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Boulton

  • 1 Boulton process

    English-German dictionary of Architecture and Construction > Boulton process

  • 2 flycatcher, Boulton’s puff-back

    2. RUS батис m Маргариты
    3. ENG Boulton’s puff-back flycatcher, Boulton’s puffback
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > flycatcher, Boulton’s puff-back

  • 3 partridge, Boulton’s hill

    3. ENG Boulton’s hill partridge
    5. FRA torquéole f de Boulton

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > partridge, Boulton’s hill

  • 4 puffback, Boulton’s

    2. RUS батис m Маргариты
    3. ENG Boulton’s puff-back flycatcher, Boulton’s puffback
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > puffback, Boulton’s

  • 5 warbler, Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland)

    1. LAT Ph. laurae ( Boulton)
    2. RUS пеночка f Лауры
    3. ENG Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland) warbler, Laura’s leaf warbler
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > warbler, Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland)

  • 6 warbler, Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland)

    1. LAT Ph. laurae ( Boulton)
    2. RUS пеночка f Лауры
    3. ENG Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland) warbler, Laura’s leaf warbler
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > warbler, Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland)

  • 7 Boulton process

    (c. e)
    பூற்றன் முறை

    English-Tamil dictionary > Boulton process

  • 8 greenbul, Pulitzer’s

    3. ENG Pulitzer’s longbill, Pulitzer’s greenbul
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > greenbul, Pulitzer’s

  • 9 longbill, Pulitzer’s

    3. ENG Pulitzer’s longbill, Pulitzer’s greenbul
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > longbill, Pulitzer’s

  • 10 warbler, Laura’s leaf

    1. LAT Ph. laurae ( Boulton)
    2. RUS пеночка f Лауры
    3. ENG Mrs. Boulton’s (woodland) warbler, Laura’s leaf warbler
    5. FRA

    ПЯТИЯЗЫЧНЫЙ СЛОВАРЬ НАЗВАНИЙ ЖИВОТНЫХ — птицы > warbler, Laura’s leaf

  • 11 barb, minnow

    2. RUS барбус m Артура Вернея
    3. ENG spot-tailed [minnow] barb
    4. DEU
    5. FRA

    DICTIONARY OF ANIMAL NAMES IN FIVE LANGUAGES > barb, minnow

  • 12 barb, spot-tailed

    2. RUS барбус m Артура Вернея
    3. ENG spot-tailed [minnow] barb
    4. DEU
    5. FRA

    DICTIONARY OF ANIMAL NAMES IN FIVE LANGUAGES > barb, spot-tailed

  • 13 Austin, John

    SUBJECT AREA: Textiles
    [br]
    fl. 1789 Scotland
    [br]
    Scottish contributor to the early development of the power loom.
    [br]
    On 6 April 1789 John Austin wrote to James Watt, seeking advice about patenting "a weaving loom I have invented to go by the hand, horse, water or any other constant power, to comb, brush, or dress the yarn at the same time as it is weaving \& by which one man will do the work of three and make superior work to what can be done by the common loom" (Boulton \& Watt Collection, Birmingham, James Watt Papers, JW/22). Watt replied that "there is a Clergyman by the name of Cartwright at Doncaster who has a patent for a similar contrivance" (Boulton \& Watt Collection, Birmingham, Letter Book 1, 15 April 1789). Watt pointed out that there was a large manufactory running at Doncaster and something of the same kind at Manchester with working power looms. Presumably, this reply deterred Austin from taking out a patent. However, some members of the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce continued developing the loom, and in 1798 one that was tried at the spinning mill of J.Monteith, of Pollokshaws, near Glasgow, answered the purpose so well that a building was erected and thirty of the looms were installed. Later, in 1800, this number was increased to 200, all of which were driven by a steam engine, and it was stated that one weaver and a boy could tend from three to five of these looms.
    Austin's loom was worked by eccentrics, or cams. There was one cam on each side with "a sudden beak or projection" that drove the levers connected to the picking pegs, while other cams worked the heddles and drove the reed. The loom was also fitted with a weft stop motion and could produce more cloth than a hand loom, and worked at about sixty picks per minute. The pivoting of the slay at the bottom allowed the loom to be much more compact than previous ones.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    A.Rees, 1819, The Cyclopaedia: or Universal Dictionary of Arts, Sciences and Literature, London.
    A.P.Usher, 1958, A History of Mechanical Inventions.
    W.English, 1969, The Textile Industry, London.
    R.L.Hills, 1970, Power in the Industrial Revolution, Manchester.
    RLH

