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mocked

  • 1 burlar

    v.
    1 to evade.
    consiguió burlar a sus perseguidores she managed to outwit her pursuers
    El ladrón burló la seguridad The thief evaded the security measures.
    2 to trick, to put on.
    Silvia burló a Ricardo Silvia tricked Richard.
    3 to get by.
    El auto burló a la policía The car got by the police.
    * * *
    1 to deceive, trick
    2 (eludir) to dodge, evade
    1 to mock (de, -), make fun (de, of), laugh (de, at)
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=engañar) [+ persona] to deceive, trick; [+ enemigo] to outwit; [+ vigilancia] to defeat; [+ bloqueo] to run
    2) (=frustrar) [+ ambición, plan] to thwart, frustrate; [+ esperanzas] to ruin, frustrate
    3) (=seducir) to seduce
    4) * (=saber usar) to know how to use, be able to handle
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < medidas de seguridad> to evade, get around
    b) < enemigo> to outwit
    2.
    burlarse v pron

    burlarse de algo/alguien — to make fun of something/somebody

    * * *
    = mock, hoodwink, outwit, bilk, outfox, outsmart.
    Nota: Literalmente significa "ser más listo que".
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex. In turn, a consequential effect is that reference librarians and scholars might end up getting hoodkwinked.
    Ex. Two dangerous trysts are spied upon by a third and hostile party, whose presence is detected by the lovers who act in consort to outwit him.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. It also led to a continuing guerilla war between the authorities and caricaturists who sought to evade, outfox, or entirely defy them.
    Ex. Smart and speedy start-ups blindside mature companies with their inventiveness then grow up into mature companies and are outsmarted in their turn.
    ----
    * burlar el sistema = beat + the system, game + the system.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < medidas de seguridad> to evade, get around
    b) < enemigo> to outwit
    2.
    burlarse v pron

    burlarse de algo/alguien — to make fun of something/somebody

    * * *
    = mock, hoodwink, outwit, bilk, outfox, outsmart.
    Nota: Literalmente significa "ser más listo que".

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.

    Ex: In turn, a consequential effect is that reference librarians and scholars might end up getting hoodkwinked.
    Ex: Two dangerous trysts are spied upon by a third and hostile party, whose presence is detected by the lovers who act in consort to outwit him.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: It also led to a continuing guerilla war between the authorities and caricaturists who sought to evade, outfox, or entirely defy them.
    Ex: Smart and speedy start-ups blindside mature companies with their inventiveness then grow up into mature companies and are outsmarted in their turn.
    * burlar el sistema = beat + the system, game + the system.

    * * *
    burlar [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹medidas de seguridad/control› to evade, get around
    el barco se fugó burlando la vigilancia de la marina the boat escaped despite being under navy surveillance
    burlarse DE algo/algn to make fun OF sth/sb
    ¡de mí no se burla nadie! no-one makes fun of me!
    * * *

     

    burlar ( conjugate burlar) verbo transitivo


    b) enemigo to outwit

    burlarse verbo pronominal burlarse de algo/algn to make fun of sth/sb
    burlar verbo transitivo
    1 (engañar) to outwit
    2 (esquivar) to evade
    ' burlar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    cheat
    - outwit
    - run
    - out
    * * *
    vt
    [esquivar] to evade; [ley] to flout;
    consiguió burlar a sus perseguidores she managed to outwit her pursuers;
    el ladrón burló los sistemas de seguridad the thief found a way round the security systems;
    burla burlando without anyone noticing
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 riesgo, dificultad get round
    2 ( engañar) trick, take in
    II v/i mock
    * * *
    burlar vt
    engañar: to trick, to deceive
    * * *
    burlar vb
    1. (esquivar) to give the slip [pt. gave; pp. given]
    2. (engañar) to trick

