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muddied

  • 1 al comienzo

    adv.
    at the beginning, incipiently, at first.
    * * *
    (n.) = early on, at the outset, to start with, at startup
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. However, it should be stated at the outset that it is not the aim of this course to make you proficient in the use of the Colon Classification as a practical indexing language.
    Ex. To start with, most catalogues, indexes, data bases and bibliographies provide access to information or documents.
    Ex. At start-up, the Library plans to deacidify approximately 15 000 volumes per week.
    * * *
    al comienzo(de)
    = at the start (of), in the early days (of), at the outbreak of, at the onset of, early in

    Ex: Two recent water-related disasters were described at the start of the workshop.

    Ex: The problems surrounding the neglect of concept coordination as it is to be found in the document were recognized in the early days of card-based postcoordinate indexes.
    Ex: At the outbreak of World War 1, there were about 5,000 private libraries in the occupied Polish territories.
    Ex: Student's experience with computers was minimal at the onset of the study.
    Ex: Couples are forced to make the decision between owner-occupation & council tenancy early in their marriages.

    (n.) = early on, at the outset, to start with, at startup

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Ex: However, it should be stated at the outset that it is not the aim of this course to make you proficient in the use of the Colon Classification as a practical indexing language.
    Ex: To start with, most catalogues, indexes, data bases and bibliographies provide access to information or documents.
    Ex: At start-up, the Library plans to deacidify approximately 15 000 volumes per week.

    Spanish-English dictionary > al comienzo

  • 2 al principio

    adv.
    in the beginning, at first, at the beginning, at the outset.
    * * *
    at first, at the beginning
    * * *
    (n.) = at first, at the outset, early [earlier -comp., earliest -sup.], in the early years, originally, to start with, early on, at startup
    Ex. The style of recording instructions for references differs from that in Sears', and can at first seem strange, but instructions are clear.
    Ex. However, it should be stated at the outset that it is not the aim of this course to make you proficient in the use of the Colon Classification as a practical indexing language.
    Ex. Microforms are easy to use, although there were early reservations concerning the fact that users need to become familiar with any specific kind of microform and its reader.
    Ex. A unique feature of this book, then, is that the cases emphasize the kinds of problems recent graduates encounter in the early years of their careers.
    Ex. A relative index, as originally proposed by Melville Dewey, contains at least one entry for each subject in the scheme.
    Ex. To start with, most catalogues, indexes, data bases and bibliographies provide access to information or documents.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. At start-up, the Library plans to deacidify approximately 15 000 volumes per week.
    * * *
    al principio(de)
    = at the beginning (of), at the dawn of, at the onset of, early in

    Ex: A summary at the beginning of a document serves to prepare the reader to proceed to the remainder of the text.

    Ex: At the dawn of this new century, we see the result of current scientific and technological advancement.
    Ex: Student's experience with computers was minimal at the onset of the study.
    Ex: Couples are forced to make the decision between owner-occupation & council tenancy early in their marriages.

    (n.) = at first, at the outset, early [earlier -comp., earliest -sup.], in the early years, originally, to start with, early on, at startup

    Ex: The style of recording instructions for references differs from that in Sears', and can at first seem strange, but instructions are clear.

    Ex: However, it should be stated at the outset that it is not the aim of this course to make you proficient in the use of the Colon Classification as a practical indexing language.
    Ex: Microforms are easy to use, although there were early reservations concerning the fact that users need to become familiar with any specific kind of microform and its reader.
    Ex: A unique feature of this book, then, is that the cases emphasize the kinds of problems recent graduates encounter in the early years of their careers.
    Ex: A relative index, as originally proposed by Melville Dewey, contains at least one entry for each subject in the scheme.
    Ex: To start with, most catalogues, indexes, data bases and bibliographies provide access to information or documents.
    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex: At start-up, the Library plans to deacidify approximately 15 000 volumes per week.

    Spanish-English dictionary > al principio

  • 3 embarrar

    v.
    1 to cover with mud.
    El charco embarró las llantas The puddle covered the tires with mud.
    2 to smear, to befoul, to dab, to daub.
    María embarra su cara con miel Mary smears her face with honey.
    * * *
    1 (untar de barro) to cover with mud
    2 (embadurnar) to daub, smear
    1 to get covered in mud
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=enfangar) to splash with mud
    2) LAm [+ pared] [con barro] to cover with mud; [con yeso] to plaster
    3)

    embarrar a algn Caribe, Cono Sur to smear sb, damage sb's standing; CAm, Méx * to set sb up *

    la embarré Cono Sur * I put my foot in it *, I spoiled things

    2.
    VI Cono Sur to make a mess of things
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to cover... in mud

    embarrarla — (AmS fam) to mess up (AmE colloq), to mess things up (BrE colloq)

