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preyed

  • 1 alimentarse de

    v.
    to live on, to eat, to feed on, to feed upon.
    * * *
    (v.) = thrive on, feast on, prey on/upon
    Ex. It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    Ex. The author reports work since 1991 on building information carnivores, which intelligently hunt and feast on herbivores in Unix, on the Internet, and on the WWW.
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    * * *
    (v.) = thrive on, feast on, prey on/upon

    Ex: It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.

    Ex: The author reports work since 1991 on building information carnivores, which intelligently hunt and feast on herbivores in Unix, on the Internet, and on the WWW.
    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.

    Spanish-English dictionary > alimentarse de

  • 2 aprovecharse

    1 (de alguien) to take advantage (de, of); (de algo) to make the most (de, of)
    * * *
    to take advantage, exploit
    * * *
    VPR
    1) (=abusar) to take advantage

    lo puedes usar, pero sin aprovecharte — you can use it but don't take advantage

    2) Esp (=sacar provecho de) to make the most of
    3) [en sentido sexual]

    aprovecharse de[+ adulto] to take advantage of; [+ niño] to abuse

    * * *
    (v.) = profit, screw, further + Posesivo + own interest, milk
    Ex. In what respects can a student profit from a knowledge of abstracts and by developing abstracting skills?.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Are you being screwed electronically? -- ethical issues in an electronic age'.
    Ex. Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex. A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.
    * * *
    aprovecharse(de)
    (v.) = take + advantage (of), piggyback [piggy-back], cash in on, prey on/upon, tap into, leverage, make + an opportunity (out) of, ride (on) + Posesivo + coattails

    Ex: It is not surprising that the networks discussed later have all taken advantage of computer processing in some form or another.

    Ex: His logic is simple: People need the help of others to be truly creative -- thought breeds thought and ideas 'piggyback' on other ideas.
    Ex: At the same time, veteran fiction writers and new authors cashing in on fame from other media continued to rule the lists.
    Ex: From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    Ex: It is clear that a powerful and mysterious force is pushing seniors toward greater volunteer involvement, and nonprofit groups should tap into this particularly civic age group before the Indian summer of volunteering reaches its end.
    Ex: Information seeking in electronic environments will become a collaboration among end user and various electronic systems such that users leverage their heuristic power and machines leverage algorithmic power.
    Ex: Unfortunately, there are some trying to make an opportunity out of this very turbulant situation.
    Ex: Riding the coattails of Barack Obama, Democrats picked up seven seats held by Republicans in Tuesday's election to match the seven it gained two years ago.

    (v.) = profit, screw, further + Posesivo + own interest, milk

    Ex: In what respects can a student profit from a knowledge of abstracts and by developing abstracting skills?.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'Are you being screwed electronically? -- ethical issues in an electronic age'.
    Ex: Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex: A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.

    * * *

    ■aprovecharse verbo reflexivo to use to one's advantage, to take advantage: se aprovechó de Juan, she took advantage of Juan
    aprovéchate de mi buen humor y pídeme lo que quieras, make the most of my good mood and ask for anything you want
    ' aprovecharse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abusar
    - sangrar
    - sardina
    - aprovechar
    English:
    cash in
    - draw on
    - exploit
    - play on
    - play upon
    - advantage
    - cash
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [sacar provecho] to take advantage (de of);
    nos aprovechamos de que teníamos coche para ir a la ciudad we took advantage of the fact that we had a car to go to the city;
    se aprovechó de que nadie vigilaba para salir sin pagar she took advantage of the fact that nobody was watching to leave without paying;
    aprovecharse de las desgracias ajenas to benefit from other people's misfortunes
    2. [abusar de alguien] to take advantage (de of);
    todo el mundo se aprovecha de la ingenuidad de Marta everyone takes advantage of Marta's gullible nature;
    fue acusado de aprovecharse de una menor he was accused of child abuse
    * * *
    v/r take advantage (de of)
    * * *
    vr
    aprovecharse de : to take advantage of, to exploit
    * * *
    aprovecharse vb to take advantage [pt. took; pp. taken]

    Spanish-English dictionary > aprovecharse

  • 3 aprovecharse (de)

    (v.) = take + advantage (of), piggyback [piggy-back], cash in on, prey on/upon, tap into, leverage, make + an opportunity (out) of, ride (on) + Posesivo + coattails
    Ex. It is not surprising that the networks discussed later have all taken advantage of computer processing in some form or another.
    Ex. His logic is simple: People need the help of others to be truly creative -- thought breeds thought and ideas 'piggyback' on other ideas.
    Ex. At the same time, veteran fiction writers and new authors cashing in on fame from other media continued to rule the lists.
    Ex. From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    Ex. It is clear that a powerful and mysterious force is pushing seniors toward greater volunteer involvement, and nonprofit groups should tap into this particularly civic age group before the Indian summer of volunteering reaches its end.
    Ex. Information seeking in electronic environments will become a collaboration among end user and various electronic systems such that users leverage their heuristic power and machines leverage algorithmic power.
    Ex. Unfortunately, there are some trying to make an opportunity out of this very turbulant situation.
    Ex. Riding the coattails of Barack Obama, Democrats picked up seven seats held by Republicans in Tuesday's election to match the seven it gained two years ago.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aprovecharse (de)

  • 4 ave de rapiña

    bird of prey
    * * *
    (n.) = raptor
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    * * *
    (n.) = raptor

    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.

    * * *
    bird of prey

    Spanish-English dictionary > ave de rapiña

  • 5 ave rapaz

    f.
    bird of prey, predator bird, raptor.
    * * *
    (n.) = raptor
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    * * *
    (n.) = raptor

    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ave rapaz

  • 6 bobo

    adj.
    silly, booby, foolish, stupid.
    intj.
    you blot, you dope.
    m.
    fool, clod, blockhead, silly.
    * * *
    1 silly, foolish
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 fool
    * * *
    1. (f. - boba)
    noun
    fool, simpleton
    2. (f. - boba)
    adj.
    silly, stupid
    * * *
    bobo, -a
    1.
    ADJ (=tonto) silly, stupid; (=ingenuo) simple, naïve
    2.
    SM / F (=tonto) idiot, fool; (Teat) clown, funny man
    3. SM / F
    1) Caribe * (=reloj) watch
    2) Cono Sur (=corazón) heart, ticker *
    * * *
    I
    - ba adjetivo (fam) silly
    II
    - ba masculino, femenino (fam) fool

    deja de hacer el bobo — stop playing the fool, stop being so silly

    * * *
    = daft [dafter -comp., daftest -sup.], fool, simpleton, goofy [goofier -comp., goofiest -sup.], witless, simp, deadhead, nincompoop, dumbbell, ditzy [ditzier -comp., ditziest -sup.], ditz, dits, ditsy [ditsier -comp., ditsiest -sup.], half-soaked, airhead, airheaded, drongo, dweeb.
    Ex. Ranking among the dafter exercises sometimes imposed on children is the one that requires them to describe a screwdriver or a vase or the desks they sit at, or any familiar object.
    Ex. A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex. A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex. The article 'Book pricing: economics of a goofy business' examines briefly the economics of the book publishing process from the viewpoint of the book wholesaler.
    Ex. She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex. This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex. This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex. This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex. The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex. She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex. She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex. But then again, there are thousands of such ditses out there that need mental help.
    Ex. If there is a stereo type for ditsy blondes she really has gone out of her way to fit it perfectly.
    Ex. Three half-soaked security guards sat around a desk at the main entrance letting through more than they checked.
    Ex. Some people like airheads with fake boobs.
    Ex. She's just an airheaded bimbo, with an endless capacity to push aside unpleasant realities in favor of her more satisfying interests: young men and jewels.
    Ex. Now I know to you inteligent types this sounds a simple problem but to a drongo like me it is like quantum physics!!!.
    Ex. For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    ----
    * como un bobo = stupidly.
    * tortuga boba = loggerhead turtle.
    * * *
    I
    - ba adjetivo (fam) silly
    II
    - ba masculino, femenino (fam) fool

    deja de hacer el bobo — stop playing the fool, stop being so silly

    * * *
    = daft [dafter -comp., daftest -sup.], fool, simpleton, goofy [goofier -comp., goofiest -sup.], witless, simp, deadhead, nincompoop, dumbbell, ditzy [ditzier -comp., ditziest -sup.], ditz, dits, ditsy [ditsier -comp., ditsiest -sup.], half-soaked, airhead, airheaded, drongo, dweeb.

    Ex: Ranking among the dafter exercises sometimes imposed on children is the one that requires them to describe a screwdriver or a vase or the desks they sit at, or any familiar object.

    Ex: A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex: A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex: The article 'Book pricing: economics of a goofy business' examines briefly the economics of the book publishing process from the viewpoint of the book wholesaler.
    Ex: She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex: This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex: This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex: This collection of videos pays tribute to nincompoops, deadheads and simps: people who walk into sliding glass doors and out of public restrooms with toilet paper trailing from one of their shoes.
    Ex: The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex: She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex: She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex: But then again, there are thousands of such ditses out there that need mental help.
    Ex: If there is a stereo type for ditsy blondes she really has gone out of her way to fit it perfectly.
    Ex: Three half-soaked security guards sat around a desk at the main entrance letting through more than they checked.
    Ex: Some people like airheads with fake boobs.
    Ex: She's just an airheaded bimbo, with an endless capacity to push aside unpleasant realities in favor of her more satisfying interests: young men and jewels.
    Ex: Now I know to you inteligent types this sounds a simple problem but to a drongo like me it is like quantum physics!!!.
    Ex: For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    * como un bobo = stupidly.
    * tortuga boba = loggerhead turtle.

