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obsolesced

  • 1 anticuarse

    pron.v.
    to become antiquated, to get out of date.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ ADECUAR], like link=adecuar adecuar
    1 to become antiquated, become obsolete
    * * *
    VPR (Ling etc) to become antiquated, go out of date; [técnica] to become obsolete
    * * *
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    * * *

    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.

    * * *
    to become old-fashioned
    * * *
    v/r become old-fashioned

    Spanish-English dictionary > anticuarse

  • 2 desactualizarse

    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    * * *

    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.

    Spanish-English dictionary > desactualizarse

  • 3 desvanecerse

    1 (disiparse) to disperse, clear
    2 figurado (desaparecer) to vanish, disappear; (recuerdos) to fade
    3 figurado (demayarse) to faint
    * * *
    2) fade
    * * *
    VPR
    1) (=desaparecer) [humo, niebla] to clear, disperse; [recuerdo, sonido] to fade, fade away; [duda] to be dispelled
    2) (Med) to faint
    3) (Quím) to evaporate
    * * *
    = fade (away/out), fall into + obscurity, fall out, perish, vanish, evaporate, dissolve, wither, banish, blow away, fizzle out, etherealise [etherealize, -USA], fade into + obscurity, fade into + oblivion, disappear into + the blue, vanish into + the blue, wear off.
    Ex. Trails that are not frequently followed are prone to fade, items are not fully permanent, memory is transitory.
    Ex. The acid rain literature illustrated the 1st paradigm, where journals from the unadjusted literature were thrust forward in the adjusted literature, and no unadjusted journal fell into obscurity.
    Ex. So when the 1908 ALA rules superseded Cutter's rules, the whole provision for bringing together editions fell out, and we didn't have them until the AACR.
    Ex. A data base must respond to a dynamic reality in which terms, 'strain, crack and sometimes break under the burden, under the tension, slip, slide, perish, decay with imprecision, will not stay in place, will not stay still'.
    Ex. She seized her sweater and purse and vanished.
    Ex. It is pointless to create interest if it is then allowed to evaporate because the books cannot be obtained.
    Ex. He adjusted himself comfortably in the chair, overlapped his legs, and blew a smoke ring that dissolved two feet above her head.
    Ex. The article 'Whither libraries? or, wither libraries' urges the profession to seriously consider its role in an electronic society.
    Ex. Microcomputers sets the stage for an interactive environment that can banish the 'master-slave' architecture of television and its progeny, the culture of passivity.
    Ex. Its prediction that, with the passing of years, the taint of scandal will blow away, looks over-optimistic.
    Ex. Over the weekend, she started three articles and each one fizzled out for lack of inspiration.
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex. But he may be put under house arrest, a dire fate for a man who is terrified of fading into obscurity.
    Ex. The music industry as we know it is slowly fading into oblivion.
    Ex. We're all puzzled by the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle where hundreds of boats and planes have disappeared into the blue leaving no trace at all.
    Ex. All about the plane round puffs of white smoke suddenly appeared, broke, and vanished into the blue.
    Ex. We're all familiar with the idea of novelty value and how it wears off with time.
    ----
    * desvanecerse la luz = light + fail.
    * * *
    = fade (away/out), fall into + obscurity, fall out, perish, vanish, evaporate, dissolve, wither, banish, blow away, fizzle out, etherealise [etherealize, -USA], fade into + obscurity, fade into + oblivion, disappear into + the blue, vanish into + the blue, wear off.

    Ex: Trails that are not frequently followed are prone to fade, items are not fully permanent, memory is transitory.