    2.
    embarrarse v pron persona to get covered in mud; <prenda/ropa> to get...muddy
    * * *
    = muddy.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo to cover... in mud

    embarrarla — (AmS fam) to mess up (AmE colloq), to mess things up (BrE colloq)

    2.
    embarrarse v pron persona to get covered in mud; <prenda/ropa> to get...muddy
    * * *

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    * * *
    embarrar [A1 ]
    vt
    to cover … in mud
    un coche que pasaba me embarró toda a passing car covered me in mud o splashed mud all over me
    embarrarla ( AmS fam); to mess up ( AmE colloq), to mess things up ( BrE colloq)
    to get covered in mud
    se embarró toda la ropa he got his clothes all muddy
    * * *

    embarrar ( conjugate embarrar) verbo transitivo
    to cover … in mud;
    embarrarla (AmS fam) to mess up (AmE colloq), to mess things up (BrE colloq)

    embarrarse verbo pronominal [ persona] to get covered in mud;

    prenda/ropato get…muddy
    ' embarrar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    muddy
    * * *
    vt
    1. [con barro] to cover with mud
    2. Méx [untar]
    embarrar el pan con mantequilla to spread butter on the bread
    3. Am [calumniar, desacreditar] to smear
    4. CAm, Méx, RP
    embarrar a alguien en algo [en asunto turbio] to get sb mixed up in sth
    5. Méx Fam
    embarrar la mano a alguien to grease sb's palm
    6. Andes, RP Fam
    embarrarla [meter la pata] to put one's foot in it
    * * *
    1) : to cover with mud
    2) embadurnar: to smear

    Spanish-English dictionary > embarrar

  • 4 enmarañar

    v.
    1 to entangle, to snag, to enmesh, to tangle up.
    El escritor enmaraña la trama The writer tangles up the plot.
    Ella enmaraña las lanas She entangles the yarns.
    2 to tangle up, to snag, to entangle, to louse up.
    El escritor enmaraña la trama The writer tangles up the plot.
    3 to swindle.
    El estafador enmaraña a sus víctimas The con man swindles his victims.
    * * *
    1 (enredar) to tangle
    2 figurado to embroil, muddle up, confuse
    1 (enredarse) to get tangled
    2 figurado to get into a muddle, get confused
    3 METEREOLOGÍA to become overcast
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ madeja, hilo] to tangle, tangle up
    2) (=complicar) to complicate
    3) [+ persona] to confuse, perplex
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <pelo/lana> to tangle; < asunto> to complicate; < persona> to confuse
    2.
    enmarañarse v pron pelo/lana to get tangled; persona

    enmarañarse en algoto get embroiled o entangled in something

    * * *
    = muddy, snarl up, entangle, knot into, tangle.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. If all goes as usual, it will snow approximately one inch and completely snarl up traffic until melted.
    Ex. The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex. The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex. The more unsuccessful she was the more bitter she became, and the more tangled in the web drawn about her by her husband and children.
    ----
    * enmarañado en = enmeshed in.
    * enmarañar las cosas = muddy + the waters.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <pelo/lana> to tangle; < asunto> to complicate; < persona> to confuse
    2.
    enmarañarse v pron pelo/lana to get tangled; persona

    enmarañarse en algoto get embroiled o entangled in something

    * * *
    = muddy, snarl up, entangle, knot into, tangle.

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Ex: If all goes as usual, it will snow approximately one inch and completely snarl up traffic until melted.
    Ex: The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex: The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex: The more unsuccessful she was the more bitter she became, and the more tangled in the web drawn about her by her husband and children.
    * enmarañado en = enmeshed in.
    * enmarañar las cosas = muddy + the waters.

    * * *
    enmarañar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹pelo/lana› to tangle
    2 ‹asunto› to complicate
    3 ‹persona› to confuse
    1 «pelo/lana» to get tangled
    2 «persona»: enmarañarse EN algo; to get involved o embroiled o entangled IN sth
    * * *
    vt
    1. [enredar] to tangle (up)
    2. [complicar] to complicate, to confuse
    * * *
    v/t
    1 pelo tangle
    2 asunto complicate, muddle
    * * *
    1) : to tangle
    2) : to complicate
    3) : to confuse, to mix up

