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thomas+hobbes

  • 61 emprender una tarea

    (v.) = go on + expedition
    Ex. Towards the end of the sixteenth century, about 1598, Sir Thomas Bodley was preparing to go on a book-buying expedition for the library.
    * * *
    (v.) = go on + expedition

    Ex: Towards the end of the sixteenth century, about 1598, Sir Thomas Bodley was preparing to go on a book-buying expedition for the library.

    Spanish-English dictionary > emprender una tarea

  • 62 enunciar

    v.
    to formulate, to enunciate.
    Ella enuncia sus ideales She enunciates her ideals.
    Ellos enunciaron palabras They enunciated=pronounced words.
    * * *
    1 (teoría) to enunciate
    2 (expresar) to express, state, word
    * * *
    VT [+ teoría] to enunciate, state; [+ idea] to put forward
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <idea/teoría> to state, enunciate (frml); <problema/teorema> to formulate
    * * *
    Ex. The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <idea/teoría> to state, enunciate (frml); <problema/teorema> to formulate
    * * *

    Ex: The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.

    * * *
    enunciar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹idea/teoría› to state, express, enunciate ( frml)
    2 ‹problema/teorema› to formulate
    * * *

    enunciar ( conjugate enunciar) verbo transitivoidea/teoría to state, enunciate (frml);
    problema/teorema to formulate
    enunciar verbo transitivo to enunciate, state
    ' enunciar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    plainly
    * * *
    to formulate, to state
    * * *
    v/t state
    * * *
    : to enunciate, to state

    Spanish-English dictionary > enunciar

  • 63 escéptico

    adj.
    skeptical, doubting, cynical, incredulous.
    m.
    skeptic, doubting Thomas, doubter, sceptic.
    * * *
    1 sceptic (US skeptic)
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 sceptic (US skeptic)
    * * *
    (f. - escéptica)
    adj.
    * * *
    escéptico, -a
    1.
    ADJ sceptical, skeptical (EEUU)
    2.
    SM / F sceptic, skeptic (EEUU)
    * * *
    I
    - ca adjetivo skeptical*
    II
    - ca masculino, femenino skeptic*
    * * *
    = skeptical, sceptic, sceptical, skeptic, incredulous, unconvinced.
    Ex. Many people were skeptical that the compact disc (CD) would replace the phonograph record.
    Ex. Please accept this from the person who was probably the biggest sceptic in the State of Ohio at the beginning -- if we had waited for this from the start, I think we never would have started.
    Ex. Bill Gates, once sceptical about the Internet, has now changed his mind.
    Ex. The article 'The conversion of a secondary school skeptic' defines a stations approach to learning as a series of activities and supporting resources designed to develop student knowledge and/or skills.
    Ex. 65% reported that they were both unhappy & incredulous.
    Ex. Many educators still remain unconvinced of the value of school libraries in the school.
    * * *
    I
    - ca adjetivo skeptical*
    II
    - ca masculino, femenino skeptic*
    * * *
    = skeptical, sceptic, sceptical, skeptic, incredulous, unconvinced.

    Ex: Many people were skeptical that the compact disc (CD) would replace the phonograph record.

    Ex: Please accept this from the person who was probably the biggest sceptic in the State of Ohio at the beginning -- if we had waited for this from the start, I think we never would have started.
    Ex: Bill Gates, once sceptical about the Internet, has now changed his mind.
    Ex: The article 'The conversion of a secondary school skeptic' defines a stations approach to learning as a series of activities and supporting resources designed to develop student knowledge and/or skills.
    Ex: 65% reported that they were both unhappy & incredulous.
    Ex: Many educators still remain unconvinced of the value of school libraries in the school.

    * * *
    skeptical*
    en cuanto a la validez de sus investigaciones soy algo escéptico I am somewhat skeptical about the validity of his research, I have my doubts as to the validity of his research
    masculine, feminine
    skeptic*
    * * *

    escéptico
    ◊ -ca adjetivo

    skeptical( conjugate skeptical)
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    skeptic( conjugate skeptic)
    escéptico,-a
    I adjetivo sceptical, US skeptical: adoptó una actitud escéptica, he adopted a sceptical attitude
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino sceptic, US skeptic

    ' escéptico' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    escéptica
    English:
    sceptic
    - sceptical
    - skeptic
    - skeptical
    * * *
    escéptico, -a
    adj
    1. [filósofo] sceptic
    2. [incrédulo] sceptical
    nm,f
    sceptic
    * * *
    I adj skeptical, Br
    sceptical
    II m, escéptica f skeptic, Br
    sceptic
    * * *
    escéptico, -ca adj
    : skeptical
    escéptico, -ca n
    : skeptic

    Spanish-English dictionary > escéptico

  • 64 estar resentido

    v.
    to have one's feelings hurt, to be in a pique.
    * * *
    (v.) = carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder
    Ex. Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.
    * * *
    (v.) = carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder

    Ex: Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.

    Spanish-English dictionary > estar resentido

  • 65 estratagema

    f.
    stratagem (military).
    * * *
    1 MILITAR stratagem
    * * *
    noun f.
    stratagem, device
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino stratagem
    * * *
    = course of action, stratagem, ruse, ploy, artifice, power play, scheme, stalking horse, trick, gaff.
    Ex. Examines the advantages and disadvantages of approval plans suggesting that each library must carefully weigh them in order to determine its own best course of action.
    Ex. Must she fortify herself with an arsenal of stratagems in order to survive?.
    Ex. The library did not burn and the purchase of Thomas Jefferson's library as a replacement was a ruse to help pay the former President's debts.
    Ex. They are using such ploys as citing budget cuts as the reason for making government information more expensive.
    Ex. Such canons need not transcend human artifice to be of enduring significance.
    Ex. The author offers a detailed overview of how Congress came to pass the USA Patriot Act and some of the power plays that took place behind the scenes.
    Ex. These cuts were a scheme to privatize the cleaning women's jobs, contracting them out to small or big private cleaning firms.
    Ex. Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex. But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex. There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.
    * * *
    femenino stratagem
    * * *
    = course of action, stratagem, ruse, ploy, artifice, power play, scheme, stalking horse, trick, gaff.