    * * *
    bobo1 -ba
    ( fam); silly
    bobo2 -ba
    masculine, feminine
    ( fam); fool
    deja de hacer el bobo stop playing the fool, stop being so silly
    * * *

    bobo
    ◊ -ba adjetivo (fam) silly

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino (fam) fool
    bobo,-a
    I adj (simple, lelo) stupid, silly
    (cándido) naïve
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino fool

    ' bobo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    atontada
    - atontado
    - boba
    - pájaro
    - che
    - hacer
    - pavo
    - primo
    English:
    boob
    - daft
    - dopey
    - dumb
    - dummy
    - goof
    - halfwit
    - lemon
    - mug
    - simple
    - soft-headed
    - sucker
    * * *
    bobo, -a
    adj
    1. [tonto] stupid, daft
    2. [ingenuo] naive, simple
    nm,f
    1. [tonto] fool, idiot;
    hacer el bobo to act o play the fool
    2. [ingenuo] simpleton
    nm
    1. Teatro = rustic simpleton
    2. CAm, Méx [pez] threadfin
    * * *
    I adj silly, foolish
    II m, boba f fool;
    pájaro bobo penguin
    * * *
    bobo, -ba adj
    : silly, stupid
    bobo, -ba n
    : fool, simpleton
    * * *
    bobo1 adj
    1. (tonto) silly [comp. sillier; superl. silliest]
    anda, no seas bobo come on, don't be silly
    2. (ingenuo) naive
    es tan bobo que se lo cree todo he's so naive, he'll believe anything
    bobo2 n fool

    Spanish-English dictionary > bobo

  • 7 comerse

    1 to eat
    2 figurado (saltarse) to omit; (párrafo) to skip; (palabra) to swallow
    3 (color) to fade
    4 (el mar, la tierra) to swallow
    * * *
    1. VPR
    1) [+ comida] to eat

    ¿quién se ha comido mi queso? — who's eaten my cheese?

    comerse las uñasto bite one's nails

    2) (=destruir)

    el sol se ha ido comiendo los colores de la alfombra — the sun has bleached the carpet, the sun has caused the colours of the carpet to fade

    3) [+ capital, recursos] to eat up
    4) (=saltarse) [+ párrafo] to miss out; [+ consonante] to swallow
    2.
    SM

    era muy parco en el comer — he didn't eat much, he wasn't a big eater

    * * *
    (v.) = make + a meal of, prey on/upon, chew up
    Ex. Even the fearsome shark knows enough not to drive away the pilot fish while it eats, nor does it make a meal of the pilot fish when food is scarce.
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    Ex. Cattle ranches are chewing up the Amazon rainforest.
    * * *
    (v.) = make + a meal of, prey on/upon, chew up

    Ex: Even the fearsome shark knows enough not to drive away the pilot fish while it eats, nor does it make a meal of the pilot fish when food is scarce.

    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    Ex: Cattle ranches are chewing up the Amazon rainforest.

    * * *

    ■comerse verbo reflexivo
    1 to eat: cómete todo el puré, eat up your purée
    2 (omitir) to skip: me comí una erre, I skipped an R
    ♦ Locuciones: figurado comerse el coco, to worry: estuvé toda la tarde comiéndome el coco con lo que me diría, I spent all afternoon worrying about what he would say to me
    ' comerse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    coco
    - marrón
    - rosca
    - tarro
    - comer
    English:
    down
    - eat into
    - grow out of
    - nail
    - nail-biting
    - ogle
    - eat
    - swallow
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [alimentos] to eat;
    en mi casa se come a las dos we have lunch at two o'clock at home;
    en ese restaurante se come muy bien the food is very good at that restaurant;
    se comió los tres platos he had all three courses;
    cómetelo todo eat it all up;
    comerse las uñas to bite one's nails;
    Fam
    como descubra al que ha hecho esto, me lo como vivo when I find out who did this, I'll have their guts for garters;
    Fam
    tu amigo está para comérselo your friend's gorgeous;
    comerse a alguien con los ojos o [m5] con la mirada to be unable to keep one's eyes off sb;
    comerse a alguien a besos to cover sb with kisses;
    Fam
    no te comas el coco o [m5] el tarro don't worry your head about it;
    Fam
    comerse un marrón: me ha tocado a mí comerme el marrón de limpiar la casa tras la fiesta I got lumbered with having to clean the house after the party;
    Esp Fam
    comerse un rosco: presume mucho, pero la realidad es que no se come un rosco he's always bragging, but the truth of the matter is he never gets off with anyone;
    ¿y eso cómo se come? and what are we/am I supposed to make of that?
    2. [consumirse] to eat up;
    se la comen los celos, se come de celos she's consumed o eaten up with jealousy
    3. [desgastar] [colores] to fade;
    [metal] to corrode;
    el sol se comió los colores de la ropa the sun made the clothes fade;
    la humedad se come el hierro moisture causes iron to rust
    4. [en juegos de mesa] to take, to capture;
    se comió mi reina she took my queen
    5. [palabras, texto] to swallow;
    se comió un párrafo she missed out a paragraph;
    te has comido todos los acentos you've missed out all the accents;
    se come las palabras al hablar he swallows his words when speaking;
    Fam Fig
    se va a comerse sus palabras she'll have to eat her words
    6. RP [saltarse]
    comerse una luz roja to go through a red light
    7. [ser mejor que] to beat;
    mi trabajo se come al tuyo my job beats yours
    8. Am muy Fam [fornicar]
    comerse a alguien to get into sb's Br knickers o US panties
    nm
    cuida mucho el comerse she's very careful about what she eats;
    es muy sobrio en el comerse he eats very frugally
    * * *
    v/r
    eat up;
    comerse de envidia be consumed with envy;
    está para comértela fam she’s really tasty fam
    2 de color fade
    3
    :
    se comió una palabra she missed out a word
    * * *
    vr
    : to eat up
    comer nm
    : eating, dining
    * * *
    1. (en general) to eat [pt. ate; pp. eaten]
    2. (saltarse) to skip [pt. & pp. skipped] / to miss out
    comerse las uñas to bite your nails [pt. bit; pp. bitten]

    Spanish-English dictionary > comerse

  • 8 cornisa

    f.
    cornice (architecture).
    * * *
    1 ARQUITECTURA cornice
    \
    la Cornisa Cantábrica the Cantabrian Coast
    * * *
    * * *
    1) (Arquit) cornice
    2) (Geog)
    * * *
    = ledge.
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    * * *
    1) (Arquit) cornice
    2) (Geog)
    * * *

    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.

    * * *
    A ( Arquit) cornice
    B ( Geog):
    la cornisa atlántica/cantábrica the Atlantic/Cantabrian coast
    * * *

    cornisa sustantivo femenino (Arquit) cornice
    cornisa sustantivo femenino
    1 cornice
    2 la cornisa Cantábrica, the Cantabrian coast
    ' cornisa' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    saliente
    English:
    cornice
    - ledge
    * * *
    1. [moldura, saliente] cornice
    2. Geog ledge, lead
    la Cornisa Cantábrica the Cantabrian coast
    * * *
    f ARQUI cornice
    * * *
    : cornice

    Spanish-English dictionary > cornisa

  • 9 depredador

    adj.
    depredatory, predatory.
    m.
    predator, depredator.
    * * *
    1 depredatory
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 depredator, pillager
    * * *
    (f. - depredadora)
    noun
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ [animal, instinto] predatory
    2.
    SM (Zool) predator
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo (Zool) <animal/ave> predatory
    II
    masculino predator
    * * *
    = predatory, predator.
    Ex. Physical violence may be predatory or affective.
    Ex. From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo (Zool) <animal/ave> predatory
    II
    masculino predator
    * * *
    = predatory, predator.

    Ex: Physical violence may be predatory or affective.

    Ex: From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.

    * * *
    1 ( Zool) ‹animal/ave› predatory
    2 ‹ataque/ejército› predatory
    predator
    * * *

    depredador 1
    ◊ - dora adjetivo (Zool) ‹animal/ave predatory

    depredador 2 sustantivo masculino
    predator
    depredador,-ora
    I adjetivo predatory
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino predator

    ' depredador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    depredadora
    English:
    predator
    - predatory
    * * *
    depredador, -ora
    adj
    predatory
    nm,f
    predator
    * * *
    I adj predatory
    II m, depredadora f ZO predator
    * * *
    : predatory
    1) : predator
    2) saqueador: plunderer

    Spanish-English dictionary > depredador

  • 10 engaño

    m.
    1 deceit, deception, trickery, cheating.
    2 lie, hoax, trick, take-in.
    3 fraudulence, deceitfulness.
    4 delusion, false impression.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: engañar.
    * * *
    1 deceit, deception
    2 (estafa) fraud, trick, swindle
    3 (mentira) lie
    4 (error) mistake
    \
    estar en un engaño to be mistaken
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=acto) [gen] deception; (=ilusión) delusion

    aquí no hay engaño — there is no attempt to deceive anybody here, it's all on the level *

    2) (=trampa) trick, swindle
    3) (=malentendido) mistake, misunderstanding

    padecer engaño — to labour under a misunderstanding, labor under a misunderstanding (EEUU)