    Spanish-English dictionary > enmarañar

  • 5 enredar

    v.
    1 to tangle up (madeja, pelo).
    El gato enreda las lanas The cat tangles up the yarns.
    2 to bother, to annoy.
    3 to get up to mischief (informal).
    enredar con algo to fiddle with o mess about with something
    4 to mix up, to entangle, to fuzz up, to louse up.
    El chico enredó las historias The boy mixed up the stories.
    5 to snag, to hook, to get hooked.
    La caña enredó al pez The fishing rod snagged the fish.
    * * *
    1 (prender con red) to catch in a net, net
    2 (para cazar) to set
    3 (engatusar) to involve, implicate
    4 (meter cizaña) to sow discord, cause trouble
    5 (enmarañar) to tangle up, entangle
    6 (entretener) to hold up, delay
    7 figurado (asunto etc) to confuse, complicate; (trabajo) to make a mess of
    1 (travesear) to be mischievous
    1 (hacerse un lío) to get tangled up, get entangled, get into a tangle
    2 (complicarse) to get complicated, get confused
    3 (en discusión) to become involved, get caught up
    4 (amancebarse) to have an affair
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ hilos, cuerda] to tangle up

    este viento te enreda el pelo — your hair gets tangled up in this wind, this wind tangles your hair up

    2) [+ situación, asunto] to make complicated, complicate

    con tanta mentira enredó las cosas aún más — with all his lies he made matters even more complicated, with all his lies he complicated matters even more

    3) * (=desordenar) to get into a mess, mess up

    estos niños lo han enredado todo — these children have got everything into a mess, these children have messed everything up

    4) * (=involucrar) to get mixed o caught up (en in)
    5) * (=entretener)

    no me enredes, que llego tarde — don't hold me back, or I'll be late

    6) * (=engañar) to trick
    7) (=enemistar) to cause trouble among o between
    8) (Caza) [+ animal] to net; [+ trampa] to set
    2.
    VI * (=juguetear) to play around, monkey around *

    ¡no enredes! — stop playing around!

    ¡deja ya de enredar con los lápices! — stop fiddling (around) with the pencils, will you?

    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <cuerdas/cables> to get... tangled up, tangle up
    b) ( embarullar) < persona> to muddle... up, confuse; <asunto/situación> to complicate
    c) (fam) ( involucrar)
    2.
    enredar vi (fam)
    a) ( intrigar) to make trouble, stir up trouble
    b) (Esp) ( molestar) to fidget

    enredar con algo — to fiddle around with something, fiddle with something

    3.
    enredarse v pron
    1) lana/cuerda to get tangled, become entangled; pelo to get tangled o knotted; planta to twist itself around
    2)
    a) (fam) ( en lío amoroso)
    b) (fam) ( involucrarse)

    enredarse en algoto get mixed up o involved in something

    c) (fam) ( enfrascarse)
    d) (fam) ( embarullarse) to get mixed up get muddled up
    * * *
    = bog down, muddy, bamboozle, snarl up, entangle, knot into, coil, tangle, ensnare, snare, make + trouble.
    Ex. There is increased evidence that we are being bogged down today as specialization extends.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. Benny Morris claims that Karsh is attempting to hoodwink and bamboozle readers.
    Ex. If all goes as usual, it will snow approximately one inch and completely snarl up traffic until melted.
    Ex. The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex. The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex. This booklet is intended to provide general information on coiling of brain aneurysms.
    Ex. The more unsuccessful she was the more bitter she became, and the more tangled in the web drawn about her by her husband and children.
    Ex. The novel has many trappings that will ensnare the average reader but skulking at the bottom of its well of intrigue is a timeless terror more attuned to the mature sensibilities of an adult audience.
    Ex. In fact, the Indians had been snaring animals long before the white man came to North America.
    Ex. As President Bush's second term winds down, this is no time for him to be making trouble for his successor.
    ----
    * enredar a Alguien para que haga Algo = talk + Nombre + into.
    * enredar las cosas = muddy + the waters.
    * enredarse = kink.
    * enredarse con = get + involved with/in.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <cuerdas/cables> to get... tangled up, tangle up
    b) ( embarullar) < persona> to muddle... up, confuse; <asunto/situación> to complicate
    c) (fam) ( involucrar)
    2.
    enredar vi (fam)
    a) ( intrigar) to make trouble, stir up trouble
    b) (Esp) ( molestar) to fidget

    enredar con algo — to fiddle around with something, fiddle with something

    3.
    enredarse v pron
    1) lana/cuerda to get tangled, become entangled; pelo to get tangled o knotted; planta to twist itself around
    2)
    a) (fam) ( en lío amoroso)
    b) (fam) ( involucrarse)

    enredarse en algoto get mixed up o involved in something

    c) (fam) ( enfrascarse)
    d) (fam) ( embarullarse) to get mixed up get muddled up
    * * *
    = bog down, muddy, bamboozle, snarl up, entangle, knot into, coil, tangle, ensnare, snare, make + trouble.