    Ex: Examines the advantages and disadvantages of approval plans suggesting that each library must carefully weigh them in order to determine its own best course of action.

    Ex: Must she fortify herself with an arsenal of stratagems in order to survive?.
    Ex: The library did not burn and the purchase of Thomas Jefferson's library as a replacement was a ruse to help pay the former President's debts.
    Ex: They are using such ploys as citing budget cuts as the reason for making government information more expensive.
    Ex: Such canons need not transcend human artifice to be of enduring significance.
    Ex: The author offers a detailed overview of how Congress came to pass the USA Patriot Act and some of the power plays that took place behind the scenes.
    Ex: These cuts were a scheme to privatize the cleaning women's jobs, contracting them out to small or big private cleaning firms.
    Ex: Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex: But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex: There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.

    * * *
    stratagem
    * * *

    estratagema sustantivo femenino
    stratagem
    estratagema sustantivo femenino stratagem
    ' estratagema' also found in these entries:
    English:
    device
    - frame-up
    - scheme
    - stratagem
    * * *
    1. Mil stratagem
    2. [astucia] artifice, trick
    * * *
    f stratagem
    * * *
    artimaña: stratagem, ruse

    Spanish-English dictionary > estratagema

  • 66 exponente

    f. & m.
    1 exponent, exhibitor, expositor.
    2 exponent, power, index.
    m.
    exponent (Mat) (& figurative).
    * * *
    1 exponent, expounding
    1 MATEMÁTICAS index, exponent
    2 (prototipo) exponent
    * * *
    1.
    SMF (=persona) exponent
    2. SM
    1) (Mat) index, exponent
    2) (=ejemplo) model, prime example
    * * *
    masculino y femenino
    1) ( persona) exponent
    2) exponente masculino
    a) (Mat) exponent
    b) ( indicador) indicator
    * * *
    = spokesman [spokesmen, -pl.], exponent, expositor, spokeswoman [spokeswomen, -pl.].
    Nota: Femenino.
    Ex. The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.
    Ex. The Commission of the European Communities is also the exponent of Community as distinct from national interests in the Council of Ministers.
    Ex. Reference work has been ill-served in the past by its expositors and theoreticians: its extensive literature of several hundred papers and books is swollen by a mass of the transient and the trivial.
    Ex. The UK Labour Party spokeswoman on information technology reviewed some of the future applications of the information superhighway to education.
    ----
    * exponente de un número = superscript numeral.
    * * *
    masculino y femenino
    1) ( persona) exponent
    2) exponente masculino
    a) (Mat) exponent
    b) ( indicador) indicator
    * * *
    = spokesman [spokesmen, -pl.], exponent, expositor, spokeswoman [spokeswomen, -pl.].
    Nota: Femenino.

    Ex: The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.

    Ex: The Commission of the European Communities is also the exponent of Community as distinct from national interests in the Council of Ministers.
    Ex: Reference work has been ill-served in the past by its expositors and theoreticians: its extensive literature of several hundred papers and books is swollen by a mass of the transient and the trivial.
    Ex: The UK Labour Party spokeswoman on information technology reviewed some of the future applications of the information superhighway to education.
    * exponente de un número = superscript numeral.

    * * *
    1 ( Mat) exponent
    2
    (representante, modelo): el máximo exponente de su arte the greatest exponent of his art
    3 (indicador) indicator
    * * *

    exponente
    I mf exponent
    II sustantivo masculino Mat exponent
    ' exponente' also found in these entries:
    English:
    exponent
    - index
    * * *
    1. Mat exponent
    2. [representante] [persona] exponent;
    [cosa] example;
    esta película es un buen exponente del cine francés actual this movie is a good example of current French cinema
    * * *
    m exponent
    * * *
    : exponent

    Spanish-English dictionary > exponente

  • 67 famoso

    adj.
    famous, celebrated, famed, renowned.
    * * *
    1 famous, well-known
    1 the famous
    * * *
    1. (f. - famosa)
    adj.
    famous, well-known
    2. (f. - famosa)
    noun
    * * *
    famoso, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (=célebre) famous, well-known

