctions on those who fail to keep abreast of developments in librarianship.
    Ex: 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex: He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * ignorancia es muy atrevida, la = ignorance is very daring.
    * persona atrevida = risk taker.
    * ser atrevido = make + a bold statement.

    * * *
    atrevido1 -da
    1 (insolente) mouthy ( AmE colloq), sassy ( AmE colloq), cheeky ( BrE colloq)
    2 (osado) ‹escote/vestido› daring; ‹chiste› risqué
    el atrevido diseño del edificio the bold o adventurous design of the building
    me parece algo atrevido decir una cosa así I think it would be rash to say such a thing
    un escritor atrevido a daring writer
    3 (valiente) brave
    ¿te vas a vivir allí? eres muy atrevido are you going to live there? that's very brave of you
    atrevido2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    1
    (insolente): ese niño es un atrevido y un maleducado that little boy is mouthy ( AmE) o sassy ( AmE) o ( BrE) cheeky and bad-mannered ( colloq)
    2
    (valiente): el mundo es de los atrevidos fortune favors the brave
    * * *

     

    Del verbo atreverse: ( conjugate atreverse)

    atrevido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    atreverse    
    atrevido
    atreverse ( conjugate atreverse) verbo pronominal
    to dare;
    ¡anda, atrévete! go on then, I dare you (to);

    no me atrevo a decírselo I daren't tell him;
    ¿cómo te atreves a pegarle? how dare you hit him?;
    ¿a que conmigo no te atreves? I bet you wouldn't dare take me on
    atrevido -da adjetivo
    a) ( insolente) sassy (AmE colloq), cheeky (BrE colloq)

    b) ( osado) ‹escote/persona daring;

    chiste risqué;
    diseño bold

    atreverse verbo reflexivo to dare: ¿te atreves a hacerlo?, do you dare to do it? o dare you do it? ➣ Ver nota en dare
    atrevido,-a adjetivo
    1 (descarado) daring, bold
    2 (insolente) cheeky, impudent
    3 (un vestido) risqué
    ' atrevido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arrojada
    - arrojado
    - atrevida
    - desvergonzada
    - desvergonzado
    - impertinente
    - lanzada
    - lanzado
    English:
    audacious
    - daredevil
    - daring
    - naughty
    - presumptuous
    - revealing
    - forward
    - risqué
    - sassy
    - unadventurous
    * * *
    atrevido, -a
    adj
    1. [osado] daring;
    es muy atrevido, le encantan los deportes de riesgo he's very daring, he loves dangerous sports;
    un escote atrevido a daring neckline;
    una película/escultura atrevida a bold movie/sculpture
    2. [caradura] cheeky
    nm,f
    1. [osado] daring person
    2. [caradura] cheeky person;
    ¡qué atrevido, contestar así a tu madre! what a cheek, answering your mother back like that!
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( insolente) sassy fam, Br
    cheeky fam
    2 ( valiente) brave, daring
    * * *
    atrevido, -da adj
    1) : bold, daring
    2) : insolent
    * * *
    1. (audaz) daring
    2. (insolente) cheeky [comp. cheekier; superl. cheekiest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > atrevido

  • 4 audaz

    adj.
    1 daring, bold.
    2 audacious, bold, brave, courageous.
    3 wild.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl audaces)
    1 audacious, bold, daring
    * * *
    adj.
    bold, audacious
    * * *
    ADJ bold, audacious
    * * *
    adjetivo ( valiente) brave, courageous; ( osado) daring, bold
    * * *
    = adventurous, daring, fearless, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], dauntless, brave [braver -comp., bravest -sup.], audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. Many say the role of consumer advice centres as being simply mediators between the consumer and the retailer/manufacturer; only a few adventurous authorities encouraged the aggressive championing of consumer complaints.
    Ex. One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex. He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex. 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex. He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    Ex. It would be a brave man who would predict that such a process will always remain clumsy, slow and faulty in detail.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    ----
    * persona audaz = risk taker.
    * * *
    adjetivo ( valiente) brave, courageous; ( osado) daring, bold
    * * *
    = adventurous, daring, fearless, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], dauntless, brave [braver -comp., bravest -sup.], audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: Many say the role of consumer advice centres as being simply mediators between the consumer and the retailer/manufacturer; only a few adventurous authorities encouraged the aggressive championing of consumer complaints.

    Ex: One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex: He describes the decoration of the tombs, explaining that this artwork is a fearless thumbing of the nose at death itself.
    Ex: 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex: He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    Ex: It would be a brave man who would predict that such a process will always remain clumsy, slow and faulty in detail.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * persona audaz = risk taker.

