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one who seeks evasions

  • 1 bovinator

    bŏvīnātor, ōris, m. [bovinor].
    I.
    A brawler, blusterer, reviler, acc. to the Gloss.: bovinatores thorubopoioi, thrullon poiountes ê tarachên; v. bovinor.—
    II.
    = tergiversator, one who seeks evasions (the figure drawn perh. from the holding back of draught cattle), Lucil. ap. Gell. 11, 7, 9; cf. Non. p. 79, 26.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > bovinator

  • 2 agripeta

        agripeta ae, m    [ager + PET-], a colonist, one who seeks land to cultivate, C. (twice).
    * * *
    settler, one who searches for land; land-grabber, squatter, one who seizes it

    Latin-English dictionary > agripeta

  • 3 conciliō

        conciliō āvī, ātus, āre    [concilium], to bring together, unite, reconcile, make friendly, win over, conciliate: nos: inter nos legiones sibi pecuniā: homines inter se: homines sibi conciliari amiciores, N.: civitates amicitiā Caesari, Cs.: primoribus se patrum, L.: arma quae sibi conciliet, seeks as allies, V.: deos homini, O.: reges, N.: animos hominum: mihi sceptra Iovemque, i. e. the throne through the favor of Jupiter, V.—To procure, purchase, obtain, acquire, win, gain: prodi, male conciliate, you bad bargain, T.: HS viciens ex hoc uno genere, to extort: pecuniae conciliandae causā.—Fig., to cause, bring about, procure, mediate, acquire, make, produce: pacem, T.: favorem ad volgum, L.: quocum mihi amicitiam: vestram ad me audiendum benevolentiam: maiestatem nomini Romano, L.: otium, N.— To commend: artes suas (alicui), O.
    * * *
    conciliare, conciliavi, conciliatus V TRANS
    unite, bring together/about; cause; win over, attract; acquire, procure, buy; attract favor of, render favorably disposed; commend, endear; acquire; gain; bring a woman to man as wife, match; procure as a mistress; obtain improperly

    Latin-English dictionary > conciliō

  • 4 intus

        intus adv.,    on the inside, within: intus est hostis: estne frater intus? T.: Format natura nos intus, H.: in animis: in aede, L.: extra et intus hostem habere, Cs.: clausi (tauri), in the stalls, V.: intus Digna geri, i. e. in private, H.: adductos intus agere equos, closer to the goal, O.: tali intus templo, V.—Prov.: omnia intus canere, on the inner side (of the cithara), i. e. to oneself: hoc carmen non vobis sed sibi intus canit, i. e. seeks his own interest.—To the inside, into, within, in: ducitur intus, O.—From within: obsera ostium, T.: unde nisi intus Monstratum? i. e. by instinct, H.
    * * *
    within, on the inside, inside; at home

    Latin-English dictionary > intus

  • 5 prae-struō

        prae-struō ūxī, ūctus, ere,    to build before, block, stop up, make impassable, make inaccessible: aditum obice montis, O.: Porta Fonte fuit praestructa, stopped up, O.: Hospitis effugio omnia, against the escape, O.—Fig.: fraus fidem in parvis sibi praestruit, seeks to win confidence beforehand, L.

    Latin-English dictionary > prae-struō

  • 6 adfectrix

    aspirant (female); she who seeks/strives for (thing)

    Latin-English dictionary > adfectrix

  • 7 adsectator

    follower, companion, attendant; disciple; researcher, student, one who seeks

    Latin-English dictionary > adsectator

  • 8 affectrix

    aspirant (female); she who seeks/strives for (thing)

    Latin-English dictionary > affectrix

  • 9 antisophista

    one who seeks to refute another, opponent in argument; counter-sophist

    Latin-English dictionary > antisophista

  • 10 antisophistes

    one who seeks to refute another, opponent in argument; counter-sophist

    Latin-English dictionary > antisophistes

  • 11 assectator

    follower, companion, attendant; disciple; researcher, student, one who seeks

    Latin-English dictionary > assectator

  • 12 bovinator

    one who rails/reviles?; brawler (L+S), blusterer; one who seeks evasion

    Latin-English dictionary > bovinator

  • 13 altercatio

    altercātĭo, ōnis, f. [id.], a strife or contest in words, a dispute, debate; either with or without passion: amoibaios logos, Gloss. Philox. (perh. not entirely dignified, since Cic. uses it several times in his Epistt. and philos. writings; but in his Oratt. disceptatio and contentio generally take its place).
    I.
    In gen.: in pauciores avidos altercatio est, * Plaut. Aul. 3, 5, 11:

    dies consumptus est altercatione Lentuli consulis et Caninii tribuni plebis,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 2:

    redeo ad altercationem,

    id. Att. 1, 16 med.; so id. ib. 4, 13:

    oritur mihi magna de re altercatio cum Velleio,

    id. N. D. 1, 6, 15; Liv. 4, 6:

    magna ibi non disceptatio modo, sed etiam altercatio fuit,

    id. 38, 32; 1, 7; 10, 40;

    35, 17: Cn. Domitius collegae suo altercatione ortā objecit, quod etc.,

    Val. Max. 9, 1, 4; Tac. H. 4, 7:

    verborum altercatio,

    Scrib. Comp. 181:

    in altercatione barbam invadere,

    Suet. Caes. 71.—
    II.
    Esp., in rhet., an altercation; a kind of discourse in a court of justice, which is not continuous, but where one seeks to vanquish his opponent by interposed questions, sometimes mingled with abuse (cf. Quint. 6, 3, 4; 4, 1, 28, and altercor, II.), Cic. Brut. 44, 164.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > altercatio

  • 14 ambitiose

    ambĭtĭōsus, a, um, adj. [ambitio].
    I.
    (Very rare and mostly poet.) Going round, encompassing; poet., embracing, twining round:

    lascivis hederis ambitiosior,

    Hor. C. 1, 36, 20 (cf.:

    undique ambientibus ramis,

    Curt. 4, 7, 16).—Of a river, making circuits, having many windings:

    Jordanes amnis ambitiosus,

    Plin. 5, 15, 15, § 71.— Of oratorical ornament, excessive, superfluous:

    vir bonus ambitiosa recidet Ornamenta,

    Hor. A. P. 447.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    That asks for a thing fawningly; esp., that solicits the favor, good-will, etc., of any one, in a good and bad sense, honor-loving, ambitious, courting favor; vain, vainglorious, conceited, etc.:

    qui ita sit ambitiosus, ut omnes vos nosque cotidie persalutet,

    Cic. Fl. 18:

    homo minime ambitiosus, minime in rogando molestus,

    id. Fam. 13, 1:

    ne forte me in Graecos tam ambitiosum factum esse mirere,

    desirous of the favor of the Greeks, id. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 2:

    pro nostris ut sis ambitiosa malis, Ov P. 3, 1, 84: pro nato caerula mater Ambitiosa suo fuit,

    i.e. begs fawningly of Vulcan for weapons for her son, id. M. 13, 289:

    malis artibus ambitiosus,

    seeking to ingratiate one's self, Tac. H. 2, 57:

    salubris magis princeps quam ambitiosus,

    Suet. Aug. 42 al. —
    B.
    Pass., that is willingly solicited or entreated, ambitious; much sought, honored, admired:

    ambitiosus et qui ambit et qui ambitur,

    Gell. 9, 12:

    turba caelestes ambitiosa sumus,

    Ov. F. 5, 298:

    sexus muliebris saevus, ambitiosus, potestatis avidus,

    Tac. A. 3, 33: si locuples hostis est, avari;

    si pauper, ambitiosi,

    id. Agr. 30:

    nota quidem sed non ambitiosa domus,

    not sought after, Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 18 Jahn: ambitiosae pulchritudinis scortum. Just. 30, 2. —
    C.
    Of things, vain, ostentatious:

    amicitiae,

    founded merely on the desire to please, interested, Cic. Att. 1, 18:

    rogationes,

    id. Fam. 6, 12; so id. ib. 6, 6:

    gloriandi genus,

    Quint. 11, 1, 22:

    preces,

    urgent, Tac. H. 2, 49:

    sententiae,

    Suet. Dom. 8: mors, ambitious, i. e. to obtain fame, Tac. Agr. 42:

    medicina ars,

    boastful, Plin. 29, 1, 8, § 20:

    et quaesitorum pelago terrāque ciborum Ambitiosa fames,

    Luc. 4, 376:

    atria,

    splendid, gorgeous, Mart. 12, 69:

    ambitiosis utilia praeferre,

    Quint. 1, 2, 27:

    ambitiosius id existimans quam domi suae majestas postularet,

    more condescending, submissive, Suet. Aug. 25.—
    D.
    In rhet.: orator ambitiosus, who seeks to rouse attention by obsolete or unusual expressions:

    antigerio nemo nisi ambitiosus utetur,

    Quint. 8, 3, 26.—Hence, adv.: ambĭtĭōsē, ambitiously, ostentatiously, etc.:

    de triumpho ambitiose agere,

    Cic. Att. 15, 1:

    ambitiose regnum petere,

    Liv. 1, 35: amicitias ambitiose colere, Tac. [p. 103] H. 1, 10 al.— Comp., Cic. Fam. 3, 7.— Sup., Quint. 6, 3, 68.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ambitiose

  • 15 ambitiosus

    ambĭtĭōsus, a, um, adj. [ambitio].
    I.
    (Very rare and mostly poet.) Going round, encompassing; poet., embracing, twining round:

    lascivis hederis ambitiosior,

    Hor. C. 1, 36, 20 (cf.:

    undique ambientibus ramis,

    Curt. 4, 7, 16).—Of a river, making circuits, having many windings:

    Jordanes amnis ambitiosus,

    Plin. 5, 15, 15, § 71.— Of oratorical ornament, excessive, superfluous:

    vir bonus ambitiosa recidet Ornamenta,

    Hor. A. P. 447.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    That asks for a thing fawningly; esp., that solicits the favor, good-will, etc., of any one, in a good and bad sense, honor-loving, ambitious, courting favor; vain, vainglorious, conceited, etc.:

    qui ita sit ambitiosus, ut omnes vos nosque cotidie persalutet,

    Cic. Fl. 18:

    homo minime ambitiosus, minime in rogando molestus,

    id. Fam. 13, 1:

    ne forte me in Graecos tam ambitiosum factum esse mirere,

    desirous of the favor of the Greeks, id. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 2:

    pro nostris ut sis ambitiosa malis, Ov P. 3, 1, 84: pro nato caerula mater Ambitiosa suo fuit,

    i.e. begs fawningly of Vulcan for weapons for her son, id. M. 13, 289:

    malis artibus ambitiosus,

    seeking to ingratiate one's self, Tac. H. 2, 57:

    salubris magis princeps quam ambitiosus,

    Suet. Aug. 42 al. —
    B.
    Pass., that is willingly solicited or entreated, ambitious; much sought, honored, admired:

    ambitiosus et qui ambit et qui ambitur,

    Gell. 9, 12:

    turba caelestes ambitiosa sumus,

    Ov. F. 5, 298:

    sexus muliebris saevus, ambitiosus, potestatis avidus,

    Tac. A. 3, 33: si locuples hostis est, avari;

    si pauper, ambitiosi,

    id. Agr. 30:

    nota quidem sed non ambitiosa domus,

    not sought after, Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 18 Jahn: ambitiosae pulchritudinis scortum. Just. 30, 2. —
    C.
    Of things, vain, ostentatious:

    amicitiae,

    founded merely on the desire to please, interested, Cic. Att. 1, 18:

    rogationes,

    id. Fam. 6, 12; so id. ib. 6, 6:

    gloriandi genus,

    Quint. 11, 1, 22:

    preces,

    urgent, Tac. H. 2, 49:

    sententiae,

    Suet. Dom. 8: mors, ambitious, i. e. to obtain fame, Tac. Agr. 42:

    medicina ars,

    boastful, Plin. 29, 1, 8, § 20:

    et quaesitorum pelago terrāque ciborum Ambitiosa fames,

    Luc. 4, 376:

    atria,

    splendid, gorgeous, Mart. 12, 69:

    ambitiosis utilia praeferre,

    Quint. 1, 2, 27:

    ambitiosius id existimans quam domi suae majestas postularet,

    more condescending, submissive, Suet. Aug. 25.—
    D.
    In rhet.: orator ambitiosus, who seeks to rouse attention by obsolete or unusual expressions:

    antigerio nemo nisi ambitiosus utetur,

    Quint. 8, 3, 26.—Hence, adv.: ambĭtĭōsē, ambitiously, ostentatiously, etc.:

    de triumpho ambitiose agere,

    Cic. Att. 15, 1:

    ambitiose regnum petere,

    Liv. 1, 35: amicitias ambitiose colere, Tac. [p. 103] H. 1, 10 al.— Comp., Cic. Fam. 3, 7.— Sup., Quint. 6, 3, 68.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ambitiosus

  • 16 campe

    campē (Col. poët. 10, 324; 10, 366), ēs (the Lat. form of the nom. campa is not used), f., = kampê.
    * I.
    A turning, writhing:

    campas dicere,

    to seek evasions, Plaut. Truc. 5, 50.—
    II.
    A caterpillar, pure Lat. eruca, Col. l. l. (cf. id. 11, 3, 63, kampai); Pall. 1, 35, 6 and 13.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > campe

  • 17 candidata

    1.
    candĭdātus, a, um, adj. [candidus, like albatus, atratus, from albus, ater].
    I.
    In adj. uses,
    A.
    Lit., clothed in white (only in Plaut. and in post-Aug. prose;

    Cic., Hor., and Plin. use albatus): aequius vos erat Candidatas venire hostiatasque,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 5, 12:

    mastigia,

    id. Cas. 2, 8, 10; *Suet. Aug. 98; Prud. steph. 1, 67.—
    B.
    Trop.:

    farinulentā cinere sordide candidati homunculi,

    App. M. 9, p. 222, 33; cf. candido.—
    II.
    Subst.
    A.
    candĭdātus. i, m., a candidate for office, because clothed in a glittering white toga; cf. Dict. of Antiq. (class. and freq.).
    1.
    Lit.:

    praetorius,

    a candidate for the prœtorship, Cic. Mur. 27, 57:

    tribunicii,

    id. Q. Fr. 2, 14 (15), 4; Liv. 4, 6, 10:

    consulatus,

    Plin. Pan. 95 fin.; Suet. Caes. 24; id. Aug. 4:

    aedilitatis ac mox praeturae,

    id. Vesp. 2:

    quaesturae,

    id. Tib. 42:

    summae equestris gradus, i. e. praefecturae,

    id. Galb. 14:

    sacerdotiorum,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 28, 2.—

    From their obsequious demeanor towards the electors, called officiosissima natio candidatorum,

    Cic. Pis. 23, 55:

    improbitati irasci candidatorum,

    id. Mil. 16, 42:

    aedilitas alicui candidato data,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 14, § 37:

    candidatus Caesaris,

    a candidate especially recommended by Cœsar, Vell. 2, 124, 4; cf. Suet. Caes. 41; id. Aug. 56; Tac. A. 1, 15.—Hence prov.:

    petis tamquam Caesaris candidatus,

    i. e. certain of the result, Quint. 6, 3, 62.—In the time of the emperors:

    candidati Principis,

    quœstors appointed by the emperor himself to read his speeches and rescripts, Dig. 1, 13; Sid. Ep. 2, 80; cf. Tac. A. 16, 27; Suet. Aug. 65; id. Tit. 6.—
    2.
    Trop., he who strives after or aims at a thing, a candidate or a claimant of something (post-Aug.):

    candidatus non consulatus tantum, sed immortalitatis et gloriae,

    Plin. Pan. 63, 1:

    majus est opus atque praestantius, ad quod ipse (sc. orator) tendit, et cujus est velut candidatus,

    Quint. 12, 2, 27:

    Atticae eloquentiae, id. prooem. § 13: crucis,

    i. e. soon to suffer crucifixion, App. M. 1, p. 108:

    aeternitatis,

    Tert. Res Carn. 58:

    philosophiae,

    Symm. Ep. 1, 41.—
    B.
    candĭdāta, ae, f., one who seeks or solicits an office, a candidate (rare and postAug.):

    sacerdotii,

    Quint. Decl. 252 fin.
    2.
    candĭdātus, ūs, m. [id.], a candidacy, Cod. Th. 6, 4, 21, § 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > candidata

  • 18 candidatus

    1.
    candĭdātus, a, um, adj. [candidus, like albatus, atratus, from albus, ater].
    I.
    In adj. uses,
    A.
    Lit., clothed in white (only in Plaut. and in post-Aug. prose;

    Cic., Hor., and Plin. use albatus): aequius vos erat Candidatas venire hostiatasque,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 5, 12:

    mastigia,

    id. Cas. 2, 8, 10; *Suet. Aug. 98; Prud. steph. 1, 67.—
    B.
    Trop.:

    farinulentā cinere sordide candidati homunculi,

    App. M. 9, p. 222, 33; cf. candido.—
    II.
    Subst.
    A.
    candĭdātus. i, m., a candidate for office, because clothed in a glittering white toga; cf. Dict. of Antiq. (class. and freq.).
    1.
    Lit.:

    praetorius,

    a candidate for the prœtorship, Cic. Mur. 27, 57:

    tribunicii,

    id. Q. Fr. 2, 14 (15), 4; Liv. 4, 6, 10:

    consulatus,

    Plin. Pan. 95 fin.; Suet. Caes. 24; id. Aug. 4:

    aedilitatis ac mox praeturae,

    id. Vesp. 2:

    quaesturae,

    id. Tib. 42:

    summae equestris gradus, i. e. praefecturae,

    id. Galb. 14:

    sacerdotiorum,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 28, 2.—

    From their obsequious demeanor towards the electors, called officiosissima natio candidatorum,

    Cic. Pis. 23, 55:

    improbitati irasci candidatorum,

    id. Mil. 16, 42:

    aedilitas alicui candidato data,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 14, § 37:

    candidatus Caesaris,

    a candidate especially recommended by Cœsar, Vell. 2, 124, 4; cf. Suet. Caes. 41; id. Aug. 56; Tac. A. 1, 15.—Hence prov.:

    petis tamquam Caesaris candidatus,

    i. e. certain of the result, Quint. 6, 3, 62.—In the time of the emperors:

    candidati Principis,

    quœstors appointed by the emperor himself to read his speeches and rescripts, Dig. 1, 13; Sid. Ep. 2, 80; cf. Tac. A. 16, 27; Suet. Aug. 65; id. Tit. 6.—
    2.
    Trop., he who strives after or aims at a thing, a candidate or a claimant of something (post-Aug.):

    candidatus non consulatus tantum, sed immortalitatis et gloriae,

    Plin. Pan. 63, 1:

    majus est opus atque praestantius, ad quod ipse (sc. orator) tendit, et cujus est velut candidatus,

    Quint. 12, 2, 27:

    Atticae eloquentiae, id. prooem. § 13: crucis,

    i. e. soon to suffer crucifixion, App. M. 1, p. 108:

    aeternitatis,

    Tert. Res Carn. 58:

    philosophiae,

    Symm. Ep. 1, 41.—
    B.
    candĭdāta, ae, f., one who seeks or solicits an office, a candidate (rare and postAug.):

    sacerdotii,

    Quint. Decl. 252 fin.
    2.
    candĭdātus, ūs, m. [id.], a candidacy, Cod. Th. 6, 4, 21, § 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > candidatus

  • 19 cavillatrix

    căvillātrix, īcis, f. [cavillator, II.] (only twice in Quint.), she who seeks to take by sophistry:

    conclusio,

    Quint. 7, 3, 14; hence also sophistry, id. 2, 15, 25.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > cavillatrix

  • 20 factiosus

    factĭōsus, a, um, adj. [factio, II.], that has or seeks to form a party, powerful or eager for power, factious, seditious (class.;

    syn.: perduellis, seditiosus, tumultuosus, turbulentus, potens, praepotens): homo dives, factiosus,

    a demagogue, Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 50:

    potens et factiosus,

    Auct. Her. 2, 26, 40:

    homo (with potens),

    Nep. Ages. 1:

    exsistunt in re publica plerumque largitores et factiosi, ut opes quam maximas consequantur, et sint vi potius superiores quam justitia pares,

    Cic. Off. 1, 19, 64:

    non divitiis cum divite, neque factione cum factioso, certabat,

    Sall. C. 54, 5; id. J. 31, 15 Dietsch:

    vel optimatium vel factiosa tyrannis illa vel regia, etc.,

    i. e. oligarchical, Cic. Rep. 1, 29, 45: linguă factiosi, busy with the tongue, i. e. promising a great deal, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 13.— Comp.:

    mulier,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 21.— Sup.:

    quisque,

    Plin. Ep. 4, 9, 5. —
    * Adv.: factĭōse, mightily, powerfully, Sid. Ep. 4, 24.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > factiosus

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