    Ex: There is increased evidence that we are being bogged down today as specialization extends.

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex: Benny Morris claims that Karsh is attempting to hoodwink and bamboozle readers.
    Ex: If all goes as usual, it will snow approximately one inch and completely snarl up traffic until melted.
    Ex: The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex: The issues entangled in Van Gogh's work - issues of the market, gender, and class - were also knotted into the work of many avant-garde artists of the late 19th c.
    Ex: This booklet is intended to provide general information on coiling of brain aneurysms.
    Ex: The more unsuccessful she was the more bitter she became, and the more tangled in the web drawn about her by her husband and children.
    Ex: The novel has many trappings that will ensnare the average reader but skulking at the bottom of its well of intrigue is a timeless terror more attuned to the mature sensibilities of an adult audience.
    Ex: In fact, the Indians had been snaring animals long before the white man came to North America.
    Ex: As President Bush's second term winds down, this is no time for him to be making trouble for his successor.
    * enredar a Alguien para que haga Algo = talk + Nombre + into.
    * enredar las cosas = muddy + the waters.
    * enredarse = kink.
    * enredarse con = get + involved with/in.

    * * *
    enredar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹cuerdas/cables› to get … tangled up, tangle up
    2 ‹asunto/situación› to complicate, make … complicated
    no enredes más las cosas don't complicate things any further
    3 ( fam) (involucrar) enredar a algn EN algo to get sb mixed up o caught up o embroiled o involved IN sth
    lo enredaron en la compra de las acciones they got him involved o caught up in buying shares
    ■ enredar
    vi
    ( fam)
    1 (intrigar) to make trouble, stir up trouble, stir ( colloq)
    2 ( Esp) (molestar) to fidget enredar CON algo to fiddle around WITH sth, fiddle WITH sth
    A
    1 «lana/cuerda» to get tangled, become entangled; «pelo» to get tangled o knotted o ( AmE) snarled
    la cuerda se enredó en las patas de la silla the rope got tangled around o entangled in the chair legs
    2 «planta» to twist itself around
    B
    1 ( fam) (en un lío amoroso) enredarse CON algn to get involved WITH sb
    2 ( fam) (involucrarse) enredarse EN algo to get mixed up IN sth, get involved IN sth
    se ha enredado en un negocio sucio he's got mixed up in some funny business
    3 ( fam) (enfrascarse) enredarse EN algo to get INTO sth ( colloq)
    se enredaron en una acalorada discusión they got into a heated discussion
    4 ( fam) (embarullarse) to get mixed up ( colloq), get muddled up ( colloq)
    * * *

    enredar ( conjugate enredar) verbo transitivo
    a)cuerdas/cablesto get … tangled up, tangle up

    b) ( embarullar) ‹ personato muddle … up, confuse;

    asunto/situación to complicate
    c) (fam) ( involucrar) enredar a algn en algo to get sb mixed up o caught up in sth

    verbo intransitivo (fam)

    b) (Esp) ( molestar) to fidget;

    enredar con algo to fiddle (around) with sth
    enredarse verbo pronominal
    1 [lana/cuerda] to get tangled, become entangled;
    [ pelo] to get tangled o knotted;
    [ planta] to twist itself around
    2 (fam)
    a) ( en lío amoroso) enredarse con algn to get involved with sb

    b) ( involucrarse) enredarse en algo to get mixed up o involved in sth


    enredar verbo transitivo
    1 (cables, cuerdas, pelo) to entangle, tangle up
    2 (un asunto, situación) to confuse, complicate
    3 fig (implicar en algo ilegal, turbio) to involve [en, in], to mix up [en, in]
    4 (convencer, liar) lo enredaron para presentarse a las elecciones, they talked him into being a candidate in the election
    ' enredar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    envolver
    - trastear
    - implicar
    English:
    embroil
    - entangle
    - tangle
    - tangle up
    - foul
    - snarl
    * * *
    vt
    1. [cuerdas, madeja, pelo] to tangle (up)
    2. [situación, asunto] to complicate;
    será mejor no enredar más las cosas it's best not to make matters more complicated
    3. [implicar]
    enredar a alguien en to get sb involved in, to embroil sb in;
    me enredaron en sus sucios negocios they got me mixed up in their dirty dealings
    4. [entretener] to bother, to annoy
    vi
    Fam
    1. [hacer travesuras] to get up to mischief
    2. [juguetear]
    enredar con algo to fiddle with o mess about with sth
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 tangle, get tangled
    2 fig
    complicate, make complicated
    II v/i make trouble
    * * *
    1) : to tangle up, to entangle
    2) : to confuse, to complicate
    3) : to involve, to implicate
    * * *
    1. (involucrar) to involve
    2. (complicar) to complicate
    3. (confundir) to muddle / to confuse
    4. (tocar) to mess about