    * * *
    1 (valiente) ‹persona/acción› brave, courageous, daring, bold
    2 (osado) daring, bold, audacious
    * * *

    audaz adjetivo ( valiente) brave, courageous;
    ( osado) daring, bold
    audaz adjetivo audacious, bold
    ' audaz' also found in these entries:
    English:
    audacious
    - bold
    - daring
    - defiant
    - intrepid
    - unadventurous
    * * *
    audaz adj
    1. [valiente] daring, bold
    2. [descarado] audacious
    * * *
    adj daring, bold, audacious
    * * *
    audaz adj, pl audaces : bold, audacious, daring
    audazmente adv
    * * *
    audaz adj daring / bold

    Spanish-English dictionary > audaz

  • 5 confiscar

    v.
    to confiscate.
    La corte interviene sus bienes The court seized his belongings.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SACAR], like link=sacar sacar
    1 to confiscate
    * * *
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <contrabando/armas> to confiscate, seize; ( para uso del estado) to requisition
    * * *
    = confiscate, hijack, requisition.
    Ex. Under the Treaty of Riga in 1922, the return of important library collections and national archives confiscated by Russia in 1772 was secured.
    Ex. Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex. The delay could have been avoided, if senior officials were empowered to requisition aircraft from any operator.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <contrabando/armas> to confiscate, seize; ( para uso del estado) to requisition
    * * *
    = confiscate, hijack, requisition.

    Ex: Under the Treaty of Riga in 1922, the return of important library collections and national archives confiscated by Russia in 1772 was secured.

    Ex: Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex: The delay could have been avoided, if senior officials were empowered to requisition aircraft from any operator.

    * * *
    confiscar [A2 ]
    vt
    1 ‹contrabando/armas› to confiscate, seize
    2 (para uso del estado) to requisition
    * * *

    confiscar ( conjugate confiscar) verbo transitivo
    a)contrabando/armas to confiscate, seize


    confiscar verbo transitivo to confiscate, seize: tengo que confiscar esos caramelos, I have to confiscate those sweets
    ' confiscar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    requisar
    English:
    confiscate
    - seize
    * * *
    to confiscate
    * * *
    v/t confiscate
    * * *
    confiscar {72} vt
    decomisar: to confiscate, to seize

    Spanish-English dictionary > confiscar

  • 6 fuga de la cárcel

    (n.) = prison break, jailbreak [gaolbreak, UK], gaolbreak [jailbreak, US]
    Ex. Many fans have said that this series lost steam after the prison break finally happened.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. A famous gaolbreak there led to Henry VIII ordering re-enforcement of the floor with giant stone blocks.
    * * *
    (n.) = prison break, jailbreak [gaolbreak, UK], gaolbreak [jailbreak, US]

    Ex: Many fans have said that this series lost steam after the prison break finally happened.

    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: A famous gaolbreak there led to Henry VIII ordering re-enforcement of the floor with giant stone blocks.

    Spanish-English dictionary > fuga de la cárcel

  • 7 fuga de la prisión

    (n.) = prison break, jailbreak [gaolbreak, UK], gaolbreak [jailbreak, US]
    Ex. Many fans have said that this series lost steam after the prison break finally happened.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. A famous gaolbreak there led to Henry VIII ordering re-enforcement of the floor with giant stone blocks.
    * * *
    (n.) = prison break, jailbreak [gaolbreak, UK], gaolbreak [jailbreak, US]

    Ex: Many fans have said that this series lost steam after the prison break finally happened.

    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: A famous gaolbreak there led to Henry VIII ordering re-enforcement of the floor with giant stone blocks.

    Spanish-English dictionary > fuga de la prisión

  • 8 osado

    adj.
    1 daring, devil-may-care, bold, audacious.
    2 imprudent, presumptuous, cheeky.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: osar.
    * * *
    1 (audaz) audacious, daring
    2 (desvergonzado) shameless
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=audaz) daring, bold
    2) (=descarado) impudent, audacious
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (liter) daring, bold, audacious
    * * *
    = brash [brasher -comp., brashest -sup.], daring, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], defiant, audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. Caslon rejected the brash contrast of the later Dutch founts, and produced types that were without serious blemish, but also without much life.
    Ex. One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex. 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex. Two recently elected school board members have announced their intention of 'ridding the high school of Mrs Panopoulos' -- to which she replied, with a defiant shrug, 'Let them try'.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (liter) daring, bold, audacious
    * * *
    = brash [brasher -comp., brashest -sup.], daring, bold [bolder -comp., boldest -sup.], defiant, audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: Caslon rejected the brash contrast of the later Dutch founts, and produced types that were without serious blemish, but also without much life.

    Ex: One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex: 'Would it be bold of me to ask,' she said hesitantly, 'why is the Medical Center library virtually an autonomous unit?'.
    Ex: Two recently elected school board members have announced their intention of 'ridding the high school of Mrs Panopoulos' -- to which she replied, with a defiant shrug, 'Let them try'.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.