    4) pl engaños (=astucia) wiles, tricks
    5) [de pesca] lure
    6) Cono Sur (=regalo) small gift, token
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( mentira) deception
    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)
    c) ( ardid) ploy, trick
    2) (Taur) cape
    * * *
    = fraud, snare, sham, hoax, deceit, subterfuge, confidence trick, deception, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, hocus pocus, caper, dissimulation, fiddle, trickery, bluff, con trick, con, con job.
    Ex. At our library in Minnesota we have clearly identified material that deals with many types of business and consumer frauds, national liberation movements, bedtime, Kwanza, the Afro-American holiday.
    Ex. Whilst telematics for Africa is full of snares, it is the way towards the road to mastery in the future.
    Ex. The NCC argue that the three other rights established over the last three centuries -- civil, political and social -- are 'liable to be hollow shams' without the consequent right to information.
    Ex. This article examines several controversial cataloguing problems, including the classification of anti-Semitic works and books proven to be forgeries or hoaxes.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Policing fraud and deceit: the legal aspects of misconduct in scientific enquiry'.
    Ex. Citing authors' names in references can cause great difficulties, as ghosts, subterfuges, and collaborative teamwork may often obscure the true begetters of published works.
    Ex. Unless universal education is nothing more than a confidence trick, there must be more people today who can benefit by real library service than ever there were in the past.
    Ex. Furthermore, deception is common when subjects use e-mail and chat rooms.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex. The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex. The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex. Who was the mastermind of the Watergate caper & for what purpose has never been revealed.
    Ex. In fact, the terms of the contrast are highly ambivalent: order vs. anarchy, liberty vs. despotism, or industry vs. sloth, and also dissimulation vs. honesty.
    Ex. This paper reports a study based on an eight-week period of participant observation of a particular form of resistance, fiddles.
    Ex. It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.
    Ex. The most dramatic way to spot a bluff is to look your opponent in the eye and attempt to sense his fear.
    Ex. The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex. He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex. The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    ----
    * autoengaño = self-deception.
    * conducir a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * conseguir mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * entrar mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * llevar a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * someter a engaño = perpetrate + deception.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( mentira) deception
    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)
    c) ( ardid) ploy, trick
    2) (Taur) cape
    * * *
    = fraud, snare, sham, hoax, deceit, subterfuge, confidence trick, deception, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, hocus pocus, caper, dissimulation, fiddle, trickery, bluff, con trick, con, con job.

    Ex: At our library in Minnesota we have clearly identified material that deals with many types of business and consumer frauds, national liberation movements, bedtime, Kwanza, the Afro-American holiday.

    Ex: Whilst telematics for Africa is full of snares, it is the way towards the road to mastery in the future.
    Ex: The NCC argue that the three other rights established over the last three centuries -- civil, political and social -- are 'liable to be hollow shams' without the consequent right to information.
    Ex: This article examines several controversial cataloguing problems, including the classification of anti-Semitic works and books proven to be forgeries or hoaxes.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Policing fraud and deceit: the legal aspects of misconduct in scientific enquiry'.
    Ex: Citing authors' names in references can cause great difficulties, as ghosts, subterfuges, and collaborative teamwork may often obscure the true begetters of published works.
    Ex: Unless universal education is nothing more than a confidence trick, there must be more people today who can benefit by real library service than ever there were in the past.
    Ex: Furthermore, deception is common when subjects use e-mail and chat rooms.
    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex: The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex: The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex: Who was the mastermind of the Watergate caper & for what purpose has never been revealed.
    Ex: In fact, the terms of the contrast are highly ambivalent: order vs. anarchy, liberty vs. despotism, or industry vs. sloth, and also dissimulation vs. honesty.
    Ex: This paper reports a study based on an eight-week period of participant observation of a particular form of resistance, fiddles.
    Ex: It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.
    Ex: The most dramatic way to spot a bluff is to look your opponent in the eye and attempt to sense his fear.
    Ex: The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex: He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex: The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    * autoengaño = self-deception.
    * conducir a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * conseguir mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * entrar mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * llevar a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * someter a engaño = perpetrate + deception.

    * * *
    A
    1 (mentira) deception
    lo que más me duele es el engaño it was the deceit o deception that upset me most
    fue víctima de un cruel engaño she was the victim of a cruel deception o swindle, she was cruelly deceived o taken in
    vivió en el engaño durante años for years she lived in complete ignorance of his deceit
    es un engaño, no es de oro it's a con, this isn't (made of) gold ( colloq)
    2 (ardid) ploy, trick
    se vale de todo tipo de engaños para salirse con la suya he uses all kinds of tricks o every trick in the book to get his own way
    llamarse a engaño to claim one has been cheated o deceived
    para que luego nadie pueda llamarse a engaño so that no one can claim o say that they were deceived/cheated
    C ( Dep) fake
    * * *

     

    Del verbo engañar: ( conjugate engañar)

    engaño es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    engañó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    engañar    
    engaño    
    engañó
    engañar ( conjugate engañar) verbo transitivo


    tú a mí no me engañas you can't fool me;
    lo engañó haciéndole creer que … she deceived him into thinking that …;
    engaño a algn para que haga algo to trick sb into doing sth
    b) (estafar, timar) to cheat, con (colloq)


    engañarse verbo pronominal ( refl) ( mentirse) to deceive oneself, kid oneself (colloq)
    engaño sustantivo masculino

    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)


    engañar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 to deceive, mislead
    2 (mentir) to lie: no me engañes, ese no es tu coche, you can't fool me, this isn't your car
    3 (la sed, el hambre, el sueño) comeremos un poco para engañar el hambre, we'll eat a bit to keep the wolf from the door
    4 (timar) to cheat, trick
    5 (ser infiel) to be unfaithful to
    II verbo intransitivo to be deceptive: parece pequeña, pero engaña, it looks small, but it's deceptive
    engaño sustantivo masculino
    1 (mentira, trampa) deception, swindle
    (estafa) fraud
    (infidelidad) unfaithfulness
    2 (ilusión, equivocación) delusion: deberías sacarle del engaño, you should tell him the truth
    ♦ Locuciones: llamarse a engaño, to claim that one has been duped
    ' engaño' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    engañarse
    - farsa
    - maña
    - montaje
    - tramar
    - trampear
    - coba
    - descubrir
    - desengañar
    - engañar
    - tapadera
    - tranza
    English:
    deceit
    - deception
    - delusion
    - double-cross
    - game
    - guile
    - impersonation
    - put over
    - ride
    - sham
    - unfaithful
    - hoax
    * * *
    1. [mentira] deception, deceit;
    se ganó su confianza con algún engaño she gained his trust through a deception;
    lo obtuvo mediante engaño she obtained it by deception;
    todo fue un engaño it was all a deception;
    llamarse a engaño [engañarse] to delude oneself;
    [lamentarse] to claim to have been misled;
    que nadie se llame a engaño, la economía no va bien let no one have any illusions about it, the economy isn't doing well;
    no nos llamemos a engaño, el programa se puede mejorar let's not delude ourselves, the program could be improved;
    para que luego no te llames a engaño so you can't claim to have been misled afterwards
    2. [estafa] swindle;
    ha sido víctima de un engaño en la compra del terreno he was swindled over the sale of the land
    3. [ardid] ploy, trick;
    de nada van a servirte tus engaños your ploys will get you nowhere;
    las rebajas son un engaño para que la gente compre lo que no necesita sales are a ploy to make people buy things they don't need
    4. Taurom bullfighter's cape
    5. [para pescar] lure
    * * *
    m
    1 ( mentira) deception, deceit
    2 ( ardid) trick;
    llamarse a engaño claim to have been cheated
    * * *
    1) : deception, trick
    2) : fake, feint (in sports)
    * * *
    1. (mentira) lie
    2. (trampa) trick
    3. (timo) swindle

    Spanish-English dictionary > engaño

  • 11 estafa

    f.
    1 swindle (timo, robo).
    2 fraud, cheat, bilk, theft.
    pres.indicat.
    3rd person singular (él/ella/ello) present indicative of spanish verb: estafar.
    imperat.
    2nd person singular (tú) Imperative of Spanish verb: estafar.
    * * *
    1 fraud, swindle
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=timo) swindle, trick
    2) (Com, Econ) racket, ramp *
    * * *
    a) (Der) fraud, criminal deception
    b) (fam) ( timo) rip-off (colloq), con (colloq)
    * * *
    = scam, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, confidence scam, con trick, con, con job.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex. The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex. He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex. The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    ----
    * estafa comercial = business scam.
    * estafa de la venta en cadena = pyramid scam.
    * * *
    a) (Der) fraud, criminal deception
    b) (fam) ( timo) rip-off (colloq), con (colloq)
    * * *
    = scam, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, confidence scam, con trick, con, con job.

    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.

    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex: The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex: He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex: The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    * estafa comercial = business scam.
    * estafa de la venta en cadena = pyramid scam.

    * * *
    1 ( Der) fraud, criminal deception
    lo han condenado por estafa y malversación de fondos he was found guilty of fraud and embezzlement
    se ha descubierto una estafa en la venta de los terrenos fraud o a swindle has been discovered involving the sale of the land
    2 ( fam) (timo) rip-off ( colloq), con ( colloq), swizz ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    Del verbo estafar: ( conjugate estafar)

    estafa es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) presente indicativo

    2ª persona singular (tú) imperativo

    Multiple Entries:
    estafa    
    estafar
    estafa sustantivo femenino

    b) (fam) ( timo) rip-off (colloq), con (colloq)

    estafar ( conjugate estafar) verbo transitivo
    a) (Der) to swindle, defraud;

    estafale algo a algn to defraud sb of sth, swindle sb out of sth
    b) (fam) ( timar) to rip … off (colloq), to con (colloq)

    estafa sustantivo femenino swindle: lo encontraron culpable de estafa, he was found guilty of fraud
    estafar verbo transitivo to swindle, cheat, trick: estafaron a un pensionista y le dejaron sin sus ahorros, they swindled the pensioner out of his entire savings
    ' estafa' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cambiazo
    - camelo
    - engaño
    - timo
    - robo
    English:
    cheat
    - con
    - fraud
    - rip-off
    - scam
    - show up
    - swindle
    - confidence
    * * *
    estafa nf
    1. [timo, robo] swindle;
    [a empresa, organización] fraud;
    fue condenado por el delito de estafa he was convicted of fraud;
    hicieron una estafa a la empresa de varios millones they swindled several million out of the company, they defrauded the company of several million
    2. Fam [precio abusivo] rip-off
    * * *
    f swindle, cheat
    * * *
    estafa nf
    : swindle, fraud
    * * *
    estafa n swindle

