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refractory

  • 1 calcitrō

        calcitrō —, —, āre    [1 calx], to kick, O.—Fig., to resist, be refractory: calcitrat, respuit.
    * * *
    I
    calcitrare, calcitravi, calcitratus V INTRANS
    kick with heels, kick; be refractory; resist; kick convulsively (dying)
    II
    one that kicks/is inclined to kick with heels, kicker

    Latin-English dictionary > calcitrō

  • 2 ergastulum

        ergastulum ī, n    a workhouse, house of correction, penitentiary: homines ex ergastulis empti: ductus in ergastulum, L.— Plur, the inmates of a workhouse, penitentiary convicts: quibusdam solutis ergastulis, Cs.: inscripta, branded galleyslaves, Iu.
    * * *
    I
    convicts (pl.); chain gang; inmates of a workhouse/penitentiary
    II
    prison; prison on estate where refractory slaves worked in chains; workhouse

    Latin-English dictionary > ergastulum

  • 3 ōvum

        ōvum ī, n    [3 AV-], an egg: ovum parere, to lay: ponere, O.: pullos ex ovis excuderunt, hatched: pisces ova cum genuerunt, spawn: integram famem ad ovum adfero, i. e. the beginning of the meal (when eggs were served): ab ova Usque ad mala, i. e. from the beginning to the end, H.: Nec gemino bellum Troianum orditur ab ovo (alluding to the mythical story of the eggs of Leda), H.: ovo prognatus eodem, i. e. of the same mother, H.: ova ad notas curriculis numerandus (wooden eggs used in the circus as counters, one being removed after each circuit made), L.     pēius and sup. pessimē    [see malus], badly, wrongly, ill, wretchedly: homines male vestiti: animo malest? are you vexed? T.: hoc male habet virum, vexes, T.: L. Antonio male sit, ill betide: audire, be ill-spoken of.—Badly, wickedly, cruelly, maliciously, hurtfully, injuriously: quod mihi re male feceris, T.: male agendi causā: loqui: pessume istuc in illum consulis, T.: Carthagini male iam diu cogitanti bellum denuntio: agmen adversariorum male habere, harass, Cs.— Badly, awkwardly, unskilfully, unsuccessfully, unfortunately, ruinously: male gerendo negotio: res suae male gestae: pugnare, S.: Nec vixit male, qui, etc., failed in life, H.: quae res tibi vortat male, turn out ill, T.: vendendum, too cheap: empta, too dear: cui male si palpere, awkwardly, H.: defendit pampinus uvas, to no purpose, V.: salsus, impertinently, H.: sedula nutrix, unseasonably, O.— Badly, excessively, extremely, greatly, very much: male metuo, ne, etc., <*>.: quo neminem peius oderunt: cane peius Vitabit chlamydem, H.: rauci, miserably, H.: dispar, sadly, H.— Badly, imperfectly, scarcely, not at all: (domum) male tuetur: sanus, deranged: pārens asellus, refractory, H.: male numen amicum, hostile, V.: statio male fida carinis, unsafe, V.: plenae legiunculae, L.: male viva caro est, O.
    * * *

    Latin-English dictionary > ōvum

  • 4 refrāctāriolus

        refrāctāriolus adj. dim.    [refractarius], somewhat stubborn, a trifle refractory: dicendi genus.
    * * *
    refractariola, refractariolum ADJ

    Latin-English dictionary > refrāctāriolus

  • 5 calcitro

    1.
    calcĭtro, āre, v. n. [1 calx].
    I.
    Lit., to strike with the heels, to kick, of animals (very rare), Plin. 30, 16, 53, § 149; cf. calcitratus.—
    B.
    Trop, to resist, to be stubborn or refractory: calcitrat, respuit, * Cic. Cael. 15, 36.—
    C.
    Prov.:

    calcitrare contra stimulum,

    to kick against the pricks, Amm. 18, 5, 1; Vulg. Act. 9, 5; 26, 14; cf. 1. calx. —
    * II.
    In gen., to strike convulsively with the feet, of one dying, Ov M. 12, 240.
    2.
    calcĭtro, ōnis, m. [1. calcitro].
    I.
    One who strikes with his heels, a kicker: equus mordax, calcitro, Varr. ap. Non. p. 45, 2 (Sat. Men. 81, 3).—
    II.
    Of men, a boisterous fellow, a blusterer, Plaut. As. 2, 3, 11.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > calcitro

  • 6 Maenia Columna

    Maenĭus, a, the name of a Roman gens:

    C. Maenius, consul A. U. C. 416,

    Liv. 8, 13, 1.—Hence,
    A.
    Maenĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Mænius, Mænian: Maenia lex, proposed by the people's tribune Mænius, A. U. C. 468, Cic. Brut. 14, 55.— Esp. freq., Maenĭa Cŏlumna, ae, f., a pillar in the Forum, at which thieves and refractory slaves were scourged, and to which bad debtors were summoned, a whipping-post, Cic. Div. in Caecil. 16, 50; id. Sest. 58, 124.—
    B.
    Maenĭānum, i, n., a projecting gallery, balcony of a house (first made use of by a Mænius); commonly used in the plur.: Maeniana appellata sunt a Maenio censore, qui primus in Foro ultra columnas tigna projecit, quo ampliarentur superiora spectacula, Paul. ex Fest. p. 134 Müll.; Cic. Ac. 2, 22, 70; Suet. Calig. 18; Vitr. 5, 1, 2; Varro ap. Plin. 35, 10, 37, § 113; Dig. 50, 16, 242; Cod. Just. 8, 10, 11. —In sing.:

    Maenianum conscendere,

    Val. Max. 9, 12, 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Maenia Columna

  • 7 Maenianum

    Maenĭus, a, the name of a Roman gens:

    C. Maenius, consul A. U. C. 416,

    Liv. 8, 13, 1.—Hence,
    A.
    Maenĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Mænius, Mænian: Maenia lex, proposed by the people's tribune Mænius, A. U. C. 468, Cic. Brut. 14, 55.— Esp. freq., Maenĭa Cŏlumna, ae, f., a pillar in the Forum, at which thieves and refractory slaves were scourged, and to which bad debtors were summoned, a whipping-post, Cic. Div. in Caecil. 16, 50; id. Sest. 58, 124.—
    B.
    Maenĭānum, i, n., a projecting gallery, balcony of a house (first made use of by a Mænius); commonly used in the plur.: Maeniana appellata sunt a Maenio censore, qui primus in Foro ultra columnas tigna projecit, quo ampliarentur superiora spectacula, Paul. ex Fest. p. 134 Müll.; Cic. Ac. 2, 22, 70; Suet. Calig. 18; Vitr. 5, 1, 2; Varro ap. Plin. 35, 10, 37, § 113; Dig. 50, 16, 242; Cod. Just. 8, 10, 11. —In sing.:

    Maenianum conscendere,

    Val. Max. 9, 12, 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Maenianum

  • 8 Maenius

    Maenĭus, a, the name of a Roman gens:

    C. Maenius, consul A. U. C. 416,

    Liv. 8, 13, 1.—Hence,
    A.
    Maenĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Mænius, Mænian: Maenia lex, proposed by the people's tribune Mænius, A. U. C. 468, Cic. Brut. 14, 55.— Esp. freq., Maenĭa Cŏlumna, ae, f., a pillar in the Forum, at which thieves and refractory slaves were scourged, and to which bad debtors were summoned, a whipping-post, Cic. Div. in Caecil. 16, 50; id. Sest. 58, 124.—
    B.
    Maenĭānum, i, n., a projecting gallery, balcony of a house (first made use of by a Mænius); commonly used in the plur.: Maeniana appellata sunt a Maenio censore, qui primus in Foro ultra columnas tigna projecit, quo ampliarentur superiora spectacula, Paul. ex Fest. p. 134 Müll.; Cic. Ac. 2, 22, 70; Suet. Calig. 18; Vitr. 5, 1, 2; Varro ap. Plin. 35, 10, 37, § 113; Dig. 50, 16, 242; Cod. Just. 8, 10, 11. —In sing.:

    Maenianum conscendere,

    Val. Max. 9, 12, 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Maenius

  • 9 pugnax

    pugnax, ācis, adj. [pugno], fond of fighting, combative, warlike, martial.
    I.
    Lit.:

    centuriones pugnaces,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 9, 26:

    acer et pugnax,

    id. Rep. 5, 8, 10 (from Non. 337, 31):

    Minerva,

    Ov. Tr. 3, 9, 7:

    Achivi,

    Hor. C. 3, 3, 27:

    filius Thetidis,

    id. ib. 4, 6, 8:

    gens,

    Tac. Agr. 17:

    hastas,

    Prop. 3, 7 (4, 8), 25:

    pugnacissimus quique,

    Tac. H. 4, 60:

    gentes pugnacissimae,

    Curt. 3, 9, 3: hac legione noli pugnacius quidquam putare, Asin. Pol. ap. Cic. Fam, 10, 31, 5:

    aries,

    Col. 7, 3, 6; cf.:

    galli gallinacei pugnacissimi duo,

    Petr. 86:

    ensis,

    Ov. Tr. 5, 7, 48.— Poet., with inf.:

    tenui pugnax instare veruto,

    Sil. 3, 363.—
    B.
    Trop., of a speech or of the speaker, combative, quarrelsome, contentious:

    oratio pugnacior (opp. pacatior),

    Cic. Brut. 31, 121:

    oratio pugnax et contentiosa,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 19, 5:

    exordium dicendi vehemens et pugnax, non saepe esse debeat,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 78, 317.—
    II.
    Transf., in gen., obstinate, refractory, pertinacious:

    Graecus nimis pugnax esse noluit,

    Cic. Pis. 28, 70: non est pugnax in vitiis, Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 13, 1.—Of things, concrete and abstract; with dat.:

    ignis aquae pugnax,

    Ov. M. 1, 432; Plin. 15, 3, 4, § 13:

    musta,

    harsh, id. 14, 20, 25, § 125:

    quid ferri duritiā pugnacius?

    id. 36, 16, 25, § 127.—Hence, adv.: pugnācĭter, contentiously, violently, obstinately:

    certare cum aliis pugnaciter,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 20, 65:

    dicere,

    Quint. 9, 4, 126:

    ferire,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 2, 11.— Comp.:

    alia pugnacius dicenda,

    Quint. 9, 4, 130.— Sup.:

    pugnacissime defendere sententiam,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 3, 9.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > pugnax

  • 10 refractariolus

    rē̆fractārĭŏlus, a, um, adj. dim. [refractarius], somewhat stubborn or refractory:

    judiciale dicendi genus,

    Cic. Att. 2, 1, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > refractariolus

  • 11 refractarius

    rē̆fractārĭus, a, um, adj. [refringo], stubborn, obstinate, refractory:

    contumaces ac refractarios,

    Sen. Ep. 73, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > refractarius

См. также в других словарях:

  • Refractory — Re*frac to*ry ( r?), a. [L. refractorius, fr. refringere: cf. F. refractaire. See {Refract}.] 1. Obstinate in disobedience; contumacious; stubborn; unmanageable; as, a refractory child; a refractory beast. [1913 Webster] Raging appetites that are …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Refractory — Re*frac to*ry, n. 1. A refractory person. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] 2. Refractoriness. [Obs.] Jer. TAylor. [1913 Webster] 3. OPottery) A piece of ware covered with a vaporable flux and placed in a kiln, to communicate a glaze to the other articles …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • refractory — [ri frak′tər ē] adj. [altered < obs. refractary < L refractarius < refractus: see REFRACT] 1. hard to manage; stubborn; obstinate: said of a person or animal 2. resistant to heat; hard to melt or work: said of ores or metals 3. a) not… …   English World dictionary

  • Refractory — Refractory. См. Огнеупор. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • refractory — index contumacious, difficult, disobedient, disorderly, fractious, froward, hostile, incorrigible, ind …   Law dictionary

  • refractory — stubborn, obstinate, perverse, 1610s (earlier refractorious, 1550s), from L. refractarius obstinate …   Etymology dictionary

  • refractory — recalcitrant, intractable, ungovernable, *unruly, headstrong, willful Analogous words: *contrary, perverse, froward, wayward: *insubordinate, rebellious, contumacious Antonyms: malleable: amenable (sense 2) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • refractory — ► ADJECTIVE 1) formal stubborn or unmanageable. 2) Medicine not yielding to treatment. 3) technical heat resistant; hard to melt or fuse. DERIVATIVES refractoriness noun. ORIGIN Latin refractarius stubborn …   English terms dictionary

  • Refractory — A refractory is a material that retains its strength at high temperatures. ASTM C71 defines refractories as non metallic materials having those chemical and physical properties that made them applicable for structures, or as components of systems …   Wikipedia

  • refractory — refractorily, adv. refractoriness, n. /ri frak teuh ree/, adj., n., pl. refractories. adj. 1. hard or impossible to manage; stubbornly disobedient: a refractory child. 2. resisting ordinary methods of treatment. 3. difficult to fuse, reduce, or… …   Universalium

  • Refractory — Not yielding (at least not yielding readily) to treatment. * * * 1. Resistant to treatment, as of a disease. SYN: intractable (1), obstinate (2). 2. SYN: obstinate (1). [L. refractarius, fr. refringo, pp. fractus, to break in pieces] * * *… …   Medical dictionary

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