    Spanish-English dictionary > enredar

  • 6 enturbiar

    v.
    1 to cloud (also figurative).
    2 to muddy, to make cloudy, to cloud, to blur.
    La niebla empaña mi vista Fog blurs my vision.
    * * *
    1 to make muddy, make cloudy, cloud
    2 figurado to cloud, muddle, obscure
    1 to get muddy, become cloudy
    2 figurado to get confused, get muddled
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ líquido] to muddy, make cloudy
    2) (=complicar) [+ asunto] to confuse, fog; [+ mente, persona] to confuse
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo < agua> to cloud; <relación/felicidad> to mar, cloud
    2.
    enturbiarse v pron agua to become o go cloudy; relación/felicidad to be marred
    * * *
    = muddy, cloud, roil.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. Whilst library schools should continue to concentrate upon traditional priorities and the obsession with machines and techniques should not cloud those priorities.
    Ex. Financial markets, which had been roiled Tuesday by a falling dollar and soaring energy prices, recovered some of their losses Wednesday.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo < agua> to cloud; <relación/felicidad> to mar, cloud
    2.
    enturbiarse v pron agua to become o go cloudy; relación/felicidad to be marred
    * * *
    = muddy, cloud, roil.

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Ex: Whilst library schools should continue to concentrate upon traditional priorities and the obsession with machines and techniques should not cloud those priorities.
    Ex: Financial markets, which had been roiled Tuesday by a falling dollar and soaring energy prices, recovered some of their losses Wednesday.

    * * *
    enturbiar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹agua› to cloud
    2 ‹relación/felicidad› to mar, cloud
    1 «agua» to become o go cloudy
    2 «relación/felicidad» to be marred
    * * *

    enturbiar verbo transitivo
    1 (agua) to make cloudy
    2 fig (asunto) to cloud
    ' enturbiar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    cloud
    - muddy
    - roil
    * * *
    vt
    1. [líquido] to cloud;
    [aire] to make murky
    2. [acto, relación, situación] to cloud, to mar
    * * *
    v/t tb fig
    cloud
    * * *
    1) : to cloud
    2) : to confuse

    Spanish-English dictionary > enturbiar

  • 7 falto de claridad

    (adj.) = nebulous
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    * * *
    (adj.) = nebulous

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Spanish-English dictionary > falto de claridad

  • 8 impreciso

    adj.
    1 imprecise, indefinite, uncertain, loose.
    2 blurred.
    3 clumsy, uncoordinated, unco-ordinated.
    * * *
    1 imprecise, vague
    * * *
    ADJ imprecise, vague
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo vague, imprecise
    * * *
    = fuzzy [fuzzier - comp., fuzziest -sup.], nebulous, non-crisp, vague [vaguer -comp., vaguest -sup.], imprecise, loose [looser -comp., loosest -sup.], wooly [woolier -comp., wooliest -sup.].
    Ex. This is a rather fuzzy basis for establishing subject headings, but fuzziness is not the guidelines only fault.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. The database model presented in this article is suitable for applications in which queries may require noncrisp references to certain attributes.
    Ex. Some of the terms are vague.
    Ex. The colon is the most widely used of the synthetic devices, but is an imprecise weapon which may have several different meanings.
    Ex. Kast points out that there is a 'rather loose, conglomeration of interests and approaches' in this developing field.
    Ex. On the other side, some aspects of the planning study remains wooly.
    ----
    * conjunto impreciso = imprecise set.
    * de un modo impreciso = fuzzily.
    * término impreciso = fuzzy term.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo vague, imprecise
    * * *
    = fuzzy [fuzzier - comp., fuzziest -sup.], nebulous, non-crisp, vague [vaguer -comp., vaguest -sup.], imprecise, loose [looser -comp., loosest -sup.], wooly [woolier -comp., wooliest -sup.].

    Ex: This is a rather fuzzy basis for establishing subject headings, but fuzziness is not the guidelines only fault.

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex: The database model presented in this article is suitable for applications in which queries may require noncrisp references to certain attributes.
    Ex: Some of the terms are vague.
    Ex: The colon is the most widely used of the synthetic devices, but is an imprecise weapon which may have several different meanings.
    Ex: Kast points out that there is a 'rather loose, conglomeration of interests and approaches' in this developing field.
    Ex: On the other side, some aspects of the planning study remains wooly.
    * conjunto impreciso = imprecise set.
    * de un modo impreciso = fuzzily.
    * término impreciso = fuzzy term.

