Перевод: с испанского на все языки

relentless

  • 1 acosador

    adj.
    hounding, pursuing, harassing.
    m.
    pursuer, harasser.
    * * *
    Ex. The title of the book is 'Net crimes & misdemeanors: outmaneuvering the spammers, swindlers, and stalkers who are targeting you online'.
    ----
    * acosador sexual = sex pest.
    * * *

    Ex: The title of the book is 'Net crimes & misdemeanors: outmaneuvering the spammers, swindlers, and stalkers who are targeting you online'.

    * acosador sexual = sex pest.

    * * *
    masculine, feminine
    A (hostigador) stalker
    la actriz sufría el asedio de un acosador the actress was being subjected to the attentions of a stalker
    B
    (en el colegio, trabajo) bully
    C
    (perseguidor) persecutor; tormentor
    * * *
    acosador, -ora
    adj
    relentless, persistent
    nm,f
    [en familia] abuser; [en el trabajo] (workplace) bully; [en la escuela] (school) bully

    Spanish-English dictionary > acosador

  • 2 acoso

    m.
    1 relentless pursuit.
    2 harassment (hostigamiento).
    acoso y derribo constant harrying
    acoso sexual sexual harassment
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: acosar.
    * * *
    1 pursuit, chase
    2 figurado hounding
    \
    acoso sexual sexual harassment
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=atosigamiento) harassment

    operación de acoso y derribo — (Mil) search and destroy operation

    acoso laboral — workplace bullying, workplace harassment

    2) (=persecución) relentless pursuit
    * * *
    a) ( de persona) hounding, harassment
    b) ( de presa) hounding, relentless pursuit
    * * *
    = harassment, persecution, stalking, bullying, mobbing.
    Ex. Incidents of harassment in libraries today between library employees and patrons or between one patron and another are on the increase.
    Ex. This paper discusses the problem of censorship and persecution of publishers by authoritarian regimes.
    Ex. States began passing anti stalking legislation in 1990 after a rash of stalking related murders and publicity surrounding the stalking of celebrities = Los estados empezaron a aprobar legislación contra el acecho en 1990 después de una racha de asesinatos relacionados con el acoso y de la publicidad que surgió relacionada con la persecución de famosos.
    Ex. The author focuses on the issues of divorce, bullying and homelessness, with reference to books published by Penguin and Puffin.
    Ex. Now, however, with nearly 80,000 foreign workers in the country, incidents of racism and discrimination (such as insults and mobbing in schoolyards) occur daily.
    ----
    * acoso en el trabajo = workplace mobbing.
    * acoso físico = physical harassment.
    * acoso laboral = workplace mobbing.
    * acoso sexual = sexual harassment.
    * aguantar el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.
    * pasar por el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.
    * sufrir el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.
    * * *
    a) ( de persona) hounding, harassment
    b) ( de presa) hounding, relentless pursuit
    * * *
    = harassment, persecution, stalking, bullying, mobbing.

    Ex: Incidents of harassment in libraries today between library employees and patrons or between one patron and another are on the increase.

    Ex: This paper discusses the problem of censorship and persecution of publishers by authoritarian regimes.
    Ex: States began passing anti stalking legislation in 1990 after a rash of stalking related murders and publicity surrounding the stalking of celebrities = Los estados empezaron a aprobar legislación contra el acecho en 1990 después de una racha de asesinatos relacionados con el acoso y de la publicidad que surgió relacionada con la persecución de famosos.
    Ex: The author focuses on the issues of divorce, bullying and homelessness, with reference to books published by Penguin and Puffin.
    Ex: Now, however, with nearly 80,000 foreign workers in the country, incidents of racism and discrimination (such as insults and mobbing in schoolyards) occur daily.
    * acoso en el trabajo = workplace mobbing.
    * acoso físico = physical harassment.
    * acoso laboral = workplace mobbing.
    * acoso sexual = sexual harassment.
    * aguantar el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.
    * pasar por el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.
    * sufrir el acoso de = run + the gauntlet of.