    Spanish-English dictionary > estafa

  • 12 estafador

    adj.
    swindling.
    m.
    swindler, con artist, cheat, cheater.
    * * *
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 racketeer, swindler, trickster
    * * *
    estafador, -a
    SM / F
    1) (=timador) swindler, trickster
    2) (Com, Econ) racketeer
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Der) fraudster
    b) (fam) ( timador) con man (colloq)
    * * *
    = con man, crook, swindler, cheater, fraudster, scammer, cuckoo in the nest, con artist, scamster, fraud, hoaxer, hoaxster.
    Ex. His supporters call him a 'smoothie', while his critics generally portray him as a 'glib con man'.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex. The title of the book is 'Net crimes & misdemeanors: outmaneuvering the spammers, swindlers, and stalkers who are targeting you online'.
    Ex. Intenrnet also enables enterprising would-be cheaters to cut and paste material for easy and relatively thought-free composition of essay assignments.
    Ex. The article 'Keeping fraudsters in check' describes computerized systems now being developed to help combat fraud.
    Ex. Phishing (also known as phising or carding) is the practice whereby a scammer who is pretending to be from a legitimate organisation, sends misleading emails requesting personal and financial details from unsuspecting people.
    Ex. This type of relgion is a cuckoo in the nest that, in the name of secular society and pluralism, is pushing out all other gods.
    Ex. This unlikely threesome of a con artist, a hit man, and an idiot find themselves in deep water when their heist doesn't go off as planned.
    Ex. Small business operators can be easy prey for scamsters trying to winkle out money for unsolicited - and unneeded - 'services'.
    Ex. You know what they say, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it must be a duck, or in this case, a lying, stealing, cheating fraud.
    Ex. In a subsequent call the hoaxer suggested that another bomb had been planted on the highway leading to the airport.
    Ex. This recent tsunami is not the first disaster to be exploited by email hoaxsters.
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Der) fraudster
    b) (fam) ( timador) con man (colloq)
    * * *
    = con man, crook, swindler, cheater, fraudster, scammer, cuckoo in the nest, con artist, scamster, fraud, hoaxer, hoaxster.

    Ex: His supporters call him a 'smoothie', while his critics generally portray him as a 'glib con man'.

    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex: The title of the book is 'Net crimes & misdemeanors: outmaneuvering the spammers, swindlers, and stalkers who are targeting you online'.
    Ex: Intenrnet also enables enterprising would-be cheaters to cut and paste material for easy and relatively thought-free composition of essay assignments.
    Ex: The article 'Keeping fraudsters in check' describes computerized systems now being developed to help combat fraud.
    Ex: Phishing (also known as phising or carding) is the practice whereby a scammer who is pretending to be from a legitimate organisation, sends misleading emails requesting personal and financial details from unsuspecting people.
    Ex: This type of relgion is a cuckoo in the nest that, in the name of secular society and pluralism, is pushing out all other gods.
    Ex: This unlikely threesome of a con artist, a hit man, and an idiot find themselves in deep water when their heist doesn't go off as planned.
    Ex: Small business operators can be easy prey for scamsters trying to winkle out money for unsolicited - and unneeded - 'services'.
    Ex: You know what they say, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it must be a duck, or in this case, a lying, stealing, cheating fraud.
    Ex: In a subsequent call the hoaxer suggested that another bomb had been planted on the highway leading to the airport.
    Ex: This recent tsunami is not the first disaster to be exploited by email hoaxsters.

    * * *
    masculine, feminine
    1 ( Der) fraudster
    2 ( fam) (timador) con man ( colloq), rip-off artist ( AmE colloq), rip-off merchant ( BrE colloq)
    * * *

    estafador
    ◊ - dora sustantivo masculino, femenino

    a) (Der) fraudster

    b) (fam) ( timador) swindler (colloq)

    estafador,-ora sustantivo masculino y femenino swindler, con man: era un estafador sin escrúpulos, he was an unscrupulous con man
    ' estafador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    estafadora
    - gancho
    - granuja
    - mangante
    - sinvergüenza
    English:
    cheat
    - con man
    - rope in
    - shark
    - swindler
    - con
    - hustler
    * * *
    estafador, -ora nm,f
    [timador] swindler; [de empresa, organización] fraudster
    * * *
    m, estafadora f con artist fam, fraudster
    * * *
    : cheat, swindler

    Spanish-English dictionary > estafador

  • 13 estúpido

    adj.
    1 stupid, foolish, dumb, empty-headed.
    2 stupid, foolish, inane, dumb.
    m.
    stupid, nitwit, fathead, numbskull.
    * * *
    1 stupid, silly
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 berk, idiot
    * * *
    1. (f. - estúpida)
    adj.
    2. (f. - estúpida)
    noun f.
    * * *
    estúpido, -a
    1.
    ADJ stupid
    2.
    SM / F idiot
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo <persona/argumento> stupid, silly

    ay, qué estúpida soy! — oh, how stupid of me!

    II
    - da masculino, femenino idiot, fool
    * * *
    = crazy [crazier -comp., craziest -sup.], dummy, foolish, silly, mindless, moron, stupid, daft [dafter -comp., daftest -sup.], mad, dumb [dumber -comp., dumbest -sup.], nuts, witless, bonehead, boneheaded, twit, dolally tap, dolally [do-lally], imbecile, cretinous, arsehole [asshole, -USA], brainless, dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], twat, nonsensical, mug, berk, prick, cretin, dumbbell, dull-witted, asinine, lemon, ditsy [ditsier -comp., ditsiest -sup.], dits, ditz, ditzy [ditzier -comp., ditziest -sup.], airhead, airheaded, duffer, schmuck, schmo, nonce, moke, twerp, dweeb, chump, birdbrained, birdbrain, off + Posesivo + knocker, off + Posesivo + rocker, dork, moonstruck, plonker.
    Ex. Lest it appear that Ms Marshall's committee and a few others of us, notoriously associated with that kind of work, are little more than crazy, fire-breathing radicals, let me add this gloss immediately.
    Ex. We are too prone to be dummy people by day, and thinking, articulate individuals only in the safety of home and leisure.
    Ex. It would be uneconomic and foolish to persevere with human assignment of controlled-language terms.
    Ex. In conclusion, I am sure you all believe me to be either idealistic, unrealistic, radical, or just plain silly.
    Ex. By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex. This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from Feeble minded, Imbecility, and morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.
    Ex. When any librarian is trying to find material on behalf of a user from a poor citation it leads to that librarian appearing slow and stupid to the user.
    Ex. Ranking among the dafter exercises sometimes imposed on children is the one that requires them to describe a screwdriver or a vase or the desks they sit at, or any familiar object.
    Ex. When J D Brown allowed the public of Islington to have open access to the books in the 1890s he was regarded by many of his colleagues as mad!.
    Ex. Techniques such as the automatic detection of anaphora enable systems to appear to be intelligent rather than dumb.
    Ex. I think some people would think my approach is nuts.
    Ex. She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Field Research for Boneheads: From Naivete to Insight on the Green Tortoise'.
    Ex. That was a big boneheaded error.
    Ex. Democracy's a nice idea in theory, if it wasn't for all the twits.
    Ex. Now I know this country of ours is totally dolally tap!.
    Ex. The server has gone dolally by the looks of it.
    Ex. The same evil is done in slaving, tormenting and killing, say, chimpanzees as is done in so injuring human imbeciles.
    Ex. It is already evident that he is a cretinous buffoon.
    Ex. Modern preppies try to be assholes, probably because they think it's cool, and never quite make it.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex. Parental protectiveness of children is surely a good thing if sensibly applied, but this nonsensical double standard doesn't help anyone.
    Ex. By this time, firecrackers and fireworks were being let off willy-nilly in the streets by any mug with a match.
    Ex. And before some berk starts whittling on about anti-car lobbies, we should all be lobbying for less car use if we've got any interest whatsoever in the future.
    Ex. Steve knows that he is a 'showboat, a little bit of a prick,' but he also knows that it's too late for a man in his fifties to change.
    Ex. Cretin is a word derived from an 18th century Swiss-French word meaning Christian.
    Ex. The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex. An army without culture is a dull-witted army, and a dull-witted army cannot defeat the enemy.
    Ex. This chapter is dedicated to the truly asinine rules -- ones which either defeat their own purpose altogether or are completely devoid of common sense.
    Ex. The court also heard the victim's brother accuse the defendant of physical abuse and of calling him a ' lemon and a retard'.
    Ex. If there is a stereo type for ditsy blondes she really has gone out of her way to fit it perfectly.
    Ex. But then again, there are thousands of such ditses out there that need mental help.
    Ex. She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex. She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex. Some people like airheads with fake boobs.
    Ex. She's just an airheaded bimbo, with an endless capacity to push aside unpleasant realities in favor of her more satisfying interests: young men and jewels.
    Ex. Plus, no matter what she did to stop people from picking on her she always ended up being called a duffer.
    Ex. Schmuck entered English as a borrowed word from Yiddish, where it is an obscene term literally meaning a foreskin or head of a penis, and an insult.
    Ex. This team of schmoes is capable of anything.
    Ex. Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex. States know better what their own citizens needs are than do the mokes in Washington.
    Ex. He started life as a twerp, then fairly quickly became a jerk and ended up an old sourpuss.
    Ex. For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    Ex. Americans are such chumps, because we refuse to see what is going on right in front of our eyes.
    Ex. She has her own birdbrained way of thinking about things, but most of what she says is vaguely prophetic.
    Ex. I am thinking humans can be such birdbrains when it comes to communication.
    Ex. Every firearm hast its pros and cons and anyone who tells you otherwise is off their knocker.
    Ex. I find it fascinating how Bradley can be perfectly reasonable one moment, and off his rocker the next.
    Ex. And then we get nongs like Joe here who just cant help himself from being a dork.
    Ex. ' Moonstruck' has all the fun of movies about weddings: a reluctant groom, an overeager bride, and an emotionally distraught family.
    Ex. If she'd been my daughter in fact I'd never have let her go out with an obvious plonker like myself.
    ----
    * algo estúpido = no-brainer.
    * como un estúpido = stupidly.
    * hacerse el estúpido = dumb down, act + dumb.
    * lo suficientemente estúpido como para = dumb enough to.
    * rubia estúpida = dumb blonde.
    * ser estúpido = be off + Posesivo + rocker.
    * típica rubia estúpida = bimbo.
    * volverse estúpido = go off + Posesivo + rocker.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo <persona/argumento> stupid, silly

    ay, qué estúpida soy! — oh, how stupid of me!