    un actor famosoa famous o well-known actor

    2) * (=sonado)
    2.
    SM / F celebrity, famous person
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo famous
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino celebrity, famous person
    * * *
    = famous, well-known, honoured [honored, -USA], celebrity, renowned, famed, celebrated, hit, reputed, legendary, notorious, noted, acclaimed, big name, of note, celeb, popular.
    Ex. The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.
    Ex. This may be relatively easy for well-known authors, but can be difficult for more obscure authors.
    Ex. A very successful novelist, such as Graham Greene, would clearly fall into this category and would be an honoured writer as well as a well-paid one.
    Ex. For instance, if a person is working on building a radio program, the librarian should provide her with background information that helps to set the tone of the program, with facts and foibles of celebrities, with case histories of successful campaigns, with analogies, quotations, and anecdotes, and so on.
    Ex. Jorge Luis Borges, though renowned chiefly as author, reflects in his works the very essence of libraries and librarians.
    Ex. Many recipes not taken from books, magazines or famed chefs remain untested and thus less reliable.
    Ex. Hoppe is one of the most celebrated photographers of the early 20th century.
    Ex. Her novels have been adapted for the screen most famously as the hit film Mrs Doubtfire starring Robin Williams.
    Ex. This article studies the works of an internationally reputed virologist (Indian born) settled in Canada.
    Ex. Information highways which have now become the first legendary step towards the information society.
    Ex. The textual vicissitudes of British nineteenth-century novels in America are notorious.
    Ex. Planning began about 9 months before the exhibition, with the recruitment of a noted Swiss book illustrator to design the stand.
    Ex. The 6 day residential programme, open to Australian and New Zealand information professionals, was based on the acclaimed Snowbird Institutes, held annually in Utah.
    Ex. Such programs as rock groups, big name entertainers, and jazz concerts were excluded.
    Ex. Another analytical study of note is the one for Columbia University Libraries.
    Ex. He knew the names of celebs but he could have walked past any one of them in the street without batting an eyelid.
    Ex. Although the fifteenth edition met with some success, it was not generally popular.
    ----
    * ciudad famosa por el golf = golfing town.
    * famoso en el mundo entero = world-renowned, world-renown.
    * famoso en todo el mundo = world-famous [world famous], world-renowned, world-renown.
    * famoso internacionalmente = of international renown, internationally renowned.
    * famoso por = noted for, best remembered for, famed for.
    * famosos, los = famous, the.
    * gente famosa = famous people.
    * lleno de famosos = celebrity-studded.
    * muy famoso = highly acclaimed, widely acclaimed, well-acclaimed.
    * persona famosa = famous person.
    * plagado de famosos = celebrity-studded.
    * ser famoso = gain + recognition, be popular.
    * ser famoso por = famously, have + a track record of.
    * tan famoso = much acclaimed.
    * últimas palabras que se han hecho famosas = famous last words.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo famous
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino celebrity, famous person
    * * *
    = famous, well-known, honoured [honored, -USA], celebrity, renowned, famed, celebrated, hit, reputed, legendary, notorious, noted, acclaimed, big name, of note, celeb, popular.

    Ex: The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.

    Ex: This may be relatively easy for well-known authors, but can be difficult for more obscure authors.
    Ex: A very successful novelist, such as Graham Greene, would clearly fall into this category and would be an honoured writer as well as a well-paid one.
    Ex: For instance, if a person is working on building a radio program, the librarian should provide her with background information that helps to set the tone of the program, with facts and foibles of celebrities, with case histories of successful campaigns, with analogies, quotations, and anecdotes, and so on.
    Ex: Jorge Luis Borges, though renowned chiefly as author, reflects in his works the very essence of libraries and librarians.
    Ex: Many recipes not taken from books, magazines or famed chefs remain untested and thus less reliable.
    Ex: Hoppe is one of the most celebrated photographers of the early 20th century.
    Ex: Her novels have been adapted for the screen most famously as the hit film Mrs Doubtfire starring Robin Williams.
    Ex: This article studies the works of an internationally reputed virologist (Indian born) settled in Canada.
    Ex: Information highways which have now become the first legendary step towards the information society.
    Ex: The textual vicissitudes of British nineteenth-century novels in America are notorious.
    Ex: Planning began about 9 months before the exhibition, with the recruitment of a noted Swiss book illustrator to design the stand.
    Ex: The 6 day residential programme, open to Australian and New Zealand information professionals, was based on the acclaimed Snowbird Institutes, held annually in Utah.
    Ex: Such programs as rock groups, big name entertainers, and jazz concerts were excluded.
    Ex: Another analytical study of note is the one for Columbia University Libraries.
    Ex: He knew the names of celebs but he could have walked past any one of them in the street without batting an eyelid.
    Ex: Although the fifteenth edition met with some success, it was not generally popular.
    * ciudad famosa por el golf = golfing town.
    * famoso en el mundo entero = world-renowned, world-renown.
    * famoso en todo el mundo = world-famous [world famous], world-renowned, world-renown.
    * famoso internacionalmente = of international renown, internationally renowned.
    * famoso por = noted for, best remembered for, famed for.
    * famosos, los = famous, the.
    * gente famosa = famous people.
    * lleno de famosos = celebrity-studded.
    * muy famoso = highly acclaimed, widely acclaimed, well-acclaimed.
    * persona famosa = famous person.
    * plagado de famosos = celebrity-studded.
    * ser famoso = gain + recognition, be popular.
    * ser famoso por = famously, have + a track record of.
    * tan famoso = much acclaimed.
    * últimas palabras que se han hecho famosas = famous last words.

    * * *
    famoso1 -sa
    1 (célebre) ‹escritor/actriz› famous, well-known; ‹vino/libro› famous
    se hizo famoso con ese descubrimiento that discovery made him famous
    2
    (conocido): ya estoy harto de sus famosos dolores de cabeza ( fam); I'm fed up with him and his constant headaches
    famoso POR algo famous FOR sth
    Francia es famosa por sus vinos France is famous for its wines
    es famoso por sus meteduras de pata ( fam); he's well known o renowned for putting his foot in it ( colloq)
    famoso2 -sa
    masculine, feminine
    celebrity, personality, famous person
    * * *

    famoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    famous;
    famoso por algo famous for sth
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    celebrity, famous person
    famoso,-a
    I adjetivo famous
    II sustantivo masculino famous person

    ' famoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    atentar
    - banquillo
    - conocida
    - conocido
    - famosa
    - imitar
    - popular
    - pulular
    -
    - significado
    - célebre
    - mundialmente
    English:
    big
    - byword
    - celebrity
    - famous
    - memorabilia
    - well-known
    - become
    - just
    - land
    - pinup
    - well
    - world
    * * *
    famoso, -a
    adj
    [actor, pintor, monumento] famous;
    se hizo famoso por sus murales his murals made him famous;
    es famosa por su belleza she is famous for her beauty;
    Fam
    volvieron a debatir el famoso artículo 14 they debated the famous clause 14 again
    nm,f
    famous person, celebrity
    * * *
    I adj famous
    II m, famosa f celebrity;
    los famosos celebrities, famous people pl
    * * *
    famoso, -sa adj
    célebre: famous
    famoso, -sa n
    : celebrity
    * * *
    famoso1 adj famous / well known
    famoso2 n famous person [pl. people]

    Spanish-English dictionary > famoso

  • 68 festejos

    1 festivities
    * * *
    (n.) = revels
    Ex. Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.
    * * *
    (n.) = revels

    Ex: Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.