    * * *
    1 (de una persona) harassment
    el acoso sexual en el trabajo sexual harassment in the workplace
    2 (en el colegio, trabajo) bullying
    el problema del acoso escolar the problem of bullying at school
    niegan la existencia de acoso laboral they deny the existence of bullying in the workplace
    3 (de una presa) hounding, relentless pursuit
    * * *

     

    Del verbo acosar: ( conjugate acosar)

    acoso es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    acosó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    acosar    
    acoso
    acosar ( conjugate acosar) verbo transitivo
    a) persona to hound;

    ( sexualmente) to harass;
    me acosoon con preguntas they plagued o bombarded me with questions


    acoso sustantivo masculino



    acosar verbo transitivo
    1 to harass
    2 fig (asediar) to pester: la oposición acosó al Presidente del Gobierno con sus preguntas, the opposition pestered the Prime Minister with questions
    acoso sustantivo masculino harassment
    acoso sexual, sexual harassment
    ' acoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acosar
    - sexual
    English:
    harassment
    - persecution
    - sexual harrassment
    * * *
    acoso nm
    1. [persecución] relentless pursuit
    2. [hostigamiento] harassment
    acoso cibernético cyberstalking;
    acoso y derribo = rural sport in which horsemen harry and bring down bulls;
    Fig
    han denunciado una operación de acoso y derribo contra el presidente they have condemned the concerted attempt(s) to hound the president out of office;
    acoso escolar bullying [at school];
    acoso en Internet cyberstalking;
    acoso laboral workplace bullying;
    acoso sexual sexual harassment
    * * *
    m fig
    hounding, harassment
    * * *
    acoso nm
    asedio: harassment
    acoso sexual: sexual harassment

    Spanish-English dictionary > acoso

  • 3 avasallador

    adj.
    overpowering, domineering, relentless.
    * * *
    1 overwhelming, overpowering
    * * *
    * * *
    - dora, avasallante adjetivo
    a) <persona/actitud> domineering, overbearing
    b) < triunfo> resounding
    * * *
    = overbearing, overwhelming.
    Ex. Overbearing parents are likely to raise obsessive kids, according to a new study.
    Ex. More people are taking the dip into online business and abandoning the huge corporations with overwhelming superiors and unearthly hours.
    * * *
    - dora, avasallante adjetivo
    a) <persona/actitud> domineering, overbearing
    b) < triunfo> resounding
    * * *
    = overbearing, overwhelming.

    Ex: Overbearing parents are likely to raise obsessive kids, according to a new study.

    Ex: More people are taking the dip into online business and abandoning the huge corporations with overwhelming superiors and unearthly hours.

    * * *
    1 ‹persona/actitud› domineering, overbearing
    la fuerza avasalladora del mar embravecido the overwhelming o overpowering force of the stormy sea
    2 ‹triunfo› resounding ( before n)
    * * *

    avasallador
    ◊ - dora, avasallante adjetivo

    a)persona/actitud domineering, overbearing


    * * *
    avasallador, -ora
    adj
    overwhelming
    nm,f
    slave-driver
    * * *
    adj domineering
    * * *
    : overwhelming

    Spanish-English dictionary > avasallador

  • 4 conciencia de sí mismo

    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    * * *

    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.

    Spanish-English dictionary > conciencia de sí mismo

  • 5 conciencia de uno mismo

    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    * * *

    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.

    Spanish-English dictionary > conciencia de uno mismo

  • 6 conmovedor

    adj.
    moving, touching, emotional, stirring.
    * * *
    1 moving, touching
    * * *
    (f. - conmovedora)
    adj.
    moving, touching
    * * *
    ADJ moving, touching, poignant
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo moving, touching
    * * *
    = poignant, moving, stirring, heart-rending, heart-rendering, touching, breathtaking, heart-wrenching.
    Ex. There was something inexpressibly poignant about the sight of the once powerful Roger Balzac sitting quiescently like a victim in a noose across the desk from him.
    Ex. Of them all, The Cosy Owl by James Banks is perhaps the most instructive and moving novel.
    Ex. We must plan as best we can for known events while contriving to improvise when, as often happens, such stirring distractions occur unannounced.
    Ex. Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex. In a world of daily genocide, where two-thirds of humanity are condemned, it is touching to see a spark of what solidarity can do.
    Ex. This breathtaking building is 213 meters long and has over 300 windows.
    Ex. Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    ----
    * no conmovedor = unmoving.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo moving, touching
    * * *
    = poignant, moving, stirring, heart-rending, heart-rendering, touching, breathtaking, heart-wrenching.

    Ex: There was something inexpressibly poignant about the sight of the once powerful Roger Balzac sitting quiescently like a victim in a noose across the desk from him.

    Ex: Of them all, The Cosy Owl by James Banks is perhaps the most instructive and moving novel.
    Ex: We must plan as best we can for known events while contriving to improvise when, as often happens, such stirring distractions occur unannounced.
    Ex: Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex: In a world of daily genocide, where two-thirds of humanity are condemned, it is touching to see a spark of what solidarity can do.
    Ex: This breathtaking building is 213 meters long and has over 300 windows.
    Ex: Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    * no conmovedor = unmoving.

