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venture

  • 1 alea

        alea ae, f    a game with dice: in aleā tempus consumere: exercere aleam, Ta.: luditur pernox, Iu.—Chance, hazard, risk, fortune, venture: dubia imperii servitiique, L.: dare in aleam tanti casūs se regnumque, set at risk, L.: periculosae plenum opus aleae, H.
    * * *
    game of dice; die; dice-play; gambling, risking; chance, venture, risk, stake

    Latin-English dictionary > alea

  • 2 audeō

        audeō ausus sum ( subj perf. ausim), ēre    [1 AV-], to venture, dare, be bold, dare to do, risk: tantum facinus, T.: nihil: fraudem, L.: ultima, desperate measures, L.: proelium, Ta.: pro vitā maiora, V.: res est audenda, L.: ausum Talia deposcunt, him who dared so much, O.: ausurum se in tribunis, quod, etc., in dealing with tribunes, L.: multo dolo audebantur, L.: audendum dextrā, now for a daring deed, V.: nil muttire, T.: alqd optare: loco cedere, S.: sapere aude, have the resolution, H.: vix ausim credere, O.: ad audendum impudentissimus: si audes, fac, etc.: nec quia audent, sed quia necesse est, pugnare, L.: Auctor ego audendi, V.: audendo potentior, Ta.: longius ausuri, Ta. — Of style: feliciter, H. — Poet.: in proelia, to be eager for battle, V.
    * * *
    audere, ausus sum V SEMIDEP
    intend, be prepared; dare/have courage (to go/do), act boldly, venture, risk

    Latin-English dictionary > audeō

  • 3 ausum

        ausum ī, n    [audeo], a bold deed, reckless act: fortia ausa, V: auso potiri, to succeed in boldness, V.: ausi paenitet, O.
    * * *
    I
    -, -, - V
    intend, be prepared; dare (to go/do), act boldly, risk; (SUB for audeo-kludge)
    II
    daring/bold deed, exploit, venture; attempt; presumptuous act, outrage; crime

    Latin-English dictionary > ausum

  • 4 coeptō

        coeptō —, —, āre, intens,    [coepio], to begin eagerly, begin, undertake, attempt: contingere portūs, C. (poet.): appetere ea. quae, etc.: quid coeptas, Thraso? T.: insidias, Ta.
    * * *
    coeptare, coeptavi, coeptatus V
    begin/commence (w/INF); set to work, undertake/attempt/try; venture/begin (ACC)

    Latin-English dictionary > coeptō

  • 5 cōnāta

        cōnāta ōrum, n    [1 conatus], an undertaking, attempt, venture, hazard, plan: perficere, Cs.: Carthaginiensium, L.: peragere, Iu.

    Latin-English dictionary > cōnāta

  • 6 cōnor

        cōnor ātus, ārī,    to undertake, endeavor, attempt, try, venture, seek, aim, make an effort, begin, make trial of: (mulieres) dum conantur, annus est, T.: audax ad conandum: conari desistis: conari consuescere, N.: ego obviam conabar tibi, was going to find you, T.: quicquam Fallaciae, T.: id quod conantur consequi, their ends: tantam rem, L.: multa stulte, N.: plurima frustra, V.: Ter conatus utramque viam, V.: id ne fieret omnia conanda esse, L.: ius suum exsequi, Cs.: rem labefactare: haec delere: frustra loqui, O.: frustra dehortando impedire, N.: si perrumpere possent, Cs.
    * * *
    conari, conatus sum V DEP
    attempt/try/endeavor, make an effort; exert oneself; try to go/rise/speak

    Latin-English dictionary > cōnor

  • 7 dēsiliō

        dēsiliō iluī, ultus, īre    [de + salio], to leap down, dismount: de navibus, Cs.: de raedā: ex equis, Cs.: ab equo, V.: curru ab alto, O.: biiugis, V.: altis turribus, H.: in medias undas, O.: ad pedes, to dismount, Cs.: desilite commilitones, jump overboard, Cs.: Desiluit, dismounted, O.—Poet.: unde loquaces Lymphae desiliunt, H.: aetheriā domo (of lightning), Pr.—Fig., to leap headlong, venture heedlessly: in artum, H.
    * * *
    I
    desilire, desilivi, desultus V TRANS
    leap/jump down, dismount, alight; (chariot); jump headlong, venture heedlessly
    II
    desilire, desilui, desultus V TRANS
    leap/jump down, dismount, alight; (chariot); jump headlong, venture heedlessly
    III
    desilire, desului, desultus V TRANS
    leap/jump down, dismount, alight; (chariot); jump headlong, venture heedlessly

    Latin-English dictionary > dēsiliō

  • 8 perīclitor

        perīclitor ātus, ārī, dep.    [periculum], to try, prove, test, make trial of, put to the test: periclitemur, si placet, etc.: belli fortunam: periclitandae vires ingeni: periclitatis moribus amicorum, tested. —To put in peril, endanger, risk, hazard: non est in uno homine salus summa periclitanda rei p.— To try, make an attempt: cottidie quid nostri auderent, periclitabatur, Cs.— To venture, be bold, be enterprising: proeliis et periclitando tuti sunt, Ta.— To be in danger, incur danger, be imperilled, run risk: ut potius Gallorum vita quam legionariorum periclitaretur, Cs.: quid aliud quam ingeni famā periclitarer? L.: si esset in perficiendis pontibus periclitandum, Cs.
    * * *
    periclitari, periclitatus sum V DEP
    try, prove, test, make a trial of, put to the test/in peril; risk, endanger

    Latin-English dictionary > perīclitor

  • 9 audo

    audere, - V SEMIDEP
    intend, be prepared; dare/have courage (to go/do), act boldly, venture, risk

    Latin-English dictionary > audo

  • 10 conor

    to undertake, try, venture, presume, attempt, presume.

    Latin-English dictionary of medieval > conor

  • 11 alea

    ālĕa, ae, f. [of uncer. origin; Curtius asserts an obscure connection with the words for bone; Sanscr. asthi; Zend, açti; Gr. osteon; Lat. os (ossis)].
    I.
    A game with dice, and in gen., a game of hazard or chance. There were among the Romans two kinds of dice, tesserae and tali, Cic. Sen. 16, 58. The tesserae had six sides, which were marked with I. II. III. IV. V. VI.; the tali were rounded on two sides, and marked only on the other four. Upon one side there was one point, unio, an ace, like the ace on cards, called canis; on the opp. side, six points called senio, six, sice; on the two other sides, three and four points, ternio and quaternio. In playing, four tali were used, but only three tesserae. They were put into a box made in the form of a tower, with a strait neck, and wider below than above, called fritillus, turris, turricula, etc. This box was shaken, and the dice were thrown upon the gaming-board. The highest or most fortunate throw, called Venus, jactus Venereus or basilicus, was, of the tesserae, three sixes, and of the tali when they all came out with different numbers. The worst or lowest throw, called jactus pessimus or damnosus, canis or canicula, was, of the tesserae, three aces, and of the tali when they were all the same. The other throws were valued acc. to the numbers. When one of the tali fell upon the end (in caput) it was said rectus cadere, or assistere, Cic. Fin. 3, 16, 54, and the throw was repeated. While throwing the dice, it was customary for a person to express his wishes, to repeat the name of his mistress, and the like. Games of chance were prohibited by the Lex Titia et Publicia et Cornelia (cf. Hor. C. 3, 24, 58), except in the month of December, during the Saturnalia, Mart. 4, 14, 7; 5, 85; 14, 1; Suet. Aug. 71; Dig. 11, 5. The character of gamesters, aleatores or aleones, was held as infamous in the time of Cicero, cf. Cic. Cat. 2, 5, 10; id. Phil. 2, 23, although there was much playing with aleae, and old men were esp. fond of this game, because it required little physical exertion, Cic. Sen. 16, 58; Suet. Aug. 71; Juv. 14, 4; cf.

    Jahn,

    Ov. Tr. 2, 471; Rupert. ad Tac. G. 24, 5:

    provocat me in aleam, ut ego ludam,

    Plaut. Curc. 2, 3, 75.—Ludere aleā or aleam, also sometimes in aleā:

    in foro aleā ludere,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 23, 56; Dig. 11, 5, 1: ludit assidue aleam, Poët. ap. Suet. Aug. 70:

    aleam studiosissime lusit,

    Suet. Claud. 33; so id. Ner. 30; Juv. 8, 10:

    repetitio ejus, quod in aleā lusum est,

    Dig. 11, 5, 4.—Hence, in aleā aliquid perdere, Cic. Phil. 2, 13:

    exercere aleam,

    Tac. G. 24:

    indulgere aleae,

    Suet. Aug. 70:

    oblectare se aleā,

    id. Dom. 21:

    prosperiore aleā uti,

    to play fortunately, id. Calig. 41.— Trop.: Jacta alea esto, Let the die be cast! Let the game be ventured! the memorable exclamation of Cæsar when, at the Rubicon, after long hesitation, he finally decided to march to Rome, Suet. Caes. 32, ubi v. Casaub. and Ruhnk.—
    II.
    Transf., any thing uncertain or contingent, an accident, chance, hazard, venture, risk:

    alea domini vitae ac rei familiaris,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 4:

    sequentes non aleam, sed rationem aliquam,

    id. ib. 1, 18:

    aleam inesse hostiis deligendis,

    Cic. Div. 2, 15:

    dare summam rerum in aleam,

    to risk, Liv. 42, 59:

    in dubiam imperii servitiique aleam ire,

    fortune, chance, id. 1, 23:

    alea belli,

    id. 37, 36:

    talibus admissis alea grandis inest,

    Ov. A. A. 1, 376:

    periculosae plenum opus aleae,

    Hor. C. 2, 1, 6: M. Tullius extra omnem ingenii aleam positus, raised above all doubt of his talents, Plin. praef. § 7: emere aleam, in the Pandects, to purchase any thing uncertain, contingent, e. g. a draught of fishes, Dig. 18, 1, 8; so ib. 18, 4, 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > alea