    Spanish-English dictionary > festejos

  • 69 fundir

    v.
    1 to melt (derretir) (mantequilla, hielo).
    El calor del auto fundió el queso The heat of the car melted the cheese.
    2 to blow ( electricity and electronics) (fusible, bombilla).
    3 to merge (commerce).
    4 to fade (Cine).
    5 to blow (informal) (gastar). (peninsular Spanish)
    6 to bankrupt, to ruin. ( Latin American Spanish)
    7 to cast, to mold.
    El orfebre fundió el oro The goldsmith cast the gold.
    * * *
    1 (derretir) to melt
    3 (dar forma) to cast
    4 (bombilla, plomos) to blow
    5 (unir) to unite, join
    6 familiar (despilfarrar) to waste, blow
    1 (derretirse) to melt
    2 (bombilla, plomos) to fuse, go, blow, burn out
    3 (unirse) to merge
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=derretir)
    a) [para hacer líquido] [+ metal, cera, nieve] to melt; [+ monedas, lingotes, joyas] to melt down
    b) (Min) [para extraer el metal] to smelt
    c) [en molde] [+ estatuas, cañones] to cast
    2) [+ bombilla, fusible] to blow
    3) (=fusionar) [+ organizaciones, empresas] to merge, amalgamate; [+ culturas, movimientos] to fuse
    4) (Cine) [+ imágenes] to fade
    5) * [+ dinero] to blow *
    6) Perú, Cono Sur * (=arruinar) ruin
    7) Chile * [+ niño] to spoil
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1) <metal/hierro> to melt; < mineral> to smelt
    2) <estatua/campana> to cast
    3)
    a) (Elec) to blow
    b) (AmL) < motor> ( de gasolina) to seize... up; ( eléctrico) to burn... out
    4) (fam) <dinero/herencia> to blow (colloq)
    5)
    a) ( fusionar) to merge
    b) (Cin) <imágenes/tomas> to fade, merge
    2.
    fundirse v pron
    1) metal to melt; nieve/hielo to melt, thaw
    2)
    a) (Elec)
    b) (AmL) motor ( de gasolina) to seize up; ( eléctrico) to burn out
    3) (enf) (fam) ( gastarse) to blow (colloq)
    4)
    a) ( fusionarse) to merge
    b) (Cin, Mús) to fade
    5) (Per, RPl fam) ( arruinarse) persona to lose everything; empresa to go bust
    * * *
    = amalgamate, bring into, cast, confound, weld into/together, fuse, melt, mingle (with), melt down.
    Ex. In 1971 its functions were divided, part amalgamated with the Ministry of Defence, and part amalgamated with the Board of Trade to form the Department of Trade and Industry.
    Ex. Whether or not these specific proposals will be brought into some kind of overall approach and ideology remains to me a very questionable point.
    Ex. Printing types were cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin called type-metal.
    Ex. The confounding of opposites is also common though, again, care has to be taken to see that we do not confound two subjects on which extensive literature exists.
    Ex. The Department of Trade and Industry has undergone many changes over the years; it has been split into two separate departments and welded together again.
    Ex. The experiment is financed externally and aims to fuse the functions of the 2 library types.
    Ex. The heat melts the wax on those areas which correspond with the image areas of the original, and the melted wax is absorbed into the tissue sheet.
    Ex. Not so long ago, the far off lands existed, to most people, in their imagination where they mingled with fairy tales and imaginary stories.
    Ex. In 1588 Thomas Thomas, Cambridge University printer, had one press and 1,400 kg. of type, but 40 per cent of the type was old metal waiting to be melted down.
    ----
    * caja de fundir estereotipos = casting-box [casting box].
    * fundir en = meld (in/into).
    * fundirse = become + fused, run together.
    * fundirse con = blend into, become + one with, blend in with.
    * fundir tipos = cut + punches, cast + type.
    * plomo + fundirse = blow + a fuse.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1) <metal/hierro> to melt; < mineral> to smelt
    2) <estatua/campana> to cast
    3)
    a) (Elec) to blow
    b) (AmL) < motor> ( de gasolina) to seize... up; ( eléctrico) to burn... out
    4) (fam) <dinero/herencia> to blow (colloq)
    5)
    a) ( fusionar) to merge
    b) (Cin) <imágenes/tomas> to fade, merge
    2.
    fundirse v pron
    1) metal to melt; nieve/hielo to melt, thaw
    2)
    a) (Elec)
    b) (AmL) motor ( de gasolina) to seize up; ( eléctrico) to burn out
    3) (enf) (fam) ( gastarse) to blow (colloq)
    4)
    a) ( fusionarse) to merge
    b) (Cin, Mús) to fade
    5) (Per, RPl fam) ( arruinarse) persona to lose everything; empresa to go bust
    * * *
    = amalgamate, bring into, cast, confound, weld into/together, fuse, melt, mingle (with), melt down.

    Ex: In 1971 its functions were divided, part amalgamated with the Ministry of Defence, and part amalgamated with the Board of Trade to form the Department of Trade and Industry.