    Spanish-English dictionary > burlar

  • 2 chillar

    v.
    1 to scream, to yell (gritar) (person).
    2 to screech.
    3 to yell at (informal) (reñir).
    4 to shriek, to screech, to howl, to scream.
    5 to bawl out.
    * * *
    1 (persona) to scream, shriek, shout
    ¡no chilles! stop shouting!
    chilla más que no te oigo speak up, I can't hear you
    2 (cerdo) to squeal; (ratón) to squeak; (pájaro) to squawk, screech
    3 (radio) to blare; (frenos) to screech, squeal; (puerta, ventana) to creak, squeak
    4 (colores) to be loud, be gaudy, clash
    5 familiar (reñir) to tell off
    6 figurado (protestar) to protest, complain
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VI
    1) (=gritar) [persona] to shriek, scream; [gato, animal salvaje] to screech, yowl; [ratón] to squeak; [cerdo] to squeal; [ave] to screech, squawk; [radio] to blare
    2) (Mec) [frenos] to screech, squeal
    3) [colores] to scream, jar, be loud
    4) LAm (=llorar) to bawl
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    1) pájaro to screech; cerdo to squeal; ratón to squeak
    2)
    a) persona to shout, yell (colloq); (de dolor, miedo) to scream

    chillarle a alguiento yell o shout at somebody

    b) bebé/niño ( llorar) to scream
    3) (Col) colores to clash
    * * *
    = screech, scream, shrill, howl, yelp, shriek, squeal, holler.
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex. What's the ordinary response if you're a red-blooded American consumer? I mean, you scream like hell and run to the store and demand your money back.
    Ex. And those users who are unfortunate enough to hit on a librarian who booms (or shrills) their private problems around the library floor may never ask a question again.
    Ex. If we do not listen to other people whispering their prayers today we may have to meet them tomorrow when they are howling their war cries.
    Ex. He yelped in pain and she grabbed his wrists and pinned his arms to the floor.
    Ex. At most summer camps, children shriek, laugh and generally make a ruckus.
    Ex. Our political class yaps and squeals but is incapable of rational thought.
    Ex. When McCall finished his book by saying, 'It makes me wanna holler and throw up my hands,' he almost described my reaction perfectly.
    ----
    * chillar a gripo pelado = scream + Posesivo + head off.
    * chillar a grito pelado = scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * chillar como alma en pena = scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * chillar como un cerdo = squeal like + a pig.
    * chillar como un condenado = scream like + a banshee.
    * chillar como un loco = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    1) pájaro to screech; cerdo to squeal; ratón to squeak
    2)
    a) persona to shout, yell (colloq); (de dolor, miedo) to scream

    chillarle a alguiento yell o shout at somebody

    b) bebé/niño ( llorar) to scream
    3) (Col) colores to clash
    * * *
    = screech, scream, shrill, howl, yelp, shriek, squeal, holler.

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.

    Ex: What's the ordinary response if you're a red-blooded American consumer? I mean, you scream like hell and run to the store and demand your money back.
    Ex: And those users who are unfortunate enough to hit on a librarian who booms (or shrills) their private problems around the library floor may never ask a question again.
    Ex: If we do not listen to other people whispering their prayers today we may have to meet them tomorrow when they are howling their war cries.
    Ex: He yelped in pain and she grabbed his wrists and pinned his arms to the floor.
    Ex: At most summer camps, children shriek, laugh and generally make a ruckus.
    Ex: Our political class yaps and squeals but is incapable of rational thought.
    Ex: When McCall finished his book by saying, 'It makes me wanna holler and throw up my hands,' he almost described my reaction perfectly.
    * chillar a gripo pelado = scream + Posesivo + head off.
    * chillar a grito pelado = scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * chillar como alma en pena = scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * chillar como un cerdo = squeal like + a pig.
    * chillar como un condenado = scream like + a banshee.
    * chillar como un loco = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.