  • 12 audeo

    audĕo, ausus, 2, v. a. and n. ( perf. ausi = ausus sum, Cato ap. Prisc. p. 868 P.; hence freq. in the poets, and prose writers modelled after them, subj. sync. ausim, Plaut. Poen. 5, 6, 21; Ter. Eun. 5, 2, 45; 5, 2, 65; Lucr. 2, 178; 5, 196; Verg. E. 3, 32; id. G. 2, 289; Tib. 4, 1, 193; Prop. 2, 5, 24; 3, 12, 21; Ov. Am. 2, 4, 1; Stat. Th. 1, 18; 3, 165; id. Achill. 2, 266; Liv. praef. 1; Plin. Ep. 4, 4 fin.; Tac. Agr. 43: ausis, Att. ap. Non. p. 4, 62; Lucr. 2, 982; 4, 508; 5, 730; 6, 412; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 27 Müll.:

    ausit,

    Cat. 61, 65; 61, 70; 61, 75; 66, 28; Ov. M. 6, 466; Stat. Th. 12, 101; id. Achill. 1, 544; Liv. 5, 3 fin.:

    * ausint,

    Stat. Th. 11, 126; cf. Prisc l. l.; Struve, p. 175 sq.; Ramsh. Gr. p. 140; Neue, Formenl. II. pp. 333 sq., 542, 547 sq. al.) [acc. to Pott, for avideo from avidus, pr. to be eager about something, to have spirit or courage for it; v. 1. aveo], to venture, to venture to do, to dare; to be bold, courageous (with the idea of courage, boldness; while conari designates a mere attempt, an undertaking; syn.: conor, molior); constr. with acc., inf., quin, in with acc. or abl., and absol.
    (α).
    With acc. (mostly in poets and histt., esp. in Tac.):

    Quā audaciā tantum facinus audet?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 37; so,

    ut pessimum facinus auderent,

    Tac. H. 1, 28; 2, 85; Suet. Calig. 49: quid domini faciant, audent cum talia furesl Verg. E. 3, 16:

    ausum talia deposcunt,

    Ov. M. 1, 199; 13, 244:

    capitalem fraudem ausi,

    Liv. 23, 14; 3, 2; 26, 40; Vell. 2, 24, 5:

    erant qui id flagitium formidine auderent,

    Tac. A. 1, 69:

    ausuros nocturnam castrorum oppugnationem,

    id. ib. 2, 12; 4, 49; 11, 9; 12, 28; 14, 25; id. H. 1, 48; 2, 25; 2, 69;

    4, 15 al.: ad audendum aliquid concitāsset, nisi etc.,

    Suet. Caes. 8; 19; id. Tib. 37; id. Tit. 8; Just. 5, 9 al.; hence also pass.:

    multa dolo, pleraque per vim audebantur,

    Liv. 39, 8 fin.:

    auderi adversus aliquem dimicare,

    Nep. Milt. 4 fin.:

    agenda res est audendaque,

    Liv. 35, 35, 6; Vell. 2, 56 fin.:

    patroni necem,

    Suet. Dom. 14.—Also ausus, a, um, pass., Tac. A. 3, 67 fin.
    (β).
    With inf. (the usual constr.;

    freq. both in prose and poetry): etiam audes meā revorti gratiā?

    Plaut. Men. 4, 3, 23:

    Ecquid audes de tuo istuc addere?

    do you undertake, venture upon? id. ib. 1, 2, 40:

    commovere me miser non audeo,

    I venture not to stir, id. Truc. 4, 3, 44:

    Neque tibi quicquam dare ausim,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 2, 65:

    nil jam muttire audeo,

    id. And. 3, 2, 25; 3, 5, 7; id. Heaut. 5, 1, 80; id. Phorm. 5, 1, 31:

    hoc ex ipsis caeli rationibus ausim confirmare,

    Lucr. 5, 196:

    auderent credere gentes,

    id. 2, 1036; 1, 68; by poet. license transf. to things: Vitigeni latices in aquaï fontibus audent Misceri, the juice from the vine ventures boldly to intermingle with the water, id. 6, 1072:

    Mithridates tantum victus efficere potuit, quantum incolumis numquam est ausus optare,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 9, 25:

    imperatorem deposcere,

    id. ib. 5, 12: ut de Ligarii (facto) non audeam confiteril id. Lig. 3, 8: audeo dicere, I dare say, venture to assert, = tolmô legein, Cic. Fin. 5, 28, 84 et saep.:

    qui pulsi loco cedere ausi erant,

    Sall. C. 9, 4; 20, 3:

    quem tu praeponere no bis Audes,

    Cat. 81, 6:

    refrenare licentiam,

    Hor. C. 3, 24, 28:

    vana contemnere,

    Liv. 9, 17, 9:

    mensuram prodere ausos,

    Plin. 2, 1, 1, § 3 al.:

    non sunt ausi persequi recedentes,

    Vulg. Gen. 35, 5; 44, 26; ib. Job, 29, 22; 37, 24; ib. Matt. 22, 46; ib. Act. 5, 13; ib. Rom. 5, 7 et persaepe.—
    * (γ).
    With quin:

    ut non audeam, quin promam omnia,

    Plaut. As. 1, 1, 11.—
    (δ).
    With in with acc. or abl. (eccl. Lat.): Rogo vos ne praesens audeam in quosdam (Gr. epi tinas), Vulg. 2 Cor. 10, 2: In quo quis audet, audeo et ego (Gr. en ô), ib. 2 Cor. 11, 21.—
    (ε).
    Absol.:

    (Romani) audendo... magni facti,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 4 (n. 12 fin. Gerl.):

    Nec nunc illi, quia audent, sed quia necesse est, pugnaturi sunt,

    Liv. 21, 40, 7:

    in ejus modi consiliis periculosius esse deprehendi quam audere,

    Tac. Agr. 15 fin.:

    duo itinera audendi (esse), seu mallet statim arma, seu etc.,

    id. H. 4, 49:

    auctor ego audendi,

    Verg. A. 12, 159:

    Nam spirat tragicum satis et feliciter audet,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 166.—With an object to be supplied from the context:

    hos vero novos magistros nihil intellegebam posse docere, nisi ut auderent (sc. dicere, orationes habere, etc.),

    Cic. de Or. 3, 24, 94; Quint. 10, 1, 33 Frotsch.; 1, 5, 72: Judaei sub ipsos muros struxere aciem, rebus secundis longius ausuri (sc. progredi, to advance further), Tac. H. 5, 11: 2, 25, cf. Verg. A. 2, 347.— Hence, P. a.,
    1.
    audens, entis, daring, bold, intrepid, courageous; mostly in a good sense ( poet. or in post-Aug prose):

    tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito,

    Verg. A. 6, 95:

    audentes deus ipse juvat,

    Ov. M. 10, 586; so id. A. A. 1, 608; id. F. 2, 782:

    spes audentior,

    Val. Fl. 4, 284:

    nil gravius audenti quam ignavo patiendum esse,

    Tac. A. 14, 58; id. H. 2, 2 audentissimi cujusque procursu. id. Agr. 33; id. Or. 14 al.— Adv.: audenter, boldly, fearlessly, rashly: liceat audenter dicere, — Vulg Act. 2, 29; Dig. 28, 2, 29 fin.Comp.:

    audentius jam onerat Sejanum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68 progressus, id. ib. 13, 40:

    circumsistere,

    id. H. 2, 78:

    inrupere,

    id. ib. 1, 79:

    agere fortius et audentius,

    id. Or 18.— Sup prob not in use.—
    2.
    ausus, a, um, ventured, attempted, undertaken, hence subst.: au-sum, i, n., a daring attempt, a venture, an undertaking, enterprise ( poet. or in postAug. prose; acc. to Serv. ad Verg. A. 12, 351, perh. not before Verg.):

    At tibi pro scelere, exclamat, pro talibus ausis,

    Verg. A. 2, 535; 12, 351:

    fortia ausa,

    id. ib. 9, 281:

    ingentibus annuat ausis,

    Ov. M. 7, 178; 2, 328; 11, 12; 9, 621; 10, 460; 11, 242; id. H. 14, 49 al.; Stat. Th. 4, 368:

    ausum improbum,

    Plin. 2, 108, 112, § 147.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > audeo

  • 13 committo

    com-mitto ( con-m-), mīsi, missum, 3, v. a.
    I.
    Of two or more objects, to bring, join, combine into one whole; to join or put together, to connect, unite.
    A.
    In gen. (rare; not in Cic.), constr. inter se, cum aliquā re, alicui, with in and acc., and with acc. only.
    (α).
    Inter se:

    res in ordinem digestae atque inter se commissae,

    Quint. 7, prooem. §

    1: per nondum commissa inter se munimenta urbem intravit,

    Liv. 38, 4, 8; cf. thus with inter se:

    oras vulneris suturis,

    Cels. 7, 19:

    duo verba,

    Quint. 9, 4, 33:

    easdem litteras,

    id. ib.:

    duo comparativa,

    id. 9, 3, 19.—
    (β).
    With cum:

    costae committuntur cum osse pectoris,

    Cels. 8, 1.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    viam a Placentiā ut Flaminiae committeret,

    Liv. 39, 2, 10:

    quā naris fronti committitur,

    is joined to, Ov. M. 12, 315:

    quā vir equo commissus erat,

    id. ib. 12, 478 (of a Centaur); cf.