    * * *
    vague, imprecise
    un número impreciso de personas an indeterminate number of people
    * * *

    impreciso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    vague, imprecise;
    un número impreciso de personas an indeterminate number of people
    impreciso,-a adjetivo imprecise, vague

    ' impreciso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    imprecisa
    - vaguedad
    - indeterminado
    English:
    imprecise
    - inaccurate
    - vague
    - woolly
    - wooly
    - shadowy
    * * *
    impreciso, -a adj
    imprecise, vague
    * * *
    adj imprecise
    * * *
    impreciso, -sa adj
    1) : imprecise, vague
    2) : inaccurate
    * * *
    impreciso adj imprecise / inaccurate

    Spanish-English dictionary > impreciso

  • 9 mucho antes

    adv.
    long time before, long before, a long time before, much earlier.
    * * *
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    * * *

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mucho antes

  • 10 nebuloso

    adj.
    1 foggy, misty, cloudy, hazy.
    2 vague, cloudy, ambiguous, clouded.
    3 nepheloid.
    * * *
    1 cloudy, hazy
    2 figurado vague, nebulous
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (Astron) nebular, nebulous; [cielo] cloudy; [aire] misty; (=tétrico) dark, gloomy
    2) (=impreciso) nebulous, vague; (=oscuro) obscure
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) (Meteo) misty
    b) (Astron) nebular
    c) <idea/imagen> hazy, nebulous
    * * *
    = nebulous, foggy [foggier -comp., foggiest -sup.].
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    Ex. What they will not do is clear up the foggy area in most cataloguers' minds, the area that leads to an inconsistent application of half-understood principles'.
    ----
    * nebuloso en aparencia = nebulous-seeming.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) (Meteo) misty
    b) (Astron) nebular
    c) <idea/imagen> hazy, nebulous
    * * *
    = nebulous, foggy [foggier -comp., foggiest -sup.].

    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.

    Ex: What they will not do is clear up the foggy area in most cataloguers' minds, the area that leads to an inconsistent application of half-understood principles'.
    * nebuloso en aparencia = nebulous-seeming.

    * * *
    2 ( Astron) nebular
    3 ‹idea/imagen› hazy, nebulous
    * * *

    nebuloso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a) (Meteo) misty

    b)idea/imagen hazy, nebulous

    nebuloso,-a adjetivo
    1 Meteor cloudy, hazy
    2 (poco claro, poco explicativo) nebulous, vague: tengo un recuerdo suyo muy nebuloso, I've got some vague recollection of him
    ' nebuloso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    nebulosa
    English:
    foggy
    - hazy
    * * *
    nebuloso, -a adj
    1. [con nubes] cloudy;
    [de niebla] foggy
    2. [poco claro] vague, nebulous
    * * *
    adj fig
    hazy, nebulous
    * * *
    nebuloso, -sa adj
    1) : hazy, misty
    2) : nebulous, vague

    Spanish-English dictionary > nebuloso

  • 11 vago2

    2 = dim [dimmer -comp., dimmest -sup.], fuzzy [fuzzier - comp., fuzziest -sup.], vague [vaguer -comp., vaguest -sup.], feeble, loose [looser -comp., loosest -sup.], wooly [woolier -comp., wooliest -sup.], indistinct, indistinctive, nebulous.
    Ex. The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.
    Ex. This is a rather fuzzy basis for establishing subject headings, but fuzziness is not the guidelines only fault.
    Ex. Some of the terms are vague.
    Ex. Mearns warns us, 'Recollection is treacherous; it is usually too broad or too narrow for another's use; and what is more serious, it is frequently undependable and worn and feeble'.
    Ex. Kast points out that there is a 'rather loose, conglomeration of interests and approaches' in this developing field.
    Ex. On the other side, some aspects of the planning study remains wooly.
    Ex. The typescript will be fuzzy and indistinct without the smooth, firm surface which the backing sheet offers.
    Ex. This research suggests that people are threatened by categorizations that portray them as too distinctive or too indistinctive.
    Ex. The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    ----
    * de manera vaga = hazily.