    II
    - da masculino, femenino idiot, fool
    * * *
    = crazy [crazier -comp., craziest -sup.], dummy, foolish, silly, mindless, moron, stupid, daft [dafter -comp., daftest -sup.], mad, dumb [dumber -comp., dumbest -sup.], nuts, witless, bonehead, boneheaded, twit, dolally tap, dolally [do-lally], imbecile, cretinous, arsehole [asshole, -USA], brainless, dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], twat, nonsensical, mug, berk, prick, cretin, dumbbell, dull-witted, asinine, lemon, ditsy [ditsier -comp., ditsiest -sup.], dits, ditz, ditzy [ditzier -comp., ditziest -sup.], airhead, airheaded, duffer, schmuck, schmo, nonce, moke, twerp, dweeb, chump, birdbrained, birdbrain, off + Posesivo + knocker, off + Posesivo + rocker, dork, moonstruck, plonker.

    Ex: Lest it appear that Ms Marshall's committee and a few others of us, notoriously associated with that kind of work, are little more than crazy, fire-breathing radicals, let me add this gloss immediately.

    Ex: We are too prone to be dummy people by day, and thinking, articulate individuals only in the safety of home and leisure.
    Ex: It would be uneconomic and foolish to persevere with human assignment of controlled-language terms.
    Ex: In conclusion, I am sure you all believe me to be either idealistic, unrealistic, radical, or just plain silly.
    Ex: By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex: This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from Feeble minded, Imbecility, and morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.
    Ex: When any librarian is trying to find material on behalf of a user from a poor citation it leads to that librarian appearing slow and stupid to the user.
    Ex: Ranking among the dafter exercises sometimes imposed on children is the one that requires them to describe a screwdriver or a vase or the desks they sit at, or any familiar object.
    Ex: When J D Brown allowed the public of Islington to have open access to the books in the 1890s he was regarded by many of his colleagues as mad!.
    Ex: Techniques such as the automatic detection of anaphora enable systems to appear to be intelligent rather than dumb.
    Ex: I think some people would think my approach is nuts.
    Ex: She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Field Research for Boneheads: From Naivete to Insight on the Green Tortoise'.
    Ex: That was a big boneheaded error.
    Ex: Democracy's a nice idea in theory, if it wasn't for all the twits.
    Ex: Now I know this country of ours is totally dolally tap!.
    Ex: The server has gone dolally by the looks of it.
    Ex: The same evil is done in slaving, tormenting and killing, say, chimpanzees as is done in so injuring human imbeciles.
    Ex: It is already evident that he is a cretinous buffoon.
    Ex: Modern preppies try to be assholes, probably because they think it's cool, and never quite make it.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex: Parental protectiveness of children is surely a good thing if sensibly applied, but this nonsensical double standard doesn't help anyone.
    Ex: By this time, firecrackers and fireworks were being let off willy-nilly in the streets by any mug with a match.
    Ex: And before some berk starts whittling on about anti-car lobbies, we should all be lobbying for less car use if we've got any interest whatsoever in the future.
    Ex: Steve knows that he is a 'showboat, a little bit of a prick,' but he also knows that it's too late for a man in his fifties to change.
    Ex: Cretin is a word derived from an 18th century Swiss-French word meaning Christian.
    Ex: The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex: An army without culture is a dull-witted army, and a dull-witted army cannot defeat the enemy.
    Ex: This chapter is dedicated to the truly asinine rules -- ones which either defeat their own purpose altogether or are completely devoid of common sense.
    Ex: The court also heard the victim's brother accuse the defendant of physical abuse and of calling him a ' lemon and a retard'.
    Ex: If there is a stereo type for ditsy blondes she really has gone out of her way to fit it perfectly.
    Ex: But then again, there are thousands of such ditses out there that need mental help.
    Ex: She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex: She might be a ditz, you can do that with the money she makes, if she wasn't so rich she'd be just another ditzy broad.
    Ex: Some people like airheads with fake boobs.
    Ex: She's just an airheaded bimbo, with an endless capacity to push aside unpleasant realities in favor of her more satisfying interests: young men and jewels.
    Ex: Plus, no matter what she did to stop people from picking on her she always ended up being called a duffer.
    Ex: Schmuck entered English as a borrowed word from Yiddish, where it is an obscene term literally meaning a foreskin or head of a penis, and an insult.
    Ex: This team of schmoes is capable of anything.
    Ex: Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex: States know better what their own citizens needs are than do the mokes in Washington.
    Ex: He started life as a twerp, then fairly quickly became a jerk and ended up an old sourpuss.
    Ex: For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    Ex: Americans are such chumps, because we refuse to see what is going on right in front of our eyes.
    Ex: She has her own birdbrained way of thinking about things, but most of what she says is vaguely prophetic.
    Ex: I am thinking humans can be such birdbrains when it comes to communication.
    Ex: Every firearm hast its pros and cons and anyone who tells you otherwise is off their knocker.
    Ex: I find it fascinating how Bradley can be perfectly reasonable one moment, and off his rocker the next.
    Ex: And then we get nongs like Joe here who just cant help himself from being a dork.
    Ex: ' Moonstruck' has all the fun of movies about weddings: a reluctant groom, an overeager bride, and an emotionally distraught family.
    Ex: If she'd been my daughter in fact I'd never have let her go out with an obvious plonker like myself.
    * algo estúpido = no-brainer.
    * como un estúpido = stupidly.
    * hacerse el estúpido = dumb down, act + dumb.
    * lo suficientemente estúpido como para = dumb enough to.
    * rubia estúpida = dumb blonde.
    * ser estúpido = be off + Posesivo + rocker.
    * típica rubia estúpida = bimbo.
    * volverse estúpido = go off + Posesivo + rocker.

    * * *
    estúpido1 -da
    ‹persona› stupid; ‹argumento› stupid, silly
    ay, qué estúpida, me equivoqué oh, how stupid of me, I've done it wrong
    un gasto estúpido a stupid waste of money
    es estúpido que vayamos las dos it's silly o stupid for us both to go
    estúpido2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    idiot, fool
    el estúpido de mi hermano my stupid brother
    * * *

     

    estúpido
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ persona stupid;


    argumento stupid, silly;
    ¡ay, qué estúpida soy! oh, how stupid of me!

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    idiot, fool
    estúpido,-a
    I adjetivo stupid
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino idiot

    ' estúpido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    burra
    - burro
    - estúpida
    - animal
    - apendejarse
    - baboso
    - caballo
    - el
    - embromar
    - gafo
    - huevón
    - pendejo
    English:
    also
    - believe
    - bit
    - bonehead
    - bozo
    - damn
    - dopey
    - equally
    - foolish
    - goof
    - idiotic
    - mindless
    - obtuse
    - pretty
    - shame
    - soft
    - stupid
    - that
    - wonder
    - inane
    - jerk
    * * *
    estúpido, -a
    adj
    stupid;
    ¡qué estúpido soy! me he vuelto a olvidar what an idiot I am! I've gone and forgotten again;
    sería estúpido no reconocerlo it would be foolish not to admit it
    nm,f
    idiot;
    el estúpido de mi vecino my idiot of a neighbour
    * * *
    I adj stupid
    II m, estúpida f idiot
    * * *
    estúpido, -da adj
    : stupid
    estúpido, -da n
    idiota: idiot, fool
    * * *
    estúpido1 adj stupid [comp. stupider; superl. stupidest]
    estúpido2 n stupid person / idiot