    * * *
    chillar [A1 ]
    vi
    A «pájaro» to screech; «cerdo» to squeal; «ratón» to squeak
    B
    1 (gritar) to shout, yell ( colloq); (de dolor) to scream; (de miedo) to scream, shriek
    chillaban como locos they were shouting their heads off, they were shouting like crazy o ( BrE) mad
    chillarle A algn to yell o shout AT sb
    no hace falta que me chilles, no estoy sorda there's no need to shout o yell, I'm not deaf
    si llega tarde le chillarán ( fam); if he's late he'll get a real earful o he'll get bawled out o he'll get yelled at ( colloq)
    2 «oídos» to ring
    3 «bebé/niño» (llorar) to scream
    C ( Col) «colores» to clash
    * * *

    chillar ( conjugate chillar) verbo intransitivo

    [ cerdo] to squeal;
    [ ratón] to squeak
    b) [ persona] to shout, yell (colloq);

    (de dolor, miedo) to scream;
    chillarle a algn to yell o shout at sb
    c) [bebé/niño] ( llorar) to scream

    chillar verbo intransitivo
    1 (emitir un chillido) to scream, shriek
    2 (levantar la voz) to shout
    3 (un ave) to screech
    (un cerdo) to squeal
    ' chillar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    bawl
    - call
    - jar
    - scream
    - screech
    - shriek
    - squall
    - squeak
    - squeal
    - cry
    - squawk
    * * *
    vi
    1. [gritar] [personas] to scream, to yell;
    [aves, monos] to screech; [cerdo] to squeal; [ratón] to squeak
    2. [hablar alto] to shout;
    chilla más, que aquí atrás no se te oye speak up, we can't hear you at the back;
    ¡no chilles, que no somos sordos! don't shout, we're not deaf!
    3. [chirriar] to screech;
    [puerta, madera] to creak; [bisagras] to squeak
    vt
    Fam [reñir] to yell o shout at;
    siempre le chilla al niño she's always yelling o shouting at the child;
    a mí no me chilla nadie no one shouts at me
    * * *
    v/i scream, shriek; de cerdo squeal
    * * *
    1) : to squeal, to screech
    2) : to scream, to yell
    3) : to be gaudy, to clash
    * * *
    1. (gritar) to shout
    2. (hablar más fuerte) to speak up [pt. spoke; pp. spoken]
    3. (berrear) to scream
    4. (loro, frenos) to screech
    5. (cerdo) to squeal
    6. (ratón) to squeak

    Spanish-English dictionary > chillar

  • 3 chirriar

    v.
    1 to screech.
    2 to squeak, to scrape, to creak, to screech.
    La puerta chirría al abrirse solamente The door squeaks only when it opens
    3 to chirp.
    El avecilla chirriaba alegre The little bird chirped happily.
    4 to make screechy sounds.
    Me chirrían los zapatos My shoes make screechy sounds.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ DESVIAR], like link=desviar desviar
    2 (rueda, frenos) to screech, squeal; (puerta) to creak
    3 (aves) to squawk
    4 figurado (persona) to sing out of tune
    * * *
    verb
    to creak, squeak
    * * *
    VI
    1) (Zool) [grillo] to chirp, sing; [ave] to screech, squawk
    2) [bisagra, puerta] to creak, squeak
    3) [frenos] to screech, squeal
    4) And (=tiritar) [de frío] to shiver
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo puerta/gozne to squeak, creak; frenos/neumáticos to screech
    * * *
    = screech, squeal.
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex. Our political class yaps and squeals but is incapable of rational thought.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo puerta/gozne to squeak, creak; frenos/neumáticos to screech
    * * *
    = screech, squeal.

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.

    Ex: Our political class yaps and squeals but is incapable of rational thought.