    * * *
    moving, touching
    * * *

    conmovedor
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    moving, touching
    conmovedor,-ora adjetivo moving: era una escena conmovedora, it was a touching scene

    ' conmovedor' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    conmovedora
    - emocionante
    English:
    emotional
    - moving
    - poignant
    - soulful
    - stirring
    - touching
    * * *
    conmovedor, -ora adj
    moving, touching
    * * *
    adj moving
    * * *
    emocionante: moving, touching
    * * *
    conmovedor adj moving

    Spanish-English dictionary > conmovedor

  • 7 desgarrador

    adj.
    heartbreaking, harrowing, tearing, heartrending.
    * * *
    1 heartbreaking, heart-rending
    2 (aterrador) bloodcurdling
    * * *
    ADJ [escena, noticia] heartbreaking, heartrending; [grito] piercing; [emoción] heartrending
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo heartbreaking, heartrending
    * * *
    = lancinating, heart-rending, heart-rendering, gut-wrenching, heart-wrenching, heartbreaking.
    Ex. The personnel officer experienced an involuntary shiver as the lancinating reality of the board's decision sank in.
    Ex. Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex. In these gut-wrenching times it's important to know who the strongest, healthiest providers are to keep your money out of harm's way!.
    Ex. Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    Ex. These are some of the most gripping, and most heartbreaking, pictures so far from Haiti in the aftermath of yesterday's devastating earthquake.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo heartbreaking, heartrending
    * * *
    = lancinating, heart-rending, heart-rendering, gut-wrenching, heart-wrenching, heartbreaking.

    Ex: The personnel officer experienced an involuntary shiver as the lancinating reality of the board's decision sank in.

    Ex: Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex: In these gut-wrenching times it's important to know who the strongest, healthiest providers are to keep your money out of harm's way!.
    Ex: Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    Ex: These are some of the most gripping, and most heartbreaking, pictures so far from Haiti in the aftermath of yesterday's devastating earthquake.

    * * *
    heartbreaking, heartrending
    * * *

    desgarrador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    heartbreaking, heartrending
    desgarrador,-ora adjetivo
    1 (que causa pena, angustia) heart-rending
    2 (que causa horror) bloodcurdling

    ' desgarrador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    desgarradora
    English:
    heart-breaking
    - harrowing
    - heart
    - piercing
    * * *
    desgarrador, -ora adj
    [grito] piercing; [llanto] heart-rending; [noticia] harrowing; [tragedia] terrible
    * * *
    adj heart-rending
    * * *
    : heartrending, heartbreaking

    Spanish-English dictionary > desgarrador

  • 8 despiadado

    adj.
    merciless, cruel, inhuman, cold-hearted.
    * * *
    1 ruthless, merciless
    * * *
    (f. - despiadada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] heartless; [ataque] merciless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.
    Ex. For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex. Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.

    Ex: For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex: Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.

    * * *
    ‹persona› ruthless, heartless; ‹ataque/crítica› savage, merciless
    * * *

    despiadado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ persona ruthless, heartless;


    ataque/crítica savage, merciless
    despiadado,-a adjetivo merciless, ruthless
    ' despiadado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acerba
    - acerbo
    - bárbara
    - bárbaro
    - despiadada
    English:
    cold-blooded
    - cold-hearted
    - cutthroat
    - merciless
    - pitiless
    - remorseless
    - ruthless
    - unmerciful
    - vicious
    - cold
    * * *
    despiadado, -a adj
    [persona] merciless; [trato] inhuman, pitiless; [ataque] savage, merciless
    * * *
    adj ruthless
    * * *
    despiadado, -da adj
    cruel: cruel, merciless, pitiless
    * * *
    despiadado adj hard-hearted / heartless / ruthless

    Spanish-English dictionary > despiadado

  • 9 estremecedor

    adj.
    shaking, shocking, striking.
    * * *
    1 startling
    2 (grito) bloodcurdling
    * * *
    ADJ alarming, disturbing
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo <escena/noticia> horrifying; <grito/relato> spine-chilling, hair-raising
    * * *
    = eerie, heart-rending, heart-rendering, touching, spooky [spookier -comp., spookiest -sup.], spine-tingling, groundshaking, heart-wrenching, thrilling.
    Ex. Undoubtedly in Dickens's 'Oliver Twist' we are meant to feel the eerie terror of Oliver's first night spent with the coffins in the undertaker's workshop, where he is made to sleep.
    Ex. Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex. In a world of daily genocide, where two-thirds of humanity are condemned, it is touching to see a spark of what solidarity can do.
    Ex. Records are even being sold with terrifying sounds designed to create a ' spooky' atmosphere at home.
    Ex. This is a spine-tingling collection of real haunted houses and spooky ghost stories.
    Ex. The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex. Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    Ex. This makes autobiography a thrilling ingredient of biography.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo <escena/noticia> horrifying; <grito/relato> spine-chilling, hair-raising
    * * *
    = eerie, heart-rending, heart-rendering, touching, spooky [spookier -comp., spookiest -sup.], spine-tingling, groundshaking, heart-wrenching, thrilling.

