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implacably

  • 1 acosar

    v.
    1 to pursue relentlessly.
    2 to harass.
    3 to besiege, to irritate, to nag, to accost.
    El policía persigue a Ricardo The policeman persecutes=harasses Richard.
    * * *
    1 to pursue, chase
    \
    acosar a preguntas to bombard with questions
    * * *
    verb
    to harass, hound
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=atosigar) to hound, harass

    ser acosado sexualmente — to suffer (from) sexual harassment, be sexually harassed

    2) (=perseguir) to pursue relentlessly; [+ animal] to urge on
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
    Ex. For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex. I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex. Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex. The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex. The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex. Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex. Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex. This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex. Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex. And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    ----
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.

    Ex: For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex: I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex: Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex: The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex: The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex: Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex: Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex: This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex: Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex: And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex: So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.

    * * *
    acosar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to hound
    lo acosan sus acreedores his creditors are hounding him o are after him
    un compañero que la acosaba sexualmente a colleague who was sexually harassing her
    se ven acosados por el hambre y las enfermedades they are beset by hunger and disease
    me acosaron con preguntas sobre su paradero they plagued o bombarded me with questions regarding his whereabouts
    2 ‹presa› to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *

     

    acosar ( conjugate acosar) verbo transitivo
    a) persona to hound;

    ( sexualmente) to harass;
    me acosaron con preguntas they plagued o bombarded me with questions


    acosar verbo transitivo
    1 to harass
    2 fig (asediar) to pester: la oposición acosó al Presidente del Gobierno con sus preguntas, the opposition pestered the Prime Minister with questions
    ' acosar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arrinconar
    - asediar
    - hostigar
    English:
    assault
    - beset
    - harass
    - hound
    - mob
    - molest
    - persecute
    - plague
    - ply
    - stalk
    - bait
    - goad
    - harry
    - worry
    * * *
    acosar, Méx acosijar vt
    1. [perseguir] to pursue relentlessly
    2. [hostigar] to harass;
    lo acosaron a o [m5] con preguntas they fired questions at him;
    fue acosada sexualmente en el trabajo she was sexually harassed at work
    * * *
    v/t hound, pursue;
    me acosaron a preguntas they bombarded me with questions
    * * *
    acosar vt
    perseguir: to pursue, to hound, to harass

    Spanish-English dictionary > acosar

  • 2 atosigar

    v.
    1 to harass.
    2 to poison.
    María atosigó a su jefe contra él Mary poisoned her boss against him.
    3 to pester, to breathe down one's neck, to harass, to harry.
    El chico atosiga a su mamá The kid pesters his mom.
    * * *
    1 to harass, pester
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=envenenar) to poison
    2) (=importunar) to harass, plague, pester *; (=presionar) to rush, put pressure on, pressurize
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo ( importunar) to pester, hassle (colloq); ( presionar) to pressure (AmE), to pressurize (BrE)
    * * *
    = nobble, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo ( importunar) to pester, hassle (colloq); ( presionar) to pressure (AmE), to pressurize (BrE)
    * * *
    = nobble, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.

    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.

    * * *
    atosigar [A3 ]
    vt
    1 (importunar) to pester, hassle ( colloq)
    no hacía más que atosigarme con preguntas he did nothing but badger me with questions
    2 (presionar) to harass, to pressure ( AmE), to pressurize ( BrE), to hassle ( colloq)
    ( refl) ( Chi) to stuff oneself
    * * *

    atosigar ( conjugate atosigar) verbo transitivo ( importunar) to pester, hassle (colloq);
    ( presionar) to pressure (AmE), to pressurize (BrE)
    atosigar verbo transitivo to harass
    * * *
    vt
    1. [con prisas] to harass;
    no me atosigues, que estaré listo en un instante stop rushing o harassing me, I'll be ready in a moment
    2. [con exigencias] to pester, to badger;
    los periodistas lo atosigaban con preguntas the journalists badgered him with questions
    * * *
    v/t pester
    * * *
    atosigar {52} vt
    : to harass, to annoy

    Spanish-English dictionary > atosigar

  • 3 despiadadamente

    adv.
    cruelly; mercilessly, relentlessly; heartlessly.
    * * *
    1 ruthlessly
    * * *
    ADV mercilessly, relentlessly
    * * *
    adverbio mercilessly, relentlessly
    * * *
    = brutally, mercilessly, relentlessly, ruthlessly, implacably.
    Ex. These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.
    Ex. Low was possibly the most celebrated political cartoonist of the 20th century, best remembered for the way he mercilessly ridiculed Hitler and Mussolini in a humorous vein.
    Ex. Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex. The traditional lending services were revamped and the book collection ruthlessly weeded to books that are used frequently.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    * * *
    adverbio mercilessly, relentlessly
    * * *
    = brutally, mercilessly, relentlessly, ruthlessly, implacably.

    Ex: These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.

    Ex: Low was possibly the most celebrated political cartoonist of the 20th century, best remembered for the way he mercilessly ridiculed Hitler and Mussolini in a humorous vein.
    Ex: Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex: The traditional lending services were revamped and the book collection ruthlessly weeded to books that are used frequently.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.

    * * *
    mercilessly, relentlessly
    * * *
    pitilessly, mercilessly

    Spanish-English dictionary > despiadadamente

  • 4 hostigar

    v.
    1 to pester, to bother.
    2 to harass (military).
    3 to whip a horse.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ LLEGAR], like link=llegar llegar
    1 (azotar) to whip
    2 figurado (perseguir) to plague, persecute; (al enemigo) to harass
    3 figurado (molestar) to pester
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=molestar) to harass, plague, pester
    2) (=dar latigazos) to lash, whip
    3) LAm [+ comida] to surfeit, cloy
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( acosar) to bother, pester
    b) (Mil) to harass
    c) < caballo> to whip
    2) (Andes fam) comida/bebida to pall on
    * * *
    = harass, taunt, tease, twit, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], pressurise [pressurize, -USA], nobble, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex. The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex. I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex. Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex. He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( acosar) to bother, pester
    b) (Mil) to harass
    c) < caballo> to whip
    2) (Andes fam) comida/bebida to pall on
    * * *
    = harass, taunt, tease, twit, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], pressurise [pressurize, -USA], nobble, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.

    Ex: The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex: I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex: Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex: He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.

    * * *
    hostigar [A3 ]
    vt
    A
    1 (acosar) to bother, pester
    lo hostigaba para que se enfrentara con el jefe she kept pestering him to confront the boss
    2 ( Mil) to harass
    3 ‹caballo› to whip
    B
    ( Andes fam) «comida/bebida» (empalagar, hartar): tanto pollo terminó por hostigarme I eventually got sick of o fed up of eating so much chicken ( colloq)
    esto me hostiga this is too sickly o sickly-sweet for me
    * * *

    hostigar ( conjugate hostigar) verbo transitivo
    1

    b) (Mil) to harass

    c) caballo to whip

    2 (Andes fam) [comida/bebida] to pall on
    hostigar verbo transitivo
    1 (a una persona, a un enemigo) to harass
    2 (con un látigo, esp a un caballo) to whip
    ' hostigar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    harass
    - harry
    * * *
    1. [acosar] to pester, to bother
    2. [golpear] to whip
    3. Mil to harass
    4. Andes, CAm, Méx [sujeto: dulces]
    los bombones me hostigan I find chocolates sickly
    * * *
    v/t
    1 pester
    2 MIL harass
    3 caballo whip
    * * *
    hostigar {52} vt
    acosar, asediar: to harass, to pester

    Spanish-English dictionary > hostigar

  • 5 implacablemente

    adv.
    1 implacably, relentlessly.
    2 inexorably, implacably, relentlessly, remorselessly.
    * * *
    1 implacably
    * * *
    ADV implacably, relentlessly
    * * *
    = inexorably, remorselessly, relentlessly, ruthlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.
    Ex. It is still the same inexorably literal logic which must ultimately glance into the chaos, and small differences create infinite displacements between records.
    Ex. The number of abstracts has increased remorselessly; at present over 350,000 a year, the figure seems likely to reach the 400,000 mark in the foreseeable future.
    Ex. Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex. The traditional lending services were revamped and the book collection ruthlessly weeded to books that are used frequently.
    Ex. This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    ----
    * continuar implacablemente = march on.
    * * *
    = inexorably, remorselessly, relentlessly, ruthlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.

    Ex: It is still the same inexorably literal logic which must ultimately glance into the chaos, and small differences create infinite displacements between records.

    Ex: The number of abstracts has increased remorselessly; at present over 350,000 a year, the figure seems likely to reach the 400,000 mark in the foreseeable future.
    Ex: Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex: The traditional lending services were revamped and the book collection ruthlessly weeded to books that are used frequently.
    Ex: This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    * continuar implacablemente = march on.

    * * *
    implacably, relentlessly
    * * *
    relentlessly

    Spanish-English dictionary > implacablemente

  • 6 incesantemente

    adv.
    1 incessantly, continually.
    2 unceasingly, incessantly, continuously, ceaselessly.
    * * *
    1 incessantly
    * * *
    ADV incessantly, unceasingly
    * * *
    = ceaselessly, steadily, incessantly, endlessly, relentlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.
    Ex. These thoughts and many more like them flitted to and fro ceaselessly over the troubled surface of his mind.
    Ex. Rather readers grow by fits and starts now rushing ahead, now lying fallow, and now moving steadily on.
    Ex. She told him that these management techniques seemed to her designed to harness people to treadmills, to make them slaves to their schedules, and to convert them into employees crippled by anxiety, stretching themselves incessantly against unrealistic goals.
    Ex. Computers can work endlessly without having to stop to rest unless there is a breakdown.
    Ex. Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex. This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    * * *
    = ceaselessly, steadily, incessantly, endlessly, relentlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.

    Ex: These thoughts and many more like them flitted to and fro ceaselessly over the troubled surface of his mind.

    Ex: Rather readers grow by fits and starts now rushing ahead, now lying fallow, and now moving steadily on.
    Ex: She told him that these management techniques seemed to her designed to harness people to treadmills, to make them slaves to their schedules, and to convert them into employees crippled by anxiety, stretching themselves incessantly against unrealistic goals.
    Ex: Computers can work endlessly without having to stop to rest unless there is a breakdown.
    Ex: Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex: This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.

    * * *
    incessantly, unceasingly
    * * *
    incessantly, ceaselessly

    Spanish-English dictionary > incesantemente

  • 7 inexorablemente

    adv.
    inexorably, implacably, relentlessly, remorselessly.
    * * *
    1 inexorably
    * * *
    * * *
    = inexorably, remorselessly, relentlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.
    Ex. It is still the same inexorably literal logic which must ultimately glance into the chaos, and small differences create infinite displacements between records.
    Ex. The number of abstracts has increased remorselessly; at present over 350,000 a year, the figure seems likely to reach the 400,000 mark in the foreseeable future.
    Ex. Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex. This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    ----
    * continuar inexorablemente = march on.
    * tiempo + avanzar inexorablemente = time + march on.
    * * *
    = inexorably, remorselessly, relentlessly, unrelentingly, implacably.

    Ex: It is still the same inexorably literal logic which must ultimately glance into the chaos, and small differences create infinite displacements between records.

    Ex: The number of abstracts has increased remorselessly; at present over 350,000 a year, the figure seems likely to reach the 400,000 mark in the foreseeable future.
    Ex: Computers, on the other hand adhere to their initial instructions and execute these relentlessly until the task that is set is completed.
    Ex: This book explains why 'the good old days' were only good for a privileged few and why they were unrelentingly hard for most.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    * continuar inexorablemente = march on.
    * tiempo + avanzar inexorablemente = time + march on.

    * * *
    inexorably
    * * *
    inexorably

    Spanish-English dictionary > inexorablemente

  • 8 oprimir

    v.
    2 to pinch, to be too tight for.
    la corbata le oprimía el cuello his tie felt too tight
    3 to oppress.
    El tirano oprime al pueblo The tyrant oppresses the people.
    4 to weigh down on, to burden.
    5 to squeeze, to press, to depress, to bear down.
    María oprime naranjas todo el día Mary squeezes oranges the whole day.
    * * *
    1 (botón) to press
    2 figurado to oppress
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=apretar) [+ objeto] to squeeze, press, exert pressure on; [+ gas] to compress
    2) [+ botón, tecla] to press
    3) [+ pueblo, nación] (=tiranizar) to oppress; (=cargar) to burden, weigh down; (=aplastar) to crush
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) (frml) (apretar, presionar) to press

    la angustia le oprimía el pecho — (liter) he was wracked with anguish

    b) ( tiranizar) to oppress
    * * *
    = tyrannize, bear down on.
    Ex. Her sympathy for small, helpless creatures suggests that she sees herself as an imprisoned, helpless creature herself, vulnerable to men who would menace or tyrannize her.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) (frml) (apretar, presionar) to press

    la angustia le oprimía el pecho — (liter) he was wracked with anguish

    b) ( tiranizar) to oppress
    * * *
    = tyrannize, bear down on.

    Ex: Her sympathy for small, helpless creatures suggests that she sees herself as an imprisoned, helpless creature herself, vulnerable to men who would menace or tyrannize her.

    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.

    * * *
    oprimir [I1 ]
    vt
    1 ( frml) (apretar, presionar) to press
    oprima el botón de la izquierda press the left-hand button
    la angustia le oprimía el pecho ( liter); he was wracked with anguish
    2 (tiranizar) to oppress
    * * *

    oprimir ( conjugate oprimir) verbo transitivo
    a) (frml) (apretar, presionar) to press


    oprimir verbo transitivo
    1 (un botón) to press: la máquina se apaga cuando oprimes este botón, the machine turns off when you press this button
    (zapatos, prenda) to be too tight
    2 (someter) to oppress: el régimen militar oprimió a los ciudadanos, the military regime oppressed its citizens
    ' oprimir' also found in these entries:
    English:
    oppress
    * * *
    1. [apretar] [botón] to press;
    [garganta, brazo] to squeeze
    2. [sujeto: zapatos, cinturón] to pinch, to be too tight for;
    la corbata le oprimía el cuello his tie felt too tight
    3. [reprimir] to oppress
    4. [angustiar] to weigh down on, to burden;
    me oprime la soledad being on my own depresses me
    * * *
    v/t
    1 pueblo oppress
    2 botón press
    3 de zapatos be too tight for
    * * *
    1) : to oppress
    2) : to press, to squeeze
    oprima el botón: push the button
    * * *
    oprimir vb (presionar) to press

    Spanish-English dictionary > oprimir

  • 9 implacablemente

    • implacably
    • inexorability
    • inexpensive
    • relentlessly
    • remorselessly
    • ruthlessly

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > implacablemente

  • 10 inexorablemente

    • implacably
    • inexorability
    • inexpensive
    • relentlessly
    • remorselessly

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > inexorablemente

См. также в других словарях:

  • Implacably — Im*pla ca*bly, adv. In an implacable manner. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • implacably — adv. Implacably is used with these adjectives: ↑opposed …   Collocations dictionary

  • implacably — implacable ► ADJECTIVE 1) unable to be appeased. 2) relentless; unstoppable. DERIVATIVES implacability noun implacably adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • implacably — adverb see implacable …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • implacably — See implacability. * * * …   Universalium

  • implacably — adverb In an implacable manner …   Wiktionary

  • implacably — adv. in an implacable manner, may not be appeased …   English contemporary dictionary

  • implacably — im·placa·bly …   English syllables

  • implacably — See: implacable …   English dictionary

  • implacably — adverb see implacable …   Useful english dictionary

  • implacably opposed — index irreconcilable Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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