    of Scylla: delphinum caudas utero commissa luporum,

    Verg. A. 3, 428:

    commissa dextera dextrae,

    Ov. H. 2, 31:

    medulla spinae commissa cerebro,

    Cels. 8, 1:

    moles, quae urbem continenti committeret,

    Curt. 4, 2, 16; Flor. 1, 4, 2 Duker.—
    (δ).
    With in and acc.:

    commissa in unum crura,

    Ov. M. 4, 580:

    committuntur suturae in unguem,

    Cels. 8, 1.—
    (ε).
    With acc. only: barbaricam pestem navibus obtulit, commissam infabre, Pac. ap. Non. p. 40, 31 (Trag. Rel. v. 271 Rib.):

    commissis operibus,

    Liv. 38, 7, 10:

    fidibusque mei commissa mariti moenia,

    Ov. M. 6, 178:

    (terra) maria committeret,

    Curt. 3, 1, 13; 7, 7, 14:

    noctes duas,

    Ov. Am. 1, 13, 46; cf.: nocte commissā. Sen. Herc. Oet. 1698:

    commissa corpore toto,

    Ov. M. 4, 369; Lucil. ap. Non. p. 248, 25: cervix committitur primo [p. 380] artu, Val. Fl. 4, 310:

    domus plumbo commissa,

    patched, Juv. 14, 310.—
    B.
    In partic., to set or bring men or animals together in a contest or fight, as competitors, etc., to set together, set on (freq. in Suet.;

    elsewhere rare): pugiles Latinos cum Graecis,

    Suet. Aug. 45:

    quingenis peditibus, elephantis vicenis, tricenis equitibus hinc et inde commissis,

    id. Caes. 39; id. Claud. 34:

    camelorum quadrigas,

    id. Ner. 11; Luc. 1, 97:

    victores committe,

    Mart. 8, 43, 3; cf. id. Spect. 28, 1:

    licet Aenean Rutulumque ferocem Committas,

    i.e. you describe their contest in your poem, you bring them in contact with each other, Juv. 1, 162:

    eunucho Bromium committere noli,

    id. 6, 378:

    inter se omnes,

    Suet. Calig. 56:

    aequales inter se,

    id. Gram. 17.—
    b.
    Trop., to bring together for comparison, to compare, put together, match:

    committit vates et comparat, inde Maronem, Atque aliā parte in trutinā suspendit Homerum,

    Juv. 6, 436; cf. Prop. 2, 3, 21; Mart. 7, 24, 1.—
    2.
    Transf., of a battle, war: proelium, certamen, bellum, etc.
    a.
    To arrange a battle or contest, to enter upon, engage in, begin, join, commence, Cic. Div. 1, 35, 77:

    proelii committendi signum dare,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 21:

    cum proelium commissum audissent,

    id. ib. 7, 62:

    commisso ab equitibus proelio,

    id. B. C. 1, 40:

    in aciem exercitum eduxit proeliumque commisit,

    Nep. Eum. 3 fin.; id. Hann. 11, 3; id. Milt. 6, 3; Just. 2, 12, 7; 15, 4, 22; 22, 6, 6:

    postquam eo ventum est, ut a ferentariis proelium committi posset,

    Sall. C. 60, 2:

    commisso proelio, diutius nostrorum militum impetum hostes ferre non potuerunt,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 35; id. B. C. 1, 13; 2, 6 Kraner ad loc.:

    Caesar cohortatus suos proelium commisit,

    id. ib. 1, 25:

    utrum proelium committi ex usu esset, necne,

    id. ib. 1, 50; 1, 52; 2, 19; Nep. Milt. 5, 3:

    pridie quam Siciliensem pugnam classe committeret,

    Suet. Aug. 96:

    avidus committere pugnam,

    Sil. 8, 619:

    pugnas,

    Stat. Th. 6, 143:

    rixae committendae causā,

    Liv. 5, 25, 2:

    cum vates monere eum (regem) coepit, ne committeret, aut certe differret obsidionem,

    Curt. 9, 4, 27.—Of a drinking contest for a wager:

    a summo septenis cyathis committe hos ludos,

    Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 19:

    nondum commisso spectaculo,

    Liv. 2, 36, 1:

    musicum agona,

    Suet. Ner. 23:

    aciem,

    Flor. 4, 2, 46:

    commissum (bellum) ac profligatum conficere,

    Liv. 21, 40, 11; 8, 25, 5; 31, 28, 1 al.; cf.:

    si quis trium temporum momenta consideret, primo commissum bellum, profligatum secundo, tertio vero confectum est,

    Flor. 2, 15, 2:

    committere Martem,

    Sil. 13, 155:

    quo die ludi committebantur,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 4, 6:

    ludos dedicationis,

    Suet. Claud. 21:

    ludos,

    Verg. A. 5, 113.—
    b.
    In gen., to maintain a contest, etc., to fight a battle, to hold, celebrate games, etc. (rare):

    illam pugnam navalem... mediocri certamine commissam arbitraris?

    Cic. Mur. 15, 33:

    levia inde proelia per quatriduum commissa,

    Liv. 34, 37, 7:

    commisso modico certamine,

    id. 23, 44, 5.—
    (β).
    Absol. (post-Aug. and rare):

    contra quem Sulla iterum commisit,

    Eutr. 5, 6; 9, 24; Dig. 9, 1, 1:

    priusquam committeretur,

    before the contest began, Suet. Vesp. 5.—
    3.
    In gen.: committere aliquid, to begin any course of action, to undertake, carry on, hold (rare):

    tribuni sanguine commissa proscriptio,

    Vell. 2, 64 fin.:

    judicium inter sicarios committitur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 5, 11. —In part. perf.:

    egregie ad ultimum in audacter commisso perseveravit,

    Liv. 44, 4, 11; cf. id. ib. § 8; 44, 6, 14.—
    4.
    In partic., to practise or perpetrate wrong, do injustice; to commit a crime (very freq. and class.).
    (α).
    With acc.:

    ut neque timeant, qui nihil commiserint, et poenam semper ante oculos versari putent, qui peccaverint,

    Cic. Mil. 23, 61; cf. Quint. 7, 2, 30:

    commississe cavet quod mox mutare laboret,

    Hor. A. P. 168:

    ego etiam quae tu sine Verre commisisti, Verri crimini daturus sum,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 11, 35:

    quantum flagitii,

    id. Brut. 61, 219:

    tantum facinus,

    id. Rosc. Am. 23, 65:

    virilis audaciae facinora,

    Sall. C. 25, 1:

    majus delictum,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 4:

    nil nefandum,

    Ov. M. 9, 626:

    nefarias res,

    Cic. Phil. 6, 1, 2:

    scelus,

    id. Sull. 2, 6; Dig. 48, 9, 7:

    adulterium,

    Quint. 7, 2, 11; 7, 3, 1:

    incestum cum filio,

    id. 5, 10, 19:

    parricidium,

    id. 7, 2, 2:

    caedem,

    id. 7, 4, 43; 10, 1, 12; 5, 12, 3:

    sacrilegium,

    id. 7, 2, 18:

    fraudem,

    Hor. C. 1, 28, 31.— Aliquid adversus, in, erga:

    committere multa et in deos et in homines impie nefarieque,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 2, § 6; cf.:

    in te,

    Verg. A. 1, 231:

    aliquid adversus populum Romanum,

    Liv. 42, 38, 3:

    aliquid erga te,

    Cic. Att. 3, 20, 3.—
    (β).
    Committere contra legem, in legem, lege, to offend, sin, commit an offence:

    quasi committeret contra legem,

    Cic. Brut. 12, 48:

    in legem Juliam de adulteriis,

    Dig. 48, 5, 39; 48, 10, 13:

    adversus testamentum,

    ib. 34, 3, 8, § 2:

    ne lege censoriā committant,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 1, 16:

    lege de sicariis,

    Quint. 7, 1, 9. —
    (γ).
    Absol.:

    hoc si in posterum edixisses, minus esset nefarium... nemo enim committeret,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 43, § 110.—
    (δ).
    With ut, to be guilty or be in fault, so that, to give occasion or cause, that, to act so as that:

    id me commissurum ut patiar fieri,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 78:

    non committet hodie iterum ut vapulet,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 1, 5:

    ego nolo quemquam civem committere, ut morte multandus sit: tu, etiam si commiserit, conservandum putas,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 5, 15:

    committere ut accusator nominere,

    id. Off. 2, 14, 50; so Liv. 25, 6, 17:

    non committam, ut tibi ipse insanire videar,

    Cic. Fam. 5, 5, 3; 3, 7, 3; id. Att. 1, 6, 1; 1, 20, 3; id. de Or. 2, 57, 233; id. Off. 3, 2, 6; Brut. ap. Cic. Fam. 11, 20, 1, Quint. 1, 10, 30; 5, 13, 27; Cic. Leg. 1, 13, 37.—More rare in a like sense,
    (ε).
    With cur or quare:

    Caedicius negare se commissurum, cur sibi quisquam imperium finiret,

    Liv. 5, 46, 6:

    neque commissum a se, quare timeret,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 14.—
    (ζ).
    With inf.:

    non committunt scamna facere,

    Col. 2, 4, 3:

    infelix committit saepe repelli,

    Ov. M. 9, 632.—
    b.
    Poenam, multam, etc., jurid. t. t., to bring punishment upon one ' s self by an error or fault, to incur, make one ' s self liable to it:

    poenam,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 12, § 30; cf. Quint. 7, 4, 20; and:

    committere in poenam edicti,

    Dig. 2, 2, 4:

    ut illam multam non commiserit,

    Cic. Clu. 37, 103; Dig. 35, 1, 6 pr.—
    (β).
    Committi, with a definite object, to be forfeited or confiscated, as a penalty:

    hereditas Veneri Erycinae commissa,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 10, § 27; 2, 2, 14, § 36; so,

    commissae hypothecae,

    id. Fam. 13, 56, 2:

    commissa tibi fiducia,

    id. Fl. 21, 51:

    merces,

    Dig. 39, 4, 11, § 2:

    mancipium,

    ib. 39, 14, 6:

    praedia in publicum,

    ib. 3, 5, 12:

    hanc devotionem capitis esse commissam,

    incurred, Cic. Dom. 57, 145.—
    c.
    Also (mostly in jurid. Lat.) of laws, judicial regulations, promises, etc., that become binding in consequence of the fulfilment of a condition as the commission of a crime, etc.:

    in civitatem obligatam sponsione commissa iratis omnibus diis,

    a promise the condition of which has been fulfilled, Liv. 9, 11, 10 Weissenb. ad loc.; cf.:

    hanc ego devotionem capitis mei... convictam esse et commissam putabo,

    Cic. Dom. 57, 145:

    si alius committat edictum,

    transgresses, incurs its penalty, makes himself liable to, Dig. 37, 4, 3, § 11; cf.:

    commisso edicto ab alio filio, ib. lex 8, § 4: commisso per alium edicto, ib. lex 10, § 1 al.: statim atque commissa lex est,

    ib. 18, 3, 4, § 2:

    committetur stipulatio,

    ib. 24, 3, 56.
    II.
    To place a thing somewhere for preservation, protection, care, etc.; to give, intrust, commit to, to give up or resign to, to trust (syn.: commendo, trado, credo; very freq. and class.); constr. with aliquid ( aliquem) alicui, in aliquid, or absol.
    (α).
    Aliquid ( aliquem, se) alicui:

    honor non solum datus sed etiam creditus ac commissus,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 14, § 35:

    nec illi (Catoni) committendum illud negotium, sed inponendum putaverunt,

    id. Sest. 28, 60:

    qui capita vestra non dubitatis credere, cui calceandos nemo commisit pedes?