    * * *
    osado -da
    ( liter); daring, bold, audacious
    * * *

    Del verbo osar: ( conjugate osar)

    osado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    osado    
    osar
    osar ( conjugate osar) verbo intransitivo (liter) osado + INF to dare to + inf;

    osado,-a adjetivo
    1 (que no tiene miedo) daring
    2 (que no tiene respeto) impudent, disrespectful
    osar verbo intransitivo to dare ➣ Ver nota en dare

    ' osado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    osada
    - atrevido
    - audaz
    English:
    daring
    * * *
    osado, -a adj
    1. [valeroso] daring, bold
    2. [descarado] impudent, audacious
    * * *
    adj daring
    * * *
    osado, -da adj
    1) : bold, daring
    2) : audacious, impudent
    osadamente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > osado

  • 9 robado

    adj.
    robbed, stolen; naked, without ornament.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: robar.
    * * *
    ADJ stolen
    * * *
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    * * *

    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.

    Spanish-English dictionary > robado

  • 10 secuestrado

    adj.
    1 sequestered.
    2 hi-jacked.
    f. & m.
    hostage, abductee, captive.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: secuestrar.
    * * *
    secuestrado, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) [persona] kidnapped
    2) [barco, avión] hijacked
    2.
    SM / F hostage
    * * *
    = hostage, kidnapped, hijacked.
    Ex. This article reports on the coverage by the New York Times of the killing of a hostage victim during a highjack.
    Ex. In the first pass the program compares the entry 'JAWS' with ' KIDNAPPED' and no exchange is made as they are in the correct alphabetical order.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    * * *
    = hostage, kidnapped, hijacked.

    Ex: This article reports on the coverage by the New York Times of the killing of a hostage victim during a highjack.

    Ex: In the first pass the program compares the entry 'JAWS' with ' KIDNAPPED' and no exchange is made as they are in the correct alphabetical order.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.

    * * *
    secuestrado, -a
    adj
    [raptado] kidnapped; [avión, barco, pasajero] hijacked
    nm,f
    hostage

    Spanish-English dictionary > secuestrado

  • 11 secuestrar

    v.
    1 to kidnap.
    2 to hijack.
    3 to seize.
    * * *
    1 (personas) to kidnap; (avión) to hijack
    2 DERECHO to sequester, seize, confiscate
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT
    1) [+ persona] to kidnap
    2) [+ avión] to hijack
    3) (Jur) to seize, confiscate
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to kidnap; < avión> to hijack
    b) <periódico/revista> to seize; < bienes> to sequestrate, confiscate
    * * *
    = hold + hostage, hijack, kidnap, abduct.
    Ex. The author recounts some cases where librarians have been killed or held hostage, and the lessons learned from these incidents.
    Ex. Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex. Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex. Suppose you are abducted by a highway robber, who intends to ransom you and in return for your release you promise to deliver the ransom yourself; should you subsequently keep your promise?.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to kidnap; < avión> to hijack
    b) <periódico/revista> to seize; < bienes> to sequestrate, confiscate
    * * *
    = hold + hostage, hijack, kidnap, abduct.

    Ex: The author recounts some cases where librarians have been killed or held hostage, and the lessons learned from these incidents.

    Ex: Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex: Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex: Suppose you are abducted by a highway robber, who intends to ransom you and in return for your release you promise to deliver the ransom yourself; should you subsequently keep your promise?.

    * * *
    secuestrar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to kidnap; ‹avión› to hijack
    2 ‹periódico/revista› to seize; ‹bienes› to sequestrate, confiscate
    * * *

    secuestrar ( conjugate secuestrar) verbo transitivo persona to kidnap;
    avión to hijack
    secuestrar verbo transitivo
    1 (a una persona) to kidnap
    2 (un vehículo) to hijack
    3 Jur (una edición, una publicación) to confiscate
    ' secuestrar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    raptar
    English:
    abduct
    - conspiracy
    - hijack
    - kidnap
    - seize
    - snatch
    * * *
    1. [raptar] to kidnap;
    [avión, barco] to hijack
    2. [bienes, publicación] to seize
    * * *
    v/t barco, avión hijack; persona kidnap, abduct
    * * *
    1) raptar: to kidnap, to abduct
    2) : to hijack, to commandeer
    3) confiscar: to confiscate, to seize
    * * *
    1. (persona) to kidnap [pt. & pp. kidnapped]
    2. (avión) to hijack

    Spanish-English dictionary > secuestrar

  • 12 temerario

    adj.
    1 reckless, bold, audacious, brash.
    2 reckless, breakneck, suicidal.
    3 cock-brained.
    * * *
    1 reckless, rash
    * * *
    (f. - temeraria)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona, acto] (=imprudente) rash, reckless; (=audaz) bold
    2) [juicio] hasty, rash
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo bold
    * * *
    = daring, reckless, rash, foolhardy, audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex. The article is entitled ' Reckless driving on the information highway, or, is the scholar of the research library effectively using the available resources?'.
    Ex. And some way down the list of benefits was a rash promise to 'slash the red tape that hinders our trade with Europe -- and thereby safeguard the 2 1/2 million jobs involved'.
    Ex. There is nothing wrong with killing enemy soldiers that are attacking you and it would seem foolhardy just to let them escape.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    ----
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.
    * juicio temerario = snap judgement.
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo bold
    * * *
    = daring, reckless, rash, foolhardy, audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.