    Spanish-English dictionary > vago2

  • 12 vago

    adj.
    1 footloose, errant, roving, shiftless.
    2 nebulous, amorphous, formless, shapeless.
    3 vague, general, unspecific.
    4 rambling, excursive.
    f. & m.
    1 bum, loafer, deadbeat, good-for-nothing.
    2 vagus.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: vagar.
    * * *
    1 (impreciso) vague
    ————————
    1 (vacío) empty; (desocupado) vacant
    2 (holgazán) lazy, idle
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (holgazán) idler, layabout, slacker
    2 DERECHO vagrant
    \
    hacer el vago to laze around
    * * *
    1. (f. - vaga)
    adj.
    1) idle, lazy
    2. (f. - vaga)
    noun
    * * *
    vago, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (gen) vague; (Arte, Fot) blurred, ill-defined; (=indeterminado) indeterminate
    2) [persona] (=perezoso) lazy, slack; (=poco fiable) unreliable; (=ocioso) idle, unemployed
    3) [ojo] lazy; [objeto] idle, unused; [espacio] empty
    4) (=errante) roving, wandering
    5)

    en vago[mantenerse] unsteadily; [esforzarse] in vain

    dar golpes en vago — to flail about, beat the air

    2. SM/ F
    1) (=holgazán) idler, lazybones *; (=inútil) useless individual, dead loss
    2) (=vagabundo) tramp, vagrant, bum (EEUU); (=pobre) down-and-out
    * * *
    I
    - ga adjetivo
    1) (fam) < persona> lazy, idle
    2) <recuerdo/idea> vague, hazy; <contorno/forma> vague, indistinct; < explicación> vague
    II
    - ga masculino, femenino (fam) layabout, slacker (colloq)
    * * *
    I
    - ga adjetivo
    1) (fam) < persona> lazy, idle
    2) <recuerdo/idea> vague, hazy; <contorno/forma> vague, indistinct; < explicación> vague
    II
    - ga masculino, femenino (fam) layabout, slacker (colloq)
    * * *
    vago1
    1 = slacker, bum, lazybones, layabout, idler.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'No slackers here: SLA's youngest members have the vision and enthusiasm to shape the profession'.

    Ex: Although the results provide support for the 'drunken bum' theory of wife beating, they also demythologize the stereotype because alcohol is shown to be far from a necessary or sufficient cause of wife abuse.
    Ex: Many see his art as a vocation for lazybones and social misfits.
    Ex: There is no evidence that inherited wealth is in itself responsible for turning young people into useless layabouts.
    Ex: This magazine prints essays and stories that celebrate the joyful life of an idler.
    * persona vaga y mal vestida = slob.

    vago2
    2 = dim [dimmer -comp., dimmest -sup.], fuzzy [fuzzier - comp., fuzziest -sup.], vague [vaguer -comp., vaguest -sup.], feeble, loose [looser -comp., loosest -sup.], wooly [woolier -comp., wooliest -sup.], indistinct, indistinctive, nebulous.

    Ex: The genesis of this brave new world of solid state logic, in which bibliographic data are reduced to phantasmagoria on the faces of cathode-ray tubes (CRT), extends at most only three-quarters of a decade into the dim past.

    Ex: This is a rather fuzzy basis for establishing subject headings, but fuzziness is not the guidelines only fault.
    Ex: Some of the terms are vague.
    Ex: Mearns warns us, 'Recollection is treacherous; it is usually too broad or too narrow for another's use; and what is more serious, it is frequently undependable and worn and feeble'.
    Ex: Kast points out that there is a 'rather loose, conglomeration of interests and approaches' in this developing field.
    Ex: On the other side, some aspects of the planning study remains wooly.
    Ex: The typescript will be fuzzy and indistinct without the smooth, firm surface which the backing sheet offers.
    Ex: This research suggests that people are threatened by categorizations that portray them as too distinctive or too indistinctive.
    Ex: The concept of such a center remained nebulous at best, and we later learned that communication problems early on had muddied the message about what was really needed.
    * de manera vaga = hazily.

    * * *
    vago1 -ga
    A ( fam); ‹persona› lazy, idle
    B ‹recuerdo/idea› vague, hazy; ‹contorno/forma› vague, indistinct
    hay un vago parecido entre los dos there is a vague resemblance between them
    me dio una explicación muy vaga de lo que había sucedido she gave me a very vague explanation of what had happened, she only explained very vaguely what had happened
    tengo la vaga sensación de haberlo visto antes I have a vague feeling I've seen him before
    vago2 -ga
    masculine, feminine
    ( fam)
    layabout, slacker ( colloq)
    deja ya de hacer el vago y ponte a trabajar stop lazing around and get some work done ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    Del verbo vagar: ( conjugate vagar)

    vago es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    vagó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    vagar    
    vago
    vagar ( conjugate vagar) verbo intransitivo
    to wander, roam
    vago
    ◊ -ga adjetivo

