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wanton endangerment

  • 1 imprudencia

    f.
    1 carelessness, recklessness (falta de prudencia) (en los actos).
    2 careless or reckless act, indiscretion.
    3 imprudence, carelessness, recklessness, rashness.
    * * *
    1 (falta de prudencia) imprudence, carelessness; (en la carretera) dangerous driving
    2 (acción imprudente) rash move, reckless move; (indiscrección) indiscretion
    \
    las imprudencias se pagan carelessness costs lives
    imprudencia temeraria (gen) criminal negligence 2 (en carretera) reckless driving
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=cualidad) [al hacer algo] imprudence, rashness; [al averiguar algo] indiscretion
    2) (=acción)
    * * *
    a) ( acción) imprudence

    decir eso fue una imprudenciait was a rash o an imprudent thing to say

    b) ( cualidad) imprudence
    * * *
    = unwisdom, imprudence, recklessness, endangerment, wantonness, rashness.
    Ex. They believed in the 'inevitability of stratification, necessity of aristocracy, importance of religion and morality, sanctity of property, unwisdom of majority rule, urgency of constitutionalism, and folly of all attempts at social and economic leveling'.
    Ex. Lack of proper self-evaluation may explain both their callousness and their imprudence = La falta de una autoevaluación adecuada puede explicar su insensibilidad e imprudencia.
    Ex. General principles of criminal law, including the difference between recklessness and gross negligence, are reviewed to provide those in the outdoor industry a rough guide as to their possible criminal liability.
    Ex. This article postulates that communities are achieved through endangerment and are not founded on proximity or convenience but rather an opening of the self to the risks of human connection.
    Ex. This Court has often reiterated that while ordinary negligence involves inadvertence, wantonness requires a showing of a conscious or an intentional act.
    Ex. Courage stands halfway between cowardice and rashness, one of which is a lack, the other an excess of courage.
    ----
    * cometer una imprudencia = commit + imprudence, be reckless.
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.
    * * *
    a) ( acción) imprudence

    decir eso fue una imprudenciait was a rash o an imprudent thing to say

    b) ( cualidad) imprudence
    * * *
    = unwisdom, imprudence, recklessness, endangerment, wantonness, rashness.

    Ex: They believed in the 'inevitability of stratification, necessity of aristocracy, importance of religion and morality, sanctity of property, unwisdom of majority rule, urgency of constitutionalism, and folly of all attempts at social and economic leveling'.

    Ex: Lack of proper self-evaluation may explain both their callousness and their imprudence = La falta de una autoevaluación adecuada puede explicar su insensibilidad e imprudencia.
    Ex: General principles of criminal law, including the difference between recklessness and gross negligence, are reviewed to provide those in the outdoor industry a rough guide as to their possible criminal liability.
    Ex: This article postulates that communities are achieved through endangerment and are not founded on proximity or convenience but rather an opening of the self to the risks of human connection.
    Ex: This Court has often reiterated that while ordinary negligence involves inadvertence, wantonness requires a showing of a conscious or an intentional act.
    Ex: Courage stands halfway between cowardice and rashness, one of which is a lack, the other an excess of courage.
    * cometer una imprudencia = commit + imprudence, be reckless.
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.

    * * *
    1 (acción) imprudence
    decir eso fue una imprudencia it was a rash o an imprudent thing to say
    se debió a una imprudencia del piloto it was caused by the pilot's imprudence
    no cometas esa imprudencia don't be so rash o reckless
    2 (cualidad) imprudence
    su imprudencia al conducir his reckless driving
    Compuesto:
    criminal negligence
    el conductor fue condenado por imprudencia temeraria the driver was convicted of reckless driving o of criminal negligence
    * * *

    imprudencia sustantivo femenino
    imprudence;
    no cometas esa imprudencia don't be so rash o reckless;

    su imprudencia al conducir his reckless driving
    imprudencia sustantivo femenino imprudence, rashness: fue una imprudencia hablar de ello, it was unwise to talk about it
    imprudencia temeraria, criminal negligence