    Ex: Undoubtedly in Dickens's 'Oliver Twist' we are meant to feel the eerie terror of Oliver's first night spent with the coffins in the undertaker's workshop, where he is made to sleep.

    Ex: Their heart-rending plight stretching over centuries is a blot on Indian civilization.
    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    Ex: In a world of daily genocide, where two-thirds of humanity are condemned, it is touching to see a spark of what solidarity can do.
    Ex: Records are even being sold with terrifying sounds designed to create a ' spooky' atmosphere at home.
    Ex: This is a spine-tingling collection of real haunted houses and spooky ghost stories.
    Ex: The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex: Which just goes to show that truth is always, always, always more amazing, more heart-wrenching, more fantastic than anyone's imagination.
    Ex: This makes autobiography a thrilling ingredient of biography.

    * * *
    ‹escena/noticia/relato› horrifying, hair-raising
    un grito estremecedor a spine-chilling cry
    * * *

    estremecedor
    ◊ - dora adjetivo ‹escena/noticia horrifying;


    grito/relato spine-chilling, hair-raising
    * * *
    estremecedor, -ora adj
    [ruido, grito] horrifying, ghastly; [crimen, imágenes, historia] horrifying, appalling
    * * *
    adj terrifying
    * * *
    : horrifying

    Spanish-English dictionary > estremecedor

  • 10 facultad física

    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    * * *

    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.

    Spanish-English dictionary > facultad física

  • 11 facultad mental

    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    * * *

    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.

    Spanish-English dictionary > facultad mental

  • 12 implacable

    adj.
    implacable, relentless.
    * * *
    1 implacable, relentless
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ implacable, relentless
    * * *
    a) <odio/furia> implacable; <avance/lucha> relentless; < sol> relentless
    b) <juez/crítico> implacable
    c) <enemigo/contrincante> ruthless
    * * *
    = unrelenting, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, unforgiving, bitter, implacable, inexorable, nagging, unsparing, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    Ex. The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo implacable = play + hardball.
    * ser implacable = play + hardball.
    * * *
    a) <odio/furia> implacable; <avance/lucha> relentless; < sol> relentless
    b) <juez/crítico> implacable
    c) <enemigo/contrincante> ruthless
    * * *
    = unrelenting, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, unforgiving, bitter, implacable, inexorable, nagging, unsparing, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    Ex: The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    * actuar de un modo implacable = play + hardball.
    * ser implacable = play + hardball.

    * * *
    1 ‹odio/furia› implacable; ‹avance/lucha› relentless
    el implacable sol del mediodía the relentless midday sun
    el paso implacable del tiempo the inexorable passage of time
    2 ‹juez/crítico› implacable
    es implacable cuando se trata de corregir errores de ortografía she is unforgiving o uncompromising when it comes to correcting spelling mistakes
    3 ‹enemigo/contrincante› ruthless
    * * *

    implacable adjetivo
    a)odio/furia implacable;

    avance/lucha relentless;
    sol relentless
    b)juez/crítico implacable

    c)enemigo/contrincante ruthless

    implacable adjetivo relentless, implacable
    ' implacable' also found in these entries:
    English:
    bitter
    - fierce
    - persecution
    - pitiless
    - relentless
    - remorseless
    - unrelenting
    - hard
    - implacable
    - ruthless
    - unyielding
    * * *
    1. [odio, ira] implacable;
    [sol] relentless; [clima] harsh;
    el implacable avance del desierto the relentless o inexorable advance of the desert
    2. [persona] inflexible, firm;
    es implacable con sus alumnos she's very hard on her pupils
    3. [incontestable] unassailable;
    un argumento de una lógica implacable an argument of unassailable logic
    * * *
    adj implacable
    * * *
    : implacable, relentless

    Spanish-English dictionary > implacable

  • 13 incesante

    adj.
    1 incessant, ceaseless.
    2 unceasing, full-time, lasting, incessant.
    * * *
    1 incessant, unceasing
    * * *
    ADJ incessant, unceasing
    * * *
    adjetivo incessant
    * * *
    = unrelenting, incessant, ceaseless, relentless, implacable, inexorable, unremitting, unceasing.
    Ex. Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.
    Ex. The great practical education of the Englishman is derived from incessant intercourse between man and man, in trade.
    Ex. Children in modern society are faced with a ceaseless stream of new ideas, and responsibility for their upbringing has generally moved from parents to childminders and teachers.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. This unremitting castigation of the Nazi masks both the historical complicity of the United States with Nazi crimes and our own racist and genocidal histories.
    Ex. But just as she pulled over the road in the pitch blackness of night she heard the unceasing sound of the night like she had never heard it.
    * * *
    adjetivo incessant
    * * *
    = unrelenting, incessant, ceaseless, relentless, implacable, inexorable, unremitting, unceasing.