    1 (fam) ‹ persona lazy, idle
    2recuerdo/idea vague, hazy;
    contorno/forma vague, indistinct;
    explicación/parecido vague
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino (fam) layabout, slacker (colloq);

    vagar vi (ir sin rumbo fijo) to wander, roam: vagamos por la ciudad toda la noche, we wandered around the town all night long
    vagaba por el desierto, he was wandering about in the desert
    vago,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 pey (holgazán) lazy
    2 (difuso) slight, vague: tiene una vaga idea de lo que ocurrió, he has a vague idea of what happened
    II m,f (gandul) layabout
    ' vago' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    boluda
    - boludo
    - floja
    - flojo
    - sambenito
    - señorito
    - vaga
    - hecho
    - indeterminado
    English:
    bone-idle
    - dim
    - do-nothing
    - easy-going
    - faint
    - hazy
    - indistinct
    - layabout
    - obscure
    - screw around
    - slack
    - slob
    - swan about
    - swan around
    - vague
    - work shy
    - bum
    - wooly
    * * *
    vago, -a
    adj
    1. [persona] lazy, idle;
    Fam Hum
    2. [imagen, recuerdo] vague
    3. Med
    nervio vago vagus nerve
    nm,f
    lazy person, idler;
    ser un vago to be lazy o idle
    nm
    hacer el vago to laze around
    * * *
    I adj
    1 ( holgazán) lazy;
    hacer el vago laze around
    2 ( indefinido) vague
    II m, vaga f idler, Br
    layabout fam
    * * *
    vago, -ga adj
    1) : vague
    2) perezoso: lazy, idle
    vago, -ga n
    1) : idler, loafer
    2) vagabundo: vagrant, bum
    * * *
    vago1 adj
    1. (gandul) lazy [comp. lazier; superl. laziest]
    2. (impreciso) vague
    vago2 n lazybones

    Spanish-English dictionary > vago

  • 13 enfangado

    ADJ
    1) [terreno, persona] muddy
    2) (fig) [ideal] muddied

    Spanish-English dictionary > enfangado

См. также в других словарях:

  • muddied — adjective a) Made dirty with muddied. He muddied the situation until they acquitted in confusion. b) Made unclear, obfuscated (generally as part of the phrase muddied the water) The addition of the second batch of paint muddied the bright colors… …   Wiktionary

  • Muddied — Muddy Mud dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Muddied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Muddying}.] 1. To soil with mud; to dirty; to render turbid. [1913 Webster] 2. (Fig.): To cloud; to make dull or heavy; to confuse. Grew. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • muddied — adjective (of color) discolored by impurities; not bright and clear (Freq. 1) dirty is often used in combination a dirty (or dingy) white the muddied grey of the sea muddy colors dirty green walls dirty blonde ha …   Useful english dictionary

  • muddied — mÊŒdɪd adj. dirtied, soiled; soiled with mud, covered in mud; obscure, unclear; cloudy, turbid mud·dy || mÊŒdɪ v. make dirty with mud, cover in mud; cloud, make impure; confuse the issue, make unclear adj. covered in mud; turbid, cloudy;… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • muddy — [[t]mʌ̱di[/t]] muddier, muddiest, muddies, muddying, muddied 1) ADJ GRADED Something that is muddy contains mud or is covered in mud. ...a muddy track... The ground was still very muddy. ...his muddy boots. 2) VERB If you muddy something, you… …   English dictionary

  • Mohamed Atta's alleged Prague connection — The alleged Prague connection between Iraq and Al Qaeda came through an alleged meeting between September 11 hijacker Mohamed Atta and Iraqi consulate Ahmad Samir al Ani in April 2001. Czech counterintelligence service claimed that Mohamed Atta… …   Wikipedia

  • muddy — I UK [ˈmʌdɪ] / US adjective Word forms muddy : adjective muddy comparative muddier superlative muddiest * 1) covered with mud, or full of mud muddy boots 2) dull in colour II UK [ˈmʌdɪ] / US verb [transitive] Word forms muddy : present tense… …   English dictionary

  • Mohamed Atta — Born Mohamed Atta (in Arabic: محمد عطا) September 1, 1968(1968 09 01) Kafr el Sheikh, Egypt Died September 11, 2001 …   Wikipedia

  • muddy — 1. adjective 1) muddy ground Syn: waterlogged, boggy, marshy, swampy, squishy, mucky, slimy, spongy, wet, soft, heavy; archaic quaggy 2) muddy shoes Syn: mud caked …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • Muddy — Mud dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Muddied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Muddying}.] 1. To soil with mud; to dirty; to render turbid. [1913 Webster] 2. (Fig.): To cloud; to make dull or heavy; to confuse. Grew. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Muddying — Muddy Mud dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Muddied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Muddying}.] 1. To soil with mud; to dirty; to render turbid. [1913 Webster] 2. (Fig.): To cloud; to make dull or heavy; to confuse. Grew. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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