    Ex: The acid rain literature illustrated the 1st paradigm, where journals from the unadjusted literature were thrust forward in the adjusted literature, and no unadjusted journal fell into obscurity.
    Ex: So when the 1908 ALA rules superseded Cutter's rules, the whole provision for bringing together editions fell out, and we didn't have them until the AACR.
    Ex: A data base must respond to a dynamic reality in which terms, 'strain, crack and sometimes break under the burden, under the tension, slip, slide, perish, decay with imprecision, will not stay in place, will not stay still'.
    Ex: She seized her sweater and purse and vanished.
    Ex: It is pointless to create interest if it is then allowed to evaporate because the books cannot be obtained.
    Ex: He adjusted himself comfortably in the chair, overlapped his legs, and blew a smoke ring that dissolved two feet above her head.
    Ex: The article 'Whither libraries? or, wither libraries' urges the profession to seriously consider its role in an electronic society.
    Ex: Microcomputers sets the stage for an interactive environment that can banish the 'master-slave' architecture of television and its progeny, the culture of passivity.
    Ex: Its prediction that, with the passing of years, the taint of scandal will blow away, looks over-optimistic.
    Ex: Over the weekend, she started three articles and each one fizzled out for lack of inspiration.
    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex: But he may be put under house arrest, a dire fate for a man who is terrified of fading into obscurity.
    Ex: The music industry as we know it is slowly fading into oblivion.
    Ex: We're all puzzled by the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle where hundreds of boats and planes have disappeared into the blue leaving no trace at all.
    Ex: All about the plane round puffs of white smoke suddenly appeared, broke, and vanished into the blue.
    Ex: We're all familiar with the idea of novelty value and how it wears off with time.
    * desvanecerse la luz = light + fail.

    * * *

    desvanecerse ( conjugate desvanecerse) verbo pronominal
    a) [humo/nubes/niebla] to clear, disperse;

    [dudas/temores/sospechas] to vanish, be dispelled;
    [fantasma/visión] to disappear, vanish

    desvanecerse verbo reflexivo
    1 (un recuerdo, una imagen, duda) to vanish, fade
    (la niebla) to clear
    2 (perder el conocimiento) to faint
    ' desvanecerse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    disiparse
    English:
    evaporate
    - recede
    - disappear
    - dissipate
    - fade
    - melt
    - swoon
    - window
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [desmayarse] to faint;
    caer desvanecido to fall in a faint, to faint;
    yacía desvanecido en el pavimento he lay unconscious in the road
    2. [humo, nubes] to clear, to disappear;
    [perfil, figura] to become blurred; [colores] to fade; [sonido, olor] to fade away;
    su imagen se desvanece y en la pantalla vemos un paisaje her image fades out and we see a country scene
    3. [sospechas, temores] to be dispelled;
    [esperanzas] to be dashed; [recuerdos] to fade;
    * * *
    v/r
    1 de niebla disperse;
    desvanecerse en el aire vanish into thin air
    2 MED faint
    * * *
    vr
    1) : to vanish, to disappear
    2) : to fade
    3) desmayarse: to faint, to swoon

    Spanish-English dictionary > desvanecerse

  • 4 esfumarse

    pron.v.
    1 to fade away (esperanzas, posibilidades).
    2 to vanish, to disappear (informal) (person).
    ¡esfúmate! beat it!, get lost!
    * * *
    1 familiar (largarse) to disappear, fade away
    * * *
    VPR
    1) [apoyo, esperanzas] to fade away, melt away
    2) [persona] to vanish, make o.s. scarce

    ¡esfúmate! — * get lost! *

    * * *
    = evaporate, fizzle out, etherealise [etherealize, -USA], disappear into + the blue, vanish into + the blue, skulk off, sneak off, sneak away.
    Ex. It is pointless to create interest if it is then allowed to evaporate because the books cannot be obtained.
    Ex. Over the weekend, she started three articles and each one fizzled out for lack of inspiration.
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex. We're all puzzled by the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle where hundreds of boats and planes have disappeared into the blue leaving no trace at all.
    Ex. All about the plane round puffs of white smoke suddenly appeared, broke, and vanished into the blue.
    Ex. Good attendance with 21 people there though a few skulked off without paying!.
    Ex. One of the great joys in life is sneaking off.
    Ex. So I decided to take my chances and sneak away quietly on a day when Fabiola had a group meeting at her lab.
    * * *
    = evaporate, fizzle out, etherealise [etherealize, -USA], disappear into + the blue, vanish into + the blue, skulk off, sneak off, sneak away.