    Ex: Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.

    Ex: The great practical education of the Englishman is derived from incessant intercourse between man and man, in trade.
    Ex: Children in modern society are faced with a ceaseless stream of new ideas, and responsibility for their upbringing has generally moved from parents to childminders and teachers.
    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: This unremitting castigation of the Nazi masks both the historical complicity of the United States with Nazi crimes and our own racist and genocidal histories.
    Ex: But just as she pulled over the road in the pitch blackness of night she heard the unceasing sound of the night like she had never heard it.

    * * *
    incessant
    * * *

    incesante adjetivo
    incessant
    incesante adjetivo incessant, never-ending
    ' incesante' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    constante
    - continua
    - continuo
    English:
    ceaseless
    - constant
    - incessant
    - nonstop
    - unceasing
    - unremitting
    - relentless
    * * *
    incessant, ceaseless
    * * *
    adj incessant
    * * *
    : incessant

    Spanish-English dictionary > incesante

  • 14 inexorable

    adj.
    inexorable (avance).
    * * *
    1 inexorable
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo <sentencia/castigo> inexorable; <juez/padre> inflexible, unyielding
    * * *
    = unrelenting, grim [grimmer -comp., grimmest -sup.], inexorable, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, bitter, grim-faced, implacable, adamantine.
    Ex. Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.
    Ex. Anita Schiller's own grim conclusion was that 'These two opposing and often inimical views, when incorporated within reference service, often reduce overall effectiveness'.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex. In the English language, people are described as grim, while in Journalese they are referred to as being ' grim-faced'.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. Nilsson's adamantine voice cut a swathe through 20th-century operatic history.
    ----
    * tiempo + seguir su marcha inexorable = time + march on.
    * * *
    adjetivo <sentencia/castigo> inexorable; <juez/padre> inflexible, unyielding
    * * *
    = unrelenting, grim [grimmer -comp., grimmest -sup.], inexorable, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, bitter, grim-faced, implacable, adamantine.

    Ex: Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.

    Ex: Anita Schiller's own grim conclusion was that 'These two opposing and often inimical views, when incorporated within reference service, often reduce overall effectiveness'.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex: In the English language, people are described as grim, while in Journalese they are referred to as being ' grim-faced'.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: Nilsson's adamantine voice cut a swathe through 20th-century operatic history.
    * tiempo + seguir su marcha inexorable = time + march on.

    * * *
    inexorable
    el inexorable paso del tiempo the inexorable passing of time
    * * *

    inexorable adjetivo inexorable
    ' inexorable' also found in these entries:
    English:
    grim
    - unrelenting
    - ruthless
    * * *
    1. [avance] inexorable
    2. [persona] pitiless, unforgiving
    * * *
    adj inexorable
    * * *
    : inexorable

    Spanish-English dictionary > inexorable

  • 15 intenso

    adj.
    1 intense, grave, severe, strong.
    2 intense, passionate, ardent, deep.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: intensar.
    * * *
    1 (gen) intense
    2 (dolor) acute
    3 (luz, color) bright, intense
    4 (amor) passionate
    * * *
    (f. - intensa)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [frío, dolor, actividad] intense; [emoción] powerful, strong; [recuerdo] vivid; [color] deep, intense; [bronceado] deep; [corriente eléctrica] strong
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <frío/luz/color> intense
    b) <emoción/mirada> intense; <dolor/sentimiento> intense, acute
    c) < esfuerzo> strenuous; < negociaciones> intensive
    * * *
    = deep [deeper -comp., deepest -sup.], severe [severer -comp., severest -sup.], vivid, intense, fierce [fiercer -comp., fiercest -sup.], vehement, high-powered.
    Ex. The world's largest processing department's plans and policies are always of deep interest.
    Ex. Obviously if it were not for the fact that such indexes also have severe limitations there would be little need to produce any other type of subject index.
    Ex. There are vivid examples of serious fires and other natural disasters occuring in libraries that cause incalculable financial and academic losses to society.
    Ex. Mexico is undergoing an intense epidemiological transition characterised by a decline in the incidence of infectious diseases and a rapid increase in the importance of chronic illnesses and accidents.
    Ex. The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.
    Ex. There was besides vehement opposition to the machines from the hand compositors.
    Ex. This is a useful collection of essays, particularly for graduate students and high-powered undergraduates cutting their teeth on Aristotle.
    ----
    * amarillo intenso = bright yellow.
    * azul intenso = deep blue.
    * brillo intenso de la pantalla = screen glare.
    * horario intenso de trabajo = long hours, the.
    * lluvia intensa = heavy rain.
    * naranja intenso = bright orange.
    * poco intenso = light [lighter -comp., lightest -sup.].
    * tráfico intenso = heavy traffic.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <frío/luz/color> intense
    b) <emoción/mirada> intense; <dolor/sentimiento> intense, acute
    c) < esfuerzo> strenuous; < negociaciones> intensive
    * * *
    = deep [deeper -comp., deepest -sup.], severe [severer -comp., severest -sup.], vivid, intense, fierce [fiercer -comp., fiercest -sup.], vehement, high-powered.