    Ex: Whether or not these specific proposals will be brought into some kind of overall approach and ideology remains to me a very questionable point.
    Ex: Printing types were cast in an alloy of lead, antimony, and tin called type-metal.
    Ex: The confounding of opposites is also common though, again, care has to be taken to see that we do not confound two subjects on which extensive literature exists.
    Ex: The Department of Trade and Industry has undergone many changes over the years; it has been split into two separate departments and welded together again.
    Ex: The experiment is financed externally and aims to fuse the functions of the 2 library types.
    Ex: The heat melts the wax on those areas which correspond with the image areas of the original, and the melted wax is absorbed into the tissue sheet.
    Ex: Not so long ago, the far off lands existed, to most people, in their imagination where they mingled with fairy tales and imaginary stories.
    Ex: In 1588 Thomas Thomas, Cambridge University printer, had one press and 1,400 kg. of type, but 40 per cent of the type was old metal waiting to be melted down.
    * caja de fundir estereotipos = casting-box [casting box].
    * fundir en = meld (in/into).
    * fundirse = become + fused, run together.
    * fundirse con = blend into, become + one with, blend in with.
    * fundir tipos = cut + punches, cast + type.
    * plomo + fundirse = blow + a fuse.

    * * *
    fundir [I1 ]
    vt
    A ‹metal› to melt; ‹mineral› to smelt; ‹hielo› to melt
    B ‹estatua/campana› to cast
    C
    1 ( Elec) to blow
    2 ( AmL) ‹motor› (de gasolina) to seize … up; (eléctrico) to burn … out
    D ( fam); ‹dinero/herencia› to blow ( colloq)
    E
    1 (unir, fusionar) to merge fundir algo EN algo to merge sth INTO sth
    2 ( Cin) ‹imágenes/tomas› to fade, merge
    F (Chi, Per fam) (destruir) to ruin, destroy
    G ( Chi) ‹niño› to spoil
    H ( Per fam) (fastidiar) to annoy, to wind … up ( BrE colloq)
    ■ fundir
    vi
    ( Per fam) (fastidiar) to be a pest o nuisance ( colloq)
    A «metal» to melt; «nieve/hielo» to melt, thaw
    B
    1 ( Elec):
    se ha fundido la bombilla the bulb has gone o fused ( colloq)
    2 ( AmL) «motor» (de gasolina) to seize up; (eléctrico) to burn out
    C ( enf) ( fam) (gastarse) to blow ( colloq)
    D
    1
    (unirse, fusionarse): las dos empresas han decidido fundirse the two companies have decided to merge
    fundirse EN algo:
    se fundieron en un apretado abrazo they clasped each other in a close embrace ( liter), they hugged each other tightly
    los distintos colores se funden en un tono cobrizo the different colors merge into a coppery hue
    2 ( Cin, Mús) to fade
    una imagen se funde sobre la siguiente toma one image fades o dissolves into the next
    E
    (Per, RPl fam) (arruinarse): se fundieron con ese negocio they lost everything in that deal
    la empresa se fundió the company went bust ( colloq)
    F ( Per fam) (fastidiarse) to cop it ( colloq)
    G ( Chi fam) «niño» to get spoiled
    H fundirse con ( Chi fam) (robar) to pocket ( colloq)
    se fundió con las ganancias comunes he pocketed all the profits
    * * *

     

    fundir ( conjugate fundir) verbo transitivo
    1
    a)metal/hierro to melt;

    mineral to smelt
    b)estatua/campana to cast

    2 (Elec) to blow
    3 ( fusionar) to merge
    fundirse verbo pronominal
    1 [ metal] to melt;
    [nieve/hielo] to melt, thaw
    2 (Elec):

    se fundieron los fusibles the fuses blew
    3 ( fusionarse) [empresas/partidos] to merge;
    fundirse en algo to merge sth into sth
    fundir verbo transitivo
    1 (derretir) to melt
    2 (fusionar, unir) to unite, join
    3 (una bombilla, un plomo) to blow
    ' fundir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    horno
    English:
    blow
    - fade in
    - fade out
    - found
    - melt
    - melt down
    - fuse
    - smelt
    * * *
    vt
    1. [derretir] [mantequilla, hielo] to melt;
    [roca, hierro, plomo] to smelt
    2. [estatua] to cast;
    [oro] to melt down;
    fundir oro en lingotes to melt down gold into ingots
    3. Com to merge
    4. Cine to fade;
    fundir un plano con otro to fade one scene into another
    5. [fusible, bombilla] to blow
    6. Esp Fam [gastar] to blow
    7. Am [motor]
    fundir el motor to make the engine seize up
    8. Am [arruinar] to bankrupt, to ruin
    9. Fam [derrotar]
    con ese comentario fundió a su oponente he floored his opponent with this remark
    vi
    Perú Fam [molestar] to be a pest;
    los vecinos están siempre fundiendo our neighbours are a real pest
    * * *
    v/t
    1 hielo melt
    2 metal smelt
    3 COM merge
    4 en TV, película fade
    * * *
    fundir vt
    1) : to melt down, to smelt
    2) : to fuse, to merge
    3) : to burn out (a lightbulb)
    * * *
    fundir vb (derretir) to melt

    Spanish-English dictionary > fundir

  • 70 golfillo

    m.
    street urchin, street Arab, gamin, guttersnipe.
    * * *
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 street urchin
    * * *
    SM urchin, street urchin
    * * *
    - lla masculino, femenino street urchin
    * * *
    = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, ragamuffin.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    * * *
    - lla masculino, femenino street urchin
    * * *
    = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, ragamuffin.

    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.

    Ex: Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex: This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex: Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex: He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.

    * * *
    urchin, street urchin
    * * *

    golfillo
    ◊ - lla sustantivo masculino, femenino

    street urchin

    ' golfillo' also found in these entries:
    English:
    urchin
    * * *
    urchin
    * * *
    m (street) urchin

    Spanish-English dictionary > golfillo

  • 71 golfo2

    2 = street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, bum, rapscallion, ragamuffin.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. Although the results provide support for the 'drunken bum' theory of wife beating, they also demythologize the stereotype because alcohol is shown to be far from a necessary or sufficient cause of wife abuse.
    Ex. In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    ----
    * golfo de la playa = beach bum.