    Spanish-English dictionary > estúpido

  • 14 explotar

    v.
    1 to exploit (person).
    El tipo explota a los empleados The guy exploits the employees.
    El minero explota los recursos The miner exploits the resources.
    2 to explode.
    El minero explotó la carga The miner exploded the charge.
    La carga explotó The charge exploded.
    María explotó por la ofensa Mary exploded because of the offense.
    3 to use, to take unfair advantage of.
    El timador usó a las personas The swindler used the people.
    4 to explode on.
    Nos explotó una bomba A bomb exploded on us.
    * * *
    1 (sacar provecho) to exploit; (mina) to work; (tierra) to cultivate; (industria) to operate, run; (recursos) to tap, exploit
    2 peyorativo (personas) to exploit
    3 (bomba) to explode
    1 (explosionar) to explode, blow up
    * * *
    verb
    2) to run, operate
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=usar) [+ recursos, riquezas] to exploit; [+ planta] to run, operate; [+ mina] to work
    2) (=usar excesivamente) [+ obreros] to exploit; [+ situación] to exploit, make capital out of
    3) [+ bomba] to explode
    2.
    VI [bomba] to explode, go off

    cayó sin explotar — it fell but did not go off, it landed without going off

    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < tierra> to exploit, work; < mina> to operate, work; < negocio> to run, operate
    b) <idea/debilidad> to exploit
    2) < trabajador> to exploit
    2.
    a) bomba to explode, go off; caldera/máquina to explode, blow up
    b) (fam) persona to explode, to blow a fuse (colloq)
    * * *
    = deploy, explode, exploit, harness, tap, burst, blow up, cash in on, prey on/upon, detonate, milk, mine, blow + a fuse, ride (on) + Posesivo + coattails, go off.
    Ex. The article presents the results of trials in which the model was deployed to classify aspects of the construction industry, such as construction norms and regulations.
    Ex. Other systems also employ a thesaurus in offering the facility to explode search profiles.
    Ex. The Library of Congress List of Subject Headings (LCSH) can be exploited as a general index, since it shows LCC numbers for many of the headings listed.
    Ex. When computers were first harnessed for information retrieval and cataloguing applications, the information retrieval systems, and some of the cataloguing systems developed in different environments.
    Ex. It must be pointed out, however, that the potential for online catalogs to increase library staff productivity has hardly been tapped.
    Ex. The article 'Will the CD bubble burst: conflicting messages on the future of electronic publishing' considers the future of the CD-ROM market.
    Ex. The article 'The library has blown up!' relates the short circuit in the main electrical circuit board of Porstmouth Public Library caused by electricians who were carrying out routine work.
    Ex. At the same time, veteran fiction writers and new authors cashing in on fame from other media continued to rule the lists.
    Ex. From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    Ex. There has been an explosion in terminology detonated by developments related to XML (eXtensible Markup Language).
    Ex. A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.
    Ex. For instance, if children are doing a project work on dogs, they will hunt out anything and everything that so much as mentions them and the bits thus mined are assiduously transcribed into project folders.
    Ex. He simply blew a fuse and decided to go out on the road, spitefully apologizing again and again, until he got it right.
    Ex. Riding the coattails of Barack Obama, Democrats picked up seven seats held by Republicans in Tuesday's election to match the seven it gained two years ago.
    Ex. My hand looks like a hand grenade went off near it -- all cut up, bruised and with perforations by small bits of flying glass.
    ----
    * explotar al máximo = realise + to its full potential, realise + the potential.
    * explotar beneficios = exploit + benefits.
    * hacer explotar = blow up.
    * por explotar = untapped.
    * sin explotar = untapped, unexploded.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < tierra> to exploit, work; < mina> to operate, work; < negocio> to run, operate
    b) <idea/debilidad> to exploit
    2) < trabajador> to exploit
    2.
    a) bomba to explode, go off; caldera/máquina to explode, blow up
    b) (fam) persona to explode, to blow a fuse (colloq)
    * * *
    = deploy, explode, exploit, harness, tap, burst, blow up, cash in on, prey on/upon, detonate, milk, mine, blow + a fuse, ride (on) + Posesivo + coattails, go off.

    Ex: The article presents the results of trials in which the model was deployed to classify aspects of the construction industry, such as construction norms and regulations.

    Ex: Other systems also employ a thesaurus in offering the facility to explode search profiles.
    Ex: The Library of Congress List of Subject Headings (LCSH) can be exploited as a general index, since it shows LCC numbers for many of the headings listed.
    Ex: When computers were first harnessed for information retrieval and cataloguing applications, the information retrieval systems, and some of the cataloguing systems developed in different environments.
    Ex: It must be pointed out, however, that the potential for online catalogs to increase library staff productivity has hardly been tapped.
    Ex: The article 'Will the CD bubble burst: conflicting messages on the future of electronic publishing' considers the future of the CD-ROM market.
    Ex: The article 'The library has blown up!' relates the short circuit in the main electrical circuit board of Porstmouth Public Library caused by electricians who were carrying out routine work.
    Ex: At the same time, veteran fiction writers and new authors cashing in on fame from other media continued to rule the lists.
    Ex: From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    Ex: There has been an explosion in terminology detonated by developments related to XML (eXtensible Markup Language).
    Ex: A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.
    Ex: For instance, if children are doing a project work on dogs, they will hunt out anything and everything that so much as mentions them and the bits thus mined are assiduously transcribed into project folders.
    Ex: He simply blew a fuse and decided to go out on the road, spitefully apologizing again and again, until he got it right.
    Ex: Riding the coattails of Barack Obama, Democrats picked up seven seats held by Republicans in Tuesday's election to match the seven it gained two years ago.
    Ex: My hand looks like a hand grenade went off near it -- all cut up, bruised and with perforations by small bits of flying glass.
    * explotar al máximo = realise + to its full potential, realise + the potential.
    * explotar beneficios = exploit + benefits.
    * hacer explotar = blow up.
    * por explotar = untapped.
    * sin explotar = untapped, unexploded.

    * * *
    explotar [A1 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹tierra› to exploit, work; ‹mina› to operate, work, exploit; ‹negocio› to run, operate
    2 (sacar provecho de) to exploit
    supo explotar esta idea al máximo she knew how to exploit this idea to the full o how to make the most of this idea
    sabe explotar los puntos flacos de su rival he knows how to exploit his opponent's weak points
    B ‹trabajador› to exploit
    ■ explotar
    vi
    1 «bomba» to explode, go off; «caldera/máquina» to explode, blow up
    2 ( fam); «persona» to explode, to blow a fuse ( colloq), to go through the roof ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    explotar ( conjugate explotar) verbo transitivo
    a) tierra to exploit, work;

    mina to operate, work;
    negocio to run, operate
    b)idea/debilidad to exploit


    verbo intransitivo

    [caldera/máquina] to explode, blow up
    b) (fam) [ persona] to explode, to blow a fuse (colloq)

    explotar
    I verbo intransitivo (un artefacto) to explode, go off
    II verbo transitivo
    1 (desarrollar, utilizar) to exploit
    (una mina) to work
    (la tierra) to cultivate
    2 (a una persona) to exploit
    ' explotar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    estallar
    - jugo
    - exprimir
    English:
    blow up
    - explode
    - exploit
    - go off
    - milk
    - prey on
    - rag
    - shell-hole
    - tap
    - untapped
    - use
    - flare
    - mileage
    - prey
    - set
    - top
    - undeveloped
    - work
    * * *
    1. [niños, trabajadores] to exploit;
    en esta empresa explotan a los trabajadores this firm exploits its workers
    2. [recursos naturales] to exploit;
    [fábrica, negocio] to run, to operate; [terreno] to farm; [mina] to work
    3. [tema, asunto, situación] to exploit
    1. [bomba, explosivo, petardo] to explode, to go off;
    [globo, neumático, caldera] to explode, to burst
    2. [persona] to explode (with rage)
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 tierra, mina work, exploit
    2 situación take advantage of, exploit
    3 trabajador exploit
    II v/i go off, explode; fig
    explode, blow a fuse fam
    * * *
    1) : to exploit
    2) : to operate, to run
    estallar, reventar: to explode
    * * *
    1. (bomba, etc) to explode / to go off
    2. (mina) to work
    3. (tierra) to farm
    4. (aprovechar) to exploit

    Spanish-English dictionary > explotar

  • 15 granuja

    adj.
    rascally, impish, mischievous.
    f. & m.
    1 rogue, scoundrel (pillo).
    2 rascal, little wretch, urchin, gamin.
    3 loose grape separate from the bunch.
    4 seeds of the grape and other small fruits.
    * * *
    1 (uva) grapes plural
    1 (pilluelo) ragamuffin, urchin
    2 (estafador) crook, trickster
    * * *
    1.
    SMF (=bribón) rogue; [dicho con afecto] rascal; (=pilluelo) urchin, ragamuffin
    2.
    SF (=uvas) loose grapes pl ; (=semilla) grape seed
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.
    Ex. When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.
    Ex. The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex. The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex. He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex. It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex. The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex. Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex. This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex. Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex. And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex. In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex. In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex. Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex. He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex. The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex. Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex. In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex. He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    * * *
    masculino y femenino rascal
    * * *
    = shyster, miscreant, villain, tearaway, lager lout, street urchin, slum urchin, urchin, street arab, rascal, scallywag [scalawag, -USA], rapscallion, cad, ragamuffin, ruffian, hoodlum, swine, pig, crook.

    Ex: When loss of physical and mental rigor is accompanied by financial problems, the retiree may reject himself and fall victim to the con man and shyster.

    Ex: The forest, therefore, is regarded as the abode of robbers & sundry miscreants, implying its relation to the forces of chaos & disorder.
    Ex: The father, Old Brightwell, curses his daughter, Jane, for preferring the love of the smooth-tongued villain, Grandley, to that of her own parents.
    Ex: He acused politicians of 'losing the plot' on crime as the 'thriving yob culture' of hooligans and tearaways terrorise the streets.
    Ex: It is routine for people to complain about the 'hordes of lager louts' who turn city centres into 'no-go areas'.
    Ex: The author examines Whistler's visits to the more squalid sections of the city, his views along the Thames and his portrayals of street urchins.
    Ex: Victorian photographs of social commentary ranged from the pseudo-sentimental slum urchins of Oscar Rejlander to the stark honest portrayal of the horrible conditions of the Glascow slums by Thomas Annan.
    Ex: This is a film that that will melt hearts of stone, with its cast of scruffy urchins who learn both song and life lessons under the tutelage of a paternalistic mentor at a grim boarding school for 'difficult' boys.
    Ex: Many New York citizens blamed the street arabs for crime and violence in the city and wanted them placed in orphan homes or prisons.
    Ex: And although they may pose themselves as very religious, they are simply rascals.
    Ex: In other words, we either have morons or thugs running the White House -- or perhaps one moron, one thug, and a smattering of scalawags in between.
    Ex: In all truth, it must be said that this howling, hissing, foot-scraping body of young rapscallions found some cause for complaint.
    Ex: Not only that, but this cad has also convinced them she is losing her faculties.
    Ex: He was looking affably at the two dubious ragamuffins and, moreover, even making inviting gestures to them.
    Ex: The coroner said she had died not from drowning, but from being abused and murdered by a gang of ruffians.
    Ex: Gangs of hoodlums, aged as young as eight, are roaming the streets terrorising store owners and shoppers in broad daylight.
    Ex: In German law it is a criminal offense for A to insult B, for example, by calling him a swine.
    Ex: He was waiting for the opportunity to unleash his fury, no one calls him a pig and gets away with it.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.