    Ex: The world's largest processing department's plans and policies are always of deep interest.

    Ex: Obviously if it were not for the fact that such indexes also have severe limitations there would be little need to produce any other type of subject index.
    Ex: There are vivid examples of serious fires and other natural disasters occuring in libraries that cause incalculable financial and academic losses to society.
    Ex: Mexico is undergoing an intense epidemiological transition characterised by a decline in the incidence of infectious diseases and a rapid increase in the importance of chronic illnesses and accidents.
    Ex: The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.
    Ex: There was besides vehement opposition to the machines from the hand compositors.
    Ex: This is a useful collection of essays, particularly for graduate students and high-powered undergraduates cutting their teeth on Aristotle.
    * amarillo intenso = bright yellow.
    * azul intenso = deep blue.
    * brillo intenso de la pantalla = screen glare.
    * horario intenso de trabajo = long hours, the.
    * lluvia intensa = heavy rain.
    * naranja intenso = bright orange.
    * poco intenso = light [lighter -comp., lightest -sup.].
    * tráfico intenso = heavy traffic.

    * * *
    intenso -sa
    1 ‹frío/luz/color› intense
    2 ‹emoción› intense; ‹dolor/sentimiento› intense, acute; ‹mirada› intense
    3 ‹esfuerzo› strenuous; ‹negociaciones› intensive
    desarrolló una intensa labor en favor de los derechos de la mujer she campaigned tirelessly for women's rights
    trabaja a ritmo muy intenso she works at a relentless pace
    * * *

    intenso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a)frío/luz/color intense

    b)emoción/mirada intense;

    dolor/sentimiento intense, acute
    c) esfuerzo strenuous;

    negociaciones intensive
    intenso,-a adjetivo intense: hoy ha sido un día muy intenso, we had an intense day today
    ' intenso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    absoluta
    - absoluto
    - baja
    - bajo
    - brutal
    - carmín
    - encendida
    - encendido
    - épica
    - épico
    - fuerte
    - grande
    - hambre
    - intensa
    - intensificar
    - latigazo
    - leve
    - mucha
    - mucho
    - penetrar
    - sed
    - sofoco
    - subida
    - subido
    - tute
    - viva
    - vivo
    - azul
    - celeste
    - desprecio
    English:
    blitz
    - deep
    - fierce
    - full
    - glowing
    - great
    - intense
    - quite
    - severe
    - strenuous
    - strong
    - violent
    - vivid
    - concentrated
    - profuse
    - rich
    * * *
    intenso, -a adj
    [mirada, calor] intense; [dolor] intense, acute; [lluvia] heavy; [viento] strong; [luz, color] bright; [amor, odio] passionate; [vivencia] intense, powerful;
    poco intenso [lluvia] light;
    [luz] dim, weak
    * * *
    adj
    1 intense
    2 ( fuerte) strong
    * * *
    intenso, -sa adj
    : intense
    intensamente adv
    * * *
    intenso adj
    1. (en general) intense
    2. (luz, colores) strong / bright

    Spanish-English dictionary > intenso

  • 16 lluvia estacional

    Ex. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless.
    * * *

    Ex: Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless.

    Spanish-English dictionary > lluvia estacional

  • 17 lucidez

    f.
    lucidity, clarity.
    * * *
    1 lucidity
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=perspicacia) lucidity, clarity
    2) (tb: lucidez mental) lucidity

    es demente, pero tiene momentos de lucidez (mental) — she's insane but has moments of lucidity, she's insane but has her lucid moments

    3) CAm, Cono Sur (=brillantez) brilliance
    * * *
    a) (Psic) lucidity
    b) ( inteligencia) lucidity, clarity
    * * *
    = insight, lucidity.
    Ex. The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.
    Ex. The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    ----
    * de gran lucidez = clear-sighted.
    * * *
    a) (Psic) lucidity
    b) ( inteligencia) lucidity, clarity
    * * *
    = insight, lucidity.