    ' imprudencia' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bestialidad
    - necedad
    - temeridad
    English:
    imprudence
    - rashness
    - reckless driving
    - recklessness
    - unwariness
    * * *
    1. [falta de prudencia] [en los actos] carelessness, recklessness;
    [en los comentarios] indiscretion;
    actuó con imprudencia she acted recklessly;
    fue una imprudencia conducir bebido it was reckless of him to drive while he was drunk
    Der imprudencia concurrente contributory negligence; Der imprudencia temeraria criminal negligence
    2. [acción] careless o reckless act, indiscretion;
    [dicho indiscreto] tactless remark, indiscretion; [dicho desacertado] foolish o reckless remark;
    confiar en él fue una imprudencia it was unwise to trust him;
    cometió una imprudencia y atropelló a un peatón she knocked over a pedestrian as a result of a reckless piece of driving
    * * *
    f recklessness, rashness
    * * *
    indiscreción: imprudence, indiscretion

    Spanish-English dictionary > imprudencia

  • 2 imprudencia temeraria

    f.
    recklessness, gross negligence, culpable wantonness, hazardous negligence.
    * * *
    (gen) criminal negligence 2 (en carretera) reckless driving
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence
    Ex. This article postulates that communities are achieved through endangerment and are not founded on proximity or convenience but rather an opening of the self to the risks of human connection.
    Ex. A perpetrator, who wantonly engages in conduct that creates a substantial danger of physical injury to his victim, commits the crime of wanton endangerment.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence

    Ex: This article postulates that communities are achieved through endangerment and are not founded on proximity or convenience but rather an opening of the self to the risks of human connection.

    Ex: A perpetrator, who wantonly engages in conduct that creates a substantial danger of physical injury to his victim, commits the crime of wanton endangerment.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.

    * * *
    criminal negligence

    Spanish-English dictionary > imprudencia temeraria

  • 3 temerario

    adj.
    1 reckless, bold, audacious, brash.
    2 reckless, breakneck, suicidal.
    3 cock-brained.
    * * *
    1 reckless, rash
    * * *
    (f. - temeraria)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona, acto] (=imprudente) rash, reckless; (=audaz) bold
    2) [juicio] hasty, rash
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo bold
    * * *
    = daring, reckless, rash, foolhardy, audacious, buccaneering.
    Ex. One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.
    Ex. The article is entitled ' Reckless driving on the information highway, or, is the scholar of the research library effectively using the available resources?'.
    Ex. And some way down the list of benefits was a rash promise to 'slash the red tape that hinders our trade with Europe -- and thereby safeguard the 2 1/2 million jobs involved'.
    Ex. There is nothing wrong with killing enemy soldiers that are attacking you and it would seem foolhardy just to let them escape.
    Ex. One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex. But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    ----
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.
    * juicio temerario = snap judgement.
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo bold
    * * *
    = daring, reckless, rash, foolhardy, audacious, buccaneering.

    Ex: One wondered, did daring first-year students lose their nerve at the last minute and kneel as evidence that their audacity in approaching this 'holy of holies' was tempered by the proper reverence?.

    Ex: The article is entitled ' Reckless driving on the information highway, or, is the scholar of the research library effectively using the available resources?'.
    Ex: And some way down the list of benefits was a rash promise to 'slash the red tape that hinders our trade with Europe -- and thereby safeguard the 2 1/2 million jobs involved'.
    Ex: There is nothing wrong with killing enemy soldiers that are attacking you and it would seem foolhardy just to let them escape.
    Ex: One of Belgium's most dangerous criminals, who staged an audacious jailbreak on a hijacked helicopter, has been tracked down to Morocco.
    Ex: But whatever we make of their buccaneering spirit, the apostolic passion firing their hearts is surely beyond contention.
    * imprudencia temeraria = endangerment, wanton endangerment, criminal negligence.
    * juicio temerario = snap judgement.

    * * *
    ‹persona› rash, bold; ‹acto/empresa› rash
    * * *

    temerario,-a adj (acción, modo de conducir) reckless, (comentario, hipótesis, acusación) rash
    ' temerario' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    arriesgada
    - arriesgado
    - colgada
    - colgado
    - temeraria
    - imprudente
    English:
    daredevil
    - reckless
    - risktaker
    - dare
    * * *
    temerario, -a adj
    [persona, conducta] rash, reckless; [juicio, opinión] rash;
    conducción temeraria careless o reckless driving
    * * *
    adj rash, reckless
    * * *
    temerario, - ria adj
    : reckless, rash
    * * *
    temerario adj reckless

    Spanish-English dictionary > temerario

  • 4 a viva voz

    Ex. Also revealed is the endangerment of the open outcry trading system as the digital revolution replaces it at many of the world's financial exchanges.
    * * *

    Ex: Also revealed is the endangerment of the open outcry trading system as the digital revolution replaces it at many of the world's financial exchanges.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a viva voz

  • 5 a voces

    adv.
    aloud, in a loud voice, at the top of one's voice, clamorously.
    * * *
    shouting
    * * *
    = vociferously, vociferous, open outcry
    Ex. This article argues that the OTA report, despite its affirmation of public access to information, is unlikely to cause a redeployment of resources unless librarians argue vociferously that there is a real need for this information.
    Ex. The reaction came in 1978 -- a vociferous social demand for reading and learning, including a new interest in librarianship.
    Ex. Also revealed is the endangerment of the open outcry trading system as the digital revolution replaces it at many of the world's financial exchanges.
    * * *
    = vociferously, vociferous, open outcry

    Ex: This article argues that the OTA report, despite its affirmation of public access to information, is unlikely to cause a redeployment of resources unless librarians argue vociferously that there is a real need for this information.

    Ex: The reaction came in 1978 -- a vociferous social demand for reading and learning, including a new interest in librarianship.
    Ex: Also revealed is the endangerment of the open outcry trading system as the digital revolution replaces it at many of the world's financial exchanges.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a voces

  • 6 antropofagia

    f.
    anthropophagy, cannibalism.
    * * *
    1 cannibalism
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino cannibalism
    * * *
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    * * *
    femenino cannibalism
    * * *

    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    * * *
    cannibalism, anthropophagy
    * * *
    cannibalism, anthropophagy
    * * *
    f cannibalism
    * * *
    canibalismo: cannibalism

    Spanish-English dictionary > antropofagia

  • 7 artículos de lujo

    (n.) = luxury goods
    Ex. Luxury goods such as cosmetics, radios and lingerie, were once burned in public bonfires because they 'aroused wanton desires in the minds of the people'.
    * * *

    Ex: Luxury goods such as cosmetics, radios and lingerie, were once burned in public bonfires because they 'aroused wanton desires in the minds of the people'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > artículos de lujo

  • 8 aterrador

    adj.
    terrifying, frightful, frightening, awesome.
    * * *
    1 terrifying, frightful
    * * *
    (f. - aterradora)
    adj.
    frightening, terrifying
    * * *
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo terrifying
    * * *
    = frightening, terrifying, terrorising [terrorizing, -USA], frightful, fear-inducing, hideous, hair-raising, groundshaking, creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.].
    Ex. No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex. To the general public 'the female librarian is still angular, elderly, acidulous and terrifying', to use Geoffrey Langley's words, 'and a male librarian is impossible under any hypothesis'.
    Ex. He perceived that his life threatened to be an interminable succession of these mortifying interviews unless he could discover a way or ways to deal with her surly and terrorizing ferocity.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. This ' hair-raising' experience will allow students to have a better understanding of what energy is and why it's so important.
    Ex. The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex. For me, it's like those really creepy films I used to like watching when I was a kid.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo terrifying
    * * *
    = frightening, terrifying, terrorising [terrorizing, -USA], frightful, fear-inducing, hideous, hair-raising, groundshaking, creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.].

    Ex: No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.

    Ex: To the general public 'the female librarian is still angular, elderly, acidulous and terrifying', to use Geoffrey Langley's words, 'and a male librarian is impossible under any hypothesis'.
    Ex: He perceived that his life threatened to be an interminable succession of these mortifying interviews unless he could discover a way or ways to deal with her surly and terrorizing ferocity.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: This ' hair-raising' experience will allow students to have a better understanding of what energy is and why it's so important.
    Ex: The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex: For me, it's like those really creepy films I used to like watching when I was a kid.

    * * *
    terrifying
    * * *

    aterrador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    terrifying
    aterrador,-ora adjetivo terrifying

    ' aterrador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aterradora
    English:
    chilling
    - frightful
    - terrifying
    - terrifyingly
    - blood
    - fearful
    - fearsome
    - frightening
    * * *
    aterrador, -ora adj
    terrifying
    * * *
    adj frightening, terrifying
    * * *
    aterrador, - dora adj
    : terrifying
    * * *
    aterrador adj terrifying

    Spanish-English dictionary > aterrador

  • 9 atroz

    adj.
    1 terrible, awful.
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o awfully cold
    2 atrocious, horrible, inhumane, abominable.
    3 agonizing, excruciating.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl atroces)
    1 (bárbaro) atrocious, outrageous
    2 familiar (enorme) enormous, huge, awful
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=terrible) atrocious; (=cruel) cruel, inhuman; (=escandaloso) outrageous
    2) * (=enorme) huge, terrific; (=malísimo) dreadful, awful
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.
    Ex. The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.
    Ex. The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex. Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex. Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex. There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.

    Ex: The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.

    Ex: The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex: Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex: The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex: Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex: There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.

    * * *
    1 (brutal, cruel) appalling, terrible
    2 (uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful, dreadful ( BrE)
    tengo un dolor de cabeza atroz I have an atrocious o an awful headache
    * * *

    atroz adjetivo
    atrocious
    atroz adjetivo
    1 (pésimo, insoportable) atrocious
    2 fam (enorme) enormous, tremendous
    ' atroz' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    insensibilidad
    - barbaridad
    - muerte
    English:
    agonizing
    - appalling
    - atrocious
    - dreadful
    - excruciating
    - heinous
    - hell
    - hideous
    - raging
    - unspeakable
    - vicious
    - crippling
    - dire
    - terrible
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. [cruel] [crimen, tortura] horrific, barbaric
    2. [enorme]
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o bitterly cold;
    es de una fealdad atroz he's terribly o incredibly ugly
    3. [muy malo] atrocious, awful
    * * *
    adj
    1 appalling, atrocious
    2
    :
    un éxito atroz a smash hit
    * * *
    atroz adj, pl atroces : atrocious, appalling
    atrozamente adv
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. (cruel) atrocious / appalling
    2. (enorme) terrible
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly cold / it's freezing

    Spanish-English dictionary > atroz

  • 10 brutalmente

    adv.
    brutally, currishly, churlishly, brutishly.
    * * *
    1 brutally
    * * *
    * * *
    = brutally, ferociously, heinously.
    Ex. These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. They felt this sick feeling then that we are now experiencing when one of their own was heinously attacked.
    * * *
    = brutally, ferociously, heinously.

    Ex: These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: They felt this sick feeling then that we are now experiencing when one of their own was heinously attacked.

    * * *
    brutally
    * * *
    brutally

    Spanish-English dictionary > brutalmente

  • 11 canibalismo

    m.
    cannibalism.
    * * *
    1 cannibalism
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=antropofagia) cannibalism
    2) (=ferocidad) fierceness, savageness
    * * *
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    * * *

    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    * * *
    cannibalism
    * * *

    canibalismo sustantivo masculino cannibalism
    ' canibalismo' also found in these entries:
    English:
    canibalism
    * * *
    1. [de seres vivos] cannibalism
    2. Mktg cannibalization
    * * *
    m cannibalism
    * * *
    antropofagia: cannibalism

    Spanish-English dictionary > canibalismo

  • 12 caprichoso

    adj.
    capricious, cranky, erratic, fickle.
    * * *
    1 capricious, whimsical, fanciful
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 whimsical person
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona] capricious
    2) [idea, novela etc] whimsical, fanciful
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( inconstante) <carácter/persona> capricious; <tiempo/moda> changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino

    es un caprichoso — ( es inconstante) he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy

    * * *
    = capricious, whimsical, wayward, fickle, wanton, faddish, flighty [flightier -comp., flightiest -sup.], faddy [faddier -comp., faddies -sup.].
    Ex. Panizzi introduced what seemed to his critics unwarranted and capricious complications calculated to make the catalog much more difficult for the librarian to prepare and the reader to use.
    Ex. This slightly off-balance, whimsical remark was a Marsha James' trademark.
    Ex. The article 'The wayward scholar: resources and research in popular culture' defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource.
    Ex. The rise and dramatic fall of E-businesses is a testimony of the fickle electronic commerce (E-commerce) market.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. Whilst, presumably, a set of standards for the conduct of reference work, the document is in fact a hodgepodge shaped by faddish misconceptions.
    Ex. 'Anyway, to make a long story short, Huish said he knows Lisa has been a little flighty at times'.
    Ex. These emotions will have a knock-on effect on the child and may, in the case of the faddy eater, cause the situation to deteriorate.
    ----
    * de forma caprichosa = capriciously.
    * de modo caprichoso = capriciously.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( inconstante) <carácter/persona> capricious; <tiempo/moda> changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino

    es un caprichoso — ( es inconstante) he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy

    * * *
    = capricious, whimsical, wayward, fickle, wanton, faddish, flighty [flightier -comp., flightiest -sup.], faddy [faddier -comp., faddies -sup.].

    Ex: Panizzi introduced what seemed to his critics unwarranted and capricious complications calculated to make the catalog much more difficult for the librarian to prepare and the reader to use.

    Ex: This slightly off-balance, whimsical remark was a Marsha James' trademark.
    Ex: The article 'The wayward scholar: resources and research in popular culture' defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource.
    Ex: The rise and dramatic fall of E-businesses is a testimony of the fickle electronic commerce (E-commerce) market.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: Whilst, presumably, a set of standards for the conduct of reference work, the document is in fact a hodgepodge shaped by faddish misconceptions.
    Ex: 'Anyway, to make a long story short, Huish said he knows Lisa has been a little flighty at times'.
    Ex: These emotions will have a knock-on effect on the child and may, in the case of the faddy eater, cause the situation to deteriorate.
    * de forma caprichosa = capriciously.
    * de modo caprichoso = capriciously.

    * * *
    1 (inconstante) ‹carácter/persona› capricious; ‹tiempo/moda› changeable
    ¡qué niño más caprichoso! what a capricious child! o this child is always changing his mind
    las estalactitas presentaban formas caprichosas the stalactites formed fanciful shapes
    2 (difícil, exigente) fussy
    masculine, feminine
    es un caprichoso (es inconstante) he's so capricious o he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he is so fussy
    * * *

     

    caprichoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a) ( inconstante) ‹carácter/persona capricious;

    tiempo/moda changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino:


    (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy
    caprichoso,-a
    I sustantivo masculino y femenino mi hermana es una caprichosa, my sister is very impulsive
    II adjetivo
    1 (antojadizo) whimsical, fanciful
    2 (maniático, exigente) fussy
    3 (creativo, sin norma) las nubes creaban figuras caprichosas, the clouds made strange shapes
    ' caprichoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    caprichosa
    - mañoso
    English:
    capricious
    - erratic
    - flighty
    - moody
    - whimsical
    * * *
    caprichoso, -a adj
    capricious, impulsive;
    actuar de forma caprichosa to act capriciously o impulsively
    * * *
    adj capricious
    * * *
    caprichoso, -sa adj
    antojadizo: capricious, fickle

    Spanish-English dictionary > caprichoso

  • 13 con ferocidad

    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * * *

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.

    Spanish-English dictionary > con ferocidad

  • 14 coqueta

    adj.&f.
    coquettish.
    adj.&f.
    coquettish.
    f.
    1 dressing table.
    2 flirt, coquette, wanton woman, coquet.
    * * *
    1 (mujer) flirt, coquette
    2 (mueble) dressing table
    * * *
    SF (=mueble) dressing table
    coqueto
    * * *
    1) ( chica que flirtea) flirt, coquette (liter); ( presumida) vain girl/woman
    2) ( mueble) dressing table
    * * *
    = coquet (coquette), flirt.
    Ex. Among the novels that were avidly read during the eighteenth century are Penelope Aubin's 'The noble slaves,' William Chetwood's 'The voyages and adventures of Captain Robert Boyle' and, above all, Mary Davys' 'The reformed coquet'.
    Ex. Incomplete and anachronistic readings of the records from the 1612 trial for her rape have underpinned an image of Artemisia as, in the older treatments, a flirt and vamp or, in more recent ones, a feminist and resister of male violence.
    * * *
    1) ( chica que flirtea) flirt, coquette (liter); ( presumida) vain girl/woman
    2) ( mueble) dressing table
    * * *
    = coquet (coquette), flirt.

    Ex: Among the novels that were avidly read during the eighteenth century are Penelope Aubin's 'The noble slaves,' William Chetwood's 'The voyages and adventures of Captain Robert Boyle' and, above all, Mary Davys' 'The reformed coquet'.

    Ex: Incomplete and anachronistic readings of the records from the 1612 trial for her rape have underpinned an image of Artemisia as, in the older treatments, a flirt and vamp or, in more recent ones, a feminist and resister of male violence.

    * * *
    A (chica que flirtea) flirt, coquette ( liter); (presumida) vain girl ( o woman etc)
    eres una coqueta, siempre te estás pintando you are so vain o so obsessed with your looks, forever putting makeup on
    B (mueble) dressing table
    * * *

     

    coqueta sustantivo femenino

    ( presumida) vain girl/woman;


    coqueto,-a
    I adjetivo (persona) vain, coquettish
    (decoración) nice, pretty
    (gesto) flirting
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino flirt
    coqueta sustantivo femenino dressing table
    ' coqueta' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    coqueto
    English:
    flirt
    * * *
    [tocador] dressing table
    * * *
    : dressing table

    Spanish-English dictionary > coqueta

  • 15 crueldad

    f.
    1 cruelty.
    2 act of cruelty.
    3 cruel act, cruelty.
    * * *
    1 cruelty
    2 (dureza) harshness, severity
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=cualidad) cruelty
    2) (=acción) cruelty

    ¡es una crueldad! — that's so cruel!, it's such a cruel thing to do o say!

    * * *
    femenino cruelty
    * * *
    = cruelty, callousness, ruthlessness, inhumanity.
    Ex. Cruelty TO CHILDREN is quite clearly child abuse.
    Ex. Lack of proper self-evaluation may explain both their callousness and their imprudence = La falta de una autoevaluación adecuada puede explicar su insensibilidad e imprudencia.
    Ex. Aggression and ruthlessness are inappropriate in this context: the librarian must be sensitive to the realities of power and influence and be able to present library issues in a manner that demonstrates their importance to the academic community.
    Ex. Humanism is seen as the last best way to combat inhumanity & injustice.
    * * *
    femenino cruelty
    * * *
    = cruelty, callousness, ruthlessness, inhumanity.

    Ex: Cruelty TO CHILDREN is quite clearly child abuse.

    Ex: Lack of proper self-evaluation may explain both their callousness and their imprudence = La falta de una autoevaluación adecuada puede explicar su insensibilidad e imprudencia.
    Ex: Aggression and ruthlessness are inappropriate in this context: the librarian must be sensitive to the realities of power and influence and be able to present library issues in a manner that demonstrates their importance to the academic community.
    Ex: Humanism is seen as the last best way to combat inhumanity & injustice.

    * * *
    1 (cualidad) cruelty
    es difícil imaginar la crueldad con que los trataban it's hard to imagine just how cruelly they were treated
    2 (acción) cruelty
    las crueldades cometidas durante la guerra the cruelties o atrocities committed during the war
    es una crueldad privar a estos animales de su libertad it's cruel o it's cruelty to deprive these animals of their freedom
    Compuesto:
    mental cruelty
    * * *

    crueldad sustantivo femenino
    cruelty;

    crueldad mental mental cruelty
    crueldad sustantivo femenino cruelty

    ' crueldad' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acusar
    - sadismo
    - saña
    English:
    ASPCA
    - cruelty
    - dearly
    - heartlessness
    - viciously
    - wanton
    - inhumanity
    * * *
    1. [de persona, acción] cruelty;
    mostró una crueldad inusitada he displayed extraordinary cruelty
    2. [acción cruel] act of cruelty;
    es una crueldad abandonar animales it's cruel to abandon animals
    3. [del clima] harshness
    * * *
    f cruelty
    * * *
    : cruelty
    * * *
    crueldad n cruelty

    Spanish-English dictionary > crueldad

  • 16 despiadado

    adj.
    merciless, cruel, inhuman, cold-hearted.
    * * *
    1 ruthless, merciless
    * * *
    (f. - despiadada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] heartless; [ataque] merciless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.
    Ex. For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex. Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.

    Ex: For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex: Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.

    * * *
    ‹persona› ruthless, heartless; ‹ataque/crítica› savage, merciless
    * * *

    despiadado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ persona ruthless, heartless;


    ataque/crítica savage, merciless
    despiadado,-a adjetivo merciless, ruthless
    ' despiadado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acerba
    - acerbo
    - bárbara
    - bárbaro
    - despiadada
    English:
    cold-blooded
    - cold-hearted
    - cutthroat
    - merciless
    - pitiless
    - remorseless
    - ruthless
    - unmerciful
    - vicious
    - cold
    * * *
    despiadado, -a adj
    [persona] merciless; [trato] inhuman, pitiless; [ataque] savage, merciless
    * * *
    adj ruthless
    * * *
    despiadado, -da adj
    cruel: cruel, merciless, pitiless
    * * *
    despiadado adj hard-hearted / heartless / ruthless

    Spanish-English dictionary > despiadado

  • 17 espantoso

    adj.
    frightening, frightful, fearsome, dreadful.
    * * *
    1 (terrible) frightful, dreadful
    2 (asombroso) astonishing, amazing
    3 (desmesurado) dreadful, terrible
    hizo un frío espantoso the cold was awful, it was absolutely freezing
    * * *
    (f. - espantosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=aterrador) frightening
    2) [para exagerar]

    llevaba un traje espantososhe was wearing an awful o a hideous o a frightful o ghastly * hat

    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <escena/crimen> horrific, appalling
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) <comida/letra/tiempo> atrocious; <vestido/color> hideous; <ruido/voz> terrible, awful

    hace un calor espantosoit's boiling o roasting hot (colloq)

    * * *
    = frightening, harrowing, atrocious, awful, frightful, dire, ghastly, fear-inducing, hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, grisly [grislier -comp., grisliest -sup.], god-awful, groundshaking, nightmarish.
    Ex. No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex. See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.
    Ex. The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex. These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. True, ghastly additions were made to XML.
    Ex. The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex. Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex. The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex. Much of what he sees and shows his readers is grim, if not grisly.
    Ex. The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex. The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex. It was the drugs that made me mad: Jane was anorexic, but the treatment prescribed pushed her over the edge for 22 nightmarish years.
    ----
    * dolor de cabeza espantoso = splitting headache.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <escena/crimen> horrific, appalling
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) <comida/letra/tiempo> atrocious; <vestido/color> hideous; <ruido/voz> terrible, awful

    hace un calor espantosoit's boiling o roasting hot (colloq)

    * * *
    = frightening, harrowing, atrocious, awful, frightful, dire, ghastly, fear-inducing, hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, grisly [grislier -comp., grisliest -sup.], god-awful, groundshaking, nightmarish.

    Ex: No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.

    Ex: See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.
    Ex: The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex: These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex: True, ghastly additions were made to XML.
    Ex: The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex: Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex: The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex: Much of what he sees and shows his readers is grim, if not grisly.
    Ex: The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex: The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex: It was the drugs that made me mad: Jane was anorexic, but the treatment prescribed pushed her over the edge for 22 nightmarish years.
    * dolor de cabeza espantoso = splitting headache.

    * * *
    1 ‹escena/crimen› horrific, appalling
    fue una experiencia espantosa it was a horrific o horrifying experience
    2 ( fam)
    (uso hiperbólico): hace un calor espantoso it's boiling o roasting, it's incredibly o unbearably hot ( colloq)
    pasamos un frío espantoso we were absolutely freezing ( colloq)
    tengo un hambre espantosa I'm ravenous o starving ( colloq)
    la comida era espantosa the food was atrocious o ghastly
    ¡qué sombrero tan espantoso! what a hideous o an awful hat
    esta máquina hace un ruido espantoso this machine makes a terrible o dreadful noise ( colloq)
    llueve que es una cosa espantosa it's absolutely pouring ( colloq), it's bucketing down ( colloq)
    * * *

    espantoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a)escena/crimen horrific, appalling

    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) ‹comida/letra/tiempo atrocious;

    vestido/color hideous;
    ruido/voz terrible, awful;

    espantoso,-a adjetivo
    1 (horripilante) horrifying, appalling: es un asunto espantoso, it's a horrifying situation
    2 fam (uso hiperbólico) tengo unas ganas espantosas de que llegue el fin de semana, I'm dying for the weekend to come!
    3 fam (muy feo) awful, hideous: ¡quítate ese espantoso sombrero!, take off that awful hat!
    ' espantoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    berrido
    - espantosa
    - ridícula
    - ridículo
    - sueño
    - tener
    - hacer
    English:
    diabolic
    - diabolical
    - dreadful
    - frightening
    - frightful
    - ghastly
    - gruesome
    - hairy
    - hideous
    - horrendous
    - interminable
    - shocking
    - stinking
    - wretched
    - abominable
    - atrocious
    - boiling
    - dire
    - excruciating
    - horrific
    - split
    - terrible
    - terrific
    * * *
    espantoso, -a adj
    1. [pavoroso] horrific
    2. [enorme] terrible;
    allí dentro hacía un calor espantoso it was roasting o boiling o terribly hot in there;
    tengo un frío espantoso I'm freezing to death;
    teníamos un hambre espantosa we were famished o starving
    3. [feísimo] hideous, frightful;
    llevaba un vestido espantoso she was wearing a hideous o frightful dress
    4. [pasmoso] appalling, shocking;
    el servicio postal era espantoso the postal service was appalling;
    * * *
    adj
    1 horrific, appalling
    2 para enfatizar terrible, dreadful;
    hace un calor espantoso it’s terribly o incredibly hot
    * * *
    espantoso, -sa adj
    1) : frightening, terrifying
    2) : frightful, dreadful
    * * *
    espantoso adj awful / dreadful

    Spanish-English dictionary > espantoso

  • 18 estar al mismo nivel

    (v.) = be on a par
    Ex. The male coquette and the wanton woman are somewhat on a par.
    * * *

    Ex: The male coquette and the wanton woman are somewhat on a par.

    Spanish-English dictionary > estar al mismo nivel

  • 19 ferozmente

    adv.
    ferociously, folly, savagely.
    * * *
    1 fiercely, ferociously
    * * *
    ADV
    1) (=salvajemente) fiercely, ferociously
    2) (=cruelmente) cruelly
    * * *
    = fiercely, ferociously.
    Ex. Whether libraries are entirely suitable for extending their role into community information and advice has been fiercely debated.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * * *
    = fiercely, ferociously.

    Ex: Whether libraries are entirely suitable for extending their role into community information and advice has been fiercely debated.

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.

    * * *
    fiercely, ferociously
    * * *
    ferociously, fiercely

    Spanish-English dictionary > ferozmente

  • 20 galante

    adj.
    gallant.
    f. & m.
    gallant.
    * * *
    1 courteous, gallant, chivalrous
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [hombre] (=caballeroso) gallant; (=atento) charming, attentive ( to women); (=cortés) polite, urbane frm
    2) †† [mujer] flirtatious, flirty; pey wanton, licentious
    * * *
    a) < hombre> gallant, attentive
    b) (pey) <mujer/vida> wanton
    * * *
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. This was an untenable state of affairs and he made a gallant effort to secure librarians and library boards from the possibility of such suits.
    * * *
    a) < hombre> gallant, attentive
    b) (pey) <mujer/vida> wanton
    * * *
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: This was an untenable state of affairs and he made a gallant effort to secure librarians and library boards from the possibility of such suits.

    * * *
    1 ‹hombre› gallant, attentive
    2 ( pey); ‹mujer› wanton, loose; ‹vida› wanton
    hotel or casa galante ( euf); house of assignation ( euph)
    * * *

    galante adjetivo ‹ hombre gallant, attentive
    galante adjetivo gallant
    ' galante' also found in these entries:
    English:
    gallant
    * * *
    galante adj
    gallant
    * * *
    adj gallant
    * * *
    galante adj
    : gallant, attentive
    galantemente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > galante

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