    * * *
    vi
    «puerta/gozne» to squeak, creak; «frenos/neumáticos» to screech
    * * *

    chirriar ( conjugate chirriar) verbo intransitivo [puerta/gozne] to squeak, creak;
    [frenos/neumáticos] to screech
    chirriar vi (una bisagra, etc) to creak
    (los frenos del coche) to screech, squeal
    ' chirriar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    creak
    - grind
    - scrape
    - screech
    - squeak
    - grate
    - squeal
    * * *
    [sonar] to screech; [puerta, madera] to creak; [bisagra, muelles] to squeak
    * * *
    v/i squeak
    * * *
    chirriar {85} vi
    1) : to squeak, to creak
    2) : to screech
    chirriante adj
    * * *
    1. (rueda) to squeak
    2. (frenos) to screech
    3. (puerta) to creak

    Spanish-English dictionary > chirriar

  • 4 desdeñar

    v.
    to disdain, to despise, to disregard, to down-play.
    * * *
    1 (despreciar) to disdain, scorn
    2 (rechazar) to turn down
    1 not to deign (de, to)
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=despreciar) to scorn, disdain
    2) (=rechazar) to turn up one's nose at
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( menospreciar) to scorn
    b) < pretendiente> to spurn
    * * *
    = disdain, scorn, be scornful of, hold in + disgrace, snub, spurn, disregard, despise, dismiss with + the wave of the hand, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon, fly in + the face of.
    Ex. If people want regimentation which relieves them of responsibility, how then do you explain parents reaching out for control of schools, disdaining the help of experts.
    Ex. Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex. There is a large number of people who cannot afford paperbacks and would like to read, but are afraid or scornful of the ethos of the middle-class library.
    Ex. Yet, despite his great erudition and powerful writings, his scheme has had little success in establishing itself as a major competitor to such schemes as DC, UDC and LC, which Bliss himself held in some contempt.
    Ex. Some black librarian see little progress towards race-neutral attitudes and finds themselves either directly or indirectly snubbed, patronised or completely ignored by users as well as staff members.
    Ex. The government seems to spurns the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex. Although the overwhelming majority of technologically-driven programmes disregard information problems and issues, there are encouraging signs of a growing awareness of the need for information-driven.
    Ex. By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex. International 'rules' are often dismissed with the wave of the hand or a snort of contempt one week, and gilded and placed on a pedestal the next.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    Ex. If a planned activity flies in the face of human nature, its success will be only as great as the non-human factors can ensure.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( menospreciar) to scorn
    b) < pretendiente> to spurn
    * * *
    = disdain, scorn, be scornful of, hold in + disgrace, snub, spurn, disregard, despise, dismiss with + the wave of the hand, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon, fly in + the face of.

    Ex: If people want regimentation which relieves them of responsibility, how then do you explain parents reaching out for control of schools, disdaining the help of experts.

    Ex: Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex: There is a large number of people who cannot afford paperbacks and would like to read, but are afraid or scornful of the ethos of the middle-class library.
    Ex: Yet, despite his great erudition and powerful writings, his scheme has had little success in establishing itself as a major competitor to such schemes as DC, UDC and LC, which Bliss himself held in some contempt.
    Ex: Some black librarian see little progress towards race-neutral attitudes and finds themselves either directly or indirectly snubbed, patronised or completely ignored by users as well as staff members.
    Ex: The government seems to spurns the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex: Although the overwhelming majority of technologically-driven programmes disregard information problems and issues, there are encouraging signs of a growing awareness of the need for information-driven.
    Ex: By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex: International 'rules' are often dismissed with the wave of the hand or a snort of contempt one week, and gilded and placed on a pedestal the next.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    Ex: If a planned activity flies in the face of human nature, its success will be only as great as the non-human factors can ensure.

