Перевод: с испанского на все языки

to+fit+sth+into+sth

  • 61 a largo plazo

    (adj.) = in the long term, over the long term, long-range, in the long run, long-term, over the long run, over the long haul, long-run, in the far term, far-term
    Ex. For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.
    Ex. This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex. In September 1973, the University of Washington initiated implementation of a formal long-range planing process for the total university system.
    Ex. Ostensibly, the maneuver was accomplished to curb patronage abuses and make it easier to dismiss deadwood employees in the long run.
    Ex. The use of agents is necessary but not ideal, because an agent often represents rival concerns, and aims for a quick turnover rather than long-term profitability.
    Ex. Some feel that these sessions can be 'self-defeating over the long run because they are based on a reward-punishment psychology that serves to intensify the pressure on the individual'.
    Ex. But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex. Findings indicate that the short-run success of methadone programs does not automatically translate into long-run abstinence.
    Ex. In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex. These processes can be viewed as near-term and far-term.
    * * *
    (adj.) = in the long term, over the long term, long-range, in the long run, long-term, over the long run, over the long haul, long-run, in the far term, far-term

    Ex: For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.

    Ex: This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex: In September 1973, the University of Washington initiated implementation of a formal long-range planing process for the total university system.
    Ex: Ostensibly, the maneuver was accomplished to curb patronage abuses and make it easier to dismiss deadwood employees in the long run.
    Ex: The use of agents is necessary but not ideal, because an agent often represents rival concerns, and aims for a quick turnover rather than long-term profitability.
    Ex: Some feel that these sessions can be 'self-defeating over the long run because they are based on a reward-punishment psychology that serves to intensify the pressure on the individual'.
    Ex: But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex: Findings indicate that the short-run success of methadone programs does not automatically translate into long-run abstinence.
    Ex: In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex: These processes can be viewed as near-term and far-term.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a largo plazo

  • 62 a las mil maravillas

    wonderfully well
    * * *
    wonderfully, wonderfully well, marvellously
    * * *
    = marvellously [marvelously, -USA], famously, like a house on fire
    Ex. Carter has produced a marvellously researched biography of Anthony Blunt, the British art historian who worked as a spy for the Soviet Union.
    Ex. He gets along famously with the head of reference, by the way.
    Ex. Within ten minutes they joined into my discussion and then it rolled like a house on fire.
    * * *
    = marvellously [marvelously, -USA], famously, like a house on fire

    Ex: Carter has produced a marvellously researched biography of Anthony Blunt, the British art historian who worked as a spy for the Soviet Union.

    Ex: He gets along famously with the head of reference, by the way.
    Ex: Within ten minutes they joined into my discussion and then it rolled like a house on fire.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a las mil maravillas

  • 63 a lo extremo

    Ex. An artist has taken his love for the outdoors to the extreme, by turning his caravan into a garden he can take anywhere.
    * * *

    Ex: An artist has taken his love for the outdoors to the extreme, by turning his caravan into a garden he can take anywhere.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a lo extremo

  • 64 a lo grande

    on a grand scale, in a big way
    * * *
    *in style
    * * *
    = in a big way, big time, grandly, on a grand scale
    Ex. The United Nations (UN), its various information offices and its sister agencies are shifting into electronic publishing in a big way.
    Ex. They all enjoy doing their searches and find it a big time saver.
    Ex. I am convinced that China can hold this Olymipics game peacefully and grandly.
    Ex. A 'toxic combination' of poverty and social injustice is killing people on a grand scale, a World Health Organisation report said Thursday.
    * * *
    = in a big way, big time, grandly, on a grand scale

    Ex: The United Nations (UN), its various information offices and its sister agencies are shifting into electronic publishing in a big way.

    Ex: They all enjoy doing their searches and find it a big time saver.
    Ex: I am convinced that China can hold this Olymipics game peacefully and grandly.
    Ex: A 'toxic combination' of poverty and social injustice is killing people on a grand scale, a World Health Organisation report said Thursday.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a lo grande

  • 65 a lo máximo

    = at best, at most, at the most
    Ex. Facet analysis in UDC is, at best, inconsistent.
    Ex. The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.
    Ex. The chemical systems described must be based on a small number of elements and composed of molecules having 8 atoms at the most.
    * * *
    = at best, at most, at the most

    Ex: Facet analysis in UDC is, at best, inconsistent.

    Ex: The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.
    Ex: The chemical systems described must be based on a small number of elements and composed of molecules having 8 atoms at the most.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a lo máximo

  • 66 a lo sumo

    at most, at the most
    * * *
    = at best, at most, at the most
    Ex. Facet analysis in UDC is, at best, inconsistent.
    Ex. The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.
    Ex. The chemical systems described must be based on a small number of elements and composed of molecules having 8 atoms at the most.
    * * *
    = at best, at most, at the most

    Ex: Facet analysis in UDC is, at best, inconsistent.

    Ex: The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.
    Ex: The chemical systems described must be based on a small number of elements and composed of molecules having 8 atoms at the most.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a lo sumo

  • 67 a medianoche

    adv.
    at midnight.
    * * *
    Ex. At midnight, one pirate arose, opened the chest, and counted out the gold pieces into five even piles.
    * * *

    Ex: At midnight, one pirate arose, opened the chest, and counted out the gold pieces into five even piles.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a medianoche

  • 68 a medio fuego

    (n.) = medium heat
    Ex. Whisk ingredients together, pour into oiled waffle iron, and cook on medium heat until steam starts coming out of the sides.
    * * *

    Ex: Whisk ingredients together, pour into oiled waffle iron, and cook on medium heat until steam starts coming out of the sides.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a medio fuego

  • 69 a mitad de camino entre

    = midway between, half way between... and...
    Ex. The indicative abstract can thus be seen as occupying a place midway between the usual form of entries in an indexing service on the one hand and a fully developed abstracting service on the other.
    Ex. Sometime in the later eighteenth century an ingenious version of stereotyping called dabbing was developed, whereby a pattern of wood or metal was dabbed into the surface of a quantity of type-metal that was half way between its solid and its molten state; the dabbed metal was then used as a matrix for striking a copy of the original in similarly half-molten metal.
    * * *
    = midway between, half way between... and...

    Ex: The indicative abstract can thus be seen as occupying a place midway between the usual form of entries in an indexing service on the one hand and a fully developed abstracting service on the other.

    Ex: Sometime in the later eighteenth century an ingenious version of stereotyping called dabbing was developed, whereby a pattern of wood or metal was dabbed into the surface of a quantity of type-metal that was half way between its solid and its molten state; the dabbed metal was then used as a matrix for striking a copy of the original in similarly half-molten metal.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a mitad de camino entre

  • 70 a nosotros

    = us
    Ex. To us at first it seemed very large, but as we got into the research we found it was very small, so we did unofficial studies.
    * * *
    = us

    Ex: To us at first it seemed very large, but as we got into the research we found it was very small, so we did unofficial studies.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a nosotros

  • 71 a orillas del océano

    (adj.) = oceanfront
    Ex. A man and a woman were killed at a luxury oceanfront resort when police fired into their bungalow after they refused to drop a handgun.
    * * *
    (adj.) = oceanfront

    Ex: A man and a woman were killed at a luxury oceanfront resort when police fired into their bungalow after they refused to drop a handgun.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a orillas del océano

  • 72 a partes iguales

    into equal parts
    * * *
    = share and share alike, in equal measure(s)
    Ex. Results suggest that people endorse a 'losers weepers' norm more often than they do a 'finders keepers' or ' share and share alike' norm, although all were endorsed.
    Ex. Despite the fact I heard twitters of laughter from the audience, there is nothing funny in this movie, which mocks Christianity, Judaism, and Islam in equal measures.
    * * *
    = share and share alike, in equal measure(s)

    Ex: Results suggest that people endorse a 'losers weepers' norm more often than they do a 'finders keepers' or ' share and share alike' norm, although all were endorsed.

    Ex: Despite the fact I heard twitters of laughter from the audience, there is nothing funny in this movie, which mocks Christianity, Judaism, and Islam in equal measures.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a partes iguales

  • 73 a placer

    adv.
    at leisure.
    * * *
    Ex. Once having got into the system, he or she can switch from database to database at will.
    * * *

    Ex: Once having got into the system, he or she can switch from database to database at will.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a placer

  • 74 a punto de

    = on the verge of, a heartbeat away from
    Ex. With healthy roots in the library field, optical disc technology is on the verge of exponential growth into broader markets.
    Ex. Each of us lives every minute of every day just a heartbeat away from death.
    * * *
    = on the verge of, a heartbeat away from

    Ex: With healthy roots in the library field, optical disc technology is on the verge of exponential growth into broader markets.

    Ex: Each of us lives every minute of every day just a heartbeat away from death.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a punto de

  • 75 a regañadientes

    adv.
    reluctantly, unwillingly, discontentedly, with reluctance.
    * * *
    reluctantly, grudgingly, unwillingly
    * * *
    = grudgingly, grudging, begrudgingly, unwillingly, reluctantly
    Ex. Another point which we hope these introductory remarks make clear is that AACR2, even more than the 1967 version, is the result of give and take, of compromise, of negotiation, of concessions made graciously or grudgingly.
    Ex. There is little to be said for this grudging acceptance or utter rejection of pseudonyms.
    Ex. Even if librarians can admit begrudgingly that comic books may deserve a rightful place in many libraries, innumerable fears come to mind = Aunque los bibliotecarios pueden admitir de mala gana que los comics pueden merecerse el lugar que les corresponde en muchas bibliotecas, las dudas que les asaltan son innumerables.
    Ex. Intellectuals have been unwillingly transformed into cultural commentators and cultural studies has replaced philosophy.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    * * *
    = grudgingly, grudging, begrudgingly, unwillingly, reluctantly

    Ex: Another point which we hope these introductory remarks make clear is that AACR2, even more than the 1967 version, is the result of give and take, of compromise, of negotiation, of concessions made graciously or grudgingly.

    Ex: There is little to be said for this grudging acceptance or utter rejection of pseudonyms.
    Ex: Even if librarians can admit begrudgingly that comic books may deserve a rightful place in many libraries, innumerable fears come to mind = Aunque los bibliotecarios pueden admitir de mala gana que los comics pueden merecerse el lugar que les corresponde en muchas bibliotecas, las dudas que les asaltan son innumerables.
    Ex: Intellectuals have been unwillingly transformed into cultural commentators and cultural studies has replaced philosophy.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a regañadientes

  • 76 a su vez

    in turn
    * * *
    = Verbo + further, in turn, in its/their turn
    Ex. Main classes are divided into subclasses which are further subdivided into form, place, time and subject aspects.
    Ex. However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.
    Ex. And because the teller is sharing something of himself, the children in their turn respond by wanting to share something of themselves in the same way.
    * * *
    = Verbo + further, in turn, in its/their turn

    Ex: Main classes are divided into subclasses which are further subdivided into form, place, time and subject aspects.

    Ex: However, any refinement involves greater human intervention, and this in turn can easily overturn the arguments in favour of subject indexes based upon titles.
    Ex: And because the teller is sharing something of himself, the children in their turn respond by wanting to share something of themselves in the same way.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a su vez

  • 77 a toda máquina

    at full blast
    * * *
    = in the fast lane, fast lane, full steam ahead, at full tilt, full-tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed
    Ex. The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex. The article ' Full steam ahead' describes the implementation of optical disc based imaging system at the photographic library of the National Railway Museum in York.
    Ex. Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex. Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.
    Ex. As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex. For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex. Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex. With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex. A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.
    * * *
    = in the fast lane, fast lane, full steam ahead, at full tilt, full-tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed

    Ex: The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex: The article ' Full steam ahead' describes the implementation of optical disc based imaging system at the photographic library of the National Railway Museum in York.
    Ex: Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex: Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.
    Ex: As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex: For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex: Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex: With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex: A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a toda máquina

  • 78 a toda pastilla

    familiar (velocidad) at full speed, at full tilt 2 (volumen) at full blast
    * * *
    = in the fast lane, on the fast track, fast lane, overdrive, full steam ahead, full-tilt, at full tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at a rate of knots, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed
    Ex. The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.
    Ex. The article ' On the fast track or the road to nowhere' points to the growing practice of subsuming public libraries into larger departments headed by non-librarians = El artículo " A la vanguardia o en un camino sin rumbo" pone de manifiesto la costumbre cada vez más frecuente de incluir las bibliotecas públicas dentro de órganismos más grandes dirigidos por personal no bibliotecario.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Internet overdrive. No place for Sunday drivers'.
    Ex. The article ' Full steam ahead' describes the implementation of optical disc based imaging system at the photographic library of the National Railway Museum in York.
    Ex. Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.
    Ex. Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex. As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex. For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex. The results appear there and then not only on the VDU screen but also on a roll of paper which spills out of the attached printer at a rate of knots.
    Ex. Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex. With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex. A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.
    * * *
    = in the fast lane, on the fast track, fast lane, overdrive, full steam ahead, full-tilt, at full tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at a rate of knots, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed

    Ex: The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.

    Ex: The article ' On the fast track or the road to nowhere' points to the growing practice of subsuming public libraries into larger departments headed by non-librarians = El artículo " A la vanguardia o en un camino sin rumbo" pone de manifiesto la costumbre cada vez más frecuente de incluir las bibliotecas públicas dentro de órganismos más grandes dirigidos por personal no bibliotecario.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Internet overdrive. No place for Sunday drivers'.
    Ex: The article ' Full steam ahead' describes the implementation of optical disc based imaging system at the photographic library of the National Railway Museum in York.
    Ex: Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.
    Ex: Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex: As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex: For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex: The results appear there and then not only on the VDU screen but also on a roll of paper which spills out of the attached printer at a rate of knots.
    Ex: Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex: With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex: A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a toda pastilla

  • 79 a toda velocidad

    at full speed
    * * *
    = full-tilt, at full tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed
    Ex. Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.
    Ex. Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex. As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex. For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex. Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex. With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex. A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.
    * * *
    = full-tilt, at full tilt, full-throttle, at full throttle, at top speed, at full blast, at full speed

    Ex: Do not march off full-tilt in front of the readers.

    Ex: Their regular tasks keep them working at full tilt at all times.
    Ex: As we enter full-throttle into the Information Age, the mere mention of 'the information highway' conjures up a predictable set of high-tech images.
    Ex: For the past three it has been operating at full throttle.
    Ex: Loosing control at top speed on a highway full of cars, these guys where lucky they recovered without hitting any cars.
    Ex: With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    Ex: A train cruising at full speed hit an excavator that had backed up onto the track.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a toda velocidad

  • 80 a todas horas

    = at all hours, around the clock
    Ex. Since many people go into and out of the hospital at all hours, theft is a concern.
    Ex. Digitization is a value-added way of making library collections and materials available around the world, around the clock.
    * * *
    = at all hours, around the clock

    Ex: Since many people go into and out of the hospital at all hours, theft is a concern.

    Ex: Digitization is a value-added way of making library collections and materials available around the world, around the clock.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a todas horas

См. также в других словарях:

  • fit somebody into something — ˌfit sb/sthˈin | ˌfit sb/sth ˈin/ˈinto sth derived 1. to find time to see sb or to do sth • I ll try and fit you in after lunch. • I had to fit ten appointments into one morning. 2. to find or have enough space for sb/sth in a place • We can t… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fit something into something — ˌfit sb/sthˈin | ˌfit sb/sth ˈin/ˈinto sth derived 1. to find time to see sb or to do sth • I ll try and fit you in after lunch. • I had to fit ten appointments into one morning. 2. to find or have enough space for sb/sth in a place • We can t… …   Useful english dictionary

  • ˌfit sth ˈout — phrasal verb to put equipment into a room or building so that it can be used for a particular purpose The kitchen has been fitted out with pine cupboards.[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • fit — fit1 W2S1 [fıt] v past tense and past participle fitted also fit AmE present participle fitting ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(clothes)¦ 2¦(right size/shape)¦ 3¦(enough space)¦ 4¦(equipment/part)¦ 5¦(match/be suitable)¦ 6 fit somebody fo …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fit — 1 /fIt/ verb past tense fitted also fit AmE past participle fit 1 RIGHT SIZE (intransitive, transitive not in progressive) to be the right size and shape for someone or something: The dress fits perfectly. | fit sb: The jacket fitted me pretty… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • fit — The matching of the investor s requirements and needs such as risk tolerance and growth potential preference with a specific investment. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary * * * ▪ I. fit fit 1 [fɪt] verb fitted PASTTENSE also …   Financial and business terms

  • fit — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 way sth fits/way two things match ADJECTIVE ▪ excellent, good, nice ▪ We need to achieve the best fit between the staff required and the staff available. ▪ correct, exact …   Collocations dictionary

  • fit*/*/*/ — [fɪt] (past tense and past participle fitted) verb I 1) [I/T] to be small enough or the right size and shape to go somewhere, or to manage to put someone or something in a space I don t think that box will fit.[/ex] The book is small enough to… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • fit somebody in — ˌfit sb/sthˈin | ˌfit sb/sth ˈin/ˈinto sth derived 1. to find time to see sb or to do sth • I ll try and fit you in after lunch. • I had to fit ten appointments into one morning. 2. to find or have enough space for sb/sth in a place • We can t… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fit something in — ˌfit sb/sthˈin | ˌfit sb/sth ˈin/ˈinto sth derived 1. to find time to see sb or to do sth • I ll try and fit you in after lunch. • I had to fit ten appointments into one morning. 2. to find or have enough space for sb/sth in a place • We can t… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fit somebody in something — ˌfit sb/sthˈin | ˌfit sb/sth ˈin/ˈinto sth derived 1. to find time to see sb or to do sth • I ll try and fit you in after lunch. • I had to fit ten appointments into one morning. 2. to find or have enough space for sb/sth in a place • We can t… …   Useful english dictionary


Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное

Прямая ссылка:
Нажмите правой клавишей мыши и выберите «Копировать ссылку»

Мы используем куки для наилучшего представления нашего сайта. Продолжая использовать данный сайт, вы соглашаетесь с этим.