    * * *
    rascal
    ¿dónde se habrá metido este granujilla? where's that little rascal o monkey got(ten) to?
    * * *

    granuja sustantivo masculino y femenino
    rascal
    granuja sustantivo masculino
    1 (pícaro) urchin
    2 (estafador, truhán) swindler
    ' granuja' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bandida
    - bandido
    - pájaro
    - sinvergüenza
    - canalla
    - pajarraco
    - rufián
    English:
    rascal
    - rogue
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    1. [pillo] rogue, scoundrel
    2. [canalla] trickster, swindler
    * * *
    m/f rascal
    * * *
    granuja nmf
    pilluelo: rascal, urchin
    * * *
    granuja adj rascal

    Spanish-English dictionary > granuja

  • 16 hacerse presa de

    (v.) = prey on/upon
    Ex. Focusing on the situation of blacks, it is argued that their original status as slaves has preyed on the US conscience & kept affirmative action intact.
    * * *
    (v.) = prey on/upon

    Ex: Focusing on the situation of blacks, it is argued that their original status as slaves has preyed on the US conscience & kept affirmative action intact.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hacerse presa de

  • 17 ideología sionista

    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    * * *

    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ideología sionista

  • 18 imbécil

    adj.
    imbecile, fatheaded, stupid, half-witted.
    f. & m.
    imbecile, idiot, blinking idiot, cretin.
    * * *
    2 familiar stupid, imbecile
    1 MEDICINA imbecile
    2 familiar idiot, imbecile
    * * *
    1. adj. 2. noun mf.
    2) idiot, fool
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=idiota) silly, stupid
    2) (Med) imbecile
    2. SMF
    1) (=idiota) imbecile, idiot

    ¡imbécil! — you idiot!

    2) (Med) imbecile
    * * *
    I
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid

    qué imbécil eres! — you're so stupid!, you're such an idiot!

    b) (Med) imbecilic
    II
    masculino y femenino
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid idiot, moron (colloq & pej)
    b) (Med) imbecile
    * * *
    = feeble minded, moron, twit, imbecile, cretinous, arsehole [asshole, -USA], dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], brainless, twat, arse, witless, mug, berk, prick, blockhead, nonce, jerk, dweeb, plonker.
    Ex. This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from feeble minded, Imbecility, and Morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.
    Ex. This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from Feeble minded, Imbecility, and morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.
    Ex. Democracy's a nice idea in theory, if it wasn't for all the twits.
    Ex. The same evil is done in slaving, tormenting and killing, say, chimpanzees as is done in so injuring human imbeciles.
    Ex. It is already evident that he is a cretinous buffoon.
    Ex. Modern preppies try to be assholes, probably because they think it's cool, and never quite make it.
    Ex. The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex. In fact, there was little doubt in his mind that Nigel was an arse of the highest order.
    Ex. She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex. By this time, firecrackers and fireworks were being let off willy-nilly in the streets by any mug with a match.
    Ex. And before some berk starts whittling on about anti-car lobbies, we should all be lobbying for less car use if we've got any interest whatsoever in the future.
    Ex. Steve knows that he is a 'showboat, a little bit of a prick,' but he also knows that it's too late for a man in his fifties to change.
    Ex. They'd all call him blockhead, the ribbing was endless.
    Ex. Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex. He started life as a twerp, then fairly quickly became a jerk and ended up an old sourpuss.
    Ex. For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    Ex. If she'd been my daughter in fact I'd never have let her go out with an obvious plonker like myself.
    * * *
    I
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid

    qué imbécil eres! — you're so stupid!, you're such an idiot!

    b) (Med) imbecilic
    II
    masculino y femenino
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid idiot, moron (colloq & pej)
    b) (Med) imbecile
    * * *
    = feeble minded, moron, twit, imbecile, cretinous, arsehole [asshole, -USA], dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], brainless, twat, arse, witless, mug, berk, prick, blockhead, nonce, jerk, dweeb, plonker.

    Ex: This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from feeble minded, Imbecility, and Morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.

    Ex: This thesaurus contains a number of wretched, insensitive cross-references, like from Dumb to DEAF, and from Feeble minded, Imbecility, and morons to MENTALLY HANDICAPPED.
    Ex: Democracy's a nice idea in theory, if it wasn't for all the twits.
    Ex: The same evil is done in slaving, tormenting and killing, say, chimpanzees as is done in so injuring human imbeciles.
    Ex: It is already evident that he is a cretinous buffoon.
    Ex: Modern preppies try to be assholes, probably because they think it's cool, and never quite make it.
    Ex: The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex: In fact, there was little doubt in his mind that Nigel was an arse of the highest order.
    Ex: She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex: By this time, firecrackers and fireworks were being let off willy-nilly in the streets by any mug with a match.
    Ex: And before some berk starts whittling on about anti-car lobbies, we should all be lobbying for less car use if we've got any interest whatsoever in the future.
    Ex: Steve knows that he is a 'showboat, a little bit of a prick,' but he also knows that it's too late for a man in his fifties to change.
    Ex: They'd all call him blockhead, the ribbing was endless.
    Ex: Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex: He started life as a twerp, then fairly quickly became a jerk and ended up an old sourpuss.
    Ex: For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    Ex: If she'd been my daughter in fact I'd never have let her go out with an obvious plonker like myself.

    * * *
    1 ( fam) (tonto) stupid
    ¡qué imbécil eres! you're so stupid!, you're such an idiot!
    2 ( Med) imbecilic
    1 ( fam) (tonto) stupid idiot, moron ( colloq pej), imbecile ( colloq pej)
    2 ( Med) imbecile
    * * *

    imbécil adjetivo
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid

    b) (Med) imbecilic

    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino
    a) (fam) ( tonto) stupid idiot, moron (colloq & pej)

    b) (Med) imbecile

    imbécil
    I adjetivo stupid, silly
    II mf idiot, fool
    ' imbécil' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    capullo
    - trompo
    - boludo
    - huevón
    - pelota
    - verdadero
    English:
    absolute
    - berk
    - call
    - dead
    - dimwit
    - dope
    - feeble-minded
    - feel
    - git
    - halfwit
    - idiot
    - imbecile
    - jerk
    - knob
    - nitwit
    - perfect
    - raving
    - stupid
    - then
    - twit
    - wally
    - weak-minded
    - ass
    - moron
    - prat
    - sucker
    * * *
    adj
    1. [tonto] stupid
    2. [enfermo] imbecile
    nmf
    1. [tonto] idiot
    2. [enfermo] imbecile
    * * *
    I adj
    1 stupid
    2 MED imbecilic
    II m/f idiot, imbecile
    * * *
    : stupid, idiotic
    1) : imbecile
    2) fam : idiot, dope
    * * *
    imbécil1 adj stupid [comp. stupider; superl. stupidest]
    imbécil2 n idiot

    Spanish-English dictionary > imbécil

  • 19 ladrón

    adj.
    thieving.
    m.
    thief, burglar, robber, housebreaker.
    * * *
    1 thieving
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (persona - que roba) thief; (- que tima, engaña) crook
    1 (enchufe) adaptor
    \
    ¡al ladrón! stop thief!
    ————————
    1 (enchufe) adaptor
    * * *
    (f. - ladrona)
    noun
    thief, robber
    * * *
    ladrón, -ona
    1.
    2.
    SM / F thief

    ¡al ladrón! — stop thief!

    ladrón/ona de guante blanco — white-collar criminal

    ladrón/ona de identidades — identity thief

    3.
    SM (Elec) adaptor
    * * *
    - drona masculino, femenino
    1) (de bolsos, coches) thief; ( de bancos) bank robber; ( de casas) burglar

    aquí son unos ladrones — (fam) they really rip you off in here (colloq)

    2) ladrón masculino (Elec) adaptor
    * * *
    = robber, thief [thieves, -pl.], burglar, crook.
    Ex. Some headings are vague and without scope notes to define them: robbers AND OUTLAWS; CRIME AND CRIMINALS; ROGUES AND VAGABONDS.
    Ex. Thieves detected by a security system seem to be largely acting on impulse, or absent-minded or trying to beat the system for sport.
    Ex. Most children can easily see that they need to read if they want to know what it is like to be a sportsman, a nurse, a burglar, a pilot, a patient in a hospital = La mayoría de los niños pueden ver fácilmente que necesitan leer si quieren conocer lo que significa ser deportista, enfermero, ladrón, piloto, paciente de hospital.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    ----
    * argot de los ladrones = thieves' cant.
    * argot secreto de los ladrones = thieves' cant.
    * ladrón de corazones = lady-killer.
    * ladrón de información = info-thief.
    * * *
    - drona masculino, femenino
    1) (de bolsos, coches) thief; ( de bancos) bank robber; ( de casas) burglar

    aquí son unos ladrones — (fam) they really rip you off in here (colloq)

    2) ladrón masculino (Elec) adaptor
    * * *
    = robber, thief [thieves, -pl.], burglar, crook.

    Ex: Some headings are vague and without scope notes to define them: robbers AND OUTLAWS; CRIME AND CRIMINALS; ROGUES AND VAGABONDS.

