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was fought out on foot

  • 1 ad

       ad praep. with acc.    [cf. Eng. at].—Of approach (opp. to ab, as in to ex).    I. In space, to, toward: retorquet oculos ad urbem: una pars vergit ad septentriones, Cs.: tendens ad sidera palmas, V. —Fig.: ad alia vitia propensior, more inclined to. —Esp., ad dextram, sinistram, or laevam, to or on the right or left: ito ad dextram, T.: alqd ad dextram conspicere, Cs.: non rectā regione... sed ad laevam, L.—Designating the goal, to, toward: ad ripam convenire, Cs.: vocari ad cenam, H.: ad se adferre: reticulum ad narīs sibi admovebat (cf. accedit ad urbem, he approaches the city; and, accedit provinciae, it is added to the province).— Ad me, te, se, for domum meam, tuam, suam (in T. freq.): eamus ad me, T. — With gen., ellipt.: ad Dianae, to the temple of, T.: ad Castoris currere. — Used for dat: litteras dare ad aliquem, to write one a letter (cf. litteras dare alicui, to give a letter to one): domum ad te scribere: ad primam (epistulam) scribere, to answer.—Hence, librum ad aliquem mittere, scribere, to dedicate a book to one. —In titles, ad aliquem signifies to, addressed to.— With names of towns, ad answers to Whither? for the simple acc., i. e. to the vicinity of, to the neighborhood of: ad Aquinum accedere, approach: ut cum suis copiis iret ad Mutinam. — Of hostile movement or protection, against (cf. adversus): veniri ad se existimantes, Cs.: ipse ad hostem vehitur, N.: Romulus ad regem impetum facit (cf. in), L.: clipeos ad tela protecti obiciunt, V.: ad hos casūs provisa praesidia, Cs.—In war, of manner of fighting: ad pedes pugna venerat, was fought out on foot, L.: equitem ad pedes deducere, L.: pugna ad gladios venerat, L. — Emphatic of distance, to, even to, all the way to: a Salonis ad Oricum portūs... occupavit, Cs.: usque a Dianis ad Sinopum navigare. — Fig.: deverberasse usque ad necem, T.: virgis ad necem caedi.—Of nearness or proximity in gen. (cf. apud), near to, by, at, close by: ad forīs adsistere: Ianum ad infimum Argiletum fecit, L.: quod Romanis ad manum domi supplementum esset, at hand, L.: errantem ad flumina, V.; and ellipt.: pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret! — Of persons: qui primum pilum ad Caesarem duxerat, Cs.: ad me fuit, at my house: ad inferos poenas parricidi luent, among.—So, fig.: ad omnīs nationes sanctum, in the judgment of, Cs.: ut esset ad posteros monumentum, etc., L.: ad urbem esse (of a general outside of the walls): ad urbem cum imperio remanere, Cs.—With names of towns and verbs of rest: pons, qui erat ad Genavam, Cs.; and with an ordinal number and lapis: sepultus ad quintum lapidem, N.—    II. In time, about, toward: domum reductus ad vesperum, toward evening.—Till, until, to, even to, up to: usque ad hanc aetatem: ad multam noctem: amant ad quoddam tempus, until: quem ad finem? how long: ad quartam (sc. horam), H. — Hence, ad id (sc. tempus), till then: ad id dubios servare animos, L.— At, on, in, by: ad horam destinatam, at the appointed hour: frumentum ad diem dare. —    III. In number or amount, near, near to, almost, about, toward (cf. circiter): talenta ad quindecim coëgi, T.: annos ad quadraginta natus.—Adverb.: occisis ad hominum milibus quattuor, Cs.: ad duo milia et trecenti occisi, L.—Of a limit, to, unto, even to (rare): (viaticum) ad assem perdere, to the last farthing, H.: ad denarium solvere. —Esp., ad unum, to a single one, without exception: omnes ad unum idem sentiunt: exosus ad unum Troianos, V. —    IV. In other relations, with regard to, in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in: ad honorem antecellere: nihil ad rem pertinet.—Ellipt.: rectene an secus, nihil ad nos: Quid ad praetorem? quid ad rem? i. e. what difference does it make? H.: quibus (auxiliaribus) ad pugnam confidebat, Cs.: ad speciem ornatus, ad sensum acerbus: mentis ad omnia caecitas: ad cetera paene gemelli, H.: facultas ad dicendum.—With words denoting measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., according to, agreeably to, after: taleis ad certum pondus examinatis, Cs.: ad cursūs lunae describit annum, L.: canere ad tibiam: carmen castigare ad unguem, to perfection (see unguis), H.: ad istorum normam sapientes: ad specus angustiae vallium (i. e. ad specuum similitudinem angustae valles), Cs. — With the cause or reason, according to, at, on, in consequence of, for, in order to: ad horum proces in Boeotiam duxit, on their entreaty, L.: dictis ad fallendum instructis, L.: causae ad discordiam, to produce dissension, T.: ad facinora incendere, S.: ad speciem tabernaculis relictis, for appearance, Cs.: ad id, for this use, as a means to that end, L.: ad id ipsum, for that my purpose, L.: delecto milite ad navīs, marines, L.: puer ad cyathum statuetur, H.: biiugi ad frena leones, yoked in pairs with bits, V.: res quae sunt ad incendia, Cs.: ad communem salutem utilius.—In comparison, to, compared with, in comparison with: terra ad universi caeli complexum: nihil ad tuum equitatum, Caesar.—    V. In adverbial phrases, ad omnia, withal, to crown all: ad omnia tantum advehi auri, etc., L.—Ad hoc and ad haec, moreover, besides, in addition: ad hoc, quos... postremo omnes, quos, etc., S. — Ad id quod, beside that (rare): ad id quod... indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur, L. — Ad tempus, at a definite, fixed time, C., L.; at a fit, appropriate time, L.; for some time, for a short time, L.; according to circumstances. — Ad praesens, for the moment, for a short time.—Ad locum, on the spot: ut ad locum miles esset paratus, L.—Ad verbum, word for word, literally. — Ad summam, on the whole, generally, in general; in a word, in short, C., H.—Ad extremum, ad ultimum, ad postremum, at the end, finally, at last; of place, at the extremity, at the top, at the end: ad extremum (teli) unde ferrum exstabat, L.; of time, at last, finally: ad extremum incipit philosophari; of order, finally, lastly; to the last degree, quite, L. — Quem ad finem? to what limit? how far? how long? Note.—a. Ad rarely follows its acc: quam ad, T.: quos ad, C.: ripam ad Araxis, Ta.—b. In composition, ad- stands before vowels, b, d, f, h, i consonant, m, n, q, v, and mostly before l, r, s; acbefore c; but very often ad- before cl-, cr-, and cu-; ag- or ad- before g; ap- or ad- before p; atbefore t; but a- or ad- before gn, sp, sc, st.
    * * *
    I II
    to, up to, towards; near, at; until, on, by; almost; according to; about w/NUM

    Latin-English dictionary > ad

  • 2 dimachae

    dĭmăchae, ārum, m., = dimachai, soldiers who fought both on foot and on horseback, Anglice dragoons; a sort of troops among the Macedonians, Curt. 5, 13, 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > dimachae

  • 3 Mars

    Mars (archaic and poet. Māvors, q. v.), Martis (collat. reduplic. form Marmar, in the Song of the Arval Brothers; v. the following, and Mamers), m. [root mar-, gleam; Sanscr. marīkis, beam of light; hence Mars, the bright god; cf.: marmor, mare], Mars, who, as father of Romulus, was the primogenitor of the Roman people, the god of war, of husbandry, of shepherds and seers. For him was named the month of Martius, March, the beginning of the Roman year, Ov. F. 3, 73 sqq.:

    legio Martia... ab eo deo, a quo populum Romanum generatum accepimus,

    Cic. Phil. 4, 2, 5:

    Mars pater te precor quaesoque, uti sies volens propitius mihi, etc.,... ut tu morbos visos invisosque viduertatem vastitudinemque, calamitates intemperiasque prohibessis, etc.,

    Cato, R. R. 141, 2; cf., in the Song of the Arval Brothers, NEVE LVERVE MARMAR SINS INCVRRERE IN PLEORIS;

    for Mars pater, the forms Marspiter, gen. Marspitris, or -tĕris, and Maspiter were also employed,

    Gell. 5, 12, 5; Macr. S. 1, 12; 19; Varr. L. L. 8, § 33 Müll.; 9, § 75; 10, § 65; Prisc. p. 695:

    Mars Gradivus, Quirinus, Silvanus, Ultor, v. under h. vv.: Mars durus,

    Verg. E 10, 44:

    torvus,

    Hor. C. 1, 28, 17:

    cruentus,

    id. ib. 2, 14, 13:

    ferus,

    Ov. H. 7, 160; id. F. 4, 25:

    ferox,

    id. M. 13, 11:

    bellicus,

    id. F. 3, 1:

    fortibus sane oculis Cassius (Martem spirare dicens) se in Siciliam non iturum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 11. The Salii were destined for his service, Liv. 1, 20, 4; horses and bulls were offered to him, Paul. ex Fest. p. 61 Müll.; Ov. H. 6, 10; Macr. S. 3, 10, 4:

    per Martem, a soldier's oath,

    Plaut. Mil. 5, 21. He was often appealed to in oaths, etc., esp. by soldiers:

    Nam neque Duellona mi umquam neque Mars creduat, ni, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 8, 8; id. Mil. 1, 1, 11; id. Truc. 3, 1, 11.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    War, battle, a conflict, engagement, contest, etc.; also the art of war: cum veter occubuit Priamus sub Marte Pelasgo, Enn. ap. Prisc. p. 607 P. (Ann. v. 17 Vahl.):

    Martem accendere cantu,

    to incite to battle, Verg. A. 6, 165:

    apertus,

    fighting in the open field, Ov. M. 13, 27: equitem suo alienoque Marte pugnare, i. e. to fight both in their own fashion (on horseback) and in one which was strange to them (on foot), Liv. 3, 62, 9:

    pugna jam in manus, jam in gladios, ubi Mars est atrocissimus, venerat,

    id. 2, 46, 3:

    terribili Marte ululare,

    Plin. 26, 4, 9, § 19:

    captam sine Marte,

    Stat. Ach. 1, 401:

    quos amisimus cives, eos Martis vis perculit, non ira victoriae,

    Cic. Marcell. 6, 17.— Poet.:

    Mars forensis,

    a contest in the forum, legal contest, Ov. P. 4, 6, 29; cf.:

    et fora Marte suo litigiosa vacent,

    id. F. 4, 188.—Hence, prov.: suo (nostro, vestro) Marte, by one's own exertions, without the assistance of others:

    rex ipse suo Marte res suas recuperavit,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 37, 95; id. Off. 3, 7, 34:

    cum vos vestro Marte his rebus omnibus abundetis,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 4, § 9.—
    B.
    The issue of a war or a battle, the fortune of war:

    cum omnis belli Mars communis, et cum semper incerti exitus proeliorum sint,

    Cic. Fam. 6, 4, 1: communis adhuc Mars belli erat, Liv. 10, 28:

    aequo Marte,

    with equal advantage, on equal terms, Caes. B. G. 7, 19, 3; 8, 19, 2; Curt. 4, 1, 8:

    pari Marte,

    Hirt. B. G. 8, 19:

    aequato Marte,

    Liv. 1, 25:

    verso Marte ( = versā fortunā),

    id. 29, 3, 11:

    vario Marte pugnatum est,

    Quint. 8, 6, 24:

    incerto Marte,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    anceps,

    Liv. 7, 29, 2; 21, 1, 2:

    dubius,

    Vell. 2, 55, 3.—
    C.
    The planet Mars: Jovis stellae proximum inferiorem orbem tenet puroeis, quae stella Martis appellatur, Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 53; 2, 46, 119; Plin. 2, 8, 6, § 34; 2, 15, 12, § 60; Hyg. Astr. 2, 42:

    Martis sidus,

    Cassiod. Var. 11, 36.—Hence,
    III.
    Mar-tĭus ( Māvortĭus, v. infra), a, um, adj.
    a.
    Of or belonging to Mars:

    lupus,

    sacred to Mars, Verg. A. 9, 566; cf.: Martius lupus, integer et intactus, gentis nos Martiae et conditoris nostri admonuit, descended from Mars (since Mars is the father of Romulus and Remus), Liv. 10, 27:

    legio,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 3, 6; 4, 2, 5:

    miles,

    Ov. M. 14, 798:

    proles,

    i. e. Romulus and Remus, id. F. 3, 59:

    anguis,

    sacred to Mars, id. M. 3, 32:

    judicium,

    i. e. of the Areopagus at Athens, App. M. 10, p. 718 Oud.: Campus;

    v. campus: harena,

    a place in the Circus where the gladiators fought, Ov. Tr. 2, 282; Mart. 2, 75, 8:

    gramen,

    i. e. the Field of Mars, Hor. C. 3, 7, 26: Martius mensis, the month of March, formerly the first month of the year, Plin. 15, 3, 4, § 13:

    Martii Calendis,

    Hor. C. 3, 8, 1: Idus Martiae, the Ides of March, famous as the day on which Julius Cæsar was killed, Cic. Att. 14, 4, 2; cf. 14, 20, 1 sq.; id. Phil. 2, 35, 88; id. Fam. 10, 28, 1.— In the form Mavortius ( poet.):

    moenia,

    i. e. Rome, Verg. A. 1, 276:

    tellus,

    i. e. Thrace, id. G. 4, 462:

    conjux,

    i. e. Venus, Val. Fl. 2, 208:

    proles,

    i. e. the Thebans, Ov. M. 3, 531; cf.:

    seges belli (because sprung from the dragon's teeth),

    Claud. III. Cons. Hon. 135.—
    b.
    Transf.
    1.
    Warlike, martial:

    Martia Penthesilea,

    Verg. A. 11, 661:

    Martia saeculi voluptas,

    Mart. 5, 24, 1:

    Martius aeris rauci canor,

    Verg. G. 4, 71:

    vulnera,

    id. A. 7, 182:

    Thebe,

    i. e. where many wars were carried on, Ov. Am. 3, 6, 33.—
    2.
    Of or belonging to the planet Mars:

    ille fulgor rutilus, horribilisque terris, quem Martium dicitis,

    Cic. Rep. 6, 17, 17.—As subst.: Mar-tĭus, ii, m. (sc. mensis), March, the month of March:

    Mensium nomina fere aperta sunt, si a Martio, ut antiqui constituerunt, numeres, Nam primus a Marte,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 4, § 33.—
    IV.
    Martĭālis, e, adj.
    A.
    Of or belonging to Mars: Flamen, Varr L. L. 5, § 84 Müll.;

    7, § 45 ib.: lupus,

    sacred to Mars, Hor. C. 1, 17, 9:

    ludi,

    in honor of Mars, Suet. Claud. 1: Martialis collis, near the temple of Deus Fidius, Varr. L. L. 5, § 52 Müll.— Subst.: Martĭālis, is, m., a priest of Mars:

    Martiales quidam Larini appellabantur, ministri publici Martis,

    Cic. Clu. 15, 43.—
    B.
    Belonging to the legio Martia; hence, Martĭāles, the soldiers of the legio Martia, Cic. Phil. 4, 2, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Mars

  • 4 Martiales

    Mars (archaic and poet. Māvors, q. v.), Martis (collat. reduplic. form Marmar, in the Song of the Arval Brothers; v. the following, and Mamers), m. [root mar-, gleam; Sanscr. marīkis, beam of light; hence Mars, the bright god; cf.: marmor, mare], Mars, who, as father of Romulus, was the primogenitor of the Roman people, the god of war, of husbandry, of shepherds and seers. For him was named the month of Martius, March, the beginning of the Roman year, Ov. F. 3, 73 sqq.:

    legio Martia... ab eo deo, a quo populum Romanum generatum accepimus,

    Cic. Phil. 4, 2, 5:

    Mars pater te precor quaesoque, uti sies volens propitius mihi, etc.,... ut tu morbos visos invisosque viduertatem vastitudinemque, calamitates intemperiasque prohibessis, etc.,

    Cato, R. R. 141, 2; cf., in the Song of the Arval Brothers, NEVE LVERVE MARMAR SINS INCVRRERE IN PLEORIS;

    for Mars pater, the forms Marspiter, gen. Marspitris, or -tĕris, and Maspiter were also employed,

    Gell. 5, 12, 5; Macr. S. 1, 12; 19; Varr. L. L. 8, § 33 Müll.; 9, § 75; 10, § 65; Prisc. p. 695:

    Mars Gradivus, Quirinus, Silvanus, Ultor, v. under h. vv.: Mars durus,

    Verg. E 10, 44:

    torvus,

    Hor. C. 1, 28, 17:

    cruentus,

    id. ib. 2, 14, 13:

    ferus,

    Ov. H. 7, 160; id. F. 4, 25:

    ferox,

    id. M. 13, 11:

    bellicus,

    id. F. 3, 1:

    fortibus sane oculis Cassius (Martem spirare dicens) se in Siciliam non iturum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 11. The Salii were destined for his service, Liv. 1, 20, 4; horses and bulls were offered to him, Paul. ex Fest. p. 61 Müll.; Ov. H. 6, 10; Macr. S. 3, 10, 4:

    per Martem, a soldier's oath,

    Plaut. Mil. 5, 21. He was often appealed to in oaths, etc., esp. by soldiers:

    Nam neque Duellona mi umquam neque Mars creduat, ni, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 8, 8; id. Mil. 1, 1, 11; id. Truc. 3, 1, 11.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    War, battle, a conflict, engagement, contest, etc.; also the art of war: cum veter occubuit Priamus sub Marte Pelasgo, Enn. ap. Prisc. p. 607 P. (Ann. v. 17 Vahl.):

    Martem accendere cantu,

    to incite to battle, Verg. A. 6, 165:

    apertus,

    fighting in the open field, Ov. M. 13, 27: equitem suo alienoque Marte pugnare, i. e. to fight both in their own fashion (on horseback) and in one which was strange to them (on foot), Liv. 3, 62, 9:

    pugna jam in manus, jam in gladios, ubi Mars est atrocissimus, venerat,

    id. 2, 46, 3:

    terribili Marte ululare,

    Plin. 26, 4, 9, § 19:

    captam sine Marte,

    Stat. Ach. 1, 401:

    quos amisimus cives, eos Martis vis perculit, non ira victoriae,

    Cic. Marcell. 6, 17.— Poet.:

    Mars forensis,

    a contest in the forum, legal contest, Ov. P. 4, 6, 29; cf.:

    et fora Marte suo litigiosa vacent,

    id. F. 4, 188.—Hence, prov.: suo (nostro, vestro) Marte, by one's own exertions, without the assistance of others:

    rex ipse suo Marte res suas recuperavit,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 37, 95; id. Off. 3, 7, 34:

    cum vos vestro Marte his rebus omnibus abundetis,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 4, § 9.—
    B.
    The issue of a war or a battle, the fortune of war:

    cum omnis belli Mars communis, et cum semper incerti exitus proeliorum sint,

    Cic. Fam. 6, 4, 1: communis adhuc Mars belli erat, Liv. 10, 28:

    aequo Marte,

    with equal advantage, on equal terms, Caes. B. G. 7, 19, 3; 8, 19, 2; Curt. 4, 1, 8:

    pari Marte,

    Hirt. B. G. 8, 19:

    aequato Marte,

    Liv. 1, 25:

    verso Marte ( = versā fortunā),

    id. 29, 3, 11:

    vario Marte pugnatum est,

    Quint. 8, 6, 24:

    incerto Marte,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    anceps,

    Liv. 7, 29, 2; 21, 1, 2:

    dubius,

    Vell. 2, 55, 3.—
    C.
    The planet Mars: Jovis stellae proximum inferiorem orbem tenet puroeis, quae stella Martis appellatur, Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 53; 2, 46, 119; Plin. 2, 8, 6, § 34; 2, 15, 12, § 60; Hyg. Astr. 2, 42:

    Martis sidus,

    Cassiod. Var. 11, 36.—Hence,
    III.
    Mar-tĭus ( Māvortĭus, v. infra), a, um, adj.
    a.
    Of or belonging to Mars:

    lupus,

    sacred to Mars, Verg. A. 9, 566; cf.: Martius lupus, integer et intactus, gentis nos Martiae et conditoris nostri admonuit, descended from Mars (since Mars is the father of Romulus and Remus), Liv. 10, 27:

    legio,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 3, 6; 4, 2, 5:

    miles,

    Ov. M. 14, 798:

    proles,

    i. e. Romulus and Remus, id. F. 3, 59:

    anguis,

    sacred to Mars, id. M. 3, 32:

    judicium,

    i. e. of the Areopagus at Athens, App. M. 10, p. 718 Oud.: Campus;

    v. campus: harena,

    a place in the Circus where the gladiators fought, Ov. Tr. 2, 282; Mart. 2, 75, 8:

    gramen,

    i. e. the Field of Mars, Hor. C. 3, 7, 26: Martius mensis, the month of March, formerly the first month of the year, Plin. 15, 3, 4, § 13:

    Martii Calendis,

    Hor. C. 3, 8, 1: Idus Martiae, the Ides of March, famous as the day on which Julius Cæsar was killed, Cic. Att. 14, 4, 2; cf. 14, 20, 1 sq.; id. Phil. 2, 35, 88; id. Fam. 10, 28, 1.— In the form Mavortius ( poet.):

    moenia,

    i. e. Rome, Verg. A. 1, 276:

    tellus,

    i. e. Thrace, id. G. 4, 462:

    conjux,

    i. e. Venus, Val. Fl. 2, 208:

    proles,

    i. e. the Thebans, Ov. M. 3, 531; cf.:

    seges belli (because sprung from the dragon's teeth),

    Claud. III. Cons. Hon. 135.—
    b.
    Transf.
    1.
    Warlike, martial:

    Martia Penthesilea,

    Verg. A. 11, 661:

    Martia saeculi voluptas,

    Mart. 5, 24, 1:

    Martius aeris rauci canor,

    Verg. G. 4, 71:

    vulnera,

    id. A. 7, 182:

    Thebe,

    i. e. where many wars were carried on, Ov. Am. 3, 6, 33.—
    2.
    Of or belonging to the planet Mars:

    ille fulgor rutilus, horribilisque terris, quem Martium dicitis,

    Cic. Rep. 6, 17, 17.—As subst.: Mar-tĭus, ii, m. (sc. mensis), March, the month of March:

    Mensium nomina fere aperta sunt, si a Martio, ut antiqui constituerunt, numeres, Nam primus a Marte,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 4, § 33.—
    IV.
    Martĭālis, e, adj.
    A.
    Of or belonging to Mars: Flamen, Varr L. L. 5, § 84 Müll.;

    7, § 45 ib.: lupus,

    sacred to Mars, Hor. C. 1, 17, 9:

    ludi,

    in honor of Mars, Suet. Claud. 1: Martialis collis, near the temple of Deus Fidius, Varr. L. L. 5, § 52 Müll.— Subst.: Martĭālis, is, m., a priest of Mars:

    Martiales quidam Larini appellabantur, ministri publici Martis,

    Cic. Clu. 15, 43.—
    B.
    Belonging to the legio Martia; hence, Martĭāles, the soldiers of the legio Martia, Cic. Phil. 4, 2, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Martiales

  • 5 pes

    pēs, pĕdis, m. [kindr. with Sanscr. pād, foot, from root pad, ire; Gr. pod-, pous; Goth. fōt; old Germ. vuoz; Engl. foot], a foot of man or beast.
    I.
    Lit.:

    si pes condoluit,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 22, 52:

    calcei apti ad pedem,

    id. de Or. 1, 54, 231:

    nec manus, nec pedes, nec alia membra,

    id. Univ. 6:

    pede tellurem pulsare,

    i. e. to dance, Hor. C. 1, 37, 1; cf.:

    alterno pede terram quatere,

    id. ib. 1, 4, 7;

    4, 1, 27: pedis aptissima forma,

    Ov. Am. 3, 3, 7:

    aves omnes in pedes nascuntur,

    are born feet first, Plin. 10, 53, 74, § 149:

    cycnum pedibus Jovis armiger uncis Sustulit,

    Verg. A. 9, 564; cf. id. ib. 11, 723: pedem ferre, to go or come, id. G. 1, 11:

    si in fundo pedem posuisses,

    set foot, Cic. Caecin. 11, 31: pedem efferre, to step or go out, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 19:

    qui pedem portā non extulit,

    Cic. Att. 8, 2, 4; 6, 8, 5:

    pedem portā non plus extulit quam domo suā,

    id. ib. 8, 2, 4: pedem limine efferre, id. Cael. 14, 34: pedem referre, revocare, retrahere, to go or come back, to return:

    profugum referre pedem,

    Ov. H. 15, 186; id. M. 2, 439.—Said even of streams:

    revocatque pedem Tiberinus ab alto,

    Verg. A. 9, 125:

    retrahitque pedes simul unda relabens,

    id. ib. 10, 307; cf. infra, II. H.: pedibus, on foot, afoot:

    cum ingressus iter pedibus sit,

    Cic. Sen. 10, 34; Suet. Aug. 53.—

    Esp. in phrase: pedibus ire, venire, etc.: pedibus proficisci,

    Liv. 26, 19:

    pedibus iter conficere,

    id. 44, 5:

    quod flumen uno omnino loco pedibus transire potest,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 18:

    (Caesar) pedibus Narbonem pervenit,

    id. B. C. 2, 21:

    ut neque pedibus aditum haberent,

    id. B. G. 3, 12 init. —Rarely pede ire ( poet. and late Lat.):

    quo bene coepisti, sic pede semper eas,

    Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 66:

    Jordanem transmiserunt pede,

    Ambros. in Psa. 118, 165, n. 16.— Trop.:

    Bacchus flueret pede suo,

    i. e. wine unmixed with water, Auct. Aetn. 13; cf.:

    musta sub adducto si pede nulla fluant,

    Ov. P. 2, 9, 32, and II. H. infra.—Pregn., by land:

    cum illud iter Hispaniense pedibus fere confici soleat: aut si quis navigare velit, etc.,

    Cic. Vatin. 5, 12:

    seu pedibus Parthos sequimur, seu classe Britannos,

    Prop. 2, 20, 63 (3, 23, 5):

    ego me in pedes (conicio),

    take to my heels, make off, Ter. Eun. 5, 2, 5.— Esp.: ad pedes alicui or alicujus, accidere, procidere, jacere, se abicere, se proicere, procumbere, etc., to approach as a suppliant, to fall at one's feet:

    ad pedes omnium singillatim accidente Clodio,

    Cic. Att. 1, 14, 5:

    abjectā togā se ad generi pedes abiecit,

    id. ib. 4, 2, 4:

    rex procidit ad pedes Achillei,

    Hor. Epod. 17, 14:

    vos ad pedes lenonis proiecistis,

    Cic. Sest. 11, 26:

    filius se ad pedes meos prosternens,

    id. Phil. 2, 18, 45:

    tibi sum supplex, Nec moror ante tuos procubuisse pedes,

    Ov. H. 12, 186:

    cui cum se moesta turba ad pedes provolvisset,

    Liv. 6, 3, 4:

    ad pedes Caesaris provoluta regina,

    Flor. 4, 11, 9:

    (mater una) mihi ad pedes misera jacuit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 129; cf.:

    amplecti pedes potui,

    Ov. M. 9, 605:

    complector, regina, pedes,

    Luc. 10, 89:

    servus a pedibus,

    a footman, lackey, Cic. Att. 8, 5, 1: sub pedibus, under one's feet, i. e. in one's power, Verg. A. 7, 100; Liv. 34, 32: sub pedibus esse or jacere, to be or lie under one's feet, i. e. to be disregarded ( poet.):

    sors ubi pessima rerum, Sub pedibus timor est,

    Ov. M. 14, 490:

    amicitiae nomen Re tibi pro vili sub pedibusque jacet,

    id. Tr. 1, 8, 16: pedem opponere, to put one's foot against, i. e. to withstand, resist, oppose ( poet.), id. P. 4, 6, 8: pedem trahere, to drag one's foot, i. e. to halt, limp; said of scazontic verse, id. R. Am. 378: trahantur haec pedibus, may be dragged by the heels, i. e. may go to the dogs (class.):

    fratrem mecum et te si habebo, per me ista pedibus trahantur,

    Cic. Att. 4, 16, 10; id. Fam. 7, 32, 2: ante pedes esse or ante pedes posita esse, to lie before one's feet, i. e. before one's eyes, to be evident, palpable, glaring:

    istuc est sapere, non quod ante pedes modo est, Videre, sed etiam illa, quae futura sunt, Prospicere,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 32:

    transilire ante pedes posita, et alia longe repetita sumere,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 40, 160:

    omni pede stare,

    i. e. to use every effort, make every exertion, Quint. 12, 9, 18: nec caput nec pes, neither head nor foot, beginning nor end, no part:

    nec caput nec pes sermonum apparet,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 139:

    garriet quoi neque pes neque caput conpareat,

    id. Capt. 3, 4, 81: tuas res ita contractas, ut, quemadmodum scribis, nec caput nec pedes, Curio ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 31, 2:

    ut nec pes nec caput uni Reddatur formae,

    Hor. A. P. 8:

    dixit Cato, eam legationem nec caput, nec pedes, nec cor habere,

    Liv. Epit. 50: pes felix, secundus, i. e. a happy or fortunate arrival:

    adi pede secundo,

    Verg. A. 8, 302:

    felix,

    Ov. F. 1, 514; cf.:

    boni pedis homo, id est cujus adventus afferat aliquid felicitatis,

    Aug. Ep. ad Max. Gram. 44.—So esp. pes dexter, because it was of good omen to move the right foot first;

    temples had an uneven number of steps, that the same foot might touch the first step and first enter the temple,

    Vitr. 3, 3; cf. Petr. 30:

    quove pede ingressi?

    Prop. 3 (4), 1, 6.—So the left foot was associated with bad omens; cf. Suet. Aug. 92 init.:

    pessimo pede domum nostram accessit,

    App. M. 6, 26, p. 184, 1; hence, dextro pede, auspiciously: quid tam dextro [p. 1363] pede concipis, etc., Juv. 10, 5: pedibus pecunia compensatur, said proverbially of distant lands purchased at a cheap rate, but which it costs a great deal to reach, Cato ap. Cic. Fl. 29, 72: a pedibus usque ad caput, from head to foot, all over (late Lat.; cf.:

    ab imis unguibus usque ad verticem summum,

    Cic. Rosc. Com. 7, 20), Aug. in Psa. 55, 20; 90, 1, 2 et saep.; cf.:

    a vestigio pedis usque ad verticem,

    Ambros. Offic. Min. 2, 22, 114.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    Milit. t. t.: descendere ad pedes, to alight, dismount, of cavalry, Liv. 9, 22:

    pedibus merere,

    to serve on foot, as a foot-soldier, id. 24, 18:

    ad pedes pugna ierat,

    they fought on foot, id. 21, 46: pedem conferre, to come to close quarters:

    collato pede rem gerere,

    id. 26, 39; Cic. Planc. 19, 48.—
    2.
    Publicist's t. t.: pedibus ire in sententiam alicujus, to adopt one's opinion, take sides with one:

    cum omnes in sententiam ejus pedibus irent,

    Liv. 9, 8, 13; 5, 9, 2.—
    3.
    In mal. part.:

    pedem or pedes tollere, extollere (ad concubitum),

    Mart. 10, 81, 4; 11, 71, 8;

    hence the lusus verbb. with pedem dare and tollere,

    Cic. Att. 2, 1, 5. —
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    A foot of a table, stool, bench, etc., Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 46:

    mensae sed erat pes tertius impar,

    Ov. M. 8, 661; cf.:

    pedem et nostrum dicimus, et lecti, et veli, ut carminis (v. in the foll.),

    Sen. Ben. 2, 34, 2:

    tricliniorum,

    Plin. 34, 2, 4, § 9:

    subsellii,

    Auct. Her. 4, 55, 68:

    pes argenteus (mensae),

    Juv. 11, 128.—
    B.
    Pes veli, a rope attached to a sail for the purpose of setting it to the wind, a sheet:

    sive utrumque Juppiter Simul secundus incidisset in pedem,

    Cat. 4, 19:

    pede labitur aequo,

    i. e. before the wind, with the wind right aft, Ov. F. 3, 565:

    pedibus aequis,

    Cic. Att. 16, 6 init.; cf. also the passage quoted above from Sen. Ben. 2, 34, 2; and:

    prolato pede, transversos captare Notos,

    id. Med. 322.— Hence, facere pedem, to veer out one sheet, to take advantage of a side wind, to haul the wind: una omnes fecere pedem;

    pariterque sinistros, Nunc dextros solvere sinus,

    Verg. A. 5, 830:

    prolatis pedibus,

    Plin. 2, 47, 48, § 128.—
    C.
    The foot of a mountain (post-class.):

    Orontes imos pedes Casii montis praetermeans,

    Amm. 14, 8, 10 al. —
    D.
    Ground, soil, territory (post-class.):

    in Caesariensis pede,

    Sol. 3, 2:

    omnis Africa Zeugitano pede incipit,

    id. 27, 1; cf.:

    quamvis angustum pedem dispositio fecit habitabilem,

    Sen. Tranq. An. 10, 4.—
    E.
    The stalk or pedicle of a fruit, esp. of the grape, together with the husk:

    vinaceorum pes proruitur,

    Col. 12, 43; so id. 12, 36.—Of the olive, Plin. 15, 1, 2, § 5: pes milvinus or milvi, the stalk or stem of the plant batis, Col. 12, 7.—Hence, as a name for several plants: pedes gallinacei, a plant:

    Capnos trunca, quam pedes gallinaceos vocant,

    Plin. 25, 13, 98, § 155:

    pedes betacei,

    beetroots, Varr. R. R. 1, 27.—
    F.
    Pedes navales, rowers, sailors, Plaut. Men. 2, 2, 75.—
    G.
    The barrow of a litter, Cat. 10, 22.—
    H.
    Poet., of fountains and rivers: inde super terras fluit agmine dulci, Quā via secta semel liquido pede detulit undas, Lucr, 5, 272;

    6, 638: crepante lympha desilit pede,

    Hor. Epod. 16, 47:

    liquido pede labitur unda,

    Verg. Cul. 17:

    lento pede sulcat harenas Bagrada,

    Sil. 6, 140.—
    K.
    A metrical foot:

    ad heroum nos dactyli et anapaesti et spondei pedem invitas,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 47, 82:

    pedibus claudere verba,

    to make verses, Hor. S. 2, 1, 28:

    musa per undenos emodulanda pedes,

    in hexameters and pentameters, Ov. Am. 1, 1, 30:

    inque suos volui cogere verba pedes,

    id. Tr. 5, 12, 34.—
    2.
    A kind of verse, measure:

    et pede, quo debent fortia bella geri,

    Ov. Ib. 646:

    Lesbius,

    Hor. C. 4, 6, 35.—
    L.
    In music, time (postAug.), Plin. 29, 1, 5, § 6.—
    M.
    A foot, as a measure of length (class.):

    ne iste hercle ab istā non pedem discedat,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 13:

    ab aliquo pedem discessisse,

    Cic. Deiot. 15, 42:

    pedem e villā adhuc egressi non sumus,

    id. Att. 13, 16, 1:

    pes justus,

    Plin. 18, 31, 74, § 317.—Hence, transf.: pede suo se metiri, to measure one's self by one's own foot-rule, i. e. by one's own powers or abilities, Hor. Ep. 1, 7, 98.—
    N.
    Pedes, lice; v. pedis.—
    O.
    The leg (late Lat.), in phrase: pedem frangere, Aug. Civ. Dei, 22, 22, 3; id. Serm. 273, 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > pes

  • 6 acanthus

        acanthus ī, m, a plant, bear's-foot: mollis, V., O.; fem., an Egyptian thorn: semper frondens, V.
    * * *
    bear's-foot, (black) hellbore (plant); gum arabic tree/wood

    Latin-English dictionary > acanthus

  • 7 agō

        agō ēgī, āctus (old inf pass. agier), ere    [1 AG-], to put in motion, move, lead, drive, tend, conduct: bos Romam acta, L.: capellas, V.: pecus visere montīs, H.: ante se Thyum, N.: in exsilium, L.: Iris nubibus acta, borne on, V.: alqm in crucem, to crucify: Illum aget Fama, will carry, H.: quo hinc te agis? whither are you going? T.: se primus agebat, strode in front, V.: capellas potum, V.—Prov.: agas asellum, i. e. if you can't afford an ox, drive an ass. — Pass., to go, march: quo multitudo agebatur, L.: citius agi vellet agmen, march on quicker, L.: raptim agmine acto, L.— Esp., to drive away, carry off, steal, rob, plunder: pecoris praedas, S.; freq. with ferre, to rob, plunder: ferre agere plebem plebisque res, L.: res sociorum ferri agique vidit, L.—To chase, pursue, hunt: apros, V.: cervum, V. — Fig.: dum haec crimina agam ostiatim, track out from house to house: ceteros ruerem, agerem, T.: palantīs Troas, V.—To move, press, push forward, advance, bring up: multa undique portari atque agi, Cs.: vineis ad oppidum actis, pushed forward, Cs.: moles, Cu.: cloaca maxima sub terram agenda, to be carried under ground, L.: cuniculos ad aerarium, drive: per glaebas radicibus actis, O.: pluma in cutem radices egerit, struck deep root, O.: vera gloria radices agit: tellus Fissa agit rimas, opens in fissures, O.: in litus navīs, beached, L.: navem, to steer, H.: currūs, to drive, O.: per agmen limitem ferro, V.: vias, make way, V.: (sol) amicum Tempus agens, bringing the welcome hour (of sunset), H.—To throw out, stir up: spumas ore, V.: spumas in ore: se laetus ad auras Palmes agit, shoots up into the air, V.—Animam agere, to expire: nam et agere animam et efflare dicimus; cf. et gestum et animam ageres, i. e. exert yourself in gesturing and risk your life. — Fig., to lead, direct, guide: (poëmata), animum auditoris, H.— To move, impel, excite, urge, prompt, induce, rouse, drive: quae te Mens agit in facinus? O.: ad illa te, H.: eum praecipitem: viros spe praedae diversos agit, leads astray, S.: bonitas, quae nullis casibus agitur, N.: quemcunque inscitia veri Caecum agit, blinds, H.: quibus actus fatis, V.: seu te discus agit, occupies, H.: nos exquirere terras, V.: desertas quaerere terras agimur, V. — To pursue for harm, persecute, disturb, vex, attack, assail: reginam stimulis, V.: agentia verba Lycamben, H.: diris agam vos, H.: quam deus ultor agebat, O.—To pursue, carry on, think, reflect, deliberate, treat, represent, exhibit, exercise, practise, act, perform, deliver, pronounce: nihil, to be idle: omnia per nos, in person: agendi tempus, a time for action: industria in agendo: apud primos agebat, fought in the van, S.: quae continua bella agimus, are busy with, L.: (pes) natus rebus agendis, the metre appropriate to dramatic action, H.: Quid nunc agimus? what shall we do now? T.: quid agam, habeo, i. e. I know what to do, T.: quid agitur? how are you? T.: quid agis, dulcissime rerum? i. e. how are you? H.: vereor, quid agat Ino, what is to become of: quid agis? what do you mean? nihil agis, it is of no use, T.: nihil agis, dolor, quamvis, etc.: cupis abire, sed nihil agis, usque tenebo, you cannot succeed, H.: ubi blanditiis agitur nihil, O.—Esp., hoc or id agere, to give attention to, mind, heed: hocine agis, an non? are you attending? T.: id quod et agunt et moliuntur, their purpose and aim: qui id egerunt, ut gentem conlocarent, etc., aimed at this: sin autem id actum est, ut, etc., if it was their aim: summā vi agendum esse, ut, etc., L.: certiorem eum fecit, id agi, ut pons dissolveretur, it was planned, N.: Hoc age, ne, etc., take care, H.: alias res agis, you are not listening, T.: aliud agens ac nihil eius modi cogitans, bent on other plans: animadverti eum alias res agere, paid no attention: vides, quam alias res agamus, are otherwise occupied: populum aliud nunc agere, i. e. are indifferent.—To perform, do, transact: ne quid negligenter: suum negotium, attend to his own business: neque satis constabat, quid agerent, what they were at, Cs.: agentibus divina humanaque consulibus, busy with auspices and affairs, L.: per litteras agere, quae cogitas, carry on, N.: (bellum) cum feminis, Cu.: conventum, to hold an assize: ad conventūs agendos, to preside at, Cs.: census actus eo anno, taken, L.— Of public transactions, to manage, transact, do, discuss, speak, deliberate: quae (res) inter eos agi coeptae, negotiations begun, Cs.: de condicionibus pacis, treat, L.: quorum de poenā agebatur, L.— Hence, agere cum populo, of magistrates, to address the people on a law or measure (cf. agere ad populum, to propose, bring before the people): cum populo de re p.—Of a speaker or writer, to treat, discuss, narrate: id quod agas, your subject: bella per quartum iam volumen, L.: haec dum agit, during this speech, H.—In law, to plead, prosecute, advocate: lege agito, go to law, T.: causam apud iudices: aliter causam agi, to be argued on other grounds: cum de bonis et de caede agatur, in a cause relating to, etc.: tamquam ex syngraphā agere cum populo, to litigate: ex sponso egit: agere lege in hereditatem, sue for: crimen, to press an accusation: partis lenitatis et misericordiae, to plead the cause of mercy: ii per quos agitur, the counsel: causas, i. e. to practise law: me agente, while I am counsel: ii apud quos agitur, the judges; hence, of a judge: rem agere, to hear: reos, to prosecute, L.: alqm furti, to accuse of theft. —Pass., to be in suit, be in question, be at stake: non capitis eius res agitur, sed pecuniae, T.: aguntur iniuriae sociorum, agitur vis legum.—To represent, act, perform, of an orator: cum dignitate.—Of an actor: fabulam, T.: partīs, to assume a part, T.: Ballionem, the character of: gestum agere in scena, appear as actors: canticum, L. — Fig.: lenem mitemque senatorem, act the part of, L.: noluit hodie agere Roscius: cum egerunt, when they have finished acting: triumphum, to triumph, O.: de classe populi R. triumphum, over, etc.: ex Volscis et ex Etruriā, over, etc., L.: noctu vigilias, keep watch: alta silentia, to be buried in silence, O.: arbitria victoriae, to exercise a conqueror's prerogative, Cu.: paenitentiam, to repent, Cu.: oblivia, to forget, O.: gratias (poet. grates) agere, to give thanks, thank: maximas tibi gratias: alcui gratias quod fecisset, etc., Cs.: grates parenti, O. — Of time, to spend, pass, use, live through: cum dis aevom: securum aevom, H.: dies festos, celebrate: ruri vitam, L.: otia, V.: quartum annum ago et octogesimum, in my eightyfourth year: ver magnus agebat orbis, was experiencing, V.— Pass: mensis agitur hic septimus, postquam, etc., going on seven months since, T.: bene acta vita, well spent: tunc principium anni agebatur, L.: melior pars acta (est) diei, is past, V. — Absol, to live, pass time, be: civitas laeta agere, rejoiced, S.—Meton., to treat, deal, confer, talk with: quae (patria) tecum sic agit, pleads: haec inter se dubiis de rebus, V.: Callias quidam egit cum Cimone, ut, etc., tried to persuade C., N.: agere varie, rogando alternis suadendoque coepit, L.—With bene, praeclare, male, etc., to deal well or ill with, treat or use well or ill: praeclare cum eis: facile est bene agere cum eis.— Pass impers., to go well or ill with one, be well or badly off: intelleget secum esse actum pessime: in quibus praeclare agitur, si, etc., who are well off, if, etc.—Poet.: Tros Tyriusque mihi nullo discrimine agetur, will be treated, V.— Pass, to be at stake, be at hazard, be concerned, be in peril: quasi mea res minor agatur quam tua, T.: in quibus eorum caput agatur: ibi rem frumentariam agi cernentes, L.: si sua res ageretur, if his interests were involved: agitur pars tertia mundi, is at risk, O.: non agitur de vectigalibus, S.—Praegn., to finish, complete, only pass: actā re ad fidem pronius est, after it is done, L.: iucundi acti labores, past: ad impediendam rem actam, an accomplished fact, L.— Prov.: actum, aiunt, ne agas, i. e. don't waste your efforts, T.: acta agimus: Actum est, it is all over, all is lost, T.: iam de Servio actum rati, L.: acta haec res est, is lost, T.: tantā mobilitate sese Numidae agunt, behave, S.: ferocius agunt equites, L.: quod nullo studio agebant, because they were careless, Cs.: cum simulatione agi timoris iubet, Cs.—Imper. as interj, come now, well, up: age, da veniam filio, T.: en age, rumpe moras, V.: agite dum, L.: age porro, tu, cur, etc.? age vero, considerate, etc.: age, age, iam ducat: dabo, good, T.: age, sit ita factum.
    * * *
    agere, egi, actus V
    drive, urge, conduct; spend (time w/cum); thank (w/gratias); deliver (speech)

    Latin-English dictionary > agō

  • 8 aliēnus

        aliēnus    [alius].    I. Adj. with comp. and sup, of another, belonging to another, not one's own, foreign, alien, strange: res: puer, the child of another, T.: mos, T.: menses, of other climes, V.: pecuniae: in alienis finibus decertare, Cs.: salus, of others, Cs.: alienis manibus, by the hands of others, L.: insolens in re alienā, in dealing with other men's property: mālis ridens alienis, i. e. a forced laugh, H.: mulier, another man's wife: alieni viri sermones, of another woman's husband, L.: vestigia viri alieni, one not my husband, L.: volnus, intended for another, V.: alienam personam ferre, to assume a false character, L.: cornua, i. e. those of a stag, O.: alieno Marte pugnare (equites), i. e. on foot, L.: aes alienum, another's money, i. e. debt: aes alienum alienis nominibus, debts contracted on the security of others, S.: recte facere alieno metu, fear of another, T.: crevit ex metu alieno audacia, another's fear, L.: sacerdotium genti haud alienum, foreign to, L. — Alien from, not related, not allied, not friendly, strange: ab nostrā familiā, T.: omnia alienissimis crediderunt, to utter strangers, Cs.: ne a litteris quidem alienus, not unversed in.—Strange, unsuitable, incongruous, inadequate, inconsistent, unseasonable, different from: dignitatis alicuius: neque aliena consili (domus), not inconvenient for consultation, S.: illi causae: alienum maiestate suā: aliena huius existimatione suspicio: domus magis his aliena malis, freer from, H.: alienum a vitā meā, T.: a dignitate: non alienum esse videtur, proponere, etc., Cs.: non alienum videtur,... docere, N. — Averse, hostile, unfriendly, unfavorable to: (Caesar) a me: voluntates, unfriendliness: mens, hostility, S.: alieno a te animo: a causā nobilitatis, opposed to: a Murenā nullā re alienus, in nc respect unfriendly: alienum suis rationibus, dangerous to his plans, S.: alieno esse animo in Caesarem, Cs.: alieno loco proelium committunt, unfavorable, Cs.: alienissimo sibi loco conflixit, N. —Of time, unfitting, inconvenient, unfavorable, unseasonable: ad iudicium corrumpendum tempus: ad committendum proelium alienum esse tempus, Cs.: alieno tempore defendisse: alienore aetate, at a less suitable age, T.—Of the mind, estranged, disordered: illis aliena mens erat, qui, etc., S.—    II. Substt.:
    * * *
    I
    aliena -um, alienior -or -us, alienissimus -a -um ADJ
    foreign; unconnected; another's; contrary; unworthy; averse, hostile; mad
    II
    foreigner; outsider; stranger to the family; person/slave of another house

    Latin-English dictionary > aliēnus

  • 9 ambulō

        ambulō āvī, ātus, āre    [am- (for ambi) + BA-], to walk, walk about, take a walk: ambulando contrivi diem, T.: in sole: satis ambulatum est.—To go, travel, march: biduo septingenta milia passuum.— To traverse: maria: vias, O.: in ius ambula, go to law, T.—Of gait, to march around, strut about: superbus, H.: tunicis demissis, H.
    * * *
    ambulare, ambulavi, ambulatus V INTRANS
    walk, take a walk, go on foot; travel, march; go about, gad; parade, strut

    Latin-English dictionary > ambulō

  • 10 anapaestus

        anapaestus adj., ἀνάπαιστοσ: pes, the anapaest (a metrical foot, ˘ ˘ ¯).—As subst m. (sc. pes), an anapaest. — As subst n. (sc. carmen), a poem in anapaests.
    * * *
    I
    anapaesta, anapaestum ADJ
    II
    anapaest (metrical foot, two shorts followed by long)

    Latin-English dictionary > anapaestus

  • 11 anceps

        anceps cipitis, abl. cipitī, adj.    [an- (for ambi-) + CAP-], that has two heads, two-headed: Ianus, O.: acumen, two-peaked, O.—Meton., double, twosided: securis, two-edged, O.: bestiae quasi ancipites in utrāque sede viventes, amphibious: ancipiti contentione districti, on both sides: ancipiti proelio pugnatum est, i. e. both in front and in the rear, Cs.: ancipiti premi periculo, N.: periculum anceps (erat), S.: ancipitem pugnam hostibus facere, i. e. by horse and foot, Ta.: metus, et ab cive et ab hoste, twofold, L.: munimenta, facing both ways, L.—Fig., double, twofold propter ancipitem faciendi dicendique sapientiam: ius, the uncertainty of the law, H.—Wavering, doubtful, uncertain, unfixed, ambiguous, undecided: fortuna belli: oraculum, L.: proelium, L.: Mars, indecisive, L.: bellum ancipiti Marte gestum, L.: fides, Cu.— Ellipt.: sequor hunc, Lucanus an Apulus, anceps (sc. ego), i. e. of uncertain origin, H.—Dangerous, hazardous, perilous, critical: locus: viae, O.: periculum, Ta.: quia revocare eos anceps erat, L.—As subst n., danger, hazard, peril: facilius inter ancipitia clarescunt, Ta.
    * * *
    (gen.), ancipitis ADJ
    two headed/fold/edged/meanings; faces two directions/fronts; doubtful; double

    Latin-English dictionary > anceps

  • 12 andabata

        andabata ae, m    a gladiator, who fought blindfold.
    * * *

    Latin-English dictionary > andabata

  • 13 ante-sīgnānus

        ante-sīgnānus ī, m    [ante + signum], a leader in battle: in acie.— Plur m. as subst., the soldiers who fought in front of the standards, Cs., L.

    Latin-English dictionary > ante-sīgnānus

  • 14 attingō (adt-)

        attingō (adt-) tigī, tāctus, ere    [ad + tango], to touch, come in contact with: prius quam aries murum attigisset, Cs.: telas putris, to handle, V.: Maenalon, set foot on, O.: mento aquam: pedibus terram, N.—To touch, strike, lay hands on, seize: illam, T.: (fanum), to violate: si Vestinus attingeretur, were attacked, L.: herbam, crop, V.—To approach, reach, arrive at, attain to: Italiam: lumina, i. e. life, V.: arces igneas, i. e. divine honors, H.—Of places, to be near, border on, adjoin, touch: (regio) Ciliciam: eorum fines Nervii attingebant, Cs.—Fig., to touch, affect, reach: dignitatem tuam contumeliā: quos ea infamia attingeret, L.—Of speech, to touch upon, mention, refer to: quem simul atque attigi: genera breviter: tantum modo summas, N.: ea, tamquam volnera, L.—To undertake, enter upon, engage in, take in hand, manage: causam Murenae: forum, i. e. public affairs: Graecas litteras: poeticam, N.: arma, to arm themselves, L.: alqd extremis digitis, i. e. have little experience in. — To reach, attain: auctoritatem loci: haec.—To come in contact with, be related to, belong to, resemble: officiis populum: Res gerere... Attingit solium Iovis, the administration of the state borders on, etc., H.

    Latin-English dictionary > attingō (adt-)

  • 15 bipalmis

        bipalmis e, adj.    [bi-+palmus], two spans long: spiculum, L.
    * * *
    bipalmis, bipalme ADJ
    two palms/spans (long/broad - 6 inches, Roman foot being 4 palmi)

    Latin-English dictionary > bipalmis

  • 16 būstuārius

        būstuārius adj.    [bustum], of a place for burning the dead: gladiator, who fought at a funeral pile.
    * * *
    bustuaria, bustuarium ADJ
    connected with/frequenting tombs; (bustuariusus gladiator fights at tomb to honor dead)

    Latin-English dictionary > būstuārius

  • 17 calceus

        calceus ī, m    [1 CEL-, CALC-], a shoe, halfboot (covering the whole foot): calcei habiles et apti ad pedem: laxus, H.: pede maior subvertet, minor uret, H.—Because senators wore a peculiar half-boot: calceos mutare, i. e. to become senator.
    * * *
    shoe; soft shoe, slipper

    calceus mullei/patricii -- red shoe of ex-curule senator

    Latin-English dictionary > calceus

  • 18 calcō

        calcō āvī, ātus, āre    [1 calx], to tread, tread upon, trample: exstructos morientum acervos, O.: calcata vipera, trodden, O.: in foro calcatur, L.: pede, Ta.: Huc ager dulcesque undae ad plenum calcentur, packed in, V.: cineres ossaque legionum, Ta.—Fig., to trample upon, suppress: hostem, Iu.: libertas nostra, L.: amorem, O. — Of space, to tread, pass over: calcanda semel via leti, H.: durum aequor, the frozen sea, O.
    * * *
    calcare, calcavi, calcatus V
    tread/trample upon/under foot, crush; tamp/ram down; spurn; copulate (cock)

    Latin-English dictionary > calcō

  • 19 callis

        callis is, m and f    [1 CEL-, CER-], a stony footway, foot-path, mountain-path, pass, defile: inviis callibus, L.: angustus, V.: suum servare cal<*>em, O.: deviae, L.: vix singulis pervii, Cu.—A mountain-pasturage, alp: Italiae callīs praedari: per occultos calles, V.
    * * *
    rough/stony track, path; moorland/mountain pasture; mountain pass/defile (L+S)

    Latin-English dictionary > callis

  • 20 celeripēs

        celeripēs pedis, adj.    [celer + pes], swift of foot.
    * * *
    (gen.), celeripedis ADJ
    swift-footed; swift of foot

    Latin-English dictionary > celeripēs

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