    Phaedr. 1, 14, 16:

    ego me tuae commendo et committo fidei,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 2, 47 (cf. id. And. 1, 5, 61):

    ne quid committam tibi,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 3, 21; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 15; id. And. 3, 5, 3; cf.:

    his salutem nostram, his fortunas, his liberos rectissime committi arbitramur,

    Cic. Off. 2, 9, 33; id. Att. 1, 13, 1; cf. id. ib. §

    4: tibi rem magnam,

    id. Fam. 13, 5, 1; id. Mil. 25, 68:

    quia commissi sunt eis magistratus,

    id. Planc. 25, 61:

    summum imperium potestatemque omnium rerum alicui,

    Nep. Lys. 1 fin.:

    domino rem omnem,

    Hor. S. 2, 7, 67:

    caput tonsori,

    id. A. P. 301:

    ratem pelago,

    id. C. 1, 3, 11:

    sulcis semina (corresp. with spem credere terrae),

    Verg. G. 1, 223; cf.:

    committere semen sitienti solo,

    Col. 2, 8, 4:

    ulcus frigori,

    Cels. 6, 18, n. 2:

    aliquid litteris,

    Cic. Att. 4, 1, 8; so,

    verba tabellis,

    Ov. M. 9, 587:

    vivunt commissi calores Aeoliae fidibus puellae,

    Hor. C. 4, 9, 11 al.:

    committere se populo, senatui, publicis praesidiis et armis (corresp. with se tradere),

    Cic. Mil. 23, 61; so,

    se urbi,

    id. Att. 15, 11, 1:

    se theatro populoque Romano,

    id. Sest. 54, 116:

    se proelio,

    Liv. 4, 59, 2:

    se pugnae,

    id. 5, 32, 4:

    se publico,

    to venture into the streets, Suet. Ner. 26:

    se neque navigationi, neque viae,

    Cic. Fam. 16, 8, 1; cf. id. Phil. 12, 10, 25; id. Imp. Pomp. 11, 31:

    se timidius fortunae,

    id. Att. 9, 6, 4:

    civilibus fluctibus,

    Nep. Att. 6, 1 al. —Prov.: ovem lupo (Gr. kataleipein oïn en lukoisi), Ter. Eun. 5, 1, 16.—
    (β).
    Aliquid ( aliquem, se) in aliquid (so esp. freq. in Liv.):

    aliquid in alicujus fidem committere,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 34; cf. Liv. 30, 14, 4:

    se in id conclave,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 23, 64:

    se in conspectum populi Romani,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 11, § 26; cf. Pompei. ap. Cic. Att. 8, 12, C, 2:

    se in senatum,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 2, 2; id. Ac. 2, 21, 68:

    summae fuisse dementiae dubiā spe impulsum certum in periculum se committere,

    id. Inv. 2, 8, 27:

    rem in casum ancipitis eventus,

    Liv. 4, 27, 6; cf.:

    duos filios in aleam ejus casus,

    id. 40, 21, 6:

    rem in aciem,

    id. 3, 2, 12; cf.:

    se in aciem,

    id. 7, 26, 11; 23, 11, 10;

    rempublicam in discrimen,

    id. 8, 32, 4; cf.:

    rerum summam in discrimen,

    id. 33, 7, 10. —
    (γ).
    Simply alicui, or entirely absol.:

    sanan' es, Quae isti committas?

    in trusting to him, Plaut. Curc. 5, 2, 55:

    ei commisi et credidi, Ter, Heaut. 5, 2, 13: haec cum scirem et cogitarem, commisi tamen, judices, Heio,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 7, § 16:

    universo populo neque ipse committit neque illi horum consiliorum auctores committi recte putant posse,

    id. Agr. 2, 8, 20:

    venti, quibus necessario committendum existimabat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 25:

    sed quoniam non es veritus concredere nobis, accipe commissae munera laetitiae,

    intrusted, Prop. 1, 10, 12:

    instant enim (adversarii) et saepe discrimen omne committunt, quod deesse nobis putant,

    often hazard the most important advantage, Quint. 6, 4, 17:

    cum senatus ei commiserit, ut videret, ne quid res publica detrimenti caperet,

    Cic. Mil. 26, 70.—With de:

    iste negat se de existimatione suā cuiquam nisi suis commissurum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 60, § 137. —Hence, P. a. as subst.: commissum, i, n.
    A.
    (Acc. to I. 3.) An undertaking, enterprise:

    nec aliud restabat quam audacter commissum corrigere,

    Liv. 44, 4, 8:

    supererat nihil aliud in temere commisso, quam, etc.,

    id. 44, 6, 14.—
    B.
    (Acc. to I. 4.) A transgression, offence, fault, crime:

    sacrum,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 9, 22:

    nisi aut quid commissi aut est causa jurgi,

    Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 21:

    ecquod hujus factum aut commissum non dicam audacius, sed quod, etc.,

    Cic. Sull. 26, 72; cf.

    turpe,

    Hor. C. 3, 27, 39:

    commissi praemia,

    Ov. F. 4, 590.—In plur.:

    post mihi non simili poenā commissa luetis,

    offences, Verg. A. 1, 136; so,

    fateri,

    Stat. S. 5, 5, 5:

    improba,

    Claud. Rapt. Pros. 2, 304.—
    2.
    Jurid. Lat., an incurring of fines, a confiscation or confiscated property, Suet. Calig. 41:

    in commissum cadere,

    Dig. 39, 4, 16:

    causa commissi,

    ib. 39, 4, 16 al.; 19, 2, 61 fin.:

    aliquid pro commisso tenetur,

    Quint. Decl. 341.—
    C.
    (Acc. to II.) That which is intrusted, a secret, trust:

    enuntiare commissa,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 13, 31:

    commissa celare,

    Nep. Epam. 3, 2; cf. Juv. 9, 93:

    commissa tacere,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 84:

    prodere,

    id. ib. 1, 3, 95:

    retinent commissa fideliter aures,

    id. Ep. 1, 18, 70:

    commissum teges (corresp. with arcanum scrutaberis),

    id. ib. 1, 18, 38; cf. id. A. P. 200.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > committo

  • 14 conmitto

    com-mitto ( con-m-), mīsi, missum, 3, v. a.
    I.
    Of two or more objects, to bring, join, combine into one whole; to join or put together, to connect, unite.
    A.
    In gen. (rare; not in Cic.), constr. inter se, cum aliquā re, alicui, with in and acc., and with acc. only.
    (α).
    Inter se:

    res in ordinem digestae atque inter se commissae,

    Quint. 7, prooem. §

    1: per nondum commissa inter se munimenta urbem intravit,

    Liv. 38, 4, 8; cf. thus with inter se:

    oras vulneris suturis,

    Cels. 7, 19:

    duo verba,

    Quint. 9, 4, 33:

    easdem litteras,

    id. ib.:

    duo comparativa,

    id. 9, 3, 19.—
    (β).
    With cum:

    costae committuntur cum osse pectoris,

    Cels. 8, 1.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    viam a Placentiā ut Flaminiae committeret,

    Liv. 39, 2, 10:

    quā naris fronti committitur,

    is joined to, Ov. M. 12, 315:

    quā vir equo commissus erat,

    id. ib. 12, 478 (of a Centaur); cf.

    of Scylla: delphinum caudas utero commissa luporum,

    Verg. A. 3, 428:

    commissa dextera dextrae,

    Ov. H. 2, 31:

    medulla spinae commissa cerebro,

    Cels. 8, 1:

    moles, quae urbem continenti committeret,

    Curt. 4, 2, 16; Flor. 1, 4, 2 Duker.—
    (δ).
    With in and acc.:

    commissa in unum crura,

    Ov. M. 4, 580:

    committuntur suturae in unguem,

    Cels. 8, 1.—
    (ε).
    With acc. only: barbaricam pestem navibus obtulit, commissam infabre, Pac. ap. Non. p. 40, 31 (Trag. Rel. v. 271 Rib.):

    commissis operibus,

    Liv. 38, 7, 10:

    fidibusque mei commissa mariti moenia,

    Ov. M. 6, 178:

    (terra) maria committeret,

    Curt. 3, 1, 13; 7, 7, 14:

    noctes duas,

    Ov. Am. 1, 13, 46; cf.: nocte commissā. Sen. Herc. Oet. 1698:

    commissa corpore toto,

    Ov. M. 4, 369; Lucil. ap. Non. p. 248, 25: cervix committitur primo [p. 380] artu, Val. Fl. 4, 310:

    domus plumbo commissa,

    patched, Juv. 14, 310.—
    B.
    In partic., to set or bring men or animals together in a contest or fight, as competitors, etc., to set together, set on (freq. in Suet.;

    elsewhere rare): pugiles Latinos cum Graecis,

    Suet. Aug. 45:

    quingenis peditibus, elephantis vicenis, tricenis equitibus hinc et inde commissis,

    id. Caes. 39; id. Claud. 34:

    camelorum quadrigas,

    id. Ner. 11; Luc. 1, 97:

    victores committe,

    Mart. 8, 43, 3; cf. id. Spect. 28, 1:

    licet Aenean Rutulumque ferocem Committas,

    i.e. you describe their contest in your poem, you bring them in contact with each other, Juv. 1, 162:

    eunucho Bromium committere noli,

    id. 6, 378:

    inter se omnes,

    Suet. Calig. 56:

    aequales inter se,

    id. Gram. 17.—
    b.
    Trop., to bring together for comparison, to compare, put together, match:

    committit vates et comparat, inde Maronem, Atque aliā parte in trutinā suspendit Homerum,

    Juv. 6, 436; cf. Prop. 2, 3, 21; Mart. 7, 24, 1.—
    2.
    Transf., of a battle, war: proelium, certamen, bellum, etc.
    a.
    To arrange a battle or contest, to enter upon, engage in, begin, join, commence, Cic. Div. 1, 35, 77:

    proelii committendi signum dare,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 21:

    cum proelium commissum audissent,

    id. ib. 7, 62:

    commisso ab equitibus proelio,

    id. B. C. 1, 40:

    in aciem exercitum eduxit proeliumque commisit,

    Nep. Eum. 3 fin.; id. Hann. 11, 3; id. Milt. 6, 3; Just. 2, 12, 7; 15, 4, 22; 22, 6, 6:

    postquam eo ventum est, ut a ferentariis proelium committi posset,

    Sall. C. 60, 2:

    commisso proelio, diutius nostrorum militum impetum hostes ferre non potuerunt,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 35; id. B. C. 1, 13; 2, 6 Kraner ad loc.:

    Caesar cohortatus suos proelium commisit,

    id. ib. 1, 25:

    utrum proelium committi ex usu esset, necne,

    id. ib. 1, 50; 1, 52; 2, 19; Nep. Milt. 5, 3:

    pridie quam Siciliensem pugnam classe committeret,

    Suet. Aug. 96:

    avidus committere pugnam,

    Sil. 8, 619:

    pugnas,

    Stat. Th. 6, 143:

    rixae committendae causā,

    Liv. 5, 25, 2:

    cum vates monere eum (regem) coepit, ne committeret, aut certe differret obsidionem,

    Curt. 9, 4, 27.—Of a drinking contest for a wager:

    a summo septenis cyathis committe hos ludos,

    Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 19:

    nondum commisso spectaculo,

    Liv. 2, 36, 1:

    musicum agona,

    Suet. Ner. 23:

    aciem,

    Flor. 4, 2, 46:

    commissum (bellum) ac profligatum conficere,

    Liv. 21, 40, 11; 8, 25, 5; 31, 28, 1 al.; cf.:

    si quis trium temporum momenta consideret, primo commissum bellum, profligatum secundo, tertio vero confectum est,

    Flor. 2, 15, 2:

    committere Martem,

    Sil. 13, 155:

    quo die ludi committebantur,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 4, 6:

    ludos dedicationis,

    Suet. Claud. 21:

    ludos,

    Verg. A. 5, 113.—
    b.
    In gen., to maintain a contest, etc., to fight a battle, to hold, celebrate games, etc. (rare):

    illam pugnam navalem... mediocri certamine commissam arbitraris?

    Cic. Mur. 15, 33:

    levia inde proelia per quatriduum commissa,

    Liv. 34, 37, 7:

    commisso modico certamine,

    id. 23, 44, 5.—
    (β).
    Absol. (post-Aug. and rare):

    contra quem Sulla iterum commisit,

    Eutr. 5, 6; 9, 24; Dig. 9, 1, 1:

    priusquam committeretur,

    before the contest began, Suet. Vesp. 5.—
    3.
    In gen.: committere aliquid, to begin any course of action, to undertake, carry on, hold (rare):

    tribuni sanguine commissa proscriptio,

    Vell. 2, 64 fin.:

    judicium inter sicarios committitur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 5, 11. —In part. perf.:

    egregie ad ultimum in audacter commisso perseveravit,

    Liv. 44, 4, 11; cf. id. ib. § 8; 44, 6, 14.—
    4.
    In partic., to practise or perpetrate wrong, do injustice; to commit a crime (very freq. and class.).
    (α).
    With acc.:

    ut neque timeant, qui nihil commiserint, et poenam semper ante oculos versari putent, qui peccaverint,

    Cic. Mil. 23, 61; cf. Quint. 7, 2, 30:

    commississe cavet quod mox mutare laboret,

    Hor. A. P. 168:

    ego etiam quae tu sine Verre commisisti, Verri crimini daturus sum,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 11, 35:

    quantum flagitii,

    id. Brut. 61, 219:

    tantum facinus,

    id. Rosc. Am. 23, 65:

    virilis audaciae facinora,

    Sall. C. 25, 1:

    majus delictum,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 4:

    nil nefandum,

    Ov. M. 9, 626:

    nefarias res,

    Cic. Phil. 6, 1, 2:

    scelus,

    id. Sull. 2, 6; Dig. 48, 9, 7:

    adulterium,

    Quint. 7, 2, 11; 7, 3, 1:

    incestum cum filio,

    id. 5, 10, 19:

    parricidium,

    id. 7, 2, 2:

    caedem,

    id. 7, 4, 43; 10, 1, 12; 5, 12, 3:

    sacrilegium,

    id. 7, 2, 18:

    fraudem,

    Hor. C. 1, 28, 31.— Aliquid adversus, in, erga:

    committere multa et in deos et in homines impie nefarieque,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 2, § 6; cf.:

    in te,

    Verg. A. 1, 231:

    aliquid adversus populum Romanum,

    Liv. 42, 38, 3:

    aliquid erga te,

    Cic. Att. 3, 20, 3.—
    (β).
    Committere contra legem, in legem, lege, to offend, sin, commit an offence:

    quasi committeret contra legem,

    Cic. Brut. 12, 48:

    in legem Juliam de adulteriis,

    Dig. 48, 5, 39; 48, 10, 13:

    adversus testamentum,

    ib. 34, 3, 8, § 2:

    ne lege censoriā committant,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 1, 16:

    lege de sicariis,

    Quint. 7, 1, 9. —
    (γ).
    Absol.:

    hoc si in posterum edixisses, minus esset nefarium... nemo enim committeret,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 43, § 110.—
    (δ).
    With ut, to be guilty or be in fault, so that, to give occasion or cause, that, to act so as that:

    id me commissurum ut patiar fieri,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 78:

    non committet hodie iterum ut vapulet,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 1, 5:

    ego nolo quemquam civem committere, ut morte multandus sit: tu, etiam si commiserit, conservandum putas,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 5, 15:

    committere ut accusator nominere,

    id. Off. 2, 14, 50; so Liv. 25, 6, 17:

    non committam, ut tibi ipse insanire videar,

    Cic. Fam. 5, 5, 3; 3, 7, 3; id. Att. 1, 6, 1; 1, 20, 3; id. de Or. 2, 57, 233; id. Off. 3, 2, 6; Brut. ap. Cic. Fam. 11, 20, 1, Quint. 1, 10, 30; 5, 13, 27; Cic. Leg. 1, 13, 37.—More rare in a like sense,
    (ε).
    With cur or quare:

    Caedicius negare se commissurum, cur sibi quisquam imperium finiret,

    Liv. 5, 46, 6:

    neque commissum a se, quare timeret,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 14.—
    (ζ).
    With inf.:

    non committunt scamna facere,

    Col. 2, 4, 3:

    infelix committit saepe repelli,

    Ov. M. 9, 632.—
    b.
    Poenam, multam, etc., jurid. t. t., to bring punishment upon one ' s self by an error or fault, to incur, make one ' s self liable to it:

    poenam,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 12, § 30; cf. Quint. 7, 4, 20; and:

    committere in poenam edicti,

    Dig. 2, 2, 4:

    ut illam multam non commiserit,

    Cic. Clu. 37, 103; Dig. 35, 1, 6 pr.—
    (β).
    Committi, with a definite object, to be forfeited or confiscated, as a penalty:

    hereditas Veneri Erycinae commissa,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 10, § 27; 2, 2, 14, § 36; so,

    commissae hypothecae,

    id. Fam. 13, 56, 2:

    commissa tibi fiducia,

    id. Fl. 21, 51:

    merces,

    Dig. 39, 4, 11, § 2:

    mancipium,

    ib. 39, 14, 6:

    praedia in publicum,

    ib. 3, 5, 12:

    hanc devotionem capitis esse commissam,

    incurred, Cic. Dom. 57, 145.—
    c.
    Also (mostly in jurid. Lat.) of laws, judicial regulations, promises, etc., that become binding in consequence of the fulfilment of a condition as the commission of a crime, etc.:

    in civitatem obligatam sponsione commissa iratis omnibus diis,

    a promise the condition of which has been fulfilled, Liv. 9, 11, 10 Weissenb. ad loc.; cf.:

    hanc ego devotionem capitis mei... convictam esse et commissam putabo,

    Cic. Dom. 57, 145:

    si alius committat edictum,

    transgresses, incurs its penalty, makes himself liable to, Dig. 37, 4, 3, § 11; cf.:

    commisso edicto ab alio filio, ib. lex 8, § 4: commisso per alium edicto, ib. lex 10, § 1 al.: statim atque commissa lex est,

    ib. 18, 3, 4, § 2:

    committetur stipulatio,

    ib. 24, 3, 56.
    II.
    To place a thing somewhere for preservation, protection, care, etc.; to give, intrust, commit to, to give up or resign to, to trust (syn.: commendo, trado, credo; very freq. and class.); constr. with aliquid ( aliquem) alicui, in aliquid, or absol.
    (α).
    Aliquid ( aliquem, se) alicui:

    honor non solum datus sed etiam creditus ac commissus,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 14, § 35:

    nec illi (Catoni) committendum illud negotium, sed inponendum putaverunt,

    id. Sest. 28, 60:

    qui capita vestra non dubitatis credere, cui calceandos nemo commisit pedes?

