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pressurises

  • 1 acosar

    v.
    1 to pursue relentlessly.
    2 to harass.
    3 to besiege, to irritate, to nag, to accost.
    El policía persigue a Ricardo The policeman persecutes=harasses Richard.
    * * *
    1 to pursue, chase
    \
    acosar a preguntas to bombard with questions
    * * *
    verb
    to harass, hound
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=atosigar) to hound, harass

    ser acosado sexualmente — to suffer (from) sexual harassment, be sexually harassed

    2) (=perseguir) to pursue relentlessly; [+ animal] to urge on
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
    Ex. For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex. I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex. Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex. The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex. The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex. Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex. Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex. This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex. Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex. And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    ----
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to hound

    me acosaron con preguntasthey plagued o bombarded me with questions

    b) < presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *
    = plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.

    Ex: For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
    Ex: I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
    Ex: Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
    Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex: The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
    Ex: The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex: Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
    Ex: Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
    Ex: This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
    Ex: Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
    Ex: And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex: So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
    * problema + acosar = problem + dog.

    * * *
    acosar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to hound
    lo acosan sus acreedores his creditors are hounding him o are after him
    un compañero que la acosaba sexualmente a colleague who was sexually harassing her
    se ven acosados por el hambre y las enfermedades they are beset by hunger and disease
    me acosaron con preguntas sobre su paradero they plagued o bombarded me with questions regarding his whereabouts
    2 ‹presa› to hound, pursue relentlessly
    * * *

     

    acosar ( conjugate acosar) verbo transitivo
    a) persona to hound;

    ( sexualmente) to harass;
    me acosaron con preguntas they plagued o bombarded me with questions


    acosar verbo transitivo
    1 to harass
    2 fig (asediar) to pester: la oposición acosó al Presidente del Gobierno con sus preguntas, the opposition pestered the Prime Minister with questions
    ' acosar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arrinconar
    - asediar
    - hostigar
    English:
    assault
    - beset
    - harass
    - hound
    - mob
    - molest
    - persecute
    - plague
    - ply
    - stalk
    - bait
    - goad
    - harry
    - worry
    * * *
    acosar, Méx acosijar vt
    1. [perseguir] to pursue relentlessly
    2. [hostigar] to harass;
    lo acosaron a o [m5] con preguntas they fired questions at him;
    fue acosada sexualmente en el trabajo she was sexually harassed at work
    * * *
    v/t hound, pursue;
    me acosaron a preguntas they bombarded me with questions
    * * *
    acosar vt
    perseguir: to pursue, to hound, to harass

    Spanish-English dictionary > acosar

  • 2 hacer el ridículo

    to make a fool of oneself
    * * *
    (v.) = make + a fool of + Reflexivo, make + an arse of + Reflexivo, make + a spectacle of + Reflexivo
    Ex. He made a fool of himself at a private function and was asked to leave.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He began to show signs of being an entertainer by singing in the streets, juggling and just plain making a spectacle of himself.
    * * *
    (v.) = make + a fool of + Reflexivo, make + an arse of + Reflexivo, make + a spectacle of + Reflexivo

    Ex: He made a fool of himself at a private function and was asked to leave.

    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He began to show signs of being an entertainer by singing in the streets, juggling and just plain making a spectacle of himself.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hacer el ridículo

  • 3 hostigar

    v.
    1 to pester, to bother.
    2 to harass (military).
    3 to whip a horse.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ LLEGAR], like link=llegar llegar
    1 (azotar) to whip
    2 figurado (perseguir) to plague, persecute; (al enemigo) to harass
    3 figurado (molestar) to pester
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=molestar) to harass, plague, pester
    2) (=dar latigazos) to lash, whip
    3) LAm [+ comida] to surfeit, cloy
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( acosar) to bother, pester
    b) (Mil) to harass
    c) < caballo> to whip
    2) (Andes fam) comida/bebida to pall on
    * * *
    = harass, taunt, tease, twit, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], pressurise [pressurize, -USA], nobble, bear down on, harry.
    Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
    Ex. The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex. I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex. Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex. He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( acosar) to bother, pester
    b) (Mil) to harass
    c) < caballo> to whip
    2) (Andes fam) comida/bebida to pall on
    * * *
    = harass, taunt, tease, twit, tantalise [tantalize, -USA], pressurise [pressurize, -USA], nobble, bear down on, harry.

    Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.

    Ex: The writer describes how he spent his school days avoiding bullies who taunted him because he was a dancer.
    Ex: I like to be considered one of the team, to joke with and tease the employee but that sure creates a problem when I have to discipline, correct, or fire an employee.
    Ex: Don't be tempted into twitting me with the past knowledge that you have of me, because it is identical with the past knowledge that I have of you, and in twitting me, you twit yourself.
    Ex: He may have wished to tease and tantalize his readers by insoluble problems.
    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
    Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
    Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.

    * * *
    hostigar [A3 ]
    vt
    A
    1 (acosar) to bother, pester
    lo hostigaba para que se enfrentara con el jefe she kept pestering him to confront the boss
    2 ( Mil) to harass
    3 ‹caballo› to whip
    B
    ( Andes fam) «comida/bebida» (empalagar, hartar): tanto pollo terminó por hostigarme I eventually got sick of o fed up of eating so much chicken ( colloq)
    esto me hostiga this is too sickly o sickly-sweet for me
    * * *

    hostigar ( conjugate hostigar) verbo transitivo
    1

    b) (Mil) to harass

    c) caballo to whip

    2 (Andes fam) [comida/bebida] to pall on
    hostigar verbo transitivo
    1 (a una persona, a un enemigo) to harass
    2 (con un látigo, esp a un caballo) to whip
    ' hostigar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    harass
    - harry
    * * *
    1. [acosar] to pester, to bother
    2. [golpear] to whip
    3. Mil to harass
    4. Andes, CAm, Méx [sujeto: dulces]
    los bombones me hostigan I find chocolates sickly
    * * *
    v/t
    1 pester
    2 MIL harass
    3 caballo whip
    * * *
    hostigar {52} vt
    acosar, asediar: to harass, to pester

    Spanish-English dictionary > hostigar

  • 4 presurizar

    v.
    to pressurize.
    * * *
    1 to pressurize
    * * *
    * * *
    = pressurise [pressurize, -USA].
    Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
    * * *
    = pressurise [pressurize, -USA].

    Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.

    * * *
    to pressurize
    * * *
    v/t AVIA pressurize
    * * *
    presurizar {21} vt
    : to pressurize

    Spanish-English dictionary > presurizar

См. также в других словарях:

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