    Biographical history of technology > Austin, John

  • 14 Boulsover, Thomas

    [br]
    b. 1704
    d. 1788
    [br]
    English cutler, metalworker and inventor of Sheffield plate.
    [br]
    Boulsover, originally a small-scale manufacturer of cutlery, is believed to have specialized in making knife-handle components. About 1742 he found that a thin sheet of silver could be fused to copper sheet by rolling or beating to flatten it. Thus he developed the plating of silver, later called Sheffield plate.
    The method when perfected consisted of copper sheet overlaid by thin sheet silver being annealed by red heat. Protected by iron sheeting, the copper and silver were rolled together, becoming fused to a single plate capable of undergoing further manufacturing processes. Later developments included methods of edging the fused sheets and the placing of silver sheet on both lower and upper surfaces of copper, to produce high-quality silver plate, in much demand by the latter part of the century. Boulsover himself is said to have produced only small articles such as buttons and snuff boxes from this material, which by 1758 was being exploited more commercially by Joseph Hancock in Sheffield making candlesticks, hot-water pots and coffee pots. Matthew Boulton introduced its manufacture in very high-quality products during the 1760s to Birmingham, where the technique was widely adopted later. By the 1770s Boulsover was engaged in rolling his plated copper for industry elsewhere, also trading in iron and purchasing blister steel which he converted by the Huntsman process to crucible steel. Blister steel was converted on his behalf to shear steel by forging. He is thought to have also been responsible for improving this product further, introducing "double-shear steel", by repeating the forging and faggoting of shear steel bars. Thomas Boulsover had become a Sheffield entrepreneur, well known for his numerous skills with metals.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    H.W.Dickinson, 1937, Matthew Boulton, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (describes Boulsover's innovation and further development of Sheffield plate).
    J.Holland, 1834, Manufactures in Metal III, 354–8.
    For activities in steel see: K.C.Barraclough, 1991, "Steel in the Industrial Revolution", in J.Day and R.F.Tylecote (eds), The Industrial Revolution in Metals, The Institute of Metals.
    JD

    Biographical history of technology > Boulsover, Thomas

  • 15 Bramah, Joseph

    [br]
    b. 2 April 1749 Stainborough, Yorkshire, England
    d. 9 December 1814 Pimlico, London, England
    [br]
    English inventor of the second patented water-closet, the beer-engine, the Bramah lock and, most important, the hydraulic press.
    [br]
    Bramah was the son of a tenant farmer and was educated at the village school before being apprenticed to a local carpenter, Thomas Allot. He walked to London c.1773 and found work with a Mr Allen that included the repair of some of the comparatively rare water-closets of the period. He invented and patented one of his own, which was followed by a water cock in 1783. His next invention, a greatly improved lock, involved the devising of a number of special machine tools, for it was one of the first devices involving interchangeable components in its manufacture. In this he had the help of Henry Maudslay, then a young and unknown engineer, who became Bramah's foreman before setting up business on his own. In 1784 he moved his premises from Denmark Street, St Giles, to 124 Piccadilly, which was later used as a showroom when he set up a factory in Pimlico. He invented an engine for putting out fires in 1785 and 1793, in effect a reciprocating rotary-vane pump. He undertook the refurbishment and modernization of Norwich waterworks c.1793, but fell out with Robert Mylne, who was acting as Consultant to the Norwich Corporation and had produced a remarkably vague specification. This was Bramah's only venture into the field of civil engineering.
    In 1797 he acted as an expert witness for Hornblower \& Maberley in the patent infringement case brought against them by Boulton and Watt. Having been cut short by the judge, he published his proposed evidence in "Letter to the Rt Hon. Sir James Eyre, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas…etc". In 1795 he was granted his most important patent, based on Pascal's Hydrostatic Paradox, for the hydraulic press which also incorporated the concept of hydraulics for the transmission of both power and motion and was the foundation of the whole subsequent hydraulic industry. There is no truth in the oft-repeated assertion originating from Samuel Smiles's Industrial Biography (1863) that the hydraulic press could not be made to work until Henry Maudslay invented the self-sealing neck leather. Bramah used a single-acting upstroking ram, sealed only at its base with a U-leather. There was no need for a neck leather.
    He also used the concept of the weight-loaded, in this case as a public-house beer-engine. He devised machinery for carbonating soda water. The first banknote-numbering machine was of his design and was bought by the Bank of England. His development of a machine to cut twelve nibs from one goose quill started a patent specification which ended with the invention of the fountain pen, patented in 1809. His coach brakes were an innovation that was followed bv a form of hydropneumatic carriage suspension that was somewhat in advance of its time, as was his patent of 1812. This foresaw the introduction of hydraulic power mains in major cities and included the telescopic ram and the air-loaded accumulator.
    In all Joseph Bramah was granted eighteen patents. On 22 March 1813 he demonstrated a hydraulic machine for pulling up trees by the roots in Hyde Park before a large crowd headed by the Duke of York. Using the same machine in Alice Holt Forest in Hampshire to fell timber for ships for the Navy, he caught a chill and died soon after at his home in Pimlico.
    [br]
    Bibliography
    1778, British patent no. 1177 (water-closet). 1784, British patent no. 1430 (Bramah Lock). 1795, British patent no. 2045 (hydraulic press). 1809, British patent no. 3260 (fountain pen). 1812, British patent no. 3611.
    Further Reading
    I.McNeil, 1968, Joseph Bramah, a Century of Invention.
    S.Smiles, 1863, Industrial Biography.
    H.W.Dickinson, 1942, "Joseph Bramah and his inventions", Transactions of the Newcomen Society 22:169–86.
    IMcN

    Biographical history of technology > Bramah, Joseph

  • 16 Buckle, William

    [br]
    b. 29 July 1794 Alnwick, Northumberland, England
    d. 30 September 1863 London, England
    [br]
    English mechanical engineer who introduced the first large screw-cutting lathe to Boulton, Watt \& Co.
    [br]
    William Buckle was the son of Thomas Buckle (1759–1849), a millwright who later assisted the 9th Earl of Dundonald (1749–1831) in his various inventions, principally machines for the manufacture of rope. Soon after the birth of William, the family moved from Alnwick to Hull, Yorkshire, where he received his education. The family again moved c.1808 to London, and William was apprenticed to Messrs Woolf \& Edwards, millwrights and engineers of Lambeth. During his apprenticeship he attended evening classes at a mechanical drawing school in Finsbury, which was then the only place of its kind in London.
    After completing his apprenticeship, he was sent by Messrs Humphrys to Memel in Prussia to establish steamboats on the rivers and lakes there under the patronage of the Prince of Hardenburg. After about four years he returned to Britain and was employed by Boulton, Watt \& Co. to install the engines in the first steam mail packet for the service between Dublin and Holyhead. He was responsible for the engines of the steamship Lightning when it was used on the visit of George IV to Ireland.
    About 1824 Buckle was engaged by Boulton, Watt \& Co. as Manager of the Soho Foundry, where he is credited with introducing the first large screw-cutting lathe. At Soho about 700 or 800 men were employed on a wide variety of engineering manufacture, including coining machinery for mints in many parts of the world, with some in 1826 for the Mint at the Soho Manufactory. In 1851, following the recommendations of a Royal Commission, the Royal Mint in London was reorganized and Buckle was asked to take the post of Assistant Coiner, the senior executive officer under the Deputy Master. This he accepted, retaining the post until the end of his life.
    At Soho, Buckle helped to establish a literary and scientific institution to provide evening classes for the apprentices and took part in the teaching. He was an original member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, which was founded in Birmingham in January 1847, and a member of their Council from then until 1855. He contributed a number of papers in the early years, including a memoir of William Murdock whom he had known at Soho; he resigned from the Institution in 1856 after his move to London. He was an honorary member of the London Association of Foreman Engineers.
    [br]
    Bibliography
    1850, "Inventions and life of William Murdock", Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers 2 (October): 16–26.
    RTS

    Biographical history of technology > Buckle, William

  • 17 Clegg, Samuel

    [br]
    b. 2 March 1781 Manchester, England
    d. 8 January 1861 Haverstock Hill, Hampstead, London, England
    [br]
    English inventor and gas engineer.
    [br]
    Clegg received scientific instruction from John Dalton, the founder of the atomic theory, and was apprenticed to Boulton \& Watt. While at their Soho factory in Birmingham, he assisted William Murdock with his experiments on coal gas. He left the firm in 1804 and set up as a gas engineer on his own account. He designed and installed gas plant and lighting in a number of factories, including Henry Lodge's cotton mill at Sowerby Bridge and in 1811 the Jesuit College at Stoneyhurst in Lancashire, the first non-industrial establishment to be equipped with gas lighting.
    Clegg moved to London in 1813 and successfully installed gas lighting at the premises of Rudolf Ackermann in the Strand. His success in the manufacture of gas had earned him the Royal Society of Arts Silver Medal in 1808 for furthering "the art of gas production", and in 1813 it brought him the appointment of Chief Engineer to the first gas company, the Chartered Gas, Light \& Coke Company. He left in 1817, but remained in demand to set up gas works and advise on the formation of gas companies. Throughout this time there flowed from Clegg a series of inventions of fundamental importance in the gas industry. While at Lodge's mill he had begun purifying gas by adding lime to the gas holder, and at Stoneyhurst this had become a separate lime purifier. In 1815, and again in 1818, Clegg patented the wet-meter which proved to be the basis for future devices for measuring gas. He invented the gas governor and, favouring the horizontal retort, developed the form which was to become standard for the next forty years. But after all this, Clegg joined a concern in Liverpool which failed, taking all his possessions with it. He made a fresh start in Lisbon, where he undertook various engineering works for the Portuguese government. He returned to England to find railway construction gathering pace, but he again backed a loser by engaging in the ill-fated atmospheric-rail way project. He was finally discouraged from taking part in further enterprises, but he received a government appointment as Surveying Officer to conduct enquiries in connection with the various Bills on gas that were presented to Parliament. Clegg also contributed to his son's massive treatise on the manufacture of coal gas.
    [br]
    Principal Honours and Distinctions
    Royal Society of Arts Silver Medal 1808.
    Further Reading
    Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers (1862) 21:552–4.
    S.Everard, 1949, The History of the Gas light and Coke Company, London: Ernest Benn.
    LRD

    Biographical history of technology > Clegg, Samuel

  • 18 Edwards, Humphrey

    [br]
    fl. c.1808–25 London (?), England
    d. after 1825 France (?)
    [br]
    English co-developer of Woolf s compound steam engine.
    [br]
    When Arthur Woolf left the Griffin Brewery, London, in October 1808, he formed a partnership with Humphrey Edwards, described as a millwright at Mill Street, Lambeth, where they started an engine works to build Woolf's type of compound engine. A number of small engines were constructed and other ordinary engines modified with the addition of a high-pressure cylinder. Improvements were made in each succeeding engine, and by 1811 a standard form had been evolved. During this experimental period, engines were made with cylinders side by side as well as the more usual layout with one behind the other. The valve gear and other details were also improved. Steam pressure may have been around 40 psi (2.8 kg/cm2). In an advertisement of February 1811, the partners claimed that their engines had been brought to such a state of perfection that they consumed only half the quantity of coal required for engines on the plan of Messrs Boulton \& Watt. Woolf visited Cornwall, where he realized that more potential for his engines lay there than in London; in May 1811 the partnership was dissolved, with Woolf returning to his home county. Edwards struggled on alone in London for a while, but when he saw a more promising future for the engine in France he moved to Paris. On 25 May 1815 he obtained a French patent, a Brevet d'importation, for ten years. A report in 1817 shows that during the previous two years he had imported into France fifteen engines of different sizes which were at work in eight places in various parts of the country. He licensed a mining company in the north of France to make twenty-five engines for winding coal. In France there was always much more interest in rotative engines than pumping ones. Edwards may have formed a partnership with Goupil \& Cie, Dampierre, to build engines, but this is uncertain. He became a member of the firm Scipion, Perrier, Edwards \& Chappert, which took over the Chaillot Foundry of the Perrier Frères in Paris, and it seems that Edwards continued to build steam engines there for the rest of his life. In 1824 it was claimed that he had made about 100 engines in England and another 200 in France, but this is probably an exaggeration.
    The Woolf engine acquired its popularity in France because its compound design was more economical than the single-cylinder type. To enable it to be operated safely, Edwards first modified Woolf s cast-iron boiler in 1815 by placing two small drums over the fire, and then in 1825 replaced the cast iron with wrought iron. The modified boiler was eventually brought back to England in the 1850s as the "French" or "elephant" boiler.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    Most details about Edwards are to be found in the biographies of his partner, Arthur Woolf. For example, see T.R.Harris, 1966, Arthur Woolf, 1766–1837, The Cornish Engineer, Truro: D.Bradford Barton; Rhys Jenkins, 1932–3, "A Cornish Engineer, Arthur Woolf, 1766–1837", Transactions of the Newcomen Society 13. These use information from the originally unpublished part of J.Farey, 1971, A Treatise on the Steam Engine, Vol. II, Newton Abbot: David \& Charles.
    RLH

    Biographical history of technology > Edwards, Humphrey

  • 19 Ewart, Peter

    SUBJECT AREA: Textiles
    [br]
    b. 14 May 1767 Traquair, near Peebles, Scotland
    d. September 1842 London, England
    [br]
    Scottish pioneer in the mechanization of the textile industry.
    [br]
    Peter Ewart, the youngest of six sons, was born at Traquair manse, where his father was a clergyman in the Church of Scotland. He was educated at the Free School, Dumfries, and in 1782 spent a year at Edinburgh University. He followed this with an apprenticeship under John Rennie at Musselburgh before moving south in 1785 to help Rennie erect the Albion corn mill in London. This brought him into contact with Boulton \& Watt, and in 1788 he went to Birmingham to erect a waterwheel and other machinery in the Soho Manufactory. In 1789 he was sent to Manchester to install a steam engine for Peter Drinkwater and thus his long connection with the city began. In 1790 Ewart took up residence in Manchester as Boulton \& Watt's representative. Amongst other engines, he installed one for Samuel Oldknow at Stockport. In 1792 he became a partner with Oldknow in his cotton-spinning business, but because of financial difficulties he moved back to Birmingham in 1795 to help erect the machines in the new Soho Foundry. He was soon back in Manchester in partnership with Samuel Greg at Quarry Bank Mill, Styal, where he was responsible for developing the water power, installing a steam engine, and being concerned with the spinning machinery and, later, gas lighting at Greg's other mills.
    In 1798, Ewart devised an automatic expansion-gear for steam engines, but steam pressures at the time were too low for such a device to be effective. His grasp of the theory of steam power is shown by his paper to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society in 1808, On the Measure of Moving Force. In 1813 he patented a power loom to be worked by the pressure of steam or compressed air. In 1824 Charles Babbage consulted him about automatic looms. His interest in textiles continued until at least 1833, when he obtained a patent for a self-acting spinning mule, which was, however, outclassed by the more successful one invented by Richard Roberts. Ewart gave much help and advice to others. The development of the machine tools at Boulton \& Watt's Soho Foundry has been mentioned already. He also helped James Watt with his machine for copying sculptures. While he continued to run his own textile mill, Ewart was also in partnership with Charles Macintosh, the pioneer of rubber-coated cloth. He was involved with William Fairbairn concerning steam engines for the boats that Fairbairn was building in Manchester, and it was through Ewart that Eaton Hodgkinson was introduced to Fairbairn and so made the tests and calculations for the tubes for the Britannia Railway Bridge across the Menai Straits. Ewart was involved with the launching of the Liverpool \& Manchester Railway as he was a director of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce at the time.
    In 1835 he uprooted himself from Manchester and became the first Chief Engineer for the Royal Navy, assuming responsibility for the steamboats, which by 1837 numbered 227 in service. He set up repair facilities and planned workshops for overhauling engines at Woolwich Dockyard, the first establishment of its type. It was here that he was killed in an accident when a chain broke while he was supervising the lifting of a large boiler. Engineering was Ewart's life, and it is possible to give only a brief account of his varied interests and connections here.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    Obituary, 1843, "Institution of Civil Engineers", Annual General Meeting, January. Obituary, 1843, Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society Memoirs (NS) 7. R.L.Hills, 1987–8, "Peter Ewart, 1767–1843", Manchester Literary and Philosophical
    Society Memoirs 127.
    M.B.Rose, 1986, The Gregs of Quarry Bank Mill The Rise and Decline of a Family Firm, 1750–1914, Cambridge (covers E wart's involvement with Samuel Greg).
    R.L.Hills, 1970, Power in the Industrial Revolution, Manchester; R.L.Hills, 1989, Power
    from Steam, Cambridge (both look at Ewart's involvement with textiles and steam engines).
    RLH

    Biographical history of technology > Ewart, Peter

  • 20 Fulton, Robert

    SUBJECT AREA: Ports and shipping
    [br]
    b. 14 November 1765 Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA
    d. 24 February 1815 New York, USA
    [br]
    American pioneer of steamships and of North American steam navigation.
    [br]
    The early life of Fulton is documented sparsely; however, it is clear that he was brought up in poor circumstances along with three sisters and one brother by a widowed mother. The War of Independence was raging around them for some years, but despite this it is believed that he spent some time learning the jeweller's trade in Philadelphia and had by then made a name for himself as a miniaturist. Throughout his life he remained skilled with his hands and well able to record technical detail on paper. He witnessed many of the early trials of American steamboats and saw the work of William Henry and John Fitch, and in 1787 he set off for the first time to Europe. For some years he examined steamships in Paris and without doubt saw the Charlotte Dundas on the Forth and Clyde Canal near Glasgow. In 1803 he built a steamship that ran on the Seine at 4 1/2 mph (7.25 km/h), and when it was lost, another to replace it. All his designs were based on principles that had been tried and proved elsewhere, and in this respect he was more of a developer than an inventor. After some time experimenting with submersibles and torpedoes for the British and French governments, in 1806 he returned to the United States. In 1807 he took delivery of the 100 ton displacement paddle steamer Clermont from the yard of Charles Browne of East River, New York. In August of that year it started the passenger services on the Hudson River and this can be claimed as the commencement of world passenger steam navigation. Again the ship was traditional in shape and the machinery was supplied by Messrs Boulton and Watt. This was followed by other ships, including Car of Neptune, Paragon and the world's first steam warship, Demolgos, launched in New York in October 1814 and designed by Fulton for coastal defence and the breaking of the British blockade. His last and finest boat was named Chancellor Livingston after his friend and patron Robert Livingston (1746–1813); the timber hull was launched in 1816, some months after Fulton's death.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    H.P.Spratt, 1958, The Birth of the Steamboat, London: Griffin. J.T.Flexner, 1978, Steamboats Come True, Boston: Little, Brown.
    "Robert Fulton and the centenary of steam navigation", Engineer (16 August 1907).
    FMW

    Biographical history of technology > Fulton, Robert

См. также в других словарях:

  • Boulton — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Charles Arkoll Boulton (1841–1899), kanadischer Offizier und Politiker Eric Boulton, (* 1976), kanadischer Hockeyspieler Isaac Watt Boulton (1823–1899), britischer Ingenieur und Gründer des Lokomotiven… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Boulton —   [ bəʊltən], Matthew, britischer Ingenieur und Industrieller, * Birmingham 14. 9. 1728, ✝ Handsworth (heute zu Birmingham) 17. 8. 1809; gründete 1775 mit J. Watt das Unternehmen Boulton & Watt, das dessen Erfindung der Dampfmaschine auswertete.… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Boulton — (spr. Bohlt n), Matthew, geb. 1728 in Birmingham; übernahm nach seines Vaters Tode dessen Stahlfabrik, vergrößerte dieselbe durch Ankauf von Land in Soho, legte 1769 in Verbindung mit James Watt eine Dampfmaschinenfabrik, später eine Münze, auf… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Boulton — (spr. bohlt n), Matthew, engl. Mechaniker, geb. 3. Sept. 1728 in Birmingham, gest. 17. Aug. 1809 zu Handsworth bei Soho, baute mit James Watt Dampfmaschinen, wandte zuerst die Dampfkraft auf die Münzkunst an, erfand ein mechan. Verfahren,… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Boulton — (Bohltʼn), Matthew, berühmter engl. Mechaniker u. Maschinenbauer, geb. 1728 zu Birmingham, erweiterte 1762 die von seinem Vater ererbte Stahlfabrik, trat 1769 mit dem genialen J. Watt in Verbindung, legte zu Soho eine Dampfmaschinenfabrik an,… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • Boulton — The name Boulton can refer to: * Boulton and Watt Partnership between Matthew Boulton and James Watt * Boulton Paul Aircraft Ltd Aircraft manufacturer. Some of its planes include: **Boulton Paul Sidestrand **Boulton Paul Defiant **Boulton Paul… …   Wikipedia

  • Boulton — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Boulton Charles Arkoll Boulton, militaire ; Eric Boulton, joueur de hockey ; Marjorie Boulton, docteur et écrivain anglais (née en 1924)  ; …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Boulton P.64 — Die Boulton Paul P.64, auch als Mailplane („Postflugzeug“) oder Mail Carrier („Briefträger“) bezeichnet, war ein zweimotoriger Doppeldecker des britischen Herstellers Boulton Paul Ltd aus den 1930er Jahren. Das Ganzmetallflugzeug entstand im… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Boulton — This interesting name is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a dialectal variant of the locational name Bolton, so called for example: Bolton in Cumbria (near Wigton); in Lancashire (near Urswick); also Bolton in Northumberland, Westmoreland and in the …   Surnames reference

  • Boulton — zählt. Er lieferte auch vergoldeten Gips (Boultonscher Schmuck), der von der Mode sehr begünstigt wurde, und betrieb seit 1773 die Nachbildung von Ölgemälden mittels eines mechanischen Verfahrens. Seine Bemühungen um den Bau von Dampfmaschinen… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Boulton — /ˈboʊltən/ (say bohltuhn) noun Matthew, 1728–1809, English engineer, partner of James Watt …   Australian English dictionary

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