    * * *
    desdeñar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 (menospreciar) to scorn
    no tienes por qué desdeñarlos porque no tienen estudios there's no reason to look down on them o to look down your nose at them just because they haven't had an education
    desdeñó el dinero/la fama she scorned money/fame
    2 ‹pretendiente› to spurn
    * * *

    desdeñar ( conjugate desdeñar) verbo transitivo


    desdeñar verbo transitivo to disdain
    ' desdeñar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    despreciar
    English:
    disdain
    - scorn
    - sniff
    - spurn
    - scornful
    - snub
    * * *
    1. [despreciar] to scorn;
    desdeñó a varios pretendientes she spurned several suitors;
    desdeña a la gente que no es de su clase he looks down on anyone not of his class
    2. [desestimar] to dismiss;
    no conviene desdeñar las posibilidades del equipo inglés the English team's chances should not be ruled out
    * * *
    v/t scorn
    * * *
    despreciar: to disdain, to scorn, to despise
    * * *
    desdeñar vb to scorn

    Spanish-English dictionary > desdeñar

  • 5 despreciar

    v.
    1 to scorn.
    2 to spurn.
    3 to despise, to disdain, to flout, to hold in contempt.
    Ricardo desprecia a los avaros Richard despises cheapskates.
    4 to turn down, to snub.
    La chica despreció su ayuda The girl turned down his help.
    * * *
    1 (desdeñar) to despise, scorn, look down on
    2 (desestimar) to reject; (ignorar) to disregard, ignore
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ persona] to despise, scorn
    2) (=rechazar) [+ oferta, regalo] to spurn, reject
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( menospreciar) < persona> to look down on
    b) ( rechazar) <oferta/ayuda> to spurn (liter), to reject
    c) ( no tener en cuenta) <posibilidad/consejo> to disregard, discount
    * * *
    = disparage, scorn, despise, be scornful of, hold in + disgrace, snub, deprecate, have + contempt for, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon.
    Ex. For whatever reason, Shera chose to disparage rather than to take seriously the substance of Briet's ideas.
    Ex. Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex. By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex. There is a large number of people who cannot afford paperbacks and would like to read, but are afraid or scornful of the ethos of the middle-class library.
    Ex. Yet, despite his great erudition and powerful writings, his scheme has had little success in establishing itself as a major competitor to such schemes as DC, UDC and LC, which Bliss himself held in some contempt.
    Ex. Some black librarian see little progress towards race-neutral attitudes and finds themselves either directly or indirectly snubbed, patronised or completely ignored by users as well as staff members.
    Ex. In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex. The androgynous dandy lived the idea of beauty, had contempt for bourgeois values, and was elitist and estranged from women.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( menospreciar) < persona> to look down on
    b) ( rechazar) <oferta/ayuda> to spurn (liter), to reject
    c) ( no tener en cuenta) <posibilidad/consejo> to disregard, discount
    * * *
    = disparage, scorn, despise, be scornful of, hold in + disgrace, snub, deprecate, have + contempt for, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon.

    Ex: For whatever reason, Shera chose to disparage rather than to take seriously the substance of Briet's ideas.

    Ex: Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex: By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex: There is a large number of people who cannot afford paperbacks and would like to read, but are afraid or scornful of the ethos of the middle-class library.
    Ex: Yet, despite his great erudition and powerful writings, his scheme has had little success in establishing itself as a major competitor to such schemes as DC, UDC and LC, which Bliss himself held in some contempt.
    Ex: Some black librarian see little progress towards race-neutral attitudes and finds themselves either directly or indirectly snubbed, patronised or completely ignored by users as well as staff members.
    Ex: In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex: The androgynous dandy lived the idea of beauty, had contempt for bourgeois values, and was elitist and estranged from women.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.