    Ex: The article is entitled ' Reckless driving on the information highway, or, is the scholar of the research library effectively using the available resources?'.
    Ex: And some way down the list of benefits was a rash promise to 'slash the red tape that hinders our trade with Europe -- and thereby safeguard the 2 1/2 million jobs involved'.
    Ex: There is nothing wrong with killing enemy soldiers that are attacking you and it would seem foolhardy just to let them escape.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.
    * juicio temerario = snap judgement.

    * * *
    ‹persona› rash, bold; ‹acto/empresa› rash
    * * *

    temerario,-a adj (acción, modo de conducir) reckless, (comentario, hipótesis, acusación) rash
    ' temerario' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arriesgada
    - arriesgado
    - colgada
    - colgado
    - temeraria
    - imprudente
    English:
    daredevil
    - reckless
    - risktaker
    - dare
    * * *
    temerario, -a adj
    [persona, conducta] rash, reckless; [juicio, opinión] rash;
    conducción temeraria careless o reckless driving
    * * *
    adj rash, reckless
    * * *
    temerario, - ria adj
    : reckless, rash
    * * *
    temerario adj reckless

    Spanish-English dictionary > temerario

  • 13 usurpar

    v.
    to usurp.
    * * *
    1 to usurp
    * * *
    VT [+ poder, trono] to usurp; [+ tierras] to seize
    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml) <propiedad/título> to misappropriate; < territorio> to seize; < poder> to usurp
    * * *
    = usurp, hijack, take over, rip off, commandeer.
    Ex. Peter Jackaman fears 'that public libraries have failed to grasp the opportunity which this development offered, and as result their potential role has, in many cases, been usurped by other agencies'.
    Ex. Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex. We need to replace those aspects of traditional public library service which have been taken over by other media or rendered redundant by social change.
    Ex. Thee reader is being ripped off by bookselling chains demanding so-called 'bungs' for prime space.
    Ex. He was left without a scratch and pursued the shooter on foot until the gunman commandeered a passing car.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml) <propiedad/título> to misappropriate; < territorio> to seize; < poder> to usurp
    * * *
    = usurp, hijack, take over, rip off, commandeer.

    Ex: Peter Jackaman fears 'that public libraries have failed to grasp the opportunity which this development offered, and as result their potential role has, in many cases, been usurped by other agencies'.

    Ex: Information may have been hijacked as the province of computer operators rather than librarians.
    Ex: We need to replace those aspects of traditional public library service which have been taken over by other media or rendered redundant by social change.
    Ex: Thee reader is being ripped off by bookselling chains demanding so-called 'bungs' for prime space.
    Ex: He was left without a scratch and pursued the shooter on foot until the gunman commandeered a passing car.

    * * *
    usurpar [A1 ]
    vt
    ( frml); ‹propiedad/título› to misappropriate; ‹territorio› to seize
    usurpar el poder/trono to usurp power/the throne ( frml)
    * * *

    usurpar ( conjugate usurpar) verbo transitivo (frml) ‹propiedad/título to misappropriate;
    territorio to seize;
    poder to usurp
    usurpar verbo transitivo
    1 (las funciones, poder, etc) to usurp
    2 (una propiedad) to misappropriate
    ' usurpar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    encroach
    - usurp
    * * *
    to usurp
    * * *
    v/t usurp
    * * *
    : to usurp

    Spanish-English dictionary > usurpar

См. также в других словарях:

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  • 9/11 conspiracy theories — The collapse of the two World Trade Center towers and the nearby WTC7 (in this photo, the brown building to the left of the towers) is a major focus of 9/11 cons …   Wikipedia

  • Piracy in Somalia — Map of areas under threat by Somali pirates. Pirates holding the …   Wikipedia

  • List of Cuba — Cuba is 90 miles (145 kilometres) south of Florida in the United States Contents …   Wikipedia

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  • List of hijacking of Turkish airplanes — The list of hijacking of Turkish airplanes is a listing of hijackings or hijacking attempts occurred on Turkish aircraft since the first ever incident in 1972. [ [http://www.haber7.com/haber.php?haber id=263119 News7] tr icon] *May 3, 1972 – A DC …   Wikipedia

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