    Ex: It is pointless to create interest if it is then allowed to evaporate because the books cannot be obtained.

    Ex: Over the weekend, she started three articles and each one fizzled out for lack of inspiration.
    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex: We're all puzzled by the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle where hundreds of boats and planes have disappeared into the blue leaving no trace at all.
    Ex: All about the plane round puffs of white smoke suddenly appeared, broke, and vanished into the blue.
    Ex: Good attendance with 21 people there though a few skulked off without paying!.
    Ex: One of the great joys in life is sneaking off.
    Ex: So I decided to take my chances and sneak away quietly on a day when Fabiola had a group meeting at her lab.

    * * *

    esfumarse ( conjugate esfumarse) verbo pronominal
    a) [ilusiones/sueños] to evaporate;

    [ temores] to melt away, be dispelled
    b) (fam) [persona/dinero] to vanish, disappear

    ■esfumarse vr fam to disappear, vanish: ¡esfúmate!, clear off!
    ' esfumarse' also found in these entries:
    English:
    evaporate
    - melt away
    - runner
    - scarce
    - air
    - fizzle out
    - smoke
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [esperanzas, posibilidades] to fade away;
    [dudas, sospechas] to be dispelled
    2. Fam [persona] to vanish, to disappear;
    ¡esfúmate! beat it!, get lost!
    * * *
    disappear
    * * *
    vr
    1) : to fade away, to vanish
    2) fam : to take off, to leave

    Spanish-English dictionary > esfumarse

  • 5 evaporarse

    1 to evaporate
    2 figurado to vanish, disappear
    * * *
    VPR
    1) [líquido] to evaporate
    2) (fig) to vanish o disappear into thin air
    * * *
    = etherealise [etherealize, -USA], vaporise [vaporize, -USA], vanish into + thin air, disappear into + thin air, evaporate into + thin air.
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex. These people should be shot on sight and all their genetic material vaporized... fucking losers.
    Ex. The Soviet Union's cultural presence in Prague, Budapest, and Warsaw vanished into thin air the moment the last Russian soldier departed.
    Ex. Another trick makes an enormous elephant seem to disappeared into thin air.
    Ex. Their debates have operated with a more fluid notion of power, which at times has become so fluid as to evaporate into thin air.
    * * *
    = etherealise [etherealize, -USA], vaporise [vaporize, -USA], vanish into + thin air, disappear into + thin air, evaporate into + thin air.

    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.

    Ex: These people should be shot on sight and all their genetic material vaporized... fucking losers.
    Ex: The Soviet Union's cultural presence in Prague, Budapest, and Warsaw vanished into thin air the moment the last Russian soldier departed.
    Ex: Another trick makes an enormous elephant seem to disappeared into thin air.
    Ex: Their debates have operated with a more fluid notion of power, which at times has become so fluid as to evaporate into thin air.

    * * *

    evaporarse ( conjugate evaporarse) verbo pronominal [ líquido] to evaporate;
    [ayuda/dinero] to evaporate;
    [ persona] (fam) to vanish o disappear into thin air
    ■evaporarse verbo reflexivo
    1 Fís to evaporate
    2 figurado to disappear: fue como si todas las personas que habían acudido se evaporaran en el espacio, it was as if all the people who had come had disappeared into thin air
    ' evaporarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    consumirse
    - vaporizarse
    English:
    evaporate
    - vaporize
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [líquido] to evaporate
    2. Fam [persona] to vanish o disappear (into thin air);
    [fondos, fortuna] to disappear, to vanish; [posibilidad, esperanzas, ilusiones] to evaporate, to vanish
    * * *
    v/r evaporate; fig fam
    vanish into thin air
    * * *
    vr
    esfumarse: to disappear, to vanish
    * * *
    evaporarse vb to evaporate

    Spanish-English dictionary > evaporarse

  • 6 pasar de moda

    to go out of fashion
    * * *
    (v.) = drop out of + vogue, go out of + fashion, go out of + favour, go out of + date, go out of + vogue, fall out of + vogue, go out of + style, pass away, obsolesce, drop out of + circulation
    Ex. As a word drops out of vogue, the concept that it represents will, with time, gradually be described by a new term.
    Ex. Sawn-in cords, giving flat spines, were common in the mid seventeenth century, but then went out of fashion until they were reintroduced in about 1760.
    Ex. The author follows the history through to the point, in the latter part of the nineteenth century, when mirror-image monograms went out of favour and were replaced by straightforward monograms.
    Ex. Information in the humanities does not readily go out of date.
    Ex. The name 'Canaan', never very popular, went out of vogue with the collapse of the Egyptian empire.
    Ex. He points out that these metaphors fell out of vogue in the early 1980s.
    Ex. While Gothic never went out of style in Britain, the Baroque came to be associated with the classical debased by the Industrial Revolution.
    Ex. These tools are useable for analytical studies of how technologies emerge, mature and pass away.
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex. Many songs that were once well-known but dropped out of circulation during the mid-20th century have become well known again in recent years.
    * * *
    (v.) = drop out of + vogue, go out of + fashion, go out of + favour, go out of + date, go out of + vogue, fall out of + vogue, go out of + style, pass away, obsolesce, drop out of + circulation

    Ex: As a word drops out of vogue, the concept that it represents will, with time, gradually be described by a new term.

    Ex: Sawn-in cords, giving flat spines, were common in the mid seventeenth century, but then went out of fashion until they were reintroduced in about 1760.
    Ex: The author follows the history through to the point, in the latter part of the nineteenth century, when mirror-image monograms went out of favour and were replaced by straightforward monograms.
    Ex: Information in the humanities does not readily go out of date.
    Ex: The name 'Canaan', never very popular, went out of vogue with the collapse of the Egyptian empire.
    Ex: He points out that these metaphors fell out of vogue in the early 1980s.
    Ex: While Gothic never went out of style in Britain, the Baroque came to be associated with the classical debased by the Industrial Revolution.
    Ex: These tools are useable for analytical studies of how technologies emerge, mature and pass away.
    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    Ex: Many songs that were once well-known but dropped out of circulation during the mid-20th century have become well known again in recent years.

    Spanish-English dictionary > pasar de moda

  • 7 volverse etéreo

    (v.) = etherealise [etherealize, -USA]
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    * * *
    (v.) = etherealise [etherealize, -USA]

    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and ' etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.

    Spanish-English dictionary > volverse etéreo

  • 8 volverse obsoleto

    v.
    to fall into disuse.
    La garantía caducó The warranty expired.
    * * *
    (v.) = go out of + date, become + obsolete, go out of + fashion, obsolesce
    Ex. Information in the humanities does not readily go out of date.
    Ex. Academic libraries may become obsolete as the commercial market takes over control of information.
    Ex. Sawn-in cords, giving flat spines, were common in the mid seventeenth century, but then went out of fashion until they were reintroduced in about 1760.
    Ex. The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.
    * * *
    (v.) = go out of + date, become + obsolete, go out of + fashion, obsolesce

    Ex: Information in the humanities does not readily go out of date.

    Ex: Academic libraries may become obsolete as the commercial market takes over control of information.
    Ex: Sawn-in cords, giving flat spines, were common in the mid seventeenth century, but then went out of fashion until they were reintroduced in about 1760.
    Ex: The entire hardware of Western industrialism has been obsolesced and 'etherealized' by the new surround of electronic information services.

    Spanish-English dictionary > volverse obsoleto

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