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to dance flamenco

  • 1 flamenco

    adj.
    1 flamenco.
    2 Flemish, of Belgium.
    m.
    1 flamenco, flamenco music, flamenco dance style.
    2 flamingo.
    3 Fleming, native or inhabitant of Flanders.
    * * *
    1 (de Flandes) Flemish
    2 (gitano) Andalusian gypsy
    3 (música) flamenco
    4 (robusto) sturdy; (saludable) healthy
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (persona) Fleming
    1 (idioma) Flemish
    2 (música) flamenco music, flamenco
    3 (ave) flamingo
    ————————
    1 (idioma) Flemish
    2 (música) flamenco music, flamenco
    3 (ave) flamingo
    * * *
    I
    SM (=ave) flamingo
    II flamenco, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (Geog) Flemish
    2) (Mús) flamenco
    3) pey flashy, vulgar, gaudy
    4)

    ponerse flamenco* (=engreído) to get cocky *

    5) CAm = flaco
    2.
    SM / F (=persona) Fleming

    los flamencos — the Flemings, the Flemish

    3. SM
    1) (Mús) flamenco
    2) (Ling) Flemish
    * * *
    I
    - ca adjetivo
    1) <cante/baile> flamenco (before n)

    ponerse flamenco — (Esp) to get sassy (AmE colloq), to get stroppy (BrE colloq)

    2) ( de Flandes) Flemish
    3) ( de aspecto sano) strong and healthy-looking
    II
    - ca masculino, femenino (Geog) Fleming
    III
    1) (Mús) flamenco
    2) ( idioma) Flemish
    3) (Zool) flamingo
    •• Cultural note:
    Flamenco is performed in three forms: guitar, singing, and dancing. Its origins lie with the gypsies, and many of the best cantaores (flamenco singers), bailaores (dancers), and guitarists are gypsies. There are also Arabic and North African influences. Modern flamenco blends traditional forms with rock, jazz, and salsa. Guitarists are soloists in their own right, not just accompanists. Most flamenco songs are folk songs, modified by oral tradition, on a wide range of subjects. The music and lyrics are improvised and never written down. An integral part of traditional flamenco is the duende, the idea that the performer becomes inspired by the emotion of the music or dance. But as flamenco becomes commercialized, rehearsed performances are more likely than spontaneous music and dancing
    * * *
    I
    - ca adjetivo
    1) <cante/baile> flamenco (before n)

    ponerse flamenco — (Esp) to get sassy (AmE colloq), to get stroppy (BrE colloq)

    2) ( de Flandes) Flemish
    3) ( de aspecto sano) strong and healthy-looking
    II
    - ca masculino, femenino (Geog) Fleming
    III
    1) (Mús) flamenco
    2) ( idioma) Flemish
    3) (Zool) flamingo
    •• Cultural note:
    Flamenco is performed in three forms: guitar, singing, and dancing. Its origins lie with the gypsies, and many of the best cantaores (flamenco singers), bailaores (dancers), and guitarists are gypsies. There are also Arabic and North African influences. Modern flamenco blends traditional forms with rock, jazz, and salsa. Guitarists are soloists in their own right, not just accompanists. Most flamenco songs are folk songs, modified by oral tradition, on a wide range of subjects. The music and lyrics are improvised and never written down. An integral part of traditional flamenco is the duende, the idea that the performer becomes inspired by the emotion of the music or dance. But as flamenco becomes commercialized, rehearsed performances are more likely than spontaneous music and dancing
    * * *
    flamenco1
    1 = Flemish.

    Ex: In the Flemish speaking region of Belgium students taking library and information science follow the same syllabus at all universities = En la región de habla flamenca de Bélgica los estudiantes de biblioteconomía y documentación siguen el mismo plan de estudios en todas las universidades.

    flamenco2
    2 = flamingo [flamingoes/gos, -pl.].

    Ex: Flamingoes are some of the only creatures designed to survive in the caustic environment of a volcanic lake.

    flamenco3

    Ex: The religious significance attached to the bullfight, flamenco & Passion Week celebrations in Andalusia, Spain, is examined.

    * * *
    flamenco1 -ca
    A ‹cante/baile› flamenco ( before n)
    ponerse flamenco ( Esp fam); to get sassy ( AmE colloq), to get stroppy ( BrE colloq)
    B (de Flandes) Flemish
    C ( Esp) (de aspecto sano) strong and healthy-looking
    flamenco2 -ca
    masculine, feminine
    ( Geog) Fleming
    los Flamencos the Flemish
    flamenco (↑ flamenco a1)
    A ( Mús) flamenco
    B (idioma) Flemish
    C ( Zool) flamingo
    Flamenco is performed in three forms: guitar, singing, and dancing. Its origins lie with the gypsies, and many of the best cantaores (flamenco singers), bailaores (dancers), and guitarists are gypsies. There are also Arabic and North African influences.
    Modern flamenco blends traditional forms with rock, jazz, and salsa. Guitarists are soloists in their own right, not just accompanists. Most flamenco songs are folk songs, modified by oral tradition, on a wide range of subjects. The music and lyrics are improvised and never written down.
    An integral part of traditional flamenco is the duende, the idea that the performer becomes inspired by the emotion of the music or dance. But as flamenco becomes commercialized, rehearsed performances are more likely than spontaneous music and dancing.
    * * *

    flamenco 1
    ◊ -ca adjetivo

    1cante/baile flamenco ( before n)
    2 ( de Flandes) Flemish
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    Fleming;

    flamenco 2 sustantivo masculino
    1 (Mús) flamenco
    2 ( idioma) Flemish
    3 (Zool) flamingo
    flamenco,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 Mús flamenco
    2 (de Flandes) Flemish
    II sustantivo masculino
    1 Mús flamenco
    2 Orn flamingo
    3 (idioma) Flemish
    ' flamenco' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bailaor
    - bailaora
    - cantaor
    - cantaora
    - cante
    - encarnar
    - flamenca
    - tablao
    - zapateado
    English:
    dancer
    - flamingo
    - Flemish
    * * *
    flamenco, -a
    adj
    1. [música, baile] flamenco;
    cante/espectáculo flamenco flamenco singing/show
    2. [de Flandes] Flemish
    3. Esp Fam [robusto, saludable]
    está muy flamenca she's bursting with health and vitality
    4. Esp Fam [chulo] cocky;
    ponerse flamenco (con alguien) to get cocky (with sb)
    5. Carib, Méx [flaco] skinny
    nm,f
    [persona] Fleming;
    los flamencos the Flemish
    nm
    1. [ave] flamingo
    2. [lengua] Flemish
    3. [música, baile] flamenco
    FLAMENCO
    Although often seen as synonymous with Spanish culture abroad, flamenco originated in the southern region of Andalusia. It has deep roots in Gypsy, Arab and Jewish music, and it is Spain’s “gitanos” (gypsies) who have kept it flourishing to the present day. Originally, flamenco consisted of unaccompanied singing (“cante”). Later this was accompanied by flamenco guitar (“toque”), rhythmic hand clapping (“palmas”), rhythmic feet stamping (“zapateado”) and dance (“baile”). The castanets (“castañuelas”) so often associated with flamenco were introduced only later. Flamenco is actually a catch-all term for a wide range of musical styles, which range from the strangulated emotive sobbing of “cante jondo” (one of the most traditional forms), to the work of new artists who are producing catchy rock and pop versions of flamenco.
    * * *
    I adj MÚS flamenco atr ;
    ponerse flamenco get smart o fresh;
    estar muy flamenco para su edad fam be in pretty good shape for one’s age
    II m
    1 MÚS flamenco
    2 ZO flamingo
    * * *
    flamenco, -ca adj
    1) : flamenco
    2) : Flemish
    flamenco, -ca n
    : Fleming, Flemish person
    1) : Flemish (language)
    2) : flamingo
    3) : flamenco (music or dance)
    * * *
    flamenco1 adj (cante) flamenco
    1. (cante) flamenco
    2. (ave) flamingo [pl. flamingos o flamingoes]

    Spanish-English dictionary > flamenco

  • 2 flamenco

    • flame war
    • flamenco
    • flamenco dance
    • flamenco dancer
    • flamenco show
    • flaming
    • flamingo color
    • fleetingness
    • fleetness
    • Flemish
    • flesh
    • of Belgium

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > flamenco

  • 3 estilo de baile flamenco

    • flame war
    • flamenco
    • flamenco dance
    • flamenco dancer

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > estilo de baile flamenco

  • 4 bailador de flamenco

    • flamenco dance
    • flamenco-like

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > bailador de flamenco

  • 5 danza flamenca

    f.
    flamenco dance, flamenco.

    Spanish-English dictionary > danza flamenca

  • 6 flamencología

    Spanish-English dictionary > flamencología

  • 7 flamencólogo

    flamencólogo, -a
    SM / F student of flamenco music and dance
    * * *
    flamencólogo, -a nm,f
    expert in flamenco

    Spanish-English dictionary > flamencólogo

См. также в других словарях:

  • Flamenco — Not to be confused with Flamengo or Flamingo. For films with the same name, see Flamenco (film). Flamenco Stylistic origins Romani, Andalusian, Byzantine, Mozarabic, Moorish, Sephardic Cultural origins Andalusia (Spain) Typical instruments …   Wikipedia

  • flamenco —    Flamenco, a type of Spanish music and dance, first crystallized in its present form in the early eighteenth century, in the gypsy communities of southern Andalusia, particularly in the areas of Seville, Jerez and Cadiz. The origin of the word… …   Encyclopedia of contemporary Spanish culture

  • flamenco — 1896, from Sp. flamenco, first used of Gypsy dancing in Andalusia. The word means Fleming, native of Flanders (Du. Vlaming) and also flamingo. Speculation are varied and colorful about the connection between the bird, the people, and the gypsy… …   Etymology dictionary

  • flamenco — [flə meŋ′kō, fləmen′kō] n. [Sp, lit., Flemish < MDu Flaming, a FLEMING1] 1. the Spanish gypsy style of dance (characterized by stamping, clapping, etc.) or music (typically very emotional and mournful) 2. pl. flamencos a song or dance in this… …   English World dictionary

  • flamenco — /flah meng koh, fleuh /, n., pl. flamencos, adj. n. 1. a style of dancing, characteristic of the Andalusian Gypsies, that is strongly rhythmic and involves vigorous actions, as clapping the hands and stamping the feet. 2. a style of instrumental… …   Universalium

  • dance —    Despite the richness of the Spanish dance tradition, both in its academic and folk manifestations, it was not until the 1990s that the state made a serious effort to structure dance education so as to provide a qualification of the same status …   Encyclopedia of contemporary Spanish culture

  • dance — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Motion to music Nouns 1. dance, dancing; ball, formal, tea dance, thé dansant, cotillion, promenade, dinner dance; masquerade, masked ball, bal masqué, fancy dress ball. Informal, drag, hop, prom, mixer …   English dictionary for students

  • Flamenco a Go-Go — Infobox Album | Name = Flamenco A Go Go Type = Album Artist = Steve Stevens Released = 2000 Recorded = Home Studio Genre = Flamenco, Blues, Dance Length = 55:23 Label = Ark 21 Producer = Steve Stevens Reviews = *Allmusic Rating|4.5|5… …   Wikipedia

  • dance, Western — Introduction       history of Western dance from ancient times to the present and including the development of ballet, the waltz, and various types of modern dance.       The peoples of the West of Europe and of the countries founded through… …   Universalium

  • Dance in film — This is a list of movies featuring recognizable dance forms, demonstrating them, shedding light on their origin, or being the base of a plot. This article is not about Dance film or Dance for camera which are separate genres. It is also not about …   Wikipedia

  • Flamenco —    A form of song and dance that emerged in the south of Spain in the 19th century. It is considered to be the result of a combination of Gypsy, Moorish, and Andalusian dance and music. There may be some traces of the Indian kathak style of dance …   Historical dictionary of the Gypsies

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