    * * *
    despreciar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 (menospreciar) ‹persona› to look down on
    la despreciaban por su humilde origen people looked down on her because of her humble background
    2 (rechazar) ‹oferta/ayuda› to spurn ( liter), to reject
    le despreció el regalo he spurned her gift
    es un trabajo que todos desprecian it's a job which everyone feels is beneath them
    3 (ser indiferente a) ‹peligro/muerte› to disregard, scorn ( liter)
    4 (no tener en cuenta) ‹posibilidad/consejo› to disregard, discount
    * * *

    despreciar ( conjugate despreciar) verbo transitivo

    ( profundamente) to despise
    b) ( rechazar) ‹oferta/ayuda to reject

    despreciar verbo transitivo
    1 (odiar) to despise
    2 (menospreciar) to look down on, to scorn
    3 (desdeñar) to reject, spurn
    ' despreciar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    menospreciar
    English:
    despise
    - disdain
    - flout
    - look down on
    - disregard
    - nose
    * * *
    1. [desdeñar] to look down on, to scorn;
    lo desprecian por su egoísmo they look down on him because of his selfishness;
    no sabes cómo te desprecio you can't imagine how much I despise you
    2. [rechazar] to spurn;
    ha despreciado muchas ofertas he has rejected many offers;
    tómeselo, no me lo desprecie take it, don't turn it down
    3. [ignorar] to scorn, to disregard;
    despreció el mal tiempo y se fue a esquiar scorning o disregarding the poor weather, he went skiing
    * * *
    v/t
    1 look down on, despise
    2 propuesta reject
    * * *
    desdeñar, menospreciar: to despise, to scorn, to disdain
    * * *
    1. (menospreciar) to look down on / to despise
    2. (rechazar) to reject

    Spanish-English dictionary > despreciar

  • 6 gritar

    v.
    1 to shout (hablar alto).
    no grites tanto, habla más bajo don't shout so much, lower your voice a bit
    gritó de dolor he screamed in pain
    María gritó como nunca Mary shouted as never before.
    El camionero gritó improperios The truck driver shouted insults.
    2 to shout or yell at.
    ¡no me grites! don't shout or yell at me!
    3 to shout at, to bellow at, to bark at, to bawl at.
    María le gritó a Ricardo Mary shouted at Richard.
    * * *
    1 (gen) to shout; (chillar) cry out, scream
    ¡no me grites! don't shout at me!
    * * *
    verb
    to shout, cry, scream
    * * *
    1. VI
    1) (=dar voces) to shout

    ¡no grites! — don't shout!

    no me grites, que no estoy sorda — don't shout, I'm not deaf

    ¡no le grites a tu madre! — don't shout at your mother!

    2) (=chillar) to scream
    3) (=abuchear) to jeer
    2.
    VT [+ instrucciones, órdenes] to shout
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo to shout

    gritarle a alguien — to shout at somebody; ( para llamarlo) to shout (out) to somebody

    2.
    gritar vt to shout
    * * *
    = cry (out), screech, shout, bellow, scream, yell, howl, call out, yelp, shriek, holler.
    Ex. 'Good grief!', he cried, catching sight of the clock.
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex. 'Didn't Justine Asadorian in the order department used to work in serials?' she almost shouted, with a sudden access of excitement.
    Ex. As when 'Spider!' is bellowed at someone who does not exactly care for arachnids = Como cuando se le grita "¡Una araña!" a alguien que no se asusta de los arácnidos.
    Ex. What's the ordinary response if you're a red-blooded American consumer? I mean, you scream like hell and run to the store and demand your money back.
    Ex. 'I don't want your help, I tell you!' I yelled at him.
    Ex. If we do not listen to other people whispering their prayers today we may have to meet them tomorrow when they are howling their war cries.
    Ex. It was our morning watch; when, soon after the day began to break, a man on the forecastle called out, 'Land ho!'.
    Ex. He yelped in pain and she grabbed his wrists and pinned his arms to the floor.
    Ex. At most summer camps, children shriek, laugh and generally make a ruckus.
    Ex. When McCall finished his book by saying, 'It makes me wanna holler and throw up my hands,' he almost described my reaction perfectly.
    ----
    * gritar como alma en pena = scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * gritar como un condenado = scream like + a banshee.
    * gritar como un loco = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * gritar desaforadamente = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs.
    * gritar desaforamente = scