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ferocious

  • 1 ahuyentar

    v.
    1 to scare away.
    el elevado precio ahuyentó a los compradores the high price put buyers off
    2 to drive away, to get away, to chase away, to frighten off.
    Los soldados ahuyentaron al enemigo The soldiers drove away the enemy.
    Reír ahuyenta la tristeza Laughter drives away the sorrow.
    3 to shoo off, to shoo, to shoo out.
    * * *
    1 to drive away, scare away
    2 figurado to dismiss
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=espantar) to frighten off, frighten away; (=mantener a distancia) to keep off
    2) [+ temores, dudas etc] to banish, dispel
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( hacer huir) <ladrón/animal> to frighten off or away
    b) ( mantener a distancia) <fiera/mosquitos> to keep... away
    c) < dudas> to dispel
    * * *
    = frighten off, drive away, chase away, send + Nombre + packing, scare away, chase + Nombre + off.
    Ex. Then something compelled her to blurt out: 'Are you interested in the job?' 'We haven't frightened you off, have we?' ejaculated another, with a nervous laugh.
    Ex. Moreover, the shady image of video libraries drove away discerning customers.
    Ex. Any recommendations on how to chase away the Monday blues?.
    Ex. Those who hold this view argued that the state government lacks the political will to send them packing for good.
    Ex. Falling state support for higher education has a number of onerous effects: increased tuition fees, more student debt, and a greater likelihood of scaring away low-income students.
    Ex. Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( hacer huir) <ladrón/animal> to frighten off or away
    b) ( mantener a distancia) <fiera/mosquitos> to keep... away
    c) < dudas> to dispel
    * * *
    = frighten off, drive away, chase away, send + Nombre + packing, scare away, chase + Nombre + off.

    Ex: Then something compelled her to blurt out: 'Are you interested in the job?' 'We haven't frightened you off, have we?' ejaculated another, with a nervous laugh.

    Ex: Moreover, the shady image of video libraries drove away discerning customers.
    Ex: Any recommendations on how to chase away the Monday blues?.
    Ex: Those who hold this view argued that the state government lacks the political will to send them packing for good.
    Ex: Falling state support for higher education has a number of onerous effects: increased tuition fees, more student debt, and a greater likelihood of scaring away low-income students.
    Ex: Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.

    * * *
    ahuyentar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 (hacer huir) ‹ladrón/animal› to frighten off o away
    2 (mantener a distancia) ‹fiera› to keep … away; ‹mosquitos› to repel, ward off
    3 ‹dudas› to dispel
    debes ahuyentar los malos pensamientos you must banish evil thoughts from your mind
    * * *

    ahuyentar ( conjugate ahuyentar) verbo transitivo
    a) ( hacer huir) ‹ladrón/animal› to frighten off or away

    b) ( mantener a distancia) ‹fiera/mosquitosto keep … away

    ahuyentar verbo transitivo to scare away
    ' ahuyentar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    espantar
    English:
    drive off
    - frighten away
    - frighten off
    - scare away
    - scare off
    - shoo
    - block
    - discourage
    - repel
    * * *
    1. [espantar, asustar] to scare away
    2. [mantener a distancia] to keep away;
    el fuego ahuyentaba a las fieras the fire kept the wild animals away;
    el elevado precio ahuyentó a los compradores the high price put buyers off;
    ahuyentó su mal humor he shook off his bad mood
    3. [apartar] to drive away;
    ahuyenta los malos pensamientos banish all evil thoughts from your mind
    * * *
    v/t scare off o
    away
    * * *
    1) : to scare away, to chase away
    2) : to banish, to dispel
    ahuyentar las dudas: to dispel doubts

    Spanish-English dictionary > ahuyentar

  • 2 atroz

    adj.
    1 terrible, awful.
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o awfully cold
    2 atrocious, horrible, inhumane, abominable.
    3 agonizing, excruciating.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl atroces)
    1 (bárbaro) atrocious, outrageous
    2 familiar (enorme) enormous, huge, awful
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=terrible) atrocious; (=cruel) cruel, inhuman; (=escandaloso) outrageous
    2) * (=enorme) huge, terrific; (=malísimo) dreadful, awful
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.
    Ex. The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.
    Ex. The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex. Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex. Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex. There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.

    Ex: The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.

    Ex: The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex: Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex: The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex: Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex: There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.

    * * *
    1 (brutal, cruel) appalling, terrible
    2 (uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful, dreadful ( BrE)
    tengo un dolor de cabeza atroz I have an atrocious o an awful headache
    * * *

    atroz adjetivo
    atrocious
    atroz adjetivo
    1 (pésimo, insoportable) atrocious
    2 fam (enorme) enormous, tremendous
    ' atroz' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    insensibilidad
    - barbaridad
    - muerte
    English:
    agonizing
    - appalling
    - atrocious
    - dreadful
    - excruciating
    - heinous
    - hell
    - hideous
    - raging
    - unspeakable
    - vicious
    - crippling
    - dire
    - terrible
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. [cruel] [crimen, tortura] horrific, barbaric
    2. [enorme]
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o bitterly cold;
    es de una fealdad atroz he's terribly o incredibly ugly
    3. [muy malo] atrocious, awful
    * * *
    adj
    1 appalling, atrocious
    2
    :
    un éxito atroz a smash hit
    * * *
    atroz adj, pl atroces : atrocious, appalling
    atrozamente adv
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. (cruel) atrocious / appalling
    2. (enorme) terrible
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly cold / it's freezing

    Spanish-English dictionary > atroz

  • 3 bravo

    adj.
    1 angry, furious, mad, irate.
    2 brave, dauntless, courageous, audacious.
    3 rough.
    intj.
    bravo, yeah, well done.
    * * *
    1 (valiente) brave, courageous
    2 (fiero) fierce, ferocious
    3 (bueno) fine, excellent
    4 (mar) rough
    5 (enojado) angry, violent
    interjección ¡bravo!
    1 well done!, bravo!
    \
    por las bravas by force
    * * *
    (f. - brava)
    adj.
    1) ferocious, fierce
    2) great, excellent
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) [animal] fierce, ferocious
    toro 1)
    2) [persona] (=malhumorado) bad-tempered; (=jactancioso) boastful, swaggering; (=valentón) boastful, swaggering
    3) [mar] rough, stormy; [paisaje] rugged
    costa II, 1)
    4) (=excelente) fine, excellent
    5) LAm (Culin) hot, spicy
    2.
    EXCL bravo!, well done!
    3.
    SM thug
    * * *
    I
    - va adjetivo
    1)
    a) [ser] < toro> fierce; < perro> fierce
    b) [estar] < mar> rough
    c) [estar] (AmL fam) ( enojado) angry
    2) (liter) < guerrero> brave, valiant
    3) (RPl fam) < situación> tricky; < examen> tough, hard
    II
    interjección ( expresando aprobación) well done!, good job! (AmE); ( tras actuación) bravo!
    * * *
    = spunky, dauntless.
    Ex. The author discusses a number of ' spunky' girls in adolescent and children's literature.
    Ex. He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    ----
    * ¡bravo! = bravo!.
    * * *
    I
    - va adjetivo
    1)
    a) [ser] < toro> fierce; < perro> fierce
    b) [estar] < mar> rough
    c) [estar] (AmL fam) ( enojado) angry
    2) (liter) < guerrero> brave, valiant
    3) (RPl fam) < situación> tricky; < examen> tough, hard
    II
    interjección ( expresando aprobación) well done!, good job! (AmE); ( tras actuación) bravo!
    * * *
    = spunky, dauntless.

    Ex: The author discusses a number of ' spunky' girls in adolescent and children's literature.

    Ex: He was a dauntless adventurer, a sleuthhound, a research scholar of exceptional acuity.
    * ¡bravo! = bravo!.

    * * *
    bravo1 -va
    A
    1 [ SER] ‹toro› fierce, brave; ‹perro› fierce
    la cría de toros bravos the breeding of fighting bulls
    2 [ ESTAR] ‹mar› rough
    3 [ ESTAR] ( AmL fam) (enojado) angry
    B ( liter); ‹guerrero› brave, valiant
    C ( RPl fam) ‹situación› tricky; ‹examen› tough, hard
    lo bravo va a ser explicárselo a ella the tricky o hard part's going to be explaining it to her
    hoy los chicos están bravísimos the children are being really difficult today
    (expresando aprobación) well done!, good job! ( AmE); (tras una actuación) bravo!
    * * *

    bravo 1
    ◊ -va adjetivo

    a) [ser] ‹toro/perro fierce;

    ver tb
    toro

    b) [estar] ‹ mar rough

    c) [estar] (AmL fam) ( enojado) angry

    bravo 2 interjección ( expresando aprobación) well done!, good job! (AmE);
    ( tras actuación) bravo!
    bravo,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (salvaje, fiero) fierce, ferocious
    2 (valeroso) brave, courageous
    3 (mar) rough, stormy
    4 LAm angry
    II exclamación ¡bravo!, well done!, bravo!
    ♦ Locuciones: por las bravas, forcibly
    ' bravo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    brava
    - gallarda
    - gallardo
    - olé
    - toro
    English:
    bravo
    - rough
    - show
    - wild
    * * *
    bravo, -a
    adj
    1. [persona] [valiente] brave
    2. [persona] [violento] fierce
    3. Am salvo RP [persona] [airado] angry;
    ponerse bravo to get angry
    4. [animal] wild
    5. [planta] wild
    6. [mar] rough;
    el mar se ha puesto bravo the sea has got rough
    7. RP [difícil] difficult
    interj
    bravo!
    a la brava loc adv
    Méx Fam [con descuido] in a slapdash way;
    limpiaste tu cuarto a la brava you didn't do o make a very good job of cleaning your room
    a las bravas, por las bravas loc adv
    by force
    * * *
    I adj
    1 animal fierce
    2 mar rough, choppy
    3 persona brave
    4 L.Am. ( furioso) angry
    5
    :
    a o
    por las bravas forcibly, by force
    II int well done!; en concierto etc bravo!
    * * *
    bravo, -va adj
    1) feroz: ferocious, fierce
    un perro bravo: a ferocious dog
    2) excelente: excellent, great
    ¡bravo!: bravo!, well done!
    3) : rough, rugged, wild
    4) : annoyed, angry
    * * *
    bravo interj bravo!

    Spanish-English dictionary > bravo

  • 4 bullanguero

    adj.
    riotous, uproarious, rowdy, noisy.
    m.
    noisy person, rowdy.
    * * *
    1 (alborotador) noisy, rowdy
    2 (juerguista) fun-loving
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    2 (juerguista) fun-lover
    * * *
    bullanguero, -a
    1.
    ADJ riotous, rowdy
    2. SM / F
    1) (=persona ruidosa) noisy person
    2) (=alborotador) troublemaker
    * * *
    - ra adjetivo (fam) < persona> fun-loving; <música/ambiente> lively
    * * *
    = rumbustious, boisterous.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    * * *
    - ra adjetivo (fam) < persona> fun-loving; <música/ambiente> lively
    * * *
    = rumbustious, boisterous.

    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.

    Ex: These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.

    * * *
    ( fam); ‹persona› fun-loving; ‹música/ambiente› lively
    * * *

    bullanguero
    ◊ -ra adjetivo (fam) ‹ persona fun-loving;


    música/ambiente lively
    * * *
    bullanguero, -a
    adj
    ser muy bullanguero to love a good time, to love partying
    nm,f
    es un bullanguero he loves a good time o loves partying
    * * *
    fam
    I adj rowdy
    II m, bullanguera f troublemaker

    Spanish-English dictionary > bullanguero

  • 5 bullicioso

    adj.
    1 noisy, bustling, boisterous, riotous.
    2 lively, riproaring.
    * * *
    1 (ruidoso) noisy
    2 (animado) lively; (con ajetreo) busy
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=ruidoso) [lugar] noisy; [niño] boisterous
    2) (=con actividad) busy, bustling
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo <calle/barrio> busy, noisy; < niño> boisterous
    * * *
    = lively [livelier -comp., liveliest -sup.], hard-driving, roaring, bustling, boisterous, abuzz, rumbustious, hurly-burly.
    Ex. But in the country the processes of printing always provoke such lively curiosity that the customers preferred to go in by a glazed door set in the shop-front and giving onto the street.
    Ex. Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex. Today, with its population of almost 80,000, Wexler bears little resemblance to the roaring lumber center it became in the middle decades of the nineteenth century.
    Ex. The article 'A bustling New York ALA show' describes the vendor exhibits at the American Library Association Annual Conference in New York.
    Ex. These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex. She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo <calle/barrio> busy, noisy; < niño> boisterous
    * * *
    = lively [livelier -comp., liveliest -sup.], hard-driving, roaring, bustling, boisterous, abuzz, rumbustious, hurly-burly.

    Ex: But in the country the processes of printing always provoke such lively curiosity that the customers preferred to go in by a glazed door set in the shop-front and giving onto the street.

    Ex: Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex: Today, with its population of almost 80,000, Wexler bears little resemblance to the roaring lumber center it became in the middle decades of the nineteenth century.
    Ex: The article 'A bustling New York ALA show' describes the vendor exhibits at the American Library Association Annual Conference in New York.
    Ex: These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex: She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.

    * * *
    ‹calle/barrio› busy, noisy; ‹niño› boisterous
    * * *

    bullicioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    noisy

    ' bullicioso' also found in these entries:
    English:
    boisterous
    - bustling
    - noisy
    - riotous
    - rip-roaring
    * * *
    bullicioso, -a
    adj
    1. [agitado] [reunión, multitud] noisy;
    [calle, mercado] busy, bustling
    2. [inquieto] rowdy, boisterous
    nm,f
    boisterous person
    * * *
    adj bustling
    * * *
    bullicioso, -sa adj
    : noisy, busy, turbulent

    Spanish-English dictionary > bullicioso

  • 6 carcayú

    * * *
    Ex. Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.
    * * *

    Ex: Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.

    * * *
    wolverine, carcajou

    Spanish-English dictionary > carcayú

  • 7 cruel

    adj.
    cruel.
    * * *
    1 (persona) cruel (con/para, to)
    2 (clima) harsh, severe
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ cruel
    * * *
    adjetivo cruel

    la venganza será cruel — (hum) just you wait! (I'll get you!) (colloq)

    * * *
    = brutal, cruel, perverse, unkind, callous, cold-blooded, merciless, brutish, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex. With cruel suddenness she was being called upon to cover up for him.
    Ex. The demand for business information, in relation to its price, is rather perverse in that high price often generates a high demand.
    Ex. The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex. Not all large publishing companies are conducted in a callous and philistine manner, motivated solely by profit.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex. In his most famous work, the Leviathan, Hobbes famously argued that life in the state of nature is 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short'.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    ----
    * volverse cruel = become + vicious.
    * * *
    adjetivo cruel

    la venganza será cruel — (hum) just you wait! (I'll get you!) (colloq)

    * * *
    = brutal, cruel, perverse, unkind, callous, cold-blooded, merciless, brutish, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.

    Ex: With cruel suddenness she was being called upon to cover up for him.
    Ex: The demand for business information, in relation to its price, is rather perverse in that high price often generates a high demand.
    Ex: The enumeration at 940.5316: Children and other noncombatants; Pacifists; Enemy sympathizers seems a little unkind, if nothing else.
    Ex: Not all large publishing companies are conducted in a callous and philistine manner, motivated solely by profit.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex: In his most famous work, the Leviathan, Hobbes famously argued that life in the state of nature is 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short'.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    * volverse cruel = become + vicious.

    * * *
    cruel
    aquello fue una jugada cruel del destino that was a cruel twist of fate
    fueron muy crueles con él they were very cruel to him
    la venganza será cruel ( hum); just you wait! (I'll get you!) ( colloq)
    * * *

    cruel adjetivo
    cruel;

    cruel adjetivo cruel

    ' cruel' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bárbara
    - bárbaro
    - cebarse
    - desalmada
    - desalmado
    - draconiana
    - draconiano
    - mirada
    - salvaje
    - sañosa
    - sañoso
    - sañuda
    - sañudo
    - truculenta
    - truculento
    - verduga
    - verdugo
    - crueldad
    - inhumano
    - sanguinario
    English:
    brutal
    - callous
    - cheap
    - cruel
    - cutthroat
    - hard
    - heartless
    - inhuman
    - savage
    - unkind
    - vicious
    - blood
    - cold
    - fiend
    - inhumane
    - inhumanity
    - outrage
    * * *
    cruel adj
    1. [persona, acción] cruel;
    fuiste muy cruel con ella you were very cruel to her
    2. [dolor] excruciating, terrible
    3. [clima] harsh
    4. [duda] terrible
    * * *
    adj cruel
    * * *
    cruel adj
    : cruel
    cruelmente adv
    * * *
    cruel adj cruel

    Spanish-English dictionary > cruel

  • 8 decidido

    adj.
    1 determined, bound and determined, decisive, daring.
    2 decided, clear-cut, unquestionable.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: decidir.
    * * *
    1→ link=decidir decidir
    1 determined, resolute
    * * *
    (f. - decidida)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=firme) [apoyo] wholehearted; [paso, gesto] purposeful; [esfuerzo, intento] determined; [defensor, partidario] staunch, strong; [actitud, persona] resolute

    dio su apoyo decidido al proyectohe gave his solid o wholehearted support to the project

    andaba con paso decididoshe walked purposefully o with a purposeful stride

    2)

    estar decidido: voy a dejar el trabajo, ya estoy decidido — I'm going to leave my job, I've made up my mind o I've decided

    estar decidido a hacer algoto be resolved o determined to do sth

    estaba decidida a irse con él — she'd made up her mind to go with him, she was resolved o determined to go with him

    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) [ser] <persona/tono> (resuelto, enérgico) decisive, determined
    b) [estar]

    decidido a + inf — determined o resolved to + inf

    * * *
    = determined, set, purposeful, assertive, resolute, single-minded, hell-bent.
    Ex. The fifteenth edition, published in 1951, represented a determined effort to update and unify the schedules.
    Ex. With a set number of categories the specificity of the headings to be included in the index must be determined to a large extent.
    Ex. Undue haste and panic can be minimized by calm, purposeful behavior that is reassuring to the public.
    Ex. I tried to say at the very outset of my remarks that there probably has not been sufficient consumer-like and assertive leverage exerted upon our chief suppliers.
    Ex. The work on gaining acceptance for disabled people in the 1980s is to become more resolute in the 1990s in the name of social justice.
    Ex. This article presents interviews with 6 of America's foremost book illustration collectors, demonstrating their single-minded approach to this largely underappreciated field.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    ----
    * completamente decidido a = dead set on.
    * decidido a = bent on.
    * decidido de antemano = foregone.
    * decidido previamente = foregone.
    * estar decidido a = be of a mind to, be intent on, be all set to.
    * estar decidido a continuar = be set to continue.
    * estar decidido a + Infinitivo = be set to + Infinitivo.
    * haber decidido = be intent on.
    * poco decidido = half-hearted [halfhearted].
    * totalmente decidido a = dead set on.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) [ser] <persona/tono> (resuelto, enérgico) decisive, determined
    b) [estar]

    decidido a + inf — determined o resolved to + inf

    * * *
    = determined, set, purposeful, assertive, resolute, single-minded, hell-bent.

    Ex: The fifteenth edition, published in 1951, represented a determined effort to update and unify the schedules.

    Ex: With a set number of categories the specificity of the headings to be included in the index must be determined to a large extent.
    Ex: Undue haste and panic can be minimized by calm, purposeful behavior that is reassuring to the public.
    Ex: I tried to say at the very outset of my remarks that there probably has not been sufficient consumer-like and assertive leverage exerted upon our chief suppliers.
    Ex: The work on gaining acceptance for disabled people in the 1980s is to become more resolute in the 1990s in the name of social justice.
    Ex: This article presents interviews with 6 of America's foremost book illustration collectors, demonstrating their single-minded approach to this largely underappreciated field.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    * completamente decidido a = dead set on.
    * decidido a = bent on.
    * decidido de antemano = foregone.
    * decidido previamente = foregone.
    * estar decidido a = be of a mind to, be intent on, be all set to.
    * estar decidido a continuar = be set to continue.
    * estar decidido a + Infinitivo = be set to + Infinitivo.
    * haber decidido = be intent on.
    * poco decidido = half-hearted [halfhearted].
    * totalmente decidido a = dead set on.

    * * *
    1 [ SER] ‹persona/tono› (resuelto, enérgico) decisive, determined
    pueden contar con mi decidido apoyo you can count on my wholehearted support
    2 [ ESTAR]
    (a hacer algo): me voy con él, estoy decidida I'm going with him, my mind is made up o I've made my decision
    decidido A + INF:
    estoy decidido a terminar con esta situación I've made up my mind o I'm determined o I've decided to put an end to this situation
    * * *

    Del verbo decidir: ( conjugate decidir)

    decidido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    decidido    
    decidir
    decidido
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    a) [ser] ‹persona/tono› (resuelto, enérgico) decisive, determined

    b) [estar] decidido a hacer algo determined o resolved to do sth

    decidir ( conjugate decidir) verbo transitivo
    1


    b) personato make … decide;


    2 asunto to settle;
    resultado to decide
    verbo intransitivo
    to decide;
    tiene que decidido entre los dos she has to choose o decide between the two;

    decidido sobre algo to decide on sth
    decidirse verbo pronominal
    to decide, to make up one's mind;
    decididose a hacer algo to decide to do sth;
    decididose por algo to decide on sth
    decidido,-a adjetivo determined, resolute
    decidir verbo transitivo & verbo intransitivo to decide: tú decides, it's up to you
    el penalty en el último minuto decidió el partido, the last-minute penalty decided the game

    ' decidido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    decidida
    - determinada
    - determinado
    - elección
    - empeñada
    - empeñado
    - emplazamiento
    - lanzado
    - resuelto
    English:
    concerted
    - dead
    - decide
    - decided
    - decision
    - decisive
    - determined
    - foregone
    - format
    - purposeful
    - resolute
    - self-determined
    - splash out
    - strong-minded
    - distinct
    - intent
    - order
    - settle
    - single
    - yet
    * * *
    decidido, -a adj
    [persona, gesto, modo de andar] determined, purposeful;
    camina con paso decidido he walks with a purposeful stride;
    ¿estás decidido? mira que luego no puedes echarte atrás is your mind made up? there's no going back later on, you know;
    estar decidido a hacer algo to be determined to do sth;
    están decididos a terminar con la corrupción they are determined to put an end to corruption
    * * *
    I partdecidir
    II adj decisive;
    estar decidido be determined (a to)
    * * *
    decidido, -da adj
    : decisive, determined, resolute
    * * *
    decidido adj (persona) determined

    Spanish-English dictionary > decidido

  • 9 despiadado

    adj.
    merciless, cruel, inhuman, cold-hearted.
    * * *
    1 ruthless, merciless
    * * *
    (f. - despiadada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] heartless; [ataque] merciless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.
    Ex. For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex. Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.

    Ex: For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex: Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.

    * * *
    ‹persona› ruthless, heartless; ‹ataque/crítica› savage, merciless
    * * *

    despiadado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ persona ruthless, heartless;


    ataque/crítica savage, merciless
    despiadado,-a adjetivo merciless, ruthless
    ' despiadado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acerba
    - acerbo
    - bárbara
    - bárbaro
    - despiadada
    English:
    cold-blooded
    - cold-hearted
    - cutthroat
    - merciless
    - pitiless
    - remorseless
    - ruthless
    - unmerciful
    - vicious
    - cold
    * * *
    despiadado, -a adj
    [persona] merciless; [trato] inhuman, pitiless; [ataque] savage, merciless
    * * *
    adj ruthless
    * * *
    despiadado, -da adj
    cruel: cruel, merciless, pitiless
    * * *
    despiadado adj hard-hearted / heartless / ruthless

    Spanish-English dictionary > despiadado

  • 10 destrozar

    v.
    2 to shatter, to devastate (emocionalmente) (person).
    3 to tear apart, to destroy, to shatter, to break down into pieces.
    Eso rompe huesos That breaks bones.
    * * *
    1 (romper) to destroy, shatter, wreck; (despedazar) to tear to pieces, tear to shreds
    2 figurado (gastar) to wear out
    3 figurado (estropear) to ruin, spoil; (corazón) to break
    4 figurado (causar daño moral) to crush, shatter, devastate
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=romper) [+ cristal, cerámica] to smash; [+ edificio] to destroy; [+ ropa, zapatos] to ruin; [+ nervios] to shatter
    2) (=dejar abatido a) [+ persona] to shatter; [+ corazón] to break; [+ ejército, enemigo] to crush
    3) (=arruinar) [+ persona, vida] to ruin
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (romper, deteriorar) to break
    b) <felicidad/armonía> to destroy, shatter; < corazón> to break; < matrimonio> to ruin, destroy

    su muerte la destrozóshe was devastated o shattered by his death

    2.
    destrozarse v pron (refl)
    a) ( romperse)
    b) <estómago/hígado> to ruin
    * * *
    = shatter, batter, vandalise [vandalize, -USA], wreak + devastation, smash, pull apart, ravage, go out + the window, tear + apart, mangle, dismember, shred, slaughter, blow away, wreck, rip through, pull + Nombre + to bits, wipe + the floor with, rubbish, blight, chew up.
    Ex. Her feeling of well-being was soon rudely shattered.
    Ex. But the early cylinder machines worked less accurately than the platens, tending to slur the impression and batter the type.
    Ex. This article argues in favour of the term 'conservator' rather than 'restorer' of books as the former does not conjure up a picture of the Victorian artisan vandalising documents with irreversible treatments simply for effect.
    Ex. This article describes the experiences of a fledgling information system in dealing with a hurricane which wreaked devastation on some of the most remote areas of Hawaii = Este artículo describe las experiencias de un sistema de información nuevo al verse afectado por un huracán que devastó algunas de las zonas más remotas de Hawaii.
    Ex. The library was badly vandalised and the intruders overturned 10 large bookcases, tore paintings down, emptied catalogues, and smashed intercoms, chairs, tables and windows.
    Ex. If solutions are not found to meet this challenge, users' hunger for multimedia could pull the Internet apart.
    Ex. The rigours of the climate and the effects of war and political unrest have ravaged this country's cultural heritage.
    Ex. The lack of centralisation means that good management goes out the window and everything gets sloppier.
    Ex. He is a stickler for detail and can tear apart a budget or a balance sheet faster than anyone.
    Ex. In places the waters had swept container lorries loaded with goods yards off the road where they now lay twisted and mangled and almost unrecognizable as vehicles.
    Ex. Books can seldom be disbound for the benefit of bibliographers (although it is worth remembering that they sometimes have to be rebound, when they are completely dismembered), but we can now see through printing ink by means of betaradiography.
    Ex. If they do muster up the courage to participate, they have learned what it is like to lose: they describe it as being 'slaughtered,' 'blown away,' or ' shredded'.
    Ex. These small small but very sharp flakes were used by hunters to slaughter animals.
    Ex. If they do muster up the courage to participate, they have learned what it is like to lose: they describe it as being 'slaughtered,' ' blown away,' or 'shredded'.
    Ex. They had made a secret deal with Otto Reich to wreck Cuba's economy.
    Ex. Storms in this part of the world are common and the people didn't seem to bat an eyelid at the prospect of a 135km wind ripping through their town.
    Ex. Microscopists think very little about plucking an innocent and unsuspecting insect from the garden, killing it, and pulling it to bits for study under a microscope.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. The theory of Scandinavian racial purity cherished by Hitler and the Nazis has been rubbished by new scientific research.
    Ex. The global outbreak of swine flu has spread fear through the travel sector, blighting any green shoots of recovery from the financial crisis.
    Ex. Cattle ranches are chewing up the Amazon rainforest.
    ----
    * destrozar completamente = blow + Nombre + to bits.
    * destrozarse = come + undone, go to + rack and ruin, come apart at + the seams, fall apart at + the seams, go to + ruin.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (romper, deteriorar) to break
    b) <felicidad/armonía> to destroy, shatter; < corazón> to break; < matrimonio> to ruin, destroy

    su muerte la destrozóshe was devastated o shattered by his death

    2.
    destrozarse v pron (refl)
    a) ( romperse)
    b) <estómago/hígado> to ruin
    * * *
    = shatter, batter, vandalise [vandalize, -USA], wreak + devastation, smash, pull apart, ravage, go out + the window, tear + apart, mangle, dismember, shred, slaughter, blow away, wreck, rip through, pull + Nombre + to bits, wipe + the floor with, rubbish, blight, chew up.

    Ex: Her feeling of well-being was soon rudely shattered.

    Ex: But the early cylinder machines worked less accurately than the platens, tending to slur the impression and batter the type.
    Ex: This article argues in favour of the term 'conservator' rather than 'restorer' of books as the former does not conjure up a picture of the Victorian artisan vandalising documents with irreversible treatments simply for effect.
    Ex: This article describes the experiences of a fledgling information system in dealing with a hurricane which wreaked devastation on some of the most remote areas of Hawaii = Este artículo describe las experiencias de un sistema de información nuevo al verse afectado por un huracán que devastó algunas de las zonas más remotas de Hawaii.
    Ex: The library was badly vandalised and the intruders overturned 10 large bookcases, tore paintings down, emptied catalogues, and smashed intercoms, chairs, tables and windows.
    Ex: If solutions are not found to meet this challenge, users' hunger for multimedia could pull the Internet apart.
    Ex: The rigours of the climate and the effects of war and political unrest have ravaged this country's cultural heritage.
    Ex: The lack of centralisation means that good management goes out the window and everything gets sloppier.
    Ex: He is a stickler for detail and can tear apart a budget or a balance sheet faster than anyone.
    Ex: In places the waters had swept container lorries loaded with goods yards off the road where they now lay twisted and mangled and almost unrecognizable as vehicles.
    Ex: Books can seldom be disbound for the benefit of bibliographers (although it is worth remembering that they sometimes have to be rebound, when they are completely dismembered), but we can now see through printing ink by means of betaradiography.
    Ex: If they do muster up the courage to participate, they have learned what it is like to lose: they describe it as being 'slaughtered,' 'blown away,' or ' shredded'.
    Ex: These small small but very sharp flakes were used by hunters to slaughter animals.
    Ex: If they do muster up the courage to participate, they have learned what it is like to lose: they describe it as being 'slaughtered,' ' blown away,' or 'shredded'.
    Ex: They had made a secret deal with Otto Reich to wreck Cuba's economy.
    Ex: Storms in this part of the world are common and the people didn't seem to bat an eyelid at the prospect of a 135km wind ripping through their town.
    Ex: Microscopists think very little about plucking an innocent and unsuspecting insect from the garden, killing it, and pulling it to bits for study under a microscope.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: The theory of Scandinavian racial purity cherished by Hitler and the Nazis has been rubbished by new scientific research.
    Ex: The global outbreak of swine flu has spread fear through the travel sector, blighting any green shoots of recovery from the financial crisis.
    Ex: Cattle ranches are chewing up the Amazon rainforest.
    * destrozar completamente = blow + Nombre + to bits.
    * destrozarse = come + undone, go to + rack and ruin, come apart at + the seams, fall apart at + the seams, go to + ruin.

    * * *
    destrozar [A4 ]
    vt
    1 (romper, deteriorar) to break
    la bomba destrozó varios edificios the bomb destroyed o wrecked several buildings
    no hagas eso que vas a destrozar los zapatos don't do that, you'll ruin your shoes
    2 ‹felicidad/armonía› to destroy, shatter; ‹corazón› to break; ‹matrimonio› to ruin, destroy
    me está destrozando los nervios she's making me a nervous wreck
    la muerte de su marido la destrozó she was devastated o shattered by her husband's death
    1
    (romperse): se cayó al suelo y se destrozó it fell to the ground and smashed
    se me han destrozado los zapatos my shoes are ruined o have fallen to pieces
    2 ( refl) ‹estómago/hígado› to ruin
    te vas a destrozar los pies usando esos zapatos you're going to ruin o damage your feet wearing those shoes
    * * *

    destrozar ( conjugate destrozar) verbo transitivo
    a) (romper, deteriorar) ‹ zapatos to ruin;

    cristal/jarrón to smash;
    jugueteto pull … apart;
    coche to wreck;
    libro to pull apart
    b)felicidad/matrimonio/vida to wreck, destroy;

    corazón to break;

    destrozarse verbo pronominal

    [jarrón/cristal] to smash
    b)estómago/hígado to ruin

    destrozar verbo transitivo
    1 (romper) to tear up, wreck, ruin
    2 (una tela, un papel) to tear to shreds, rip up
    3 (apenar, desgarrar) to shatter, devastate: me destroza verte así, it breaks my heart to see you this way
    4 (los planes, la convivencia, etc) to ruin
    ' destrozar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    break
    - destroy
    - mangle
    - shatter
    - smash
    - smash up
    - tear apart
    - trash
    - vandalize
    - wreck
    - write off
    - get
    - murder
    - piece
    - pull
    - write
    * * *
    vt
    1. [físicamente] [romper] to smash;
    [estropear] to ruin;
    el terremoto destrozó la ciudad the earthquake destroyed the city;
    vas a destrozar o [m5] destrozarte los zapatos de tanto usarlos you'll ruin your shoes, wearing them so much
    2. [emocionalmente] [persona] to shatter, to devastate;
    [matrimonio, relación] to wreck; [pareja] to break up; [vida] to ruin; [corazón] to break;
    el divorcio la ha destrozado she was devastated by the divorce;
    ese ruido le destroza los nervios a cualquiera that noise is enough to drive anyone up the wall;
    destrozó a su oponente en el debate he destroyed his opponent in the debate
    * * *
    v/t
    1 destroy
    2 emocio- nalmente shatter, devastate
    * * *
    destrozar {21} vt
    1) : to smash, to shatter
    2) : to destroy, to wreck
    * * *
    1. (en general) to destroy / to wreck
    2. (hacer trozos) to smash
    destrozarle el corazón a alguien to break somebody's heart [pt. broke; pp. broken]

    Spanish-English dictionary > destrozar

  • 11 determinado

    adj.
    1 determined, bound and determined, set, definite.
    2 given, particular.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: determinar.
    * * *
    1→ link=determinar determinar
    1 (preciso) definite, precise, certain, given, particular
    2 (día, hora, etc) fixed, set, appointed
    3 (resuelto) determined, decisive, resolute
    4 GRAMÁTICA definite
    5 MATEMÁTICAS determinate
    * * *
    (f. - determinada)
    adj.
    2) certain, particular
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=preciso) certain
    2) [persona] determined, resolute
    3) (Ling) [artículo] definite
    4) (Mat) determinate
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (definido, preciso) <fecha/lugar> certain
    * * *
    = determined, set, purposeful, dogged, determinate, unwavering, agreed, desired, hell-bent, certain, resolute.
    Ex. The fifteenth edition, published in 1951, represented a determined effort to update and unify the schedules.
    Ex. With a set number of categories the specificity of the headings to be included in the index must be determined to a large extent.
    Ex. Undue haste and panic can be minimized by calm, purposeful behavior that is reassuring to the public.
    Ex. The last 50 years of academic librarianship have seen a dogged search for standards.
    Ex. There is no coherent and determinate body of legal doctrine and the categories available for classifying legal problems simply mask the incoherency and indeterminacy of legal doctrine.
    Ex. Savage's greatest claim to the attention of present-day librarians is his inspiring and unwavering belief in the value of librarianship.
    Ex. Such reports are sent to 'correspondents' in the member states; these correspondents are responsible for forwarding the reports to an agreed list of destinations in their own country.
    Ex. Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. The same is true for personal names, for subject headings or descriptors, for certain types of titles, for classification numbers, for call numbers, and so on = Lo mismo ocurre en el caso de los nombres personales, los encabezamientos de materia o descriptores, cierto tipo de títulos, los números de clasificación, las signaturas topográficas, etc.
    Ex. The work on gaining acceptance for disabled people in the 1980s is to become more resolute in the 1990s in the name of social justice.
    ----
    * determinado de antemano = pre-established [preestablished].
    * determinado por el consumidor = consumer-driven [consumer driven].
    * determinado por el usuario = customer driven [customer-driven].
    * determinado por la genética = genetically-driven.
    * determinado por los genes = genetically-driven.
    * dispositivo de desconexión automática transcurrido un tiempo determinado = time out mechanism.
    * en determinadas ocasiones = sometimes, on particular occasions.
    * en ocasiones determinadas = on any one occasion.
    * en un momento determinado = at a particular point in time, on any one occasion.
    * número determinado de = nth.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (definido, preciso) <fecha/lugar> certain
    * * *
    = determined, set, purposeful, dogged, determinate, unwavering, agreed, desired, hell-bent, certain, resolute.

    Ex: The fifteenth edition, published in 1951, represented a determined effort to update and unify the schedules.

    Ex: With a set number of categories the specificity of the headings to be included in the index must be determined to a large extent.
    Ex: Undue haste and panic can be minimized by calm, purposeful behavior that is reassuring to the public.
    Ex: The last 50 years of academic librarianship have seen a dogged search for standards.
    Ex: There is no coherent and determinate body of legal doctrine and the categories available for classifying legal problems simply mask the incoherency and indeterminacy of legal doctrine.
    Ex: Savage's greatest claim to the attention of present-day librarians is his inspiring and unwavering belief in the value of librarianship.
    Ex: Such reports are sent to 'correspondents' in the member states; these correspondents are responsible for forwarding the reports to an agreed list of destinations in their own country.
    Ex: Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: The same is true for personal names, for subject headings or descriptors, for certain types of titles, for classification numbers, for call numbers, and so on = Lo mismo ocurre en el caso de los nombres personales, los encabezamientos de materia o descriptores, cierto tipo de títulos, los números de clasificación, las signaturas topográficas, etc.
    Ex: The work on gaining acceptance for disabled people in the 1980s is to become more resolute in the 1990s in the name of social justice.
    * determinado de antemano = pre-established [preestablished].
    * determinado por el consumidor = consumer-driven [consumer driven].
    * determinado por el usuario = customer driven [customer-driven].
    * determinado por la genética = genetically-driven.
    * determinado por los genes = genetically-driven.
    * dispositivo de desconexión automática transcurrido un tiempo determinado = time out mechanism.
    * en determinadas ocasiones = sometimes, on particular occasions.
    * en ocasiones determinadas = on any one occasion.
    * en un momento determinado = at a particular point in time, on any one occasion.
    * número determinado de = nth.

    * * *
    A (definido, preciso) ‹fecha/lugar› certain
    quedaron en encontrarse en un lugar determinado y no apareció they agreed to meet at a certain o given place but she didn't show up
    en determinado momento me di cuenta de que se había ido at a certain point I realized that she had gone
    en determinadas circunstancias in certain circumstances
    de una manera determinada in a certain o particular way
    si se excede una determinada dosis if a particular dosage is exceeded
    B ‹persona/actitud› determined, resolute
    * * *

     

    Del verbo determinar: ( conjugate determinar)

    determinado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    determinado    
    determinar
    determinado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹fecha/lugar certain;

    en determinadas circunstancias in certain circumstances;
    una determinada dosis a particular dosage
    determinar ( conjugate determinar) verbo transitivo
    1 (establecer, precisar)
    a) [ley/contrato] to state;

    [ persona] to determine

    2 ( motivar) to cause, bring about
    determinado,-a adjetivo
    1 (concreto, preciso) fixed: en determinado momento se puso a cantar, at one particular moment she began to sing
    le gusta un tipo de música muy determinado, she likes a certain kind of music
    2 Ling (artículo) definite
    3 (decidido, convencido) decisive, resolute
    determinar verbo transitivo
    1 (concretar, especificar) to fix, set
    2 (tomar una decisión) to decide on
    3 (averigurar, aclarar) las causas del secuestro están por determinar, the motives for the kidnapping are still unknown
    4 (condicionar) to determine
    5 (causar) to bring about
    ' determinado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    determinada
    - orientar
    - resuelta
    - resuelto
    - tardar
    - dado
    - dejar
    - empecinado
    English:
    certain
    - definite
    - given
    - hellbent
    - pitch
    - set
    - particular
    * * *
    determinado, -a adj
    1. [cierto, alguno] certain;
    en determinadas fechas es mejor no viajar it is better not to travel on certain dates;
    hay determinados lugares donde la delincuencia es mayor there are certain places where the crime rate is higher;
    ante determinados síntomas es mejor acudir al médico with some symptoms it is better to see your doctor
    2. [preciso, concreto] specific, particular;
    en un momento determinado no sabía qué hacer there was a point where I just didn't know what to do
    3. [resuelto] determined;
    estar determinado a hacer algo to be determined to do sth
    4. Gram definite;
    artículo determinado definite article
    * * *
    adj certain
    * * *
    determinado, -da adj
    1) : certain, particular
    2) : determined, resolute
    * * *
    1. (cierto) certain
    2. (preciso) specific / particular

    Spanish-English dictionary > determinado

  • 12 escandaloso

    adj.
    1 very noisy, noisy, strepitous, too noisy.
    2 outrageous, outraging, offensive, disgraceful.
    3 shocking, scandalous.
    * * *
    1 scandalous, shocking, outrageous
    2 (alborotado) noisy, rowdy
    3 (color) loud; (risa) uproarious
    * * *
    (f. - escandalosa)
    adj.
    1) shocking, scandalous
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=sorprendente) [actuación] scandalous, shocking; [delito] flagrant; [vida] scandalous
    2) (=ruidoso) [risa] hearty, uproarious; [niño] noisy
    3) [color] loud
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) < conducta> shocking, scandalous; < ropa> outrageous; < película> shocking; < vida> scandalous; < color> loud
    b) ( ruidoso) <persona/griterío> noisy; < risa> loud, uproarious
    * * *
    = scandalous, monstrous, boisterous, shocking, raucous, a monster of a, rumbustious, juicy [juicier -comp., juiciest -sup.], loudmouth.
    Ex. The article ' SCANdalous behaviour' examines the possible uses of hand-held OCR scanners as a means of converting graphics (illustrations etc) into machine readable form.
    Ex. Bogardus privately resolved that nothing would induce her to assent to this monstrous possibility.
    Ex. These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex. The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex. This is an important point which has been poorly neglected in this lively and, at times, raucous debate.
    Ex. Hurricane Rita became a monster of a storm as it gathered strength over the Gulf of Mexico.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. The book 'If Looks Could Kill' is a juicy, tell-all, insider's look at the true world of fashion.
    Ex. In that respect, if, in fact, some people may think of her as a ' loudmouth' or 'showboat' or 'jerk,' it could be good for women's soccer.
    ----
    * de forma escandalosa = outrageously.
    * de manera escandalosa = outrageously.
    * muy escandaloso = highly visible.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) < conducta> shocking, scandalous; < ropa> outrageous; < película> shocking; < vida> scandalous; < color> loud
    b) ( ruidoso) <persona/griterío> noisy; < risa> loud, uproarious
    * * *
    = scandalous, monstrous, boisterous, shocking, raucous, a monster of a, rumbustious, juicy [juicier -comp., juiciest -sup.], loudmouth.

    Ex: The article ' SCANdalous behaviour' examines the possible uses of hand-held OCR scanners as a means of converting graphics (illustrations etc) into machine readable form.

    Ex: Bogardus privately resolved that nothing would induce her to assent to this monstrous possibility.
    Ex: These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex: The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex: This is an important point which has been poorly neglected in this lively and, at times, raucous debate.
    Ex: Hurricane Rita became a monster of a storm as it gathered strength over the Gulf of Mexico.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: The book 'If Looks Could Kill' is a juicy, tell-all, insider's look at the true world of fashion.
    Ex: In that respect, if, in fact, some people may think of her as a ' loudmouth' or 'showboat' or 'jerk,' it could be good for women's soccer.
    * de forma escandalosa = outrageously.
    * de manera escandalosa = outrageously.
    * muy escandaloso = highly visible.

    * * *
    1 ‹conducta› shocking, scandalous, disgraceful; ‹ropa› outrageous; ‹película› shocking; ‹vida› scandalous; ‹color› loud
    2 (ruidoso) ‹persona› noisy; ‹risa› loud, outrageous; ‹griterío› noisy
    * * *

    escandaloso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo


    ropa outrageous;
    película shocking;
    vida scandalous
    b) ( ruidoso) ‹persona/griterío noisy;

    risa loud, uproarious
    escandaloso,-a adjetivo
    1 (ruidoso) noisy, rowdy
    2 (inmoral) scandalous, shameful
    ' escandaloso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    escandalosa
    - sórdida
    - sórdido
    - gamberrismo
    English:
    disorderly
    - outrageous
    - raucous
    - rowdy
    - scandalous
    - shocking
    * * *
    escandaloso, -a
    adj
    1. [inmoral] outrageous, shocking;
    se vio envuelto en un asunto escandaloso he got caught up in a scandalous business
    2. [ruidoso] very noisy;
    ¡mira que eres escandaloso! what a racket you make!
    nm,f
    very noisy o loud person;
    son unos escandalosos they're terribly noisy people
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( vergonzoso) scandalous, shocking
    2 ( ruidoso) noisy, rowdy
    * * *
    escandaloso, -sa adj
    1) : shocking, scandalous
    2) ruidoso: noisy, rowdy
    3) : flagrant, outrageous
    * * *
    1. (ruidoso) loud / noisy [comp. noisier; superl. noisiest]
    2. (indignante) scandalous / shocking

    Spanish-English dictionary > escandaloso

  • 13 estar a caballo entre ... y ...

    (v.) = lie + midway between... and..., tread + a fine line between... and, tread + the thin line between... and, tread + a delicate line between... and
    Ex. Typography at present is treated as an aspect of communication; it should instead be considered as lying midway between the plastic and the graphic arts.
    Ex. These ferocious competitors tread a fine line between controlled aggression and illegality.
    Ex. Therapists must be able to tread the thin line between too much involvement with patients and too little.
    Ex. Juxtaposing harrowing scenes of a family in grief with high comedy, this film does not so much tread a delicate line between these two modes as career wildly between them like a drunken mourner.
    * * *
    (v.) = lie + midway between... and..., tread + a fine line between... and, tread + the thin line between... and, tread + a delicate line between... and

    Ex: Typography at present is treated as an aspect of communication; it should instead be considered as lying midway between the plastic and the graphic arts.

    Ex: These ferocious competitors tread a fine line between controlled aggression and illegality.
    Ex: Therapists must be able to tread the thin line between too much involvement with patients and too little.
    Ex: Juxtaposing harrowing scenes of a family in grief with high comedy, this film does not so much tread a delicate line between these two modes as career wildly between them like a drunken mourner.

    Spanish-English dictionary > estar a caballo entre ... y ...

  • 14 estridente

    adj.
    1 strident, shrill (ruido).
    2 harsh-sounding, high-pitched, deafening, loud.
    * * *
    1 (ruido) strident, shrill
    2 (color etc) loud, garish, gaudy
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [ruido] strident, raucous
    2) [color] loud
    * * *
    a) <pitido/chirrido> shrill
    b) < voz> ( agudo) shrill; ( fuerte) strident

    su estridente protestaher strident o vociferous protest

    c) < color> garish, loud
    * * *
    = raucous, garish, lurid, rumbustious.
    Ex. This is an important point which has been poorly neglected in this lively and, at times, raucous debate.
    Ex. Some of the streets transform at night with garish neon lights and red lanterns signifying houses of pleasure.
    Ex. When she discovered vintage comics and their lurid covers, she went nuts.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    * * *
    a) <pitido/chirrido> shrill
    b) < voz> ( agudo) shrill; ( fuerte) strident

    su estridente protestaher strident o vociferous protest

    c) < color> garish, loud
    * * *
    = raucous, garish, lurid, rumbustious.

    Ex: This is an important point which has been poorly neglected in this lively and, at times, raucous debate.

    Ex: Some of the streets transform at night with garish neon lights and red lanterns signifying houses of pleasure.
    Ex: When she discovered vintage comics and their lurid covers, she went nuts.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.

    * * *
    1 ‹pitido/chirrido› shrill, loud and high-pitched
    2 ‹voz› (agudo) shrill, loud and high-pitched; (fuerte) strident
    su estridente protesta tuvo mala acogida her strident o vociferous protest did not go down well
    3 ‹color› lurid, garish, loud
    un rosa estridente a shocking pink
    * * *

    estridente adjetivo
    a)pitido/chirrido shrill

    b) voz› ( agudo) shrill;

    ( fuerte) strident
    c) color garish, loud

    estridente adjetivo strident
    ' estridente' also found in these entries:
    English:
    high-pitched
    - raucous
    - shrill
    - strident
    - garish
    * * *
    1. [ruido, risa, voz] strident, shrill
    2. [color] garish, loud
    3. [persona, comportamiento, quejas] loud
    * * *
    adj shrill, strident
    * * *
    : strident, shrill, loud

    Spanish-English dictionary > estridente

  • 15 feroz

    adj.
    1 fierce, ferocious (animal, bestia).
    2 cruel, savage (criminal, asesino).
    3 terrible (intenso) (dolor, angustia).
    tenía un hambre feroz he was ravenous o starving
    la competencia es feroz the competition is fierce
    4 horrendous, dreadful.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl feroces)
    1 fierce, ferocious
    \
    el lobo feroz the big bad wolf
    * * *
    adj.
    fierce, ferocious
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=salvaje) fierce, ferocious

    tengo un hambre feroz — I'm starving, I'm famished

    2) (=cruel) cruel
    3) LAm (=feo) ugly
    * * *
    a) < animal> ferocious, fierce; <ataque/mirada/odio> fierce, vicious; <viento/tempestad> fierce, violent

    tengo un hambre feroz — (fam) I'm ravenous o starved (colloq)

    b) (Col, Méx, Ven fam) ( feo) horrendous (colloq)
    * * *
    = fierce [fiercer -comp., fiercest -sup.], savage, swingeing, ferocius, ferocious, cutthroat, truculent.
    Ex. The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.
    Ex. The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex. Faced with the prospect of a swingeing cut of 15% in the periodical budget, the library had to determine which titles could be cancelled with least damage to the integrity of the research collections.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex. Senior staff members said that these fevers of truculent behavior had manifested themselves only within the past two or three years.
    ----
    * crítica feroz = hatchet job.
    * * *
    a) < animal> ferocious, fierce; <ataque/mirada/odio> fierce, vicious; <viento/tempestad> fierce, violent

    tengo un hambre feroz — (fam) I'm ravenous o starved (colloq)

    b) (Col, Méx, Ven fam) ( feo) horrendous (colloq)
    * * *
    = fierce [fiercer -comp., fiercest -sup.], savage, swingeing, ferocius, ferocious, cutthroat, truculent.

    Ex: The greatest living theoretician of descriptive cataloging, Professor Seymour Lubetzky, graced our library with his brilliance, insight, and fierce dedication to the integrity of the catalog.

    Ex: The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex: Faced with the prospect of a swingeing cut of 15% in the periodical budget, the library had to determine which titles could be cancelled with least damage to the integrity of the research collections.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex: Senior staff members said that these fevers of truculent behavior had manifested themselves only within the past two or three years.
    * crítica feroz = hatchet job.

    * * *
    1 ‹animal› ferocious, fierce; ‹ataque/mirada› fierce, vicious; ‹viento/tempestad› fierce, violent; ‹fanatismo› fierce
    bajo el feroz sol del mediodía beneath the fierce midday sun
    se desató una feroz tempestad a fierce o violent storm was unleashed ( liter)
    tengo un hambre feroz ( fam); I'm ravenous o starved ( colloq)
    2 (Col, Méx fam) (feo) horrendous ( colloq)
    un verde feroz a ghastly o horrendous green ( colloq)
    * * *

    Multiple Entries:
    algo feroz    
    feroz
    feroz adjetivo
    a) animal ferocious, fierce;

    ataque/mirada/odio fierce, vicious;
    viento/tempestad fierce, violent
    b) (Col, Méx, Ven fam) ( feo) horrendous (colloq)

    feroz adjetivo fierce, ferocious: tengo un hambre feroz, I'm ravenous
    una crítica feroz, savage criticism
    ' feroz' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bestia
    - un
    English:
    cutthroat
    - destroy
    - ferocious
    - fierce
    - glare
    - rat race
    - ravenous
    - savage
    - cut
    - furious
    - hard
    - vicious
    * * *
    feroz adj
    1. [animal, bestia] fierce, ferocious
    2. [criminal, asesino] cruel, savage
    3. [intenso] [tempestad] fierce, violent;
    [dolor, angustia] terrible;
    tenía un hambre feroz I was ravenous o starving;
    la competencia es feroz the competition is fierce;
    lanzó un ataque feroz contra la propuesta del gobierno he launched a fierce attack against the government's proposal
    4. Fam [enorme] massive;
    agarraron una feroz borrachera they got terribly o incredibly drunk
    * * *
    adj fierce; ( cruel) cruel
    * * *
    feroz adj, pl feroces fiero: ferocious, fierce
    ferozmente adv
    * * *
    feroz adj fierce / ferocious

    Spanish-English dictionary > feroz

  • 16 fiera

    adj.&f.
    feminine of FIERO.
    f.
    1 wild animal (animal).
    estar/ponerse hecho una fiera to be/go wild with anger
    2 wild beast, spitfire, beast.
    f. & m.
    demon (person) (genial). (peninsular Spanish)
    es un fiera jugando al tenis he's a demon tennis player
    * * *
    1 (animal) wild animal, wild beast
    2 figurado (persona) beast, brute
    3 figurado (genio) wizard
    4 (toro) bull
    \
    estar hecho,-a una fiera familiar to be in a rage
    ser una fiera para algo to be brilliant at something
    casa de fieras menagerie
    * * *
    1. SF
    1) (Zool) wild beast, wild animal

    hecho una fiera —

    ponerse hecho una fiera — to be furious, be beside o.s. with rage

    2) (Taur) bull
    3)

    fiera sarda And expert, top man

    2.
    SMF fiend
    * * *
    a) ( animal) wild animal, beast (liter)

    ser una fiera para algo — (fam) to be great o fantastic at something (colloq)

    se puso como or hecho una fiera — he went wild (colloq)

    * * *
    ----
    * domar la fiera = tame + the beast.
    * ponerse como una fiera = get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + top, blow + Posesivo + stack.
    * ponerse hecho una fiera = go + ballistic, go + berserk, blow + Posesivo + top, go + postal, go + crazy, blow + a fuse, lose + Posesivo + temper, throw + a wobbly, throw + a wobbler, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + stack.
    * * *
    a) ( animal) wild animal, beast (liter)

    ser una fiera para algo — (fam) to be great o fantastic at something (colloq)

    se puso como or hecho una fiera — he went wild (colloq)

    * * *
    * domar la fiera = tame + the beast.
    * ponerse como una fiera = get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + top, blow + Posesivo + stack.
    * ponerse hecho una fiera = go + ballistic, go + berserk, blow + Posesivo + top, go + postal, go + crazy, blow + a fuse, lose + Posesivo + temper, throw + a wobbly, throw + a wobbler, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + stack.
    * * *
    1 (animal) wild animal, beast ( liter)
    arrojar or tirar a algn a las fieras to throw sb to the lions o wolves
    2
    (de mal carácter): cuidado con ese perro que es una fiera mind that dog, it's fierce o vicious
    mi suegra es una fiera my mother-in-law is a real dragon ( colloq)
    se puso como or hecho una fiera he went wild ( colloq)
    ser una fiera para algo ( fam); to be great o fantastic at sth ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    fiera sustantivo femenino ( animal) wild animal, beast (liter);
    ponerse como or hecho una fiera to go wild (colloq)
    fiero,-a adjetivo
    1 (animal) wild
    2 (batalla, combate) fierce, ferocious
    fiera sustantivo femenino
    1 wild animal
    casa de fieras, zoo
    2 fam (basilisco, furia) se puso hecho una fiera, she was hopping mad
    (genio, as) es una fiera para los negocios, he's brilliant at business
    ' fiera' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ahuyentar
    - amansar
    - enjaular
    - hecho
    English:
    collar
    - wild
    - berserk
    * * *
    nf
    1. [animal] wild animal
    2. [persona] [cruel] brute;
    estar/ponerse hecho una fiera to be/go wild with anger
    nmf
    Esp Fam [genial] demon;
    es una fiera para la química she's brilliant o a real star at chemistry
    * * *
    f wild animal;
    * * *
    fiera nf
    1) : wild animal, beast
    2) : fiend, demon
    una fiera para el trabajo: a demon for work
    * * *
    fiera n wild animal
    ser una fiera en/para algo to be brilliant at something

    Spanish-English dictionary > fiera

  • 17 fiero

    adj.
    1 fierce, feral, ferocious, rancorous.
    2 harsh, angry.
    * * *
    1 (animal salvaje) wild; (feroz) fierce, ferocious
    2 (persona) cruel
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=feroz) fierce, ferocious; (Zool) wild
    2) (=cruel) cruel
    3) (=feo) ugly
    2.
    SMPL (=amenazas) threats; (=bravatas) boasts, bragging sing

    echar o hacer fieros — (=amenazas) to utter threats; (=bravatas) to boast, brag

    * * *
    - ra adjetivo
    a) ( feroz) < animal> fierce, ferocious; <huracán/tormenta> fierce
    b) (RPl fam) ( feo) ugly
    * * *
    = ferocius, ferocious.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    * * *
    - ra adjetivo
    a) ( feroz) < animal> fierce, ferocious; <huracán/tormenta> fierce
    b) (RPl fam) ( feo) ugly
    * * *
    = ferocius, ferocious.

    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.

    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.

    * * *
    fiero -ra
    1 (feroz) ‹animal› fierce, ferocious; ‹huracán/tormenta› fierce
    animales de aspecto fiero fierce-looking animals
    2 ( RPl fam) (feo) ugly
    es fiera como la noche she's as ugly as sin ( colloq)
    * * *

    fiero
    ◊ -ra adjetivo ‹ animal fierce, ferocious

    fiero,-a adjetivo
    1 (animal) wild
    2 (batalla, combate) fierce, ferocious

    ' fiero' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    brava
    - bravo
    - fiera
    English:
    fierce
    - raging
    - vicious
    * * *
    fiero, -a adj
    1. [feroz] savage, ferocious
    2. RP Fam [feo] [persona, edificio] hideous;
    [situación] horrendous;
    no vayas a su casa que está fiera la cosa don't go round to his place because things are pretty heavy
    * * *
    adj fierce
    * * *
    fiero, -ra adj
    feroz: fierce, ferocious
    * * *
    fiero adj (feroz) fierce / ferocious

    Spanish-English dictionary > fiero

  • 18 gulo gulo

    Ex. Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.
    * * *

    Ex: Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.

    Spanish-English dictionary > gulo gulo

  • 19 hacer cisco

    v.
    to tear to pieces, to smash into smithereens.
    * * *
    (v.) = tear + apart, wipe + the floor with
    Ex. He is a stickler for detail and can tear apart a budget or a balance sheet faster than anyone.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    * * *
    (v.) = tear + apart, wipe + the floor with

    Ex: He is a stickler for detail and can tear apart a budget or a balance sheet faster than anyone.

    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hacer cisco

  • 20 hacer huir

    v.
    to scare away, to put to flight, to disband, to disarray.
    * * *
    (v.) = drive away, chase + Nombre + off
    Ex. Moreover, the shady image of video libraries drove away discerning customers.
    Ex. Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.
    * * *
    (v.) = drive away, chase + Nombre + off

    Ex: Moreover, the shady image of video libraries drove away discerning customers.

    Ex: Wolverines are very ferocious scavengers that even chase wolves and bears off.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hacer huir

См. также в других словарях:

  • Ferocious — Fe*ro cious, a. [L. ferox, ocis, fierce: cf. F. f[ e]roce. See {Ferocity}.] Fierce; savage; wild; indicating cruelty; ravenous; rapacious; as, ferocious look or features; a ferocious lion. [1913 Webster] The humbled power of a ferocious enemy.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ferocious — [fə rō′shəs] adj. [< L ferox (gen. ferocis), wild, untamed < ferus, FIERCE + base akin to oculus, EYE + OUS] 1. fierce; savage; violently cruel 2. Informal very great [a ferocious appetite] ferociously adv. ferociousness …   English World dictionary

  • ferocious — index brutal, cruel, harsh, malevolent, malicious, malignant, outrageous, ruthless, vicious …   Law dictionary

  • ferocious — (adj.) 1640s, from L. ferocis, oblique case of ferox fierce, wild looking (see FEROCITY (Cf. ferocity)). Related: Ferociously; ferociousness …   Etymology dictionary

  • ferocious — *fierce, truculent, barbarous, savage, inhuman, cruel, fell Analogous words: infuriated, maddened, enraged (see ANGER vb): rapacious, *voracious, ravening, ravenous: relentless, implacable, merciless, *grim Contrasted words: *tame, subdued,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • ferocious — [adj] violent, barbaric barbarous, bloodthirsty, brutal, brutish, cruel, fell, feral, fierce, frightful, grim, implacable, inhuman, inhumane, lupine, merciless, murderous, pitiless, predatory, rapacious, ravening, ravenous, relentless, ruthless,… …   New thesaurus

  • ferocious — ► ADJECTIVE 1) savagely fierce, cruel, or violent. 2) informal very great; extreme. DERIVATIVES ferociously adverb ferociousness noun ferocity noun. ORIGIN from Latin ferox fierce …   English terms dictionary

  • ferocious — [[t]fəro͟ʊʃəs[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED A ferocious animal, person, or action is very fierce and violent. By its very nature a lion is ferocious... The police had had to deal with some of the most ferocious violence ever seen on the streets of London.… …   English dictionary

  • ferocious — fe|ro|cious [fəˈrəuʃəs US ˈrou ] adj [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: ferox wild looking , from ferus wild ] 1.) violent, dangerous, and frightening ▪ a ferocious, hungry lion ▪ a ferocious battle ▪ The storm grew more and more ferocious with… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • ferocious — adjective 1 violent, dangerous, and frightening: The battle was long and ferocious. | ferocious dogs 2 very strong, severe, and unpleasant: a ferocious headache | The heat was ferocious. ferociously adverb ferociousness noun (U) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • ferocious — adjective 1) ferocious animals Syn: fierce, savage, wild, predatory, aggressive, dangerous Ant: gentle, tame 2) a ferocious attack Syn: brutal …   Thesaurus of popular words

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