    Spanish-English dictionary > golfo2

  • 72 granuja

    adj.
    rascally, impish, mischievous.
    f. & m.
    1 rogue, scoundrel (pillo).
    2 rascal, little wretch, urchin, gamin.
    3 loose grape separate from the bunch.
    4 seeds of the grape and other small fruits.
    * * *
    1 (uva) grapes plural
    1 (pilluelo) ragamuffin, urchin
    2 (estafador) crook, trickster
    * * *
    1.
    SMF (=bribón) rogue; [dicho con afecto] rascal; (=pilluelo) urchin, ragamuffin
    2.
    SF (=uvas) loose grapes pl ; (=semilla) grape seed
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.
    Ex. When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.
    Ex. The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex. The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex. He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex. It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex. In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex. In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex. Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex. The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex. Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex. In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex. He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.

    Ex: When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.

    Ex: The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex: The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex: He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex: It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex: This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex: Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex: And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex: In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex: In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex: Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex: He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex: The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex: Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex: In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex: He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.

    * * *
    rascal
    ¿dónde se habrá metido este granujilla? where's that little rascal o monkey got(ten) to?
    * * *

    granuja sustantivo masculino y femenino
    rascal
    granuja sustantivo masculino
    1 (pícaro) urchin
    2 (estafador, truhán) swindler
    ' granuja' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bandida
    - bandido
    - pájaro
    - sinvergüenza
    - canalla
    - pajarraco
    - rufián
    English:
    rascal
    - rogue
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    1. [pillo] rogue, scoundrel
    2. [canalla] trickster, swindler
    * * *
    m/f rascal
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    pilluelo: rascal, urchin
    * * *
    granuja adj rascal

    Spanish-English dictionary > granuja

  • 73 guardar rencor

    v.
    to hold a grudge, to have a grudge, to bear a grudge, to have a chip on one's shoulder.
    * * *
    to harbour resentment (a, against)
    * * *
    (v.) = bear + a grudge, harbour + resentment, carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder
    Ex. Bearing a grudge leads one to bitterness, wrath, and hatred.
    Ex. On the other hand, anonymous review does not always stop authors harbouring resentment if their paper is rejected.
    Ex. Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.
    * * *
    guardar rencor (hacia)
    (v.) = bear + ill will (toward)

    Ex: Bailey says he left Norfolk bearing no ill will toward anyone, though perhaps he had reason to.

    (v.) = bear + a grudge, harbour + resentment, carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder

    Ex: Bearing a grudge leads one to bitterness, wrath, and hatred.

    Ex: On the other hand, anonymous review does not always stop authors harbouring resentment if their paper is rejected.
    Ex: Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.

    Spanish-English dictionary > guardar rencor

  • 74 guardar resentimiento

    v.
    to bear a grudge, to hold a grudge.
    * * *
    (v.) = carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder
    Ex. Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.
    * * *
    (v.) = carry + a chip on + Posesivo + shoulder

    Ex: Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.

    Spanish-English dictionary > guardar resentimiento

  • 75 indeterminable

    adj.
    1 indeterminable.
    2 irresolute, undecided.
    * * *
    1 indeterminable
    * * *
    Ex. Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.
    ----
    * de origen indeterminable = irretraceable.
    * * *

    Ex: Sixteen years later, the truth remains indeterminable but this much is clear: Thomas carries a huge chip on his shoulder.

    * de origen indeterminable = irretraceable.

    * * *
    indeterminable
    * * *
    adj indeterminable

    Spanish-English dictionary > indeterminable

  • 76 insigne

    adj.
    1 distinguished, illustrious.
    2 notable, celebrated, famous, noble.
    * * *
    1 distinguished, eminent
    * * *
    ADJ (=distinguido) distinguished; (=famoso) famous
    * * *
    adjetivo famous, notable
    * * *
    = palmy [palmier -comp., palmiest -sup.], eminent, famous, notable.
    Ex. In the palmier days of 1949, Bernard Berelson argued that 'the public library should be organized for those relatively few people in the community who can make 'serious' use of library materials'.
    Ex. The Colon Classification was devised by the eminent Indian librarian and classificationist the late S R Ranganathan.
    Ex. The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.
    Ex. There are notable differences in practice between the United States and the United Kingdom.
    * * *
    adjetivo famous, notable
    * * *
    = palmy [palmier -comp., palmiest -sup.], eminent, famous, notable.

    Ex: In the palmier days of 1949, Bernard Berelson argued that 'the public library should be organized for those relatively few people in the community who can make 'serious' use of library materials'.

    Ex: The Colon Classification was devised by the eminent Indian librarian and classificationist the late S R Ranganathan.
    Ex: The philosophy of these critics was enunciated by one of their most prominent spokesmen, the famous Thomas Carlyle.
    Ex: There are notable differences in practice between the United States and the United Kingdom.

    * * *
    famous, notable
    * * *

    insigne adjetivo distinguished
    ' insigne' also found in these entries:
    English:
    notable
    * * *
    insigne adj
    distinguished, illustrious
    * * *
    adj famous
    * * *
    insigne adj
    : noted, famous

    Spanish-English dictionary > insigne

  • 77 intercambiar saludos

    (v.) = exchange + greeting
    Ex. The 'empty sincerity' of the greeting one might exchange on passing an acquaintance on the street is not sufficient for reference enquirers, as Thomas Lee Eichman has recently explained.
    * * *
    (v.) = exchange + greeting

    Ex: The 'empty sincerity' of the greeting one might exchange on passing an acquaintance on the street is not sufficient for reference enquirers, as Thomas Lee Eichman has recently explained.