    Ex: Thieves detected by a security system seem to be largely acting on impulse, or absent-minded or trying to beat the system for sport.
    Ex: Most children can easily see that they need to read if they want to know what it is like to be a sportsman, a nurse, a burglar, a pilot, a patient in a hospital = La mayoría de los niños pueden ver fácilmente que necesitan leer si quieren conocer lo que significa ser deportista, enfermero, ladrón, piloto, paciente de hospital.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    * argot de los ladrones = thieves' cant.
    * argot secreto de los ladrones = thieves' cant.
    * ladrón de corazones = lady-killer.
    * ladrón de información = info-thief.

    * * *
    ( fam); thieving ( before n)
    son muy ladrones en ese restaurante they're such crooks o they really rip you off in that restaurant ( colloq)
    masculine, feminine
    A (de bolsos, coches) thief; (de bancos) bank robber; (de casas) burglar
    en esta tienda son unos ladrones ( fam); they're real crooks in this store ( colloq), they really rip you off in this store ( colloq)
    el que roba a un ladrón tiene cien años de perdón it's no crime to steal from a thief
    piensa el ladrón que todos son de su condición evildoers always think the worst of others
    B
    ladrón masculine ( Elec) adaptor
    * * *

     

    ladrón
    ◊ - drona sustantivo masculino, femenino

    1 (de bolsos, coches) thief;
    ( de bancos) bank robber;
    ( de casas) burglar
    2
    ladrón sustantivo masculino (Elec) adaptor

    ladrón,-ona
    I sustantivo masculino y femenino thief, robber: ¡al ladrón!, stop thief!
    II m Elec multiple socket o adaptor
    La traducción más fácil y más general es thief. Robber implica alguna forma de agresividad. También existe la palabra burglar, que describe a la persona que entra en una casa con intención de robar. ➣ Ver nota en robar.
    ' ladrón' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    asaltante
    - bandida
    - bandido
    - choriza
    - chorizo
    - descolgarse
    - ladrona
    - mangante
    - robar
    - salir
    - suelta
    - suelto
    - ahuyentar
    - caza
    - coger
    - introducir
    - penetrar
    - quitar
    - ratero
    - reducir
    - sinvergüenza
    English:
    adapter
    - adaptor
    - arm
    - blurt out
    - burglar
    - catch
    - get
    - ghoul
    - hear of
    - robber
    - shoplifter
    - thief
    - throw off
    - chase
    - pursuit
    - rustler
    - shop
    - suggest
    * * *
    ladrón, -ona
    adj
    thieving;
    en esa tienda son muy ladrones they're real crooks in that shop
    nm,f
    [persona] [de coches] thief; [de bancos] robber; [de casas] burglar;
    ese tendero es un ladrón that shopkeeper is a crook;
    cree o [m5] piensa el ladrón que todos son de su condición evildoers expect the worst of everyone
    ladrón de guante blanco gentleman burglar o thief; Am ladrón y poli [juego infantil] cops and robbers
    nm
    [para enchufes] adaptor
    * * *
    1 m EL fam
    adapter
    2 m, ladrona f thief
    * * *
    ladrón, - drona n, mpl
    ladrones : robber, thief, burglar
    * * *
    1. (en general) thief [pl. thieves]
    2. (en una casa) burglar
    3. (en un banco) robber

    Spanish-English dictionary > ladrón

  • 20 memo

    adj.
    silly, stupid, brainless.
    m.
    1 memo, written note, memorandum.
    2 fool, dunce, simpleton, dweeb.
    * * *
    1 familiar stupid, dim
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 familiar dummy, moron
    * * *
    I memo, -a *
    1.
    ADJ silly, stupid
    2.
    SM / F idiot
    II
    * SM memo *, memorandum
    * * *
    I
    - ma adjetivo (Esp fam) stupid, dumb (colloq)
    II
    - ma masculino, femenino
    1) (Esp fam) idiot, peabrain (colloq)
    2) memo masculino ( memorándum) memo
    * * *
    = goofy [goofier -comp., goofiest -sup.], dullard, dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], brainless, twat, witless, dumbbell, dull-witted, asinine, nonce, gaga, dweeb.
    Ex. The article 'Book pricing: economics of a goofy business' examines briefly the economics of the book publishing process from the viewpoint of the book wholesaler.
    Ex. The dullard's envy of brilliant men is always assuaged by the suspicion that they will come to bad end.
    Ex. The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex. I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex. She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex. The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex. An army without culture is a dull-witted army, and a dull-witted army cannot defeat the enemy.
    Ex. This chapter is dedicated to the truly asinine rules -- ones which either defeat their own purpose altogether or are completely devoid of common sense.
    Ex. Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex. So if Ellen and Baltar are anything to go by, it seems exceptionally smart people are a bit gaga.
    Ex. For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.
    * * *
    I
    - ma adjetivo (Esp fam) stupid, dumb (colloq)
    II
    - ma masculino, femenino
    1) (Esp fam) idiot, peabrain (colloq)
    2) memo masculino ( memorándum) memo
    * * *
    = goofy [goofier -comp., goofiest -sup.], dullard, dimwit, dim-witted [dimwitted], brainless, twat, witless, dumbbell, dull-witted, asinine, nonce, gaga, dweeb.

    Ex: The article 'Book pricing: economics of a goofy business' examines briefly the economics of the book publishing process from the viewpoint of the book wholesaler.

    Ex: The dullard's envy of brilliant men is always assuaged by the suspicion that they will come to bad end.
    Ex: The diplomats have been calling him a lucky dimwit ever since.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: From that point on, the film is not only stupid, it's dim-witted, brainless and obtuse to the point of being insulting to the audience.
    Ex: I don't really care if he does like real ale, even if his arse was hung with diamonds he would still be a twat.
    Ex: She refutes the idea of the women's magazine as a 'mouthpiece of masculine interest, of patriarchy and commercialism' that preyed on 'passive, dependent, and witless' women readers.
    Ex: The Wizard, played by Joel Grey, is a smooth-talking dumbbell who admits he is 'a corn-fed hick' and 'one of your dime-a-dozen mediocrities'.
    Ex: An army without culture is a dull-witted army, and a dull-witted army cannot defeat the enemy.
    Ex: This chapter is dedicated to the truly asinine rules -- ones which either defeat their own purpose altogether or are completely devoid of common sense.
    Ex: Justin, whilst clearly a nonce, is to be commended on instigating a high-profile campaign to free the hostages.
    Ex: So if Ellen and Baltar are anything to go by, it seems exceptionally smart people are a bit gaga.
    Ex: For this reason, I will probably not vote in the London mayoral election at all and this doesn't make me a whinging negativist dweeb.

    * * *
    memo1 -ma
    ( fam); stupid, dumb ( colloq)
    no seas memo don't be so stupid o dumb
    ¡no te quedes ahí mirando como si estuvieras mema! don't just stand there like an idiot!
    memo2 -ma
    masculine, feminine
    A ( Esp fam) idiot, peabrain ( colloq), dummy ( colloq)
    B
    * * *

    memo,-a insult
    I adjetivo silly, stupid
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino idiot
    ' memo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    boluda
    - boludo
    - mema
    - circular
    - memorándum
    English:
    memo
    - nitwit
    - soft-headed
    - goofy
    * * *
    memo, -a Esp
    adj
    stupid
    nm,f
    idiot, fool
    * * *
    fam
    I adj dumb fam
    II m, mema f idiot
    * * *
    memo, -ma adj
    : silly, stupid
    * * *
    memo1 adj silly [comp. sillier; superl. silliest]
    memo2 n idiot

    Spanish-English dictionary > memo

См. также в других словарях:

  • Preyed — Prey Prey, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Preyed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preying}.] [OF. preier, preer, L. praedari, fr. praeda. See {Prey}, n.] To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by violence. [1913 Webster] More pity that the eagle should… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preyed — preɪ n. creature that is hunted and killed for food; victim, casualty v. hunt and kill for food; take advantage of, victimize …   English contemporary dictionary

  • preyed upon — index aggrieved (harmed) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • preyed upon — was victimized, was hunted and eaten by an animal …   English contemporary dictionary

  • North American river otter — Conservation status Least Concern …   Wikipedia

  • prey — [[t]pre͟ɪ[/t]] preys, preying, preyed 1) N UNCOUNT COLL: usu with poss A creature s prey are the creatures that it hunts and eats in order to live. → See also bird of prey Electric rays stun their prey with huge electrical discharges... These… …   English dictionary

  • prey on — or[prey upon] {v.} 1. To habitually kill and eat; catch for food. * /Cats prey on mice./ 2. To capture or take in spoils of war or robbery. * /Pirates preyed on American ships in the years just after the Revolutionary War./ 3. To cheat; rob. *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • prey on — or[prey upon] {v.} 1. To habitually kill and eat; catch for food. * /Cats prey on mice./ 2. To capture or take in spoils of war or robbery. * /Pirates preyed on American ships in the years just after the Revolutionary War./ 3. To cheat; rob. *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Predation — For alternative meanings of predator and prey, see Predator (disambiguation) and Prey (disambiguation). Predating can also mean dating earlier than : see wiktionary:predate. Indian Python swallowing a small Chital deer at Mudumalai National Park …   Wikipedia

  • Coastal fish — Schooling threadfin, a coastal species Coastal fish, also called offshore fish or neritic fish, are fish that inhabit the sea between the shoreline and the edge of the continental shelf. Since the continental shelf is usually less than 200 metres …   Wikipedia

  • European polecat — This article is about a species of mammal referred to as polecat . For other uses, see Polecat (disambiguation). European polecat Temporal range: Middle Pleistocene – Recent Welsh polecat (Mustela p. anglia) at the British Wildlife Centre,… …   Wikipedia


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