    Phaedr. 1, 14, 16:

    ego me tuae commendo et committo fidei,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 2, 47 (cf. id. And. 1, 5, 61):

    ne quid committam tibi,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 3, 21; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 15; id. And. 3, 5, 3; cf.:

    his salutem nostram, his fortunas, his liberos rectissime committi arbitramur,

    Cic. Off. 2, 9, 33; id. Att. 1, 13, 1; cf. id. ib. §

    4: tibi rem magnam,

    id. Fam. 13, 5, 1; id. Mil. 25, 68:

    quia commissi sunt eis magistratus,

    id. Planc. 25, 61:

    summum imperium potestatemque omnium rerum alicui,

    Nep. Lys. 1 fin.:

    domino rem omnem,

    Hor. S. 2, 7, 67:

    caput tonsori,

    id. A. P. 301:

    ratem pelago,

    id. C. 1, 3, 11:

    sulcis semina (corresp. with spem credere terrae),

    Verg. G. 1, 223; cf.:

    committere semen sitienti solo,

    Col. 2, 8, 4:

    ulcus frigori,

    Cels. 6, 18, n. 2:

    aliquid litteris,

    Cic. Att. 4, 1, 8; so,

    verba tabellis,

    Ov. M. 9, 587:

    vivunt commissi calores Aeoliae fidibus puellae,

    Hor. C. 4, 9, 11 al.:

    committere se populo, senatui, publicis praesidiis et armis (corresp. with se tradere),

    Cic. Mil. 23, 61; so,

    se urbi,

    id. Att. 15, 11, 1:

    se theatro populoque Romano,

    id. Sest. 54, 116:

    se proelio,

    Liv. 4, 59, 2:

    se pugnae,

    id. 5, 32, 4:

    se publico,

    to venture into the streets, Suet. Ner. 26:

    se neque navigationi, neque viae,

    Cic. Fam. 16, 8, 1; cf. id. Phil. 12, 10, 25; id. Imp. Pomp. 11, 31:

    se timidius fortunae,

    id. Att. 9, 6, 4:

    civilibus fluctibus,

    Nep. Att. 6, 1 al. —Prov.: ovem lupo (Gr. kataleipein oïn en lukoisi), Ter. Eun. 5, 1, 16.—
    (β).
    Aliquid ( aliquem, se) in aliquid (so esp. freq. in Liv.):

    aliquid in alicujus fidem committere,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 34; cf. Liv. 30, 14, 4:

    se in id conclave,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 23, 64:

    se in conspectum populi Romani,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 11, § 26; cf. Pompei. ap. Cic. Att. 8, 12, C, 2:

    se in senatum,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 2, 2; id. Ac. 2, 21, 68:

    summae fuisse dementiae dubiā spe impulsum certum in periculum se committere,

    id. Inv. 2, 8, 27:

    rem in casum ancipitis eventus,

    Liv. 4, 27, 6; cf.:

    duos filios in aleam ejus casus,

    id. 40, 21, 6:

    rem in aciem,

    id. 3, 2, 12; cf.:

    se in aciem,

    id. 7, 26, 11; 23, 11, 10;

    rempublicam in discrimen,

    id. 8, 32, 4; cf.:

    rerum summam in discrimen,

    id. 33, 7, 10. —
    (γ).
    Simply alicui, or entirely absol.:

    sanan' es, Quae isti committas?

    in trusting to him, Plaut. Curc. 5, 2, 55:

    ei commisi et credidi, Ter, Heaut. 5, 2, 13: haec cum scirem et cogitarem, commisi tamen, judices, Heio,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 7, § 16:

    universo populo neque ipse committit neque illi horum consiliorum auctores committi recte putant posse,

    id. Agr. 2, 8, 20:

    venti, quibus necessario committendum existimabat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 25:

    sed quoniam non es veritus concredere nobis, accipe commissae munera laetitiae,

    intrusted, Prop. 1, 10, 12:

    instant enim (adversarii) et saepe discrimen omne committunt, quod deesse nobis putant,

    often hazard the most important advantage, Quint. 6, 4, 17:

    cum senatus ei commiserit, ut videret, ne quid res publica detrimenti caperet,

    Cic. Mil. 26, 70.—With de:

    iste negat se de existimatione suā cuiquam nisi suis commissurum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 60, § 137. —Hence, P. a. as subst.: commissum, i, n.
    A.
    (Acc. to I. 3.) An undertaking, enterprise:

    nec aliud restabat quam audacter commissum corrigere,

    Liv. 44, 4, 8:

    supererat nihil aliud in temere commisso, quam, etc.,

    id. 44, 6, 14.—
    B.
    (Acc. to I. 4.) A transgression, offence, fault, crime:

    sacrum,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 9, 22:

    nisi aut quid commissi aut est causa jurgi,

    Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 21:

    ecquod hujus factum aut commissum non dicam audacius, sed quod, etc.,

    Cic. Sull. 26, 72; cf.

    turpe,

    Hor. C. 3, 27, 39:

    commissi praemia,

    Ov. F. 4, 590.—In plur.:

    post mihi non simili poenā commissa luetis,

    offences, Verg. A. 1, 136; so,

    fateri,

    Stat. S. 5, 5, 5:

    improba,

    Claud. Rapt. Pros. 2, 304.—
    2.
    Jurid. Lat., an incurring of fines, a confiscation or confiscated property, Suet. Calig. 41:

    in commissum cadere,

    Dig. 39, 4, 16:

    causa commissi,

    ib. 39, 4, 16 al.; 19, 2, 61 fin.:

    aliquid pro commisso tenetur,

    Quint. Decl. 341.—
    C.
    (Acc. to II.) That which is intrusted, a secret, trust:

    enuntiare commissa,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 13, 31:

    commissa celare,

    Nep. Epam. 3, 2; cf. Juv. 9, 93:

    commissa tacere,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 84:

    prodere,

    id. ib. 1, 3, 95:

    retinent commissa fideliter aures,

    id. Ep. 1, 18, 70:

    commissum teges (corresp. with arcanum scrutaberis),

    id. ib. 1, 18, 38; cf. id. A. P. 200.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > conmitto

  • 15 conor

    cōnor, ātus, 1, v. dep., to undertake, endeavor, attempt, try, venture, presume, etc. (freq. and class.;

    syn. molior,

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 2, 11;

    opp. facere,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 19, 54;

    opp. perficere,

    id. Or. 30, 105); constr. with acc., inf., rarely with abl. of the gerund., or absol.
    (α).
    With acc. (mostly of indef. objects):

    quicquam fallaciae,

    Ter. And. 1, 2, 26:

    istuc,

    id. ib. 1, 5, 35:

    idem,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 3:

    opus magnum et arduum,

    Cic. Or. 10, 33:

    id quod conantur,

    id. Cat. 2, 9, 19:

    multa,

    id. Or. 30, 105; id. Fin. 1, 16, 82: tantum scelus, id. Fragm. ap. Quint. 5, 13, 30; cf.:

    tantam rem,

    Liv. 42, 59, 8:

    muita stulte,

    Nep. Hann. 8, 3; Quint. 2, 4, 10:

    plurima frustra,

    Verg. A. 9, 398.—
    (β).
    With inf. (freq.):

    hoc dicere,

    Cic. Quint. 20, 62:

    aliquid facere,

    id. Rosc. Am. 19, 54:

    me labefactare,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 14, 44:

    poëtas attingere,

    id. de Or. 2, 14, 61:

    versus pangere,

    Lucr. 1, 26:

    pueris absinthia dare,

    id. 1, 936; 4, 12 al.:

    facere id quod constituerant,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 5:

    invito transire,

    id. ib. 1, 8:

    tela mittere,

    Cat. 116, 3; Hor. C. 1, 6, 9; id. Ep. 1, 1, 19.—
    * (γ).
    With abl. gerundii:

    ne frustra dehortando impedire conemini,

    that you attempt not vainly to dissuade, Nep. Att. 21, 6.—
    (δ).
    With si:

    saepius noctu, si perrumpere possent, conati,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 8, 4. —
    (ε).
    Absol.:

    dum moliuntur (mulieres), dum conantur, annus est,

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 2, 11:

    conari manibus pedibus noctisque et dies,

    id. And. 4, 1, 52:

    conantibus, priusquam id effici posset, adesse Romanos nuntiatur,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 4:

    qui prius cogitare quam conari consuesset,

    before he proceeded to the undertaking, Nep. Dat. 7, 1:

    ego obviam conabar tibi,

    Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 2:

    audax ad conandum,

    Liv. 45, 23, 15.—
    b.
    Hence, subst.: cōnāta, ōrum, n., in pass. signif., an undertaking, attempt, venture, hazard (class.), Att. ap. Non. p. 202, 14; Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 39; Lucr. 5, 386; Caes. B. G. 1, 3; Nep. Dion, 8, 5; Liv. 21, 50, 9; 42, 11, 3; Quint. 8, 3, 69; Suet. Galb. 17; Ov. M. 10, 420; 14, 755 sq.; Juv. 13, 210; Vell. 2, 35, 5 et saep.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > conor

  • 16 inrumpo

    irrumpo ( inr-), rūpi, ruptum, 3, v. n. and a. [in-rumpo], to break, burst, or rush in or into.
    I.
    Lit.
    (α).
    With advv. or prepp.:

    cesso huc intro inrumpere?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 6, 26:

    nec inrumpo, quo non licet ire,

    Ov. P. 1, 7, 23:

    quocunque,

    id. Tr. 2, 305:

    qua irrumpens oceanus, etc.,

    Plin. 3 prooem. §

    3: in castra,

    Cic. Div. 1, 24, 50; Caes. B. G. 4, 14; 6, 36:

    in eam partem hostium,

    id. ib. 5, 43:

    in medios hostes,

    id. ib. 7, 50:

    in castellum,

    id. B. C. 3, 67:

    cum telis ad aliquem,

    Sall. C. 50, 2:

    ad regem,

    Vulg. 4 Reg. 3, 26:

    mare in aversa Asiae,

    Plin. 6, 13, 15, § 36:

    intra tecta,

    Sen. Oct. 732:

    tellurem irrumpentem in sidera,

    Sil. 15, 167: se in curiam, Varr. ap. Non. 263, 21:

    irrumpentis in curiam turbae,

    Suet. Calig. 14:

    in Macedoniam,

    Just. 24, 6, 1:

    vacuos in agros,

    Luc. 2, 441.—
    (β).
    With acc.:

    quin oppidum irrumperent,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 13. 4:

    domum alicujus,

    id. ib. 3, 111, 1:

    portam,

    Sall. J. 58, 1; 25, 9:

    castra,

    Just. 2, 11, 15:

    interiora domus irrumpit limina,

    Verg. A. 4, 645:

    moenia Romae,

    Sil. 13, 79:

    stationes hostium,

    Tac. H. 3, 9:

    Italiam,

    id. ib. 4, 13:

    Karthaginem,

    Plin. 35, 4, 7, § 23:

    cubiculum,

    Suet. Claud. 37:

    triclinium,

    id. Vesp. 5:

    vacuam arcem,

    Sil. 2, 692.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    thalamo,

    Verg. A. 6, 528:

    templo,

    Sil. 2, 378:

    trepidis,

    id. 9, 365:

    sacris muris,

    id. 10, 368:

    tectis,

    id. 13, 176.—
    (δ).
    Absol.:

    cum irrumpere nostri conarentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 67:

    ad primum gemitum,

    upon the first groan, Suet. Oth. 11:

    dixit et irrupit,

    Ov. F. 6, 453:

    cognoscit hostes pluribus agminibus inrupturos,

    Tac. Agr. 25.—
    II.
    Trop., to break or rush in or upon; to intrude upon, invade, attack, interrupt:

    quo modo in Academiam irruperit,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 44, 136:

    imagines in animos per corpus irrumpunt,

    id. ib. 2, 40, 125:

    in alicujus patrimonium,

    id. de Or. 3, 27, 108:

    luxuries in domum irrupit,

    id. ib. 3, 42, 168:

    in nostrum fletum,

    id. Lig. 5, 13:

    calamitates, quae ad me irruperunt,

    Sen. Ep. 117:

    irrumpet adulatio,

    Tac. H. 1, 15: grammatici ad prosopopoeias usque... irrumpunt, venture upon, i. e. presume to teach, Quint. 2, 1, 2:

    Deos,

    i. e. boldly inquire the will of the gods, Stat. Achill. 1, 508:

    Phoebe, hanc dignare irrumpere mentem,

    to enter, inspire, id. Th. 10, 341:

    animos populi,

    Luc. 1, 470; 5, 167:

    extremique fragor convexa irrupit Olympi,

    id. 7, 478.—
    B.
    To break, violate:

    foedus,

    Lact. 1, 18, 17; Vulg. 2 Macc. 13, 25:

    institutum, Lact. de Ira Dei, 14, 6: legem,

    Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 20:

    pacem,

    Cassiod. Var. 5, 43.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > inrumpo

  • 17 irrumpo

    irrumpo ( inr-), rūpi, ruptum, 3, v. n. and a. [in-rumpo], to break, burst, or rush in or into.
    I.
    Lit.
    (α).
    With advv. or prepp.:

    cesso huc intro inrumpere?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 6, 26:

    nec inrumpo, quo non licet ire,

    Ov. P. 1, 7, 23:

    quocunque,

    id. Tr. 2, 305:

    qua irrumpens oceanus, etc.,

    Plin. 3 prooem. §

    3: in castra,

    Cic. Div. 1, 24, 50; Caes. B. G. 4, 14; 6, 36:

    in eam partem hostium,

    id. ib. 5, 43:

    in medios hostes,

    id. ib. 7, 50:

    in castellum,

    id. B. C. 3, 67:

    cum telis ad aliquem,

    Sall. C. 50, 2:

    ad regem,

    Vulg. 4 Reg. 3, 26:

    mare in aversa Asiae,

    Plin. 6, 13, 15, § 36:

    intra tecta,

    Sen. Oct. 732:

    tellurem irrumpentem in sidera,

    Sil. 15, 167: se in curiam, Varr. ap. Non. 263, 21:

    irrumpentis in curiam turbae,

    Suet. Calig. 14:

    in Macedoniam,

    Just. 24, 6, 1:

    vacuos in agros,

    Luc. 2, 441.—
    (β).
    With acc.:

    quin oppidum irrumperent,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 13. 4:

    domum alicujus,

    id. ib. 3, 111, 1:

    portam,

    Sall. J. 58, 1; 25, 9:

    castra,

    Just. 2, 11, 15:

    interiora domus irrumpit limina,

    Verg. A. 4, 645:

    moenia Romae,

    Sil. 13, 79:

    stationes hostium,

    Tac. H. 3, 9:

    Italiam,

    id. ib. 4, 13:

    Karthaginem,

    Plin. 35, 4, 7, § 23:

    cubiculum,

    Suet. Claud. 37:

    triclinium,

    id. Vesp. 5:

    vacuam arcem,

    Sil. 2, 692.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    thalamo,

    Verg. A. 6, 528:

    templo,

    Sil. 2, 378:

    trepidis,

    id. 9, 365:

    sacris muris,

    id. 10, 368:

    tectis,

    id. 13, 176.—
    (δ).
    Absol.:

    cum irrumpere nostri conarentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 67:

    ad primum gemitum,

    upon the first groan, Suet. Oth. 11:

    dixit et irrupit,

    Ov. F. 6, 453:

    cognoscit hostes pluribus agminibus inrupturos,

    Tac. Agr. 25.—
    II.
    Trop., to break or rush in or upon; to intrude upon, invade, attack, interrupt:

    quo modo in Academiam irruperit,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 44, 136:

    imagines in animos per corpus irrumpunt,

    id. ib. 2, 40, 125:

    in alicujus patrimonium,

    id. de Or. 3, 27, 108:

    luxuries in domum irrupit,

    id. ib. 3, 42, 168:

    in nostrum fletum,

    id. Lig. 5, 13:

    calamitates, quae ad me irruperunt,

    Sen. Ep. 117:

    irrumpet adulatio,

    Tac. H. 1, 15: grammatici ad prosopopoeias usque... irrumpunt, venture upon, i. e. presume to teach, Quint. 2, 1, 2:

    Deos,

    i. e. boldly inquire the will of the gods, Stat. Achill. 1, 508:

    Phoebe, hanc dignare irrumpere mentem,

    to enter, inspire, id. Th. 10, 341:

    animos populi,

    Luc. 1, 470; 5, 167:

    extremique fragor convexa irrupit Olympi,

    id. 7, 478.—
    B.
    To break, violate:

    foedus,

    Lact. 1, 18, 17; Vulg. 2 Macc. 13, 25:

    institutum, Lact. de Ira Dei, 14, 6: legem,

    Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 20:

    pacem,

    Cassiod. Var. 5, 43.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > irrumpo

  • 18 metuo

    mĕtŭo, ŭi, ūtum (cf.:

    nimis ante metutum,

    Lucr. 5, 1140), 3, v. a. and n. [metus], to fear, be afraid of a person or thing; to hesitate, not to venture, not to wish (syn.: vereor, formido, timeo); with inf., with ne, to fear lest; with ui or ne non, to fear that not; also of inanimate things, with acc., to fear, revere, reverence one; as a v. n., to fear, be afraid, be in fear, be apprehensive, esp. as the effect of the idea of threatening evil (whereas timere usually denotes the effect of some external cause of terror); to dread, apprehend; with an indirect interrogation: non metuo quin, for non dubito quin, I doubt not but; to be anxious about any one; with dat. (class.).
    I.
    Act.: quem metuont oderunt, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 2, 7, 23 (Trag. v. 403 Vahl.):

    deos et amo et metuo,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 73:

    male ego metuo milvos,

    id. ib. 5, 5, 13:

    metuebant (senem) servi, verebantur liberi,

    Cic. Sen. 11, 37:

    tu, qui crimen ais te metuisse,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 30, § 78: nec pol istae metuunt Deos, Ter. Hec. 5, 2, 6:

    absentem patrem,

    id. Phorm. 1, 2, 68:

    nec metuit quemquam,

    id. Ad. 1, 2, 5.—With ab:

    quid a nobis metuit?

    Plaut. Capt. 2, 1, 12:

    a me insidias,

    Cic. Fam. 5, 6, 2:

    supplicia a vobis metuere debent,

    to fear from you, id. Rosc. Am. 3, 8:

    a quo (Ajace) sibi non injuriā summum periculum metuebat,

    Auct. Her. 2, 19, 29:

    a quo domino sibi metuebat graves cruciatus,

    Aug. Lib. Arbitr. 1, 4, 9; Gregor. M. Homil. 1, 14, 2; Aug. cont. Acad. 2, 8.—With ex:

    si periculum ex illis metuit,

    Sall. C. 52, 16.—With de:

    de lanificio neminem metuo, una aetate quae sit,

    i. e. no one's competition in spinning, Plaut. Merc. 3, 1, 22.—Of inanim. subjects:

    quae res cotidie videntur, minus metuunt furem,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 22.—
    (β).
    With inf.:

    metuont credere omnes,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 3, 70:

    ut tentare spem certaminis metuunt,

    Liv. 32, 31:

    nil metuunt jurare,

    Cat. 64, 146:

    reddere soldum,

    not to wish, be averse to, Hor. S. 2, 5, 65:

    praebere,

    id. Ep. 1, 18, 1.—Of nonpersonal subjects:

    illum aget pennā metuente solvi Fama superstes,

    Hor. C. 2, 2, 7. —
    (γ).
    With ne:

    nimis metuebam male, ne abiisses,

    Plaut. Ps. 4, 1, 8:

    male metuo ne... morbus aggravescat,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 2, 2:

    fratrem, ne intus sit (Gr. construction),

    id. Eun. 3, 5, 62.—
    (δ).
    With ut:

    ornamenta, quae locavi, metuo, ut possim recipere,

    Plaut. Curc. 4, 1, 3:

    metuo ut hodie possim emolirier,

    id. Bacch. 4, 5, 2:

    metuo ut substet hospes,

    Ter. And. 5, 4, 11:

    ut sis vitalis,

    Hor. S. 2, 1, 61.—
    (ε).
    With ne non:

    metuo ne non sit surda,

    Plaut. Cas. 3, 3, 12; id. Pers. 4, 6, 4:

    metuis ne non, quom velis, convincas esse illum tuom?

    Ter. Heaut. 5, 3, 15.—
    (ζ).
    With quin:

    non metuo meae quin uxori latae suppetiae sient,

    Plaut. Am. 5, 1, 54.—
    (η).
    With object-clause, to await with fear, anxiety; to be in apprehension, concerned about:

    metuo, patres quot fuerint,

    Plaut. Truc. 4, 3, 35:

    metui, quid futurum denique esset,

    I dreaded, awaited with fear, Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 8: metuo quid agam. Sy. Metuis? quasi non ea potestas sit tua, etc., id. ib. 4, 3, 42:

    metuo qualem tu me esse hominem existumes,

    id. Eun. 4, 6, 20.—
    (θ).
    Pass. with dat.:

    jam maturis metuendus Juppiter uvis,

    Verg. G. 2, 419. —
    (ι).
    Absol.:

    se e contempto metuendum fecit,

    Sall. H. 1, 48, 3.—
    B.
    (Eccl. Lat.) Of religious fear, to revere, dread, hold in reverence:

    Deum,

    Vulg. Lev. 25, 43:

    Dominum Deum nostrum,

    id. Jer. 5, 24:

    sanctuarium meum,

    id. Lev. 19, 30.—
    II.
    Neutr., to fear, be afraid, be apprehensive, etc.
    (α).
    With de:

    neque tam de suā vitā, quam de me metuit,

    fears not so much for his own life as for me, Cic. Att. 10, 4, 6.—
    (β).
    With ab:

    metuens ab Hannibale,

    afraid of Hannibal, Liv. 23, 36.—
    (γ).
    With pro:

    metuere pro aliquo,

    Petr. 123.—
    (δ).
    With dat., to be anxious about or for a person or thing:

    metuens pueris,

    Plaut. Am. 5, 1, 60:

    inopi metuens formica senectae,

    Verg. G. 1, 186:

    tum decuit metuisse tuis,

    id. A. 10, 94.—Hence, mĕtŭens, entis, P. a., fearing, afraid of any thing; anxious for any person or thing; with gen. or absol. (mostly poet. and in post-Aug. prose):

    contentus parvo metuensque futuri,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 110:

    metuens virgae,

    Juv. 7, 210.— Comp.:

    quo non metuentius ullum Numinis ingenium,

    Ov. F. 6, 259:

    Nero metuentior in posterum,

    Tac. A. 13, 25.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > metuo

  • 19 periclitatus

    pĕrīclĭtor, ātus, 1 (periclitatus, in pass. signif.; v. infra fin.), v. dep. a. and n. [periculum].
    I.
    Act.
    A.
    In gen., to try, prove, test any thing, to make a trial of, put to the test (class.;

    syn.: experior, tento): periclitatus animum sum tuum, quid faceres,

    Plaut. Am 3, 2, 33:

    an periclitamini Quid animi habeam,

    id. ib. 2, 2, 57:

    belli fortunam tentare ac periclitari,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 50, § 132:

    omnia,

    id. Quint. 31, 96: fidem alicujus. Sol. 19:

    in periclitandis experiundisque pueris,

    Cic. Div. 2, 46, 97:

    periclitandae vires ingenii,

    id. de Or. 1, 34, 157:

    exerceri in rebus cominus noscendis periclitandisque,

    Gell. 13, 8, 2.—
    B.
    In partic., to put in peril, to endanger, risk, jeopard (rare but class.): non est saepius in uno homine salus summa periclitanda rei publicae, Cic. [p. 1344] Cat. 1, 5, 11.—
    II.
    Neutr.
    A.
    To try, attempt, make an attempt (class.): periclitari volui, si, etc., Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 18, 3:

    cotidie quid nostri auderent, periclitabatur,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 8; Cic. Off. 3, 18, 73.—
    2.
    Pregn., to venture, to be bold or enterprising (post-Aug.):

    proeliis et periclitando tuti sunt,

    Tac. G. 40.—
    B.
    To be in danger or peril, to incur or be exposed to danger, to be endangered or imperilled (class.):

    ut potius Gallorum vita quam legionariorum periclitaretur,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 33: ne de summā imperii populus Romanus periclitetur, Aug. ap. Suet. Tib. 21.—
    (β).
    With abl.:

    famā ingenii,

    Liv. 40, 15:

    capite,

    to have one's head in danger, be in danger of losing one's head, Mart. 6, 26, 1:

    veneno,

    Just. 37, 3, 7:

    paralysi,

    Plin. 20, 15, 59, § 165:

    causā,

    to be on trial, Quint. 7, 2, 12.—
    (γ).
    With gen. (postclass.):

    capitis,

    to be in peril of one's life, App. M. 8, p. 216, 13.—
    (δ).
    With inf. (postAug.):

    periclitabatur totam paene tragoediam evertere,

    Petr. 140:

    rumpi,

    Quint. 11, 3, 42; Plin. 26, 11, 69, § 112.—With ab and abl.:

    ab obtrectatore,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29.—With pro:

    pro veritate,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29.—With propter:

    propter te cotidie,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29:

    propter peccatum,

    Petr. 30, 7.—With ex:

    periclitantes ex canis rabiosi morsu,

    Plin. 32, 5, 19, § 54.—
    2.
    Trop.: ut verba non periclitentur, that the words may run no danger (of losing the cause), Quint. 7, 3, 17.—Hence, pĕrīclĭtātus, a, um, part. perf.; in pass. signif., tried, tested:

    periclitatis moribus amicorum,

    Cic. Lael. 17, 63.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > periclitatus

  • 20 periclitor

    pĕrīclĭtor, ātus, 1 (periclitatus, in pass. signif.; v. infra fin.), v. dep. a. and n. [periculum].
    I.
    Act.
    A.
    In gen., to try, prove, test any thing, to make a trial of, put to the test (class.;

    syn.: experior, tento): periclitatus animum sum tuum, quid faceres,

    Plaut. Am 3, 2, 33:

    an periclitamini Quid animi habeam,

    id. ib. 2, 2, 57:

    belli fortunam tentare ac periclitari,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 50, § 132:

    omnia,

    id. Quint. 31, 96: fidem alicujus. Sol. 19:

    in periclitandis experiundisque pueris,

    Cic. Div. 2, 46, 97:

    periclitandae vires ingenii,

    id. de Or. 1, 34, 157:

    exerceri in rebus cominus noscendis periclitandisque,

    Gell. 13, 8, 2.—
    B.
    In partic., to put in peril, to endanger, risk, jeopard (rare but class.): non est saepius in uno homine salus summa periclitanda rei publicae, Cic. [p. 1344] Cat. 1, 5, 11.—
    II.
    Neutr.
    A.
    To try, attempt, make an attempt (class.): periclitari volui, si, etc., Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 18, 3:

    cotidie quid nostri auderent, periclitabatur,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 8; Cic. Off. 3, 18, 73.—
    2.
    Pregn., to venture, to be bold or enterprising (post-Aug.):

    proeliis et periclitando tuti sunt,

    Tac. G. 40.—
    B.
    To be in danger or peril, to incur or be exposed to danger, to be endangered or imperilled (class.):

    ut potius Gallorum vita quam legionariorum periclitaretur,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 33: ne de summā imperii populus Romanus periclitetur, Aug. ap. Suet. Tib. 21.—
    (β).
    With abl.:

    famā ingenii,

    Liv. 40, 15:

    capite,

    to have one's head in danger, be in danger of losing one's head, Mart. 6, 26, 1:

    veneno,

    Just. 37, 3, 7:

    paralysi,

    Plin. 20, 15, 59, § 165:

    causā,

    to be on trial, Quint. 7, 2, 12.—
    (γ).
    With gen. (postclass.):

    capitis,

    to be in peril of one's life, App. M. 8, p. 216, 13.—
    (δ).
    With inf. (postAug.):

    periclitabatur totam paene tragoediam evertere,

    Petr. 140:

    rumpi,

    Quint. 11, 3, 42; Plin. 26, 11, 69, § 112.—With ab and abl.:

    ab obtrectatore,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29.—With pro:

    pro veritate,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29.—With propter:

    propter te cotidie,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, Serm. 14, 29:

    propter peccatum,

    Petr. 30, 7.—With ex:

    periclitantes ex canis rabiosi morsu,

    Plin. 32, 5, 19, § 54.—
    2.
    Trop.: ut verba non periclitentur, that the words may run no danger (of losing the cause), Quint. 7, 3, 17.—Hence, pĕrīclĭtātus, a, um, part. perf.; in pass. signif., tried, tested:

    periclitatis moribus amicorum,

    Cic. Lael. 17, 63.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > periclitor

См. также в других словарях:

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