    Spanish-English dictionary > intercambiar saludos

  • 78 jarana

    f.
    1 rumpus, shindy (alboroto).
    2 noise, racket, din.
    3 spree, revel, high jinks, jinks.
    * * *
    1 familiar (juerga) wild party, spree
    2 (jaleo) racket, din
    \
    armar jarana to make a racket
    irse de jarana to go out on the town
    * * *
    SF
    1) * (=juerga) binge *

    andar/ir de jarana — to be/go out on the town

    2) Méx (Mús) small guitar
    3) Perú (=baile) dance
    4) Caribe (=banda) dance band
    5) CAm (=deuda) debt
    6) And (=embuste) fib
    7) LAm (=broma) practical joke, hoax

    la jarana sale a la cara CAm a joke can come back on you

    * * *
    1) (fam)
    a) ( bromas)

    basta de jaranathat's enough fun and games o fooling around (colloq)

    b) ( juerga)

    salir de jaranato go out on the town o out partying (colloq)

    3)
    b) (Per) ( fiesta) party ( with folk music)
    * * *
    = fireworks, high jinks [hijinks], horseplay, hijinks [high jinks], revels, partying, beano.
    Ex. 'You know, Tom, if I ever find another job -- and I'm already looking -- there will be some fireworks around here before I leave, I can guarantee you that!'.
    Ex. The novel has a striking emphasis on matters such high jinks, horseplay, capers, and antics.
    Ex. The novel has a striking emphasis on matters such high jinks, horseplay, capers, and antics.
    Ex. Again and again, the author races past important events in Evans' life in order to dwell on all his bedroom conquests and juvenile hijinks.
    Ex. Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.
    Ex. The party raged into the early morning hours drawing the attention of police, who have increased patrols in the area because of end of the year partying.
    Ex. Things take a turn for the unexpected, however, when Herman suggests that the three of them head off for a beano by the sea.
    ----
    * de jarana = out on the town, a (late) night out on the town.
    * irse de jarana = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * salir de jarana = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * * *
    1) (fam)
    a) ( bromas)

    basta de jaranathat's enough fun and games o fooling around (colloq)

    b) ( juerga)

    salir de jaranato go out on the town o out partying (colloq)

    3)
    b) (Per) ( fiesta) party ( with folk music)
    * * *
    = fireworks, high jinks [hijinks], horseplay, hijinks [high jinks], revels, partying, beano.

    Ex: 'You know, Tom, if I ever find another job -- and I'm already looking -- there will be some fireworks around here before I leave, I can guarantee you that!'.

    Ex: The novel has a striking emphasis on matters such high jinks, horseplay, capers, and antics.
    Ex: The novel has a striking emphasis on matters such high jinks, horseplay, capers, and antics.
    Ex: Again and again, the author races past important events in Evans' life in order to dwell on all his bedroom conquests and juvenile hijinks.
    Ex: Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.
    Ex: The party raged into the early morning hours drawing the attention of police, who have increased patrols in the area because of end of the year partying.
    Ex: Things take a turn for the unexpected, however, when Herman suggests that the three of them head off for a beano by the sea.
    * de jarana = out on the town, a (late) night out on the town.
    * irse de jarana = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * salir de jarana = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.

    * * *
    A ( fam)
    1
    (bromas): basta de jarana that's enough fun and games o larking around o fooling around ( colloq)
    2
    (juerga): salir de jarana to go out on the town ( colloq), to go out partying ( colloq)
    C
    * * *

    jarana sustantivo femenino
    1 (fam)
    a) ( bromas):

    basta de jarana that's enough fun and games o fooling around (colloq)

    b) ( juerga):

    salir de jarana to go out on the town o out partying (colloq)

    2


    jarana f fam (juerga) binge, spree
    ' jarana' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    pachanga
    English:
    revelry
    * * *
    jarana nf
    Fam
    1. [juerga]
    estar de jarana to party;
    irse de jarana to go out on the town
    2. [alboroto] rumpus;
    se organizó una gran jarana all hell broke loose
    3. Méx [guitarra] small guitar
    4. Méx [baile] = traditional dance of the Yucatan
    5. CAm [deuda] debt
    * * *
    f fam
    1 partying fam ;
    irse de jarana go out on the town fam, go out partying fam
    2 ( alboroto) racket
    * * *
    jarana nf
    1) fam : revelry, partying, spree
    2) fam : joking, fooling around
    3) : small guitar

    Spanish-English dictionary > jarana

  • 79 juerga

    f.
    1 rave-up, binge (informal).
    irse de juerga to go out on the town
    estar de juerga to be partying
    tomar algo a juerga to take something as a joke
    ¡qué juerga nos pasamos anoche con su primo! what a laugh we had with her cousin last night!
    2 drunken party, drinking session, rave-up, wassail.
    3 merrymaking.
    4 spree, boisterous merrymaking, drinking bout, good time.
    * * *
    1 familiar rave-up, bash
    está siempre de juerga he's always out having a good time, he's always out partying
    \
    correrse una juerga to have a ball
    irse de juerga to go out on the town
    * * *
    femenino (fam)

    ir de juergato go out on the town o out partying (colloq)

    organizar una juergato have o throw a party

    correrse una juerga — (fam) to have a ball o a great time (colloq)

    * * *
    = bash, revels, bout of boozing, drinking bout, boozing bout, partying, beano.
    Ex. The 'Book bash' designed to recruit special needs children and their families to the library.
    Ex. Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.
    Ex. Did you know that heavy bouts of boozing damages the red muscle fibres you need for endurance?.
    Ex. For the most part it is a story of bug-ridden rooms in working-men's hotels, of fights, drinking bouts, cheap brothels, Russian refugees, cadging.
    Ex. After another of his boozing bouts his bride-to-be throws him out of her house.
    Ex. The party raged into the early morning hours drawing the attention of police, who have increased patrols in the area because of end of the year partying.
    Ex. Things take a turn for the unexpected, however, when Herman suggests that the three of them head off for a beano by the sea.
    ----
    * correrse una juerga = have + a ball, have + a great time.
    * de juerga = out on the town, a (late) night out on the town.
    * irse de juerga = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * juerga de cerveza = beer bash.
    * salir de juerga = go out + boozing, paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * * *
    femenino (fam)

    ir de juergato go out on the town o out partying (colloq)

    organizar una juergato have o throw a party

    correrse una juerga — (fam) to have a ball o a great time (colloq)

    * * *
    = bash, revels, bout of boozing, drinking bout, boozing bout, partying, beano.

    Ex: The 'Book bash' designed to recruit special needs children and their families to the library.

    Ex: Virtually all of the revels at court and many of the temporary, purpose built banqueting houses used to celebrate diplomatic occasions between 1543 and 1559 were produced and built under the supervision of Sir Thomas Cawarden.
    Ex: Did you know that heavy bouts of boozing damages the red muscle fibres you need for endurance?.
    Ex: For the most part it is a story of bug-ridden rooms in working-men's hotels, of fights, drinking bouts, cheap brothels, Russian refugees, cadging.
    Ex: After another of his boozing bouts his bride-to-be throws him out of her house.
    Ex: The party raged into the early morning hours drawing the attention of police, who have increased patrols in the area because of end of the year partying.
    Ex: Things take a turn for the unexpected, however, when Herman suggests that the three of them head off for a beano by the sea.
    * correrse una juerga = have + a ball, have + a great time.
    * de juerga = out on the town, a (late) night out on the town.
    * irse de juerga = paint + the town red, go out on + the town.
    * juerga de cerveza = beer bash.
    * salir de juerga = go out + boozing, paint + the town red, go out on + the town.

    * * *
    ( fam)
    partying
    anoche nos fuimos de juerga last night we went out on the town o we went out partying ( colloq)
    organizar or montar una juerga to have o throw a party
    no puedo estar todas las noches de juerga I can't live it up every night, I can't go out on the town every night ( colloq)
    correrse una juerga ( fam); to have a ball o a great time ( colloq)
    * * *

    juerga sustantivo femenino (fam):
    ir de juerga to go out on the town o out partying (colloq);

    organizar una juerga to have o throw a party
    juerga f fam binge, rave-up
    correrse una juerga, to go on a binge

    ' juerga' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    amiguete
    - compinche
    - correrse
    - desmadre
    - jarana
    - jolgorio
    - farra
    English:
    approve of
    - binge
    - booze-up
    - fling
    - night
    - out
    - piss-up
    - spree
    - bash
    * * *
    juerga nf
    Fam
    montar una juerga to party, Br to have a rave-up;
    correrse una juerga, irse de juerga to go out on the town;
    estar de juerga to be partying;
    tomar algo a juerga to take sth as a joke;
    ¡qué juerga nos pasamos anoche con su primo! what a laugh we had with her cousin last night!
    * * *
    f fam
    partying fam ;
    irse de juerga go out on the town fam, go out partying fam ;
    correrse una juerga have a ball fam
    * * *
    juerga nf
    : partying, binge
    irse de juerga: to go on a spree
    * * *
    juerga n party [pl. parties]

    Spanish-English dictionary > juerga

  • 80 leviatán

    m.
    Leviathan, Biblical sea monster.
    * * *
    1 leviathan
    * * *
    * * *
    Ex. In his most famous work, the Leviathan, Hobbes famously argued that life in the state of nature is 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short'.
    * * *

    Ex: In his most famous work, the Leviathan, Hobbes famously argued that life in the state of nature is 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short'.

    * * *
    ( Bib) leviathan, Leviathan
    * * *
    leviathan

    Spanish-English dictionary > leviatán

См. также в других словарях:

  • Thomas Hobbes — (Ausschnitt aus einem Gemälde von John Michael Wright, circa 1669 1670) Thomas Hobbes ([hɔbz]; * 5. April 1588 in Westport, Wiltshire; † 4. Dezember 1679 in Hardwick Hall …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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  • Thomas Hobbes — (*5 de abril de 1588 †4 de diciembre de 1679) fue un notable filósofo político, famoso por su obra Leviathan (1651). Ha sido considerado a lo largo de la Historia del pensamiento como una persona oscura, de hecho en 1666 en Inglaterra se quemaron …   Enciclopedia Universal

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  • Thomas Hobbes — Infobox Philosopher region = Western Philosophers era = 17th century philosophy (Modern Philosophy) color = #B0C4DE| image caption = Thomas Hobbes| name = Thomas Hobbes birth = Birth date|1588|4|5|df=yes Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England death =… …   Wikipedia

  • Thomas Hobbes — noun English materialist and political philosopher who advocated absolute sovereignty as the only kind of government that could resolve problems caused by the selfishness of human beings (1588 1679) • Syn: ↑Hobbes • Instance Hypernyms:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Thomas Hobbes — ➡ Hobbes * * * …   Universalium

  • Thomas Hobbes — Libros Si yo hubiera gastado en leer tanto tiempo como otros sabios, sería tan ignorante como ellos. Vida Primero vivir, después filosofar …   Diccionario de citas

  • Thomas Hobbes — (1588 1679) English philosopher and writer, author of Leviathan …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Thomas Hobbes Scott — (1782 – 1860) was an Australian clergyman. He was the son of the Rev. James Scott and was born either in 1782 or 1783. His death notice in The Times for 5 January 1860 stated that he was in his seventy eighth year and the Gentleman s Magazine for …   Wikipedia

  • Leviathan (Thomas Hobbes) — Titelblatt von Hobbes’ Leviathan. Zu sehen ist der Souverän, der über Land, Städte und deren Bewohner herrscht. Sein Körper besteht aus den Menschen, die in den Gesellschaftsvertrag eingewilligt haben. In seinen Händen hält er Schwert und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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