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culture

  • 201 culturización

    f.
    habituation, familiarization, enculturation.
    * * *
    SF education, enlightenment
    * * *
    = acculturation, enculturation, culturation.
    Ex. Increasingly, US historians are carrying out research into the acculturation of immigrants to the USA.
    Ex. This document discusses a seminar in which participants focused on the enculturation of boys into American society.
    Ex. The author discusses the social development of infants in terms of a set of tasks which include identity, culturation, and reproduction.
    * * *
    = acculturation, enculturation, culturation.

    Ex: Increasingly, US historians are carrying out research into the acculturation of immigrants to the USA.

    Ex: This document discusses a seminar in which participants focused on the enculturation of boys into American society.
    Ex: The author discusses the social development of infants in terms of a set of tasks which include identity, culturation, and reproduction.

    * * *
    education, enlightenment
    * * *
    la culturización de los indígenas por los conquistadores the way in which the conquistadors taught their culture to the indigenous population

    Spanish-English dictionary > culturización

  • 202 culturología

    Ex. He is an American anthropologist best known for his theories of the evolution of culture and for the scientific study of culture that he called ' culturology'.
    * * *

    Ex: He is an American anthropologist best known for his theories of the evolution of culture and for the scientific study of culture that he called ' culturology'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > culturología

  • 203 cumbre

    adj.
    1 summit.
    2 peak, pinnacle (punto culminante).
    3 summit (conference) (politics).
    f.
    summit, peak, hilltop, acme.
    * * *
    1 (de montaña) summit, top
    3 (reunión) summit conference, summit meeting
    * * *
    noun f.
    height, peak, summit, top
    * * *
    1.
    SF (Geog) summit, top; (fig) top, height

    conferencia en la cumbre — (Pol) summit, summit conference

    2.
    ADJ INV
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( de montaña) top
    b) ( apogeo) height
    2) (Pol) summit (meeting)
    3) (como adj inv)

    el momento cumbre — ( de carrera) the peak; (de película, novela) the high point

    * * *
    = pinnacle, summit, peak, crest.
    Ex. There are, it is assumed, 'high' and 'low' forms of culture, especially in the field of the creative arts which are conceived of as somehow the pinnacle and foremost end of human life.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Getting to the summit: how do you get there from here? A climber's guide to consortium formation'.
    Ex. Rob's death came as he neared the culmination of a personal quest to climb the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.
    Ex. In the crest of the timeworn Black Mountains lies the summit of Mount Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi.
    ----
    * alcanzar el momento cumbre = reach + summit.
    * alcanzar la cumbre de = reach + the pinnacle of, reach + the height of.
    * cumbre de la colina = hilltop.
    * cumbre de la fama, la = pinnacle of renown, the, pinnacle of fame, the.
    * cumbre del éxito, la = pinnacle of success, the.
    * Cumbre Iberoamericana, la = Ibero-American Summit, the.
    * Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información = World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).
    * en la cumbre = at the top of the tree.
    * en la cumbre de = at the height of.
    * reunión cumbre = summit.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( de montaña) top
    b) ( apogeo) height
    2) (Pol) summit (meeting)
    3) (como adj inv)

    el momento cumbre — ( de carrera) the peak; (de película, novela) the high point

    * * *
    = pinnacle, summit, peak, crest.

    Ex: There are, it is assumed, 'high' and 'low' forms of culture, especially in the field of the creative arts which are conceived of as somehow the pinnacle and foremost end of human life.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'Getting to the summit: how do you get there from here? A climber's guide to consortium formation'.
    Ex: Rob's death came as he neared the culmination of a personal quest to climb the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.
    Ex: In the crest of the timeworn Black Mountains lies the summit of Mount Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi.
    * alcanzar el momento cumbre = reach + summit.
    * alcanzar la cumbre de = reach + the pinnacle of, reach + the height of.
    * cumbre de la colina = hilltop.
    * cumbre de la fama, la = pinnacle of renown, the, pinnacle of fame, the.
    * cumbre del éxito, la = pinnacle of success, the.
    * Cumbre Iberoamericana, la = Ibero-American Summit, the.
    * Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información = World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).
    * en la cumbre = at the top of the tree.
    * en la cumbre de = at the height of.
    * reunión cumbre = summit.

    * * *
    A
    las cumbres coronadas de nieve the snow-capped peaks o mountain tops
    alcanzaron la cumbre they reached the summit o the top
    2 (apogeo) height
    estaba en la cumbre del éxito he was at the pinnacle o height of his success
    B ( Pol) summit, summit meeting reunión
    su novela cumbre his most outstanding o important novel
    el momento cumbre de su carrera the peak o the high point of her career
    * * *

     

    cumbre sustantivo femenino

    b) ( apogeo) height;



    cumbre sustantivo femenino
    1 (de un monte) summit, peak
    2 figurado (culminación) pinnacle, peak
    en la cumbre de su carrera, at the peak of his career
    3 (de gobernantes) summit (conference)
    ' cumbre' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cresta
    - elevarse
    - ganar
    - inaccesible
    - llegar
    English:
    apex
    - height
    - peak
    - summit
    - zenith
    - hill
    - mountaintop
    - pinnacle
    - top
    - within
    * * *
    adj inv
    el momento cumbre de su carrera the peak o high point of his career;
    su obra cumbre her most outstanding work
    nf
    1. [de montaña] summit
    2. [punto culminante] peak, high point
    3. [política] summit (conference)
    la Cumbre de la Tierra the Earth Summit
    * * *
    f tb
    POL summit;
    cumbre de la economía mundial world economic summit
    * * *
    cumbre nf
    cima: top, peak, summit
    * * *
    1. (de montaña) summit / top
    2. (culminación) high point

    Spanish-English dictionary > cumbre

  • 204 cúspide

    f.
    1 peak, acme, climax, top.
    2 cusp, pointed tooth tip.
    * * *
    1 (cumbre) summit, peak
    3 figurado peak
    * * *
    noun f.
    height, peak, summit
    * * *
    SF
    1) (Anat) cusp
    2) (Geog) summit, peak; (fig) pinnacle, apex
    3) (Mat) apex
    * * *
    a) ( de montaña) top, summit; ( de pirámide) top, apex
    b) (de fama, poder) height, pinnacle
    c) ( de organización) leadership
    * * *
    = peak, pinnacle, cusp, peak, crest.
    Ex. Make a note of the story's climax in your mind, so that you can indicate to the children by pause, by quickening of the pace, the peak of the tale.
    Ex. There are, it is assumed, 'high' and 'low' forms of culture, especially in the field of the creative arts which are conceived of as somehow the pinnacle and foremost end of human life.
    Ex. Although this approach worked well for the very young and the very old, patrons on the cusp of these age groupings may have been misclassified.
    Ex. Rob's death came as he neared the culmination of a personal quest to climb the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.
    Ex. In the crest of the timeworn Black Mountains lies the summit of Mount Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi.
    ----
    * alcanzar la cúspide de = reach + the pinnacle of, reach + the height of.
    * en la cúspide = at the top of the tree.
    * * *
    a) ( de montaña) top, summit; ( de pirámide) top, apex
    b) (de fama, poder) height, pinnacle
    c) ( de organización) leadership
    * * *
    = peak, pinnacle, cusp, peak, crest.

    Ex: Make a note of the story's climax in your mind, so that you can indicate to the children by pause, by quickening of the pace, the peak of the tale.

    Ex: There are, it is assumed, 'high' and 'low' forms of culture, especially in the field of the creative arts which are conceived of as somehow the pinnacle and foremost end of human life.
    Ex: Although this approach worked well for the very young and the very old, patrons on the cusp of these age groupings may have been misclassified.
    Ex: Rob's death came as he neared the culmination of a personal quest to climb the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.
    Ex: In the crest of the timeworn Black Mountains lies the summit of Mount Mitchell, the highest point east of the Mississippi.
    * alcanzar la cúspide de = reach + the pinnacle of, reach + the height of.
    * en la cúspide = at the top of the tree.

    * * *
    1 (de una montaña) top, summit; (de una pirámide) top, apex
    2 (apogeo) height, pinnacle
    alcanzar la cúspide de la fama/del poder to reach the height o pinnacle of one's fame/power
    * * *

    cúspide sustantivo femenino

    ( de pirámide) top, apex
    b) (de fama, poder) height, pinnacle


    cúspide sustantivo femenino
    1 summit, peak
    2 (punto álgido) peak
    ' cúspide' also found in these entries:
    English:
    climax
    - apex
    - height
    * * *
    1. [de montaña] summit, top
    2. [de torre] top
    3. [de organización] leadership
    4. [apogeo] peak, height;
    en la cúspide de su carrera at the peak of her career
    5. Geom apex
    * * *
    f de montaña summit; de fama etc height
    * * *
    : zenith, apex, peak

    Spanish-English dictionary > cúspide

  • 205 dar sentido a las cosas

    (n.) = sense-making, meaning making
    Ex. Messages which users receive from the products of their culture contain information which aids in the sense-making process.
    Ex. The most important factor in literary acculturation is the peer group process of meaning making.
    * * *
    (n.) = sense-making, meaning making

    Ex: Messages which users receive from the products of their culture contain information which aids in the sense-making process.

    Ex: The most important factor in literary acculturation is the peer group process of meaning making.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar sentido a las cosas

  • 206 de mal gusto

    in bad taste
    * * *
    (adj.) = in bad taste, tawdry [tawdrier -comp., tawdriest -sup.], distasteful, unbecoming, tasteless, tacky [tackier -comp., tackiest -sup.], naff, trashy [trashier -comp., trashiest -sup.]
    Ex. The author defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource, conceding that much of its is in bad taste.
    Ex. This article looks at 'fairness' in the book trade today, and some of the tawdry tricks indulged in by publishers, agents and authors at each other's expense.
    Ex. The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex. An analysis of their usage by readers of both sexes revealed some unbecoming sexist attitudes and some ungentlemanlike behaviour.
    Ex. Of the hundreds of figurines currently on the market, here are the most bizarrely tasteless.
    Ex. There was nothing tacky about the invitation, other that the request that gifts be in the form of cash, of course.
    Ex. Elton then started to metamorphose from 'sensitive guy' singer into someone famous for wearing naff sunglasses and dressing up as a duck.
    Ex. Wilensky has argued that 'the good, the mediocre and the trashy are becoming fused in one massive middle mush' and that 'intellectuals are increasingly tempted to play to mass audiences'.
    * * *
    (adj.) = in bad taste, tawdry [tawdrier -comp., tawdriest -sup.], distasteful, unbecoming, tasteless, tacky [tackier -comp., tackiest -sup.], naff, trashy [trashier -comp., trashiest -sup.]

    Ex: The author defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource, conceding that much of its is in bad taste.

    Ex: This article looks at 'fairness' in the book trade today, and some of the tawdry tricks indulged in by publishers, agents and authors at each other's expense.
    Ex: The physical effort of keeping tabs on people as well as the distasteful practice of checking up on staff output achieves nothing and may do considerable damage.
    Ex: An analysis of their usage by readers of both sexes revealed some unbecoming sexist attitudes and some ungentlemanlike behaviour.
    Ex: Of the hundreds of figurines currently on the market, here are the most bizarrely tasteless.
    Ex: There was nothing tacky about the invitation, other that the request that gifts be in the form of cash, of course.
    Ex: Elton then started to metamorphose from 'sensitive guy' singer into someone famous for wearing naff sunglasses and dressing up as a duck.
    Ex: Wilensky has argued that 'the good, the mediocre and the trashy are becoming fused in one massive middle mush' and that 'intellectuals are increasingly tempted to play to mass audiences'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de mal gusto

  • 207 de modo pesimista

    (adj.) = gloomily
    Ex. He began by gloomily reflecting that 'the only version of national pride encouraged by American popular culture is a smipleminded militaristic chauvinism'.
    * * *
    (adj.) = gloomily

    Ex: He began by gloomily reflecting that 'the only version of national pride encouraged by American popular culture is a smipleminded militaristic chauvinism'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de modo pesimista

  • 208 de todo el mundo

    = world over, the, around the world, across the globe, throughout the world, around the globe, from (all) around the globe, all over the globe, from across the world, across the world, around the planet, the world over
    Ex. Despite its faults and inadequacies the public library brings pleasure to, and satisfies some of the needs of, millions the world over.
    Ex. Today, it is possible to connect a computer terminal to a wide range of online computer-stored data around the world.
    Ex. It is difficult to make comparisons between library services across the globe = Es difícil establecer comparaciones entre los servicios bibliocarios de todo el mundo.
    Ex. In 1953 UNESCO estimated that 269,000 books were produced throughout the world.
    Ex. The OCLC bibliographic database has become one of the world's premier library resources, consulted an average of 65 times a second by users around the globe.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Information innovations from around the globe'.
    Ex. The World Wide Web allows users to access computers all over the globe.
    Ex. The utilization of technology, coupled with skilled librarians, brings information from across the world to the user at the local public library.
    Ex. Fragmentation, competition and division is giving way to unification and cooperation as knowledge, technology, and capital flows across the world.
    Ex. It is a shining center of culture and political influence without peer around the planet.
    Ex. Every scientist, social scientist or humanist draws upon the findings and the thoughts of his predecessors or his current colleagues the world over.
    * * *
    = world over, the, around the world, across the globe, throughout the world, around the globe, from (all) around the globe, all over the globe, from across the world, across the world, around the planet, the world over

    Ex: Despite its faults and inadequacies the public library brings pleasure to, and satisfies some of the needs of, millions the world over.

    Ex: Today, it is possible to connect a computer terminal to a wide range of online computer-stored data around the world.
    Ex: It is difficult to make comparisons between library services across the globe = Es difícil establecer comparaciones entre los servicios bibliocarios de todo el mundo.
    Ex: In 1953 UNESCO estimated that 269,000 books were produced throughout the world.
    Ex: The OCLC bibliographic database has become one of the world's premier library resources, consulted an average of 65 times a second by users around the globe.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Information innovations from around the globe'.
    Ex: The World Wide Web allows users to access computers all over the globe.
    Ex: The utilization of technology, coupled with skilled librarians, brings information from across the world to the user at the local public library.
    Ex: Fragmentation, competition and division is giving way to unification and cooperation as knowledge, technology, and capital flows across the world.
    Ex: It is a shining center of culture and political influence without peer around the planet.
    Ex: Every scientist, social scientist or humanist draws upon the findings and the thoughts of his predecessors or his current colleagues the world over.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de todo el mundo

  • 209 debido a la costumbre

    (adj.) = inertial
    Ex. A theoretical case is therefore made concerning the inertial impact of culture on IT implementation.
    * * *
    (adj.) = inertial

    Ex: A theoretical case is therefore made concerning the inertial impact of culture on IT implementation.

    Spanish-English dictionary > debido a la costumbre

  • 210 debido a la inercia

    (adj.) = inertial
    Ex. A theoretical case is therefore made concerning the inertial impact of culture on IT implementation.
    * * *
    (adj.) = inertial

    Ex: A theoretical case is therefore made concerning the inertial impact of culture on IT implementation.

    Spanish-English dictionary > debido a la inercia

  • 211 decoración

    f.
    decoration, ornament, ornamentation.
    * * *
    1 (gen) decoration
    2 TEATRO scenery, set
    \
    decoración de escaparate window dressing
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=adorno) decoration

    decoración de interiores, decoración del hogar — interior decorating

    2) (Cine, Teat) set, scenery
    * * *
    a) (de pasteles, platos) decoration; ( de habitación) decor; ( de árbol de Navidad) (AmL) decoration

    decoración de vitrinas or escaparates — window dressing

    b) ( interiorismo) tb
    * * *
    = décor, decoration, ornament, display, adornment.
    Ex. A 'House maintenance' exhibition gives an opportunity to bring together books dealing with such varied subjects as décor, electricity, joinery and soft furnishing.
    Ex. There are few departments within a school which do not possess or cannot produce objects that can be used as decorations to set off books.
    Ex. He had never before taken the time to examine the immense two-story granite structure of modified Romanesque design, with its massive arched entrance generously treated with carved ornament.
    Ex. The nineteenth century also saw an explosion of exaggerated and decorated letter forms intended for display.
    Ex. In particular, body piercings, tattoos, self-mutilation, cosmetic surgery and eating disorders all form part of American culture's obsession with corporeal malleability and the body as a form of adornment.
    ----
    * decoración con banderitas = bunting.
    * decoración de interiores = interior landscaping, interior decoration, interior design.
    * decoración del hogar = home decorating.
    * decoración de los carritos de la comida = trolley dressing.
    * decoración de paredes = wall covering.
    * decoración de temporada = seasonal decor.
    * decoración interior = interior decoration.
    * decoración típica escandinava = rosemaling.
    * mobiliario y decoración interior = furnishings, home furnishings.
    * tejidos de decoración = soft furnishing.
    * * *
    a) (de pasteles, platos) decoration; ( de habitación) decor; ( de árbol de Navidad) (AmL) decoration

    decoración de vitrinas or escaparates — window dressing

    b) ( interiorismo) tb
    * * *
    = décor, decoration, ornament, display, adornment.

    Ex: A 'House maintenance' exhibition gives an opportunity to bring together books dealing with such varied subjects as décor, electricity, joinery and soft furnishing.

    Ex: There are few departments within a school which do not possess or cannot produce objects that can be used as decorations to set off books.
    Ex: He had never before taken the time to examine the immense two-story granite structure of modified Romanesque design, with its massive arched entrance generously treated with carved ornament.
    Ex: The nineteenth century also saw an explosion of exaggerated and decorated letter forms intended for display.
    Ex: In particular, body piercings, tattoos, self-mutilation, cosmetic surgery and eating disorders all form part of American culture's obsession with corporeal malleability and the body as a form of adornment.
    * decoración con banderitas = bunting.
    * decoración de interiores = interior landscaping, interior decoration, interior design.
    * decoración del hogar = home decorating.
    * decoración de los carritos de la comida = trolley dressing.
    * decoración de paredes = wall covering.
    * decoración de temporada = seasonal decor.
    * decoración interior = interior decoration.
    * decoración típica escandinava = rosemaling.
    * mobiliario y decoración interior = furnishings, home furnishings.
    * tejidos de decoración = soft furnishing.

    * * *
    A
    1 (de pasteles, platos) decoration
    decoración de escaparates or vitrinas window dressing
    decoración de interiores interior decoration
    B
    1 (efecto) decor
    2 ( Cin, Teatr) scenery, set
    * * *

     

    decoración sustantivo femenino
    a) (de pasteles, platos) decoration;

    ( de habitación) decor;
    ( de árbol de Navidad) (AmL) decoration
    b) ( interiorismo) tb


    decoración sustantivo femenino decoration: se dedica a la decoración de interiores, he's an interior designer
    la decoración del hotel es de pésimo gusto, the hotel decoration is so tacky
    ' decoración' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ambiente
    - coqueta
    - coqueto
    - escobilla
    - recargada
    - recargado
    - rústica
    - rústico
    - sobria
    - sobrio
    - adorno
    - chabacano
    - clásico
    - cursi
    - encajar
    - frío
    - variar
    English:
    decoration
    - fulsome
    - window dressing
    - decor
    * * *
    1. [acción] decoration
    decoración de escaparates window-dressing;
    decoración de interiores interior design
    2. [conjunto de adornos] décor;
    me gusta mucho la decoración de esta habitación I really like the way this room is decorated
    3. [arte, técnica] decorative arts
    4. [adornos] decorations
    5. [decorado] scenery, set
    * * *
    f decoration
    * * *
    1) : decoration
    2) : decor
    3) : stage set, scenery
    * * *
    decoración n (acción, adorno) decoration

    Spanish-English dictionary > decoración

  • 212 defender

    v.
    1 to defend.
    defender los intereses de alguien to defend somebody's interests
    defendió su teoría con sólidos argumentos he supported his theory with sound arguments
    Elsa defiende su posición Elsa defends her position.
    Elsa defiende los derechos humanos Elsa defends human rights.
    2 to protect (proteger) (del frío, calor).
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ ENTENDER], like link=entender entender
    1 (gen) to defend (contra/de, against)
    2 (mantener una opinión, afirmación) to defend, uphold; (respaldar a alguien) to stand up for, support
    3 (proteger) to protect (contra/de, against/from)
    4 DERECHO (algo) to argue, plead; (a alguien) to defend
    1 (espabilarse) to manage, get by, get along
    ¿qué tal se defiende en inglés? how does she get by in English?, what's her English like?
    \
    defender una causa DERECHO to argue a case
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    VT (Mil) [+ país, territorio, intereses] to defend; [+ causa, ideas] to defend, champion; (Jur) to defend

    el Real Madrid defiende el título de campeón — Real Madrid are defending the championship title, Real Madrid are the defending champions

    defiendo la tesis doctoral el mes que vieneI'm having a viva on o (EEUU) I'm defending my doctoral thesis next month

    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( proteger) <guarnición/nación> to defend, protect; < persona> to defend

    siempre defiende a su hermanahe always defends o stands up for his sister

    defender a alguien de algo/alguien — to defend somebody against something/somebody

    b) < intereses> to protect, defend; <derechos/título> to defend
    c) (Der) to defend
    d) <idea/teoría/opinión> to defend, uphold; <causa/ideal> to champion, defend

    defender la tesis — ≈to defend one's dissertation ( in US), ≈to have a viva on one's thesis ( in UK)

    2.
    defenderse v pron
    a) (refl) ( contra una agresión) to defend o protect oneself; (Der) to defend oneself

    defenderse de algo/alguien — to defend oneself against something/somebody

    b) (fam) ( arreglárselas) to get by (colloq)
    * * *
    = advocate, argue, argue + in favour of, be + Posesivo + contention, contend, defend, espouse, maintain, make + apology, make + a case for, plead for, put + the case for, uphold, crusade for, preach, preach, champion, speak up for, speak up for, articulate + the case for, present + case for, mount + defence, strike + a blow for, raise + the flag of, come down in + favour of, stick up for, stand by, rally (a)round, rally behind, stand for.
    Ex. In order to understand the citation order that PRECIS indexing advocates it is necessary to examine the function of the operators more closely.
    Ex. Cutter argued that when it could be established that the second term was definitely more significant then inversion of headings was acceptable.
    Ex. Despite the present financial straits of developing countries, she argues in favour of long-term plan for the acquisition of relevant rare book material.
    Ex. It is our contention that an understanding of such basic principles is fundamental to an appreciation of the many and varied contexts that the individual is likely to encounter.
    Ex. The author contends that it is possible to view the search conducted with the aid of a series of menus as having strong similarities with the search through the hierarchy of a enumerative classification scheme.
    Ex. A respondent is a candidate for a degree who, in an academic disputation, defends or opposes a thesis proposed by the praeses (q.v.); also called the defendant.
    Ex. Most respondents espoused the latter view as an appropriate response to IT developments to date.
    Ex. They maintain, in an article written for Library Resources and Technical Services (LRTS) 'that automated cataloging systems have addressed only half of the problems of maintaining a library catalog'.
    Ex. My perspective, for which I make no apology, is that of someone who works daily with the nitty-gritty of cataloging, as many of you do.
    Ex. This point-by-point evaluation makes a fairly convincing case for the public access online catalogue.
    Ex. I would plead for more standardization, not less, because I think whatever we do is going to be imperfect.
    Ex. A more moderate approach is found in the writings of Olding, who puts the case for multiple entry very concisely in a short pamphlet.
    Ex. It's about time that we go back to these principles and make sure that the quality of cataloging is upheld.
    Ex. There are also dedicated individuals within government who have found a niche from which to crusade for school libraries.
    Ex. A major failing of the information industry is that its members tend to preach to one another whereas what they should be doing is talking to everyone else outside the information industry.
    Ex. A major failing of the information industry is that its members tend to preach to one another whereas what they should be doing is talking to everyone else outside the information industry.
    Ex. In particular he championed free photoduplication of library materials as a natural extension of library services to patrons at a distance.
    Ex. Many people voiced fears that volunteers would be used to take over paid jobs from the workforce, but others spoke up for volunteers saying that in many cases they had created extra jobs for the permanent staff.
    Ex. Many people voiced fears that volunteers would be used to take over paid jobs from the workforce, but others spoke up for volunteers saying that in many cases they had created extra jobs for the permanent staff.
    Ex. Moreover, in addition to quantitative measures, qualitative indicators of benefits should be considered so as to present a complete picture when articulating the case for a library's total positive impact.
    Ex. An MP, a barrister, and a financial consultant present the case for charging Value Added Tax (VAT) on books.
    Ex. The author mounts a spirited defence of the National Library of Australia future collecting priorities.
    Ex. In an effort to save US culture, strike a blow for reading, and correct well intentioned but misguided notions about the Internet making libraries obsolete, offers ten reasons why the Internet is no substitute for a library..
    Ex. The Augustinian order kept his theological tradition, and raised the flag of the Augustinian thought before and after the German reformer.
    Ex. The author comes down in favour of adding notes to cataloguing records on the grounds that the educational purpose that they are intended to serve is clear.
    Ex. He states that he has always admired Woody Allen, explaining that when he first saw his films he was happy to see that someone was sticking up for the little guy.
    Ex. It's hard to believe she stands by a man who gets his kicks out of beating her black and blue everynight.
    Ex. I recalled how bereft we felt when we lost our son and how friends and neighbours rallied round and offered a shoulder to cry on.
    Ex. The second group, who rallied behind McCarthy, was composed of students and intellectuals who were vociferous against the war.
    Ex. I will stand for your rights as my forefathers did before me!.
    ----
    * defender a = put + a word in for.
    * defender a Alguien = stand up for.
    * defender Algo = argue + Posesivo + corner.
    * defender el fuerte = hold + the fortress.
    * defender el honor de Uno = defend + Posesivo + honour.
    * defender enérgicamente = be vociferous about/in.
    * defender la causa de = further + the cause of.
    * defender la necesidad = articulate + the need.
    * defender la necesidad de = support + the case for.
    * defender lo indenfensible = defend + the indefensible.
    * defender los derechos de Uno = stand up for + Posesivo + rights.
    * defender los intereses = defend + interests, lobby for + interests.
    * defender los intereses de = go to + bat for, bat for.
    * defender los principios de Uno = stand up for + Posesivo + principles.
    * defender + Posesivo + argumento = support + Posesivo + case, buttress + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + caso = take up + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + causa = advance + Posesivo + cause.
    * defender + Posesivo + idea = support + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + postura = argue + Posesivo + case.
    * defenderse = bite back, stand up, strike back, fight back, fight for + Posesivo + life.
    * defenderse de ataques = ward off + attacks.
    * defenderse por uno mismo = fend for + Reflexivo.
    * defender una causa = promote + cause, support + cause, champion + cause.
    * defender una idea = champion + idea.
    * defender un argumento = support + view.
    * defender un opinión = support + view.
    * saber defenderse = hold + Posesivo + own.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( proteger) <guarnición/nación> to defend, protect; < persona> to defend

    siempre defiende a su hermanahe always defends o stands up for his sister

    defender a alguien de algo/alguien — to defend somebody against something/somebody

    b) < intereses> to protect, defend; <derechos/título> to defend
    c) (Der) to defend
    d) <idea/teoría/opinión> to defend, uphold; <causa/ideal> to champion, defend

    defender la tesis — ≈to defend one's dissertation ( in US), ≈to have a viva on one's thesis ( in UK)

    2.
    defenderse v pron
    a) (refl) ( contra una agresión) to defend o protect oneself; (Der) to defend oneself

    defenderse de algo/alguien — to defend oneself against something/somebody

    b) (fam) ( arreglárselas) to get by (colloq)
    * * *
    = advocate, argue, argue + in favour of, be + Posesivo + contention, contend, defend, espouse, maintain, make + apology, make + a case for, plead for, put + the case for, uphold, crusade for, preach, preach, champion, speak up for, speak up for, articulate + the case for, present + case for, mount + defence, strike + a blow for, raise + the flag of, come down in + favour of, stick up for, stand by, rally (a)round, rally behind, stand for.

    Ex: In order to understand the citation order that PRECIS indexing advocates it is necessary to examine the function of the operators more closely.

    Ex: Cutter argued that when it could be established that the second term was definitely more significant then inversion of headings was acceptable.
    Ex: Despite the present financial straits of developing countries, she argues in favour of long-term plan for the acquisition of relevant rare book material.
    Ex: It is our contention that an understanding of such basic principles is fundamental to an appreciation of the many and varied contexts that the individual is likely to encounter.
    Ex: The author contends that it is possible to view the search conducted with the aid of a series of menus as having strong similarities with the search through the hierarchy of a enumerative classification scheme.
    Ex: A respondent is a candidate for a degree who, in an academic disputation, defends or opposes a thesis proposed by the praeses (q.v.); also called the defendant.
    Ex: Most respondents espoused the latter view as an appropriate response to IT developments to date.
    Ex: They maintain, in an article written for Library Resources and Technical Services (LRTS) 'that automated cataloging systems have addressed only half of the problems of maintaining a library catalog'.
    Ex: My perspective, for which I make no apology, is that of someone who works daily with the nitty-gritty of cataloging, as many of you do.
    Ex: This point-by-point evaluation makes a fairly convincing case for the public access online catalogue.
    Ex: I would plead for more standardization, not less, because I think whatever we do is going to be imperfect.
    Ex: A more moderate approach is found in the writings of Olding, who puts the case for multiple entry very concisely in a short pamphlet.
    Ex: It's about time that we go back to these principles and make sure that the quality of cataloging is upheld.
    Ex: There are also dedicated individuals within government who have found a niche from which to crusade for school libraries.
    Ex: A major failing of the information industry is that its members tend to preach to one another whereas what they should be doing is talking to everyone else outside the information industry.
    Ex: A major failing of the information industry is that its members tend to preach to one another whereas what they should be doing is talking to everyone else outside the information industry.
    Ex: In particular he championed free photoduplication of library materials as a natural extension of library services to patrons at a distance.
    Ex: Many people voiced fears that volunteers would be used to take over paid jobs from the workforce, but others spoke up for volunteers saying that in many cases they had created extra jobs for the permanent staff.
    Ex: Many people voiced fears that volunteers would be used to take over paid jobs from the workforce, but others spoke up for volunteers saying that in many cases they had created extra jobs for the permanent staff.
    Ex: Moreover, in addition to quantitative measures, qualitative indicators of benefits should be considered so as to present a complete picture when articulating the case for a library's total positive impact.
    Ex: An MP, a barrister, and a financial consultant present the case for charging Value Added Tax (VAT) on books.
    Ex: The author mounts a spirited defence of the National Library of Australia future collecting priorities.
    Ex: In an effort to save US culture, strike a blow for reading, and correct well intentioned but misguided notions about the Internet making libraries obsolete, offers ten reasons why the Internet is no substitute for a library..
    Ex: The Augustinian order kept his theological tradition, and raised the flag of the Augustinian thought before and after the German reformer.
    Ex: The author comes down in favour of adding notes to cataloguing records on the grounds that the educational purpose that they are intended to serve is clear.
    Ex: He states that he has always admired Woody Allen, explaining that when he first saw his films he was happy to see that someone was sticking up for the little guy.
    Ex: It's hard to believe she stands by a man who gets his kicks out of beating her black and blue everynight.
    Ex: I recalled how bereft we felt when we lost our son and how friends and neighbours rallied round and offered a shoulder to cry on.
    Ex: The second group, who rallied behind McCarthy, was composed of students and intellectuals who were vociferous against the war.
    Ex: I will stand for your rights as my forefathers did before me!.
    * defender a = put + a word in for.
    * defender a Alguien = stand up for.
    * defender Algo = argue + Posesivo + corner.
    * defender el fuerte = hold + the fortress.
    * defender el honor de Uno = defend + Posesivo + honour.
    * defender enérgicamente = be vociferous about/in.
    * defender la causa de = further + the cause of.
    * defender la necesidad = articulate + the need.
    * defender la necesidad de = support + the case for.
    * defender lo indenfensible = defend + the indefensible.
    * defender los derechos de Uno = stand up for + Posesivo + rights.
    * defender los intereses = defend + interests, lobby for + interests.
    * defender los intereses de = go to + bat for, bat for.
    * defender los principios de Uno = stand up for + Posesivo + principles.
    * defender + Posesivo + argumento = support + Posesivo + case, buttress + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + caso = take up + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + causa = advance + Posesivo + cause.
    * defender + Posesivo + idea = support + Posesivo + case.
    * defender + Posesivo + postura = argue + Posesivo + case.
    * defenderse = bite back, stand up, strike back, fight back, fight for + Posesivo + life.
    * defenderse de ataques = ward off + attacks.
    * defenderse por uno mismo = fend for + Reflexivo.
    * defender una causa = promote + cause, support + cause, champion + cause.
    * defender una idea = champion + idea.
    * defender un argumento = support + view.
    * defender un opinión = support + view.
    * saber defenderse = hold + Posesivo + own.

    * * *
    defender [E8 ]
    vt
    1 (proteger) ‹guarnición/nación› to defend, protect; ‹persona› to defend
    siempre defiende a su hermana he always defends o protects o stands up for his sister
    defender a algn DE algo/algn to defend sb AGAINST sth/sb
    la defendió de las acusaciones/de sus atacantes he defended her against the accusations/against her attackers
    2 ‹intereses› to protect, defend; ‹derechos› to defend; ‹título› to defend
    3 ( Der) ‹caso› to defend; ‹acusado/cliente› to defend
    4 ‹idea/teoría/opinión› to defend, uphold; ‹causa/ideal› to champion, defend
    defender la tesis ≈ to defend one's dissertation ( in US), ≈ to have a viva on one's thesis ( in UK)
    1 ( refl) (contra una agresión) to defend o protect oneself; ( Der) to defend oneself defenderse DE algo/algn to defend oneself AGAINST sth/sb
    2 ( fam) (arreglárselas) to get by ( colloq)
    me defiendo bastante bien en francés I can get by quite well in French
    ¿sabes jugar al tenis? — bueno, me defiendo can you play tennis? — well, I'm not too bad ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    defender ( conjugate defender) verbo transitivo
    to defend;
    intereses to protect;
    defender a algo/algn de algo/algn to defend sth/sb against sth/sb
    defenderse verbo pronominal
    a) ( refl) ( contra una agresión) to defend o protect oneself;

    (Der) to defend oneself;
    defenderse de algo/algn to defend oneself against sth/sb
    b) (fam) ( arreglárselas) to get by (colloq);


    defender verbo transitivo to defend [contra, against] [de, from]
    ' defender' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    defensa
    - defensor
    - defensora
    - muerte
    - resguardar
    - uña
    - unirse
    - valedor
    - valedora
    - defienda
    English:
    argue
    - defend
    - defender
    - guard
    - leg
    - plead
    - speak up
    - stand up
    - stick up for
    - uphold
    - advocate
    - champion
    - speak
    - stand
    - stick
    * * *
    vt
    1. [país, ideas] to defend;
    [amigo] to stand up for; Dep [contrario, delantero] to mark;
    defender a alguien de algo to defend sb from o against sth;
    defender los derechos/intereses de alguien to defend sb's rights/interests;
    defendió su teoría con sólidos argumentos he supported his theory with sound arguments;
    defender la tesis [en universidad] Br ≈ to have one's viva, US ≈ to defend one's dissertation;
    Dep
    defender el título to defend the title;
    defender algo a capa y espada to defend sth tooth and nail
    2. [reo, acusado] to defend
    3. [proteger] [del frío, calor] to protect (de against)
    vi
    Dep to mark;
    defender al hombre to mark man for man, to man-mark;
    defender en zona to use a zone defence
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 defend (de against)
    2 en fútbol mark
    II v/i en fútbol mark
    * * *
    defender {56} vt
    : to defend, to protect
    * * *
    1. (en general) to defend
    2. (proteger) to protect

    Spanish-English dictionary > defender

  • 213 deformación física voluntaria

    Ex. In particular, body piercings, tattoos, self-mutilation, cosmetic surgery and eating disorders all form part of American culture's obsession with corporeal malleability and the body as a form of adornment.
    * * *

    Ex: In particular, body piercings, tattoos, self-mutilation, cosmetic surgery and eating disorders all form part of American culture's obsession with corporeal malleability and the body as a form of adornment.

    Spanish-English dictionary > deformación física voluntaria

  • 214 degradar

    v.
    1 to degrade, to debase (moralmente).
    Sus amigos degradaron a Ricardo His friends degraded Richard.
    Ricardo degradó la leche por dinero Richard downgraded the milk for money.
    El general degradó al soldado vago The general degraded the lazy soldier.
    2 to demote.
    * * *
    1 to degrade, debase
    2 MILITAR to demote
    1 to demean oneself, degrade oneself
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=deteriorar) [+ salud] to cause to deteriorate; [+ litoral] to spoil; [+ calidad] to lower, make worse
    2) (Mil) to demote, downgrade
    3) (Inform) [+ datos] to corrupt
    4) (Geol) [+ suelo] to impoverish
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) (Mil) to demote
    b) ( envilecer) to degrade
    c) ( empeorar) <calidad/valor> to diminish
    2) (Art) to gradate
    2.
    degradarse v pron
    a) persona ( humillarse) to demean oneself, degrade oneself
    b) (Quím) compuesto to decompose, degrade
    * * *
    = cheapen, debase, downgrade [down-grade], degrade, demean, demote, abase.
    Ex. Simplification is cheapening the process.
    Ex. As American industry has conclusively proven, the most direct way to cut costs is to debase the quality of the product.
    Ex. The opposite of the 'halo effect' -- downgrading someone you dislike but whose work is good -- is also an error.
    Ex. In point of fact, I am well aware that catalogers, as a group, resist with every cell in their bodies any attempt to erode or degrade or compromise the catalog.
    Ex. While there have been some praiseworthy improvements over the past few years, many biased headings persist which demean the very people who use the catalog.
    Ex. Supervisors may have to take such action as demoting or terminating an employee.
    Ex. Fairy tales not abased by the 'culture industry' might save us from our present state of barbarism resulting from a capitalism run wild.
    ----
    * degradarse = degrade.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) (Mil) to demote
    b) ( envilecer) to degrade
    c) ( empeorar) <calidad/valor> to diminish
    2) (Art) to gradate
    2.
    degradarse v pron
    a) persona ( humillarse) to demean oneself, degrade oneself
    b) (Quím) compuesto to decompose, degrade
    * * *
    = cheapen, debase, downgrade [down-grade], degrade, demean, demote, abase.

    Ex: Simplification is cheapening the process.

    Ex: As American industry has conclusively proven, the most direct way to cut costs is to debase the quality of the product.
    Ex: The opposite of the 'halo effect' -- downgrading someone you dislike but whose work is good -- is also an error.
    Ex: In point of fact, I am well aware that catalogers, as a group, resist with every cell in their bodies any attempt to erode or degrade or compromise the catalog.
    Ex: While there have been some praiseworthy improvements over the past few years, many biased headings persist which demean the very people who use the catalog.
    Ex: Supervisors may have to take such action as demoting or terminating an employee.
    Ex: Fairy tales not abased by the 'culture industry' might save us from our present state of barbarism resulting from a capitalism run wild.
    * degradarse = degrade.

    * * *
    degradar [A1 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ( Mil) to demote
    2 (envilecer) to degrade
    estas prácticas degradan al ser humano these practices are degrading to human beings
    3 (empeorar) ‹calidad/valor› to diminish
    el suelo está excesivamente degradado the soil is too impoverished
    4 ( Quím) ‹compuesto› to degrade
    B ( Art) to gradate
    1 «persona» (humillarse) to demean oneself, degrade oneself, humiliate oneself
    2 ( Quím) «compuesto» to decompose, degrade
    * * *

    degradar ( conjugate degradar) verbo transitivo
    a) (Mil) to demote


    c) ( empeorar) ‹calidad/valor to diminish

    degradarse verbo pronominal [ persona] to demean oneself, degrade oneself
    degradar verbo transitivo
    1 to degrade: esos actos de barbarie le degradan, he had degraded himself by committing such barbaric acts
    2 (en una jerarquía) to demote
    ' degradar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    denigrar
    English:
    debase
    - degrade
    - rank
    - cheapen
    - demean
    - demote
    * * *
    vt
    1. [moralmente] to degrade, to debase;
    el alcohol la ha degradado she's been ruined by drink
    2. [físicamente] [medio ambiente, naturaleza] to degrade;
    [calidad, servicio, producto] to cause to deteriorate;
    la contaminación degrada el medio ambiente pollution degrades the environment
    3. [de mando militar, cargo] to demote, to downgrade
    * * *
    v/t
    1 degrade
    2 MIL demote
    3 PINT gradate
    * * *
    1) : to degrade, to debase
    2) : to demote

    Spanish-English dictionary > degradar

  • 215 del futuro

    = of the years to come, yet to come
    Ex. The ways in which librarians respond to the new technology will determine, in part, the library's place in the culture of the years to come.
    Ex. The article 'The library yet to come' presents a range of pessimistic and optimistic predictions for the future of the library.
    * * *
    = of the years to come, yet to come

    Ex: The ways in which librarians respond to the new technology will determine, in part, the library's place in the culture of the years to come.

    Ex: The article 'The library yet to come' presents a range of pessimistic and optimistic predictions for the future of the library.

    Spanish-English dictionary > del futuro

  • 216 deleitar

    v.
    1 to delight.
    El helado deleita a los chicos Ice cream delights the kids.
    2 to be delighted by, to be happy about, to be delighted about, to be pleased by.
    Nos deleita la ópera We are delighted by the opera.
    3 to enjoy, to be happy to.
    Me deleita ver las estrellas I enjoy looking at the stars.
    * * *
    1 to delight, please
    1 to delight (con/en, in), take delight (con/en, in)
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    VT to delight, charm
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to delight
    2.
    deleitarse v pron

    deleitarse + ger — to delight in -ing, enjoy -ing

    * * *
    = enchant, delight, please, wallow in.
    Ex. The article 'The power to enchant: puppets in the public library' describes the construction of a puppet theatre in a public library.
    Ex. Libraries must begin seriously to assess how well they are anticipating, meeting, and delighting students and faculty.
    Ex. By polar contrast the book for the mass culture reader, the 'consumer', simply aims to please.
    Ex. This has produced the matriarchal system in society on the one hand, and well-rounded libraries organized under the slogan 'Libraries are for wallowing in' on the other.
    ----
    * deleitar los oídos = please + the ears.
    * deleitarse = savour [savor, -USA], relish, gloat.
    * deleitarse con = revel in.
    * deleitarse en = delight in.
    * deleitarse mirando = feast + Posesivo + eyes on.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to delight
    2.
    deleitarse v pron

    deleitarse + ger — to delight in -ing, enjoy -ing

    * * *
    = enchant, delight, please, wallow in.

    Ex: The article 'The power to enchant: puppets in the public library' describes the construction of a puppet theatre in a public library.

    Ex: Libraries must begin seriously to assess how well they are anticipating, meeting, and delighting students and faculty.
    Ex: By polar contrast the book for the mass culture reader, the 'consumer', simply aims to please.
    Ex: This has produced the matriarchal system in society on the one hand, and well-rounded libraries organized under the slogan 'Libraries are for wallowing in' on the other.
    * deleitar los oídos = please + the ears.
    * deleitarse = savour [savor, -USA], relish, gloat.
    * deleitarse con = revel in.
    * deleitarse en = delight in.
    * deleitarse mirando = feast + Posesivo + eyes on.

    * * *
    deleitar [A1 ]
    vt
    to delight
    deleitarse + GER to delight IN -ING, enjoy -ING
    te deleitas haciéndome sufrir ¿no? you delight in o enjoy making me suffer, don't you?
    * * *

    deleitar ( conjugate deleitar) verbo transitivo
    to delight
    deleitarse verbo pronominal
    deleitarse haciendo algo to delight in doing sth, enjoy doing sth

    deleitar verbo transitivo to delight

    ' deleitar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    recrear
    English:
    delight
    * * *
    vt
    to delight;
    la música clásica nos deleita we love classical music;
    me deleitaba escucharla cantar I loved listening to her sing
    * * *
    v/t delight
    * * *
    : to delight, to please

    Spanish-English dictionary > deleitar

  • 217 demasiado grande

    adj.
    too big, jumbo, over-sized, oversize.
    * * *
    (adj.) = overgrown, oversized
    Ex. Deregulation compelled the energy utility business to restructure its inwardly directed culture and its overgrown and rivalrous internal services function.
    Ex. He had a tough time lugging his lumpy, oversized travelbag onto the plane and stuffing it in the overhead bin.
    * * *
    (adj.) = overgrown, oversized

    Ex: Deregulation compelled the energy utility business to restructure its inwardly directed culture and its overgrown and rivalrous internal services function.

    Ex: He had a tough time lugging his lumpy, oversized travelbag onto the plane and stuffing it in the overhead bin.

    Spanish-English dictionary > demasiado grande

  • 218 demasiado indulgente con uno mismo

    (adj.) = self-indulgent
    Ex. They provide a true and fertile alternative to songwriters whose point of reference is the self-indulgent, angst-ridden youth culture whose reality is read through mass media.
    * * *

    Ex: They provide a true and fertile alternative to songwriters whose point of reference is the self-indulgent, angst-ridden youth culture whose reality is read through mass media.

    Spanish-English dictionary > demasiado indulgente con uno mismo

  • 219 desabrocharse

    1 (una prenda) to come undone, come unfastened
    * * *
    VPR
    1) [ropa] to come undone

    ¿me ayudas a desabrocharme el vestido? — would you help me undo my dress?

    2) (=desahogarse) to unburden o.s.
    * * *
    (v.) = come + undone, come + loose
    Ex. Ultimately, thought, understood as part of high culture, has come undone.
    Ex. It appeared that the digger came loose on the trailer and fell onto the stone wall.
    * * *
    (v.) = come + undone, come + loose

    Ex: Ultimately, thought, understood as part of high culture, has come undone.

    Ex: It appeared that the digger came loose on the trailer and fell onto the stone wall.

    * * *

    ■desabrocharse verbo reflexivo
    1 (una persona su ropa) desabróchate el vestido, undo your dress
    2 (la prenda sola, sin querer) to come undone
    ' desabrocharse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    desabrochar
    English:
    fumble
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [persona] to undo one's buttons;
    desabróchese, por favor unbutton o undo your shirt, please;
    se desabrochó el cuello de la camisa he unbuttoned his shirt collar
    2. [ropa] to come undone;
    se te ha desabrochado la bragueta your fly has come undone
    * * *
    vr
    : to come undone
    * * *
    desabrocharse vb to come undone

    Spanish-English dictionary > desabrocharse

  • 220 desaparición de las diferencias

    (n.) = blurring of differences, blurring of roles, blurring of boundaries
    Ex. If such a national system could be accomplished, I think we would see a blurring of the differences between the public library user and the research library user.
    Ex. The article concludes that there will be a blurring of roles among local institutions, libraries and regional networks.
    Ex. One of the effects of these changes is a blurring of boundaries between the institutions, concepts, and processes which define western culture.
    * * *
    (n.) = blurring of differences, blurring of roles, blurring of boundaries

    Ex: If such a national system could be accomplished, I think we would see a blurring of the differences between the public library user and the research library user.

    Ex: The article concludes that there will be a blurring of roles among local institutions, libraries and regional networks.
    Ex: One of the effects of these changes is a blurring of boundaries between the institutions, concepts, and processes which define western culture.

    Spanish-English dictionary > desaparición de las diferencias

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  • culture — cul‧ture [ˈkʌltʆə ǁ ər] noun 1. [countable, uncountable] the ideas, beliefs, and customs that are shared and accepted by people in a society: • Western culture places a high value on material wealth. 2. [countable, uncountable] the attitudes or… …   Financial and business terms

  • culture — 1. Here is a word that had mixed fortunes in the 20c, and means all things to all men. There are about 128,000 examples of it (including the plural form and compounds such as culture bound) in the 500 million word Oxford English Corpus (language… …   Modern English usage

  • Culture — Cul ture (k?l t?r; 135), n. [F. culture, L. cultura, fr. colere to till, cultivate; of uncertain origin. Cf. {Colony}.] 1. The act or practice of cultivating, or of preparing the earth for seed and raising crops by tillage; as, the culture of the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • culture — CULTURE. s. f. Les travaux qu on emploie pour rendre la terre plus fertile, et pour améliorer ses productions. La culture des champs. La culture des vignes, des plantes, des fleurs. Travailler, s adonner à la culture de ... Abandonner la culture… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • culture — (n.) mid 15c., the tilling of land, from M.Fr. culture and directly from L. cultura a cultivating, agriculture, figuratively care, culture, an honoring, from pp. stem of colere tend, guard, cultivate, till (see CULT (Cf. cult)). The figurative… …   Etymology dictionary

  • culture — n 1 Culture, cultivation, breeding, refinement are comparable when they denote a quality of a person or group of persons which reflects his or their possession of excellent taste, manners, and social adjustment. Culture implies a high degree of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • culture — Culture. s. f. v. Les façons qu on donne à la terre pour la rendre plus fertile, & aux arbres & aux plantes pour les faire mieux venir, & les faire mieux rapporter. La culture de la terre. la culture des vignes, des plantes. travailler à la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • culture — [n1] breeding, education, sophistication ability, accomplishment, address, aestheticism, art, capacity, civilization, class, courtesy, cultivation, delicacy, dignity, discrimination, dress, elegance, elevation, enlightenment, erudition,… …   New thesaurus

  • culture — [kul′chər] n. [ME < L cultura < colere: see CULT] 1. cultivation of the soil 2. production, development, or improvement of a particular plant, animal, commodity, etc. 3. a) the growth of bacteria, microorganisms, or other plant and animal… …   English World dictionary

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