    Ex: The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.

    Ex: The book makes harrowing reading, charting the relentless disintegration of Schumann's mental and physical faculties, with equally heart-rendering intervals of lucidity and self-awareness.
    * de gran lucidez = clear-sighted.

    * * *
    1 ( Psic) lucidity
    en un momento de lucidez in a lucid moment, in a moment of lucidity
    2 (inteligencia) lucidity, clarity
    una crítica hecha con lucidez y acierto a lucid and perceptive critique
    * * *

    lucidez sustantivo femenino
    lucidity
    lucidez sustantivo femenino lucidity, perceptiveness, clarity
    * * *
    lucidity
    * * *
    f lucidity
    * * *
    lucidez nf, pl - deces : lucidity, clarity

    Spanish-English dictionary > lucidez

  • 18 sin tregua

    adj.
    truceless, without letting up, without respite, relentless.
    * * *
    = unrelenting, unremitting, unabated, without a break, without (a) rest, unrelentingly
    Ex. Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.
    Ex. This unremitting castigation of the Nazi masks both the historical complicity of the United States with Nazi crimes and our own racist and genocidal histories.
    Ex. The demand for English as the world's lingua franca continues unabated.
    Ex. Microfilming of Australian records in the UK has continued without a break since 1948 and by 1990 and a total of 9267 reels has been produced.
    Ex. This sequence was repeated, without rest, for the duration of the technique.
    Ex. This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    * * *
    = unrelenting, unremitting, unabated, without a break, without (a) rest, unrelentingly

    Ex: Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.

    Ex: This unremitting castigation of the Nazi masks both the historical complicity of the United States with Nazi crimes and our own racist and genocidal histories.
    Ex: The demand for English as the world's lingua franca continues unabated.
    Ex: Microfilming of Australian records in the UK has continued without a break since 1948 and by 1990 and a total of 9267 reels has been produced.
    Ex: This sequence was repeated, without rest, for the duration of the technique.
    Ex: This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.

    Spanish-English dictionary > sin tregua

  • 19 torrencial

    adj.
    torrential.
    m.
    heavy rain.
    * * *
    1 torrential
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo torrential
    * * *
    Ex. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless.
    ----
    * lluvia torrencial = torrential rain, pouring rain.
    * * *
    adjetivo torrential
    * * *

    Ex: Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless.

    * lluvia torrencial = torrential rain, pouring rain.

    * * *
    torrential
    * * *

    torrencial adjetivo
    torrential
    torrencial adjetivo torrential
    lluvia torrencial, torrential rain
    ' torrencial' also found in these entries:
    English:
    driving
    - pouring
    - torrential
    * * *
    torrential
    * * *
    adj torrential
    * * *
    : torrential
    * * *
    torrencial adj torrential

    Spanish-English dictionary > torrencial

  • 20 tregua

    f.
    truce.
    no dar tregua to give no respite
    * * *
    1 truce
    2 figurado respite, rest
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (Mil) truce
    2) (=descanso) lull, respite

    dar treguas[dolor] to come and go, let up from time to time; [asunto] not to be urgent

    * * *
    a) (Mil) truce

    no dar tregua: el dolor no le daba tregua the pain didn't let up for a moment; los niños no le dan tregua — she doesn't get a moment's rest with the children

    * * *
    = cease-fire, truce, armistice, lull.
    Ex. The Abuja Agreements ultimately were successful in effecting a cease-fire, in disarming 70% of the fighters, and in holding elections in Liberia in May of 1997.
    Ex. Other factors contributing to the truce involved changes in their warmongering attitudes.
    Ex. The collection consists of an accumulation of 12,000 World War 1 era picture postcards, the majority of which were purchased soon after the armistice.
    Ex. The author observes that there was no lull in the construction of Scottish castellated architecture between 1480 and 1560.
    ----
    * persiguiendo sin tregua = in hot pursuit of.
    * sin tregua = unrelenting, unremitting, unabated, without a break, without (a) rest, unrelentingly.
    * * *
    a) (Mil) truce

    no dar tregua: el dolor no le daba tregua the pain didn't let up for a moment; los niños no le dan tregua — she doesn't get a moment's rest with the children

    * * *
    = cease-fire, truce, armistice, lull.

    Ex: The Abuja Agreements ultimately were successful in effecting a cease-fire, in disarming 70% of the fighters, and in holding elections in Liberia in May of 1997.

    Ex: Other factors contributing to the truce involved changes in their warmongering attitudes.
    Ex: The collection consists of an accumulation of 12,000 World War 1 era picture postcards, the majority of which were purchased soon after the armistice.
    Ex: The author observes that there was no lull in the construction of Scottish castellated architecture between 1480 and 1560.
    * persiguiendo sin tregua = in hot pursuit of.
    * sin tregua = unrelenting, unremitting, unabated, without a break, without (a) rest, unrelentingly.

    * * *
    1 ( Mil) truce
    acordar una tregua to agree to a truce
    2
    (interrupción): sin tregua relentlessly
    lo acosaron sin tregua they pursued him relentlessly
    las olas batían el acantilado sin tregua the waves crashed relentlessly o continuously against the cliff
    no dar tregua: la gastritis no le daba tregua his gastritis didn't let up for a moment o gave him no respite
    los niños no le dan tregua she doesn't get a moment's rest o peace with those children
    * * *

     

    tregua sustantivo femenino
    a) (Mil) truce;




    tregua sustantivo femenino
    1 Pol Mil truce
    2 fig (respiro, descanso) rest, break: dame una tregua, give me a respite
    sin tregua, without a break
    ' tregua' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cuartel
    - romperse
    - fugaz
    - pactar
    English:
    lull
    - truce
    * * *
    tregua nf
    1. [en guerra] truce, ceasefire
    2. [descanso, respiro] respite;
    no dar tregua to give no respite;
    no daban tregua a la presa they gave their prey no respite;
    sin tregua relentlessly;
    trabajar sin tregua to work tirelessly o non-stop
    * * *
    f truce, ceasefire;
    sin tregua relentlessly;
    no dar tregua give no respite
    * * *
    tregua nf
    1) : truce
    2) : lull, respite
    3)
    sin tregua : relentless, unrelenting
    * * *
    tregua n truce

    Spanish-English dictionary > tregua

См. также в других словарях:

  • Relentless — may refer to:In music: * Relentless (Jackyl album) * Relentless (Jason Aldean album), an album by the country singer, Jason Aldean ** Relentless (Jason Aldean song), this album s title track * Relentless (Jo O Meara Album), pop Album by Singer Jo …   Wikipedia

  • Relentless — Re*lent less, a. Unmoved by appeals for sympathy or forgiveness; insensible to the distresses of others; destitute of tenderness; unrelenting; unyielding; unpitying; as, a prey to relentless despotism. [1913 Webster] For this the avenging power… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Relentless 7 — Relentless Seven Relentless Seven ou Relentless7 est le nom du groupe de rock avec lequel Ben Harper joue depuis 2009. Sommaire 1 Origine 2 Musiciens 3 Discographie 3.1 Albums …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Relentless — est le 17e album studio d Yngwie Malmsteen, paru en novembre 2010. Composition du groupe Yngwie Malmsteen : guitare, basse Tim Ripper Owens : chant Patrick Johansson : batterie Nick Marino: claviers Liste des titres Overture… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • relentless — [adj1] cruel, merciless adamant, bound, bound and determined, dead set on*, determined, dogged, ferocious, fierce, go for broke*, grim, hang in*, hang tough*, hard, harsh, implacable, inexorable, inflexible, inhuman, mortal, obdurate, pitiless,… …   New thesaurus

  • relentless — I adjective assiduous, bowel less, brutish, cold, cold blooded, cold hearted, continuous, cruel, determined, dictatorial, endless, hard, hard of heart, hardhearted, harsh, heedless, immisericors, impenitent, imperious, implacable, inclement,… …   Law dictionary

  • relentless — 1590s, from RELENT (Cf. relent) + LESS (Cf. less). Related: Relentlessly; relentlessness …   Etymology dictionary

  • relentless — unrelenting, merciless, implacable, *grim Analogous words: inexorable, obdurate, adamant, *inflexible: strict, stringent, *rigid, rigorous: *fierce, ferocious, cruel, inhuman Contrasted words: *soft, lenient, mild, gentle: * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • relentless — ► ADJECTIVE 1) oppressively constant. 2) harsh or inflexible. DERIVATIVES relentlessly adverb relentlessness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • relentless — [ri lent′lis] adj. 1. not relenting; harsh; pitiless 2. persistent; unremitting relentlessly adv. relentlessness n …   English World dictionary

  • relentless — 01. The company is [relentless] in its search for profits, and will obviously do whatever is necessary to make more money. 02. We must be [relentless] in our demands for a fair contract. 03. Boxer Jake LaMotta was known as a raging bull for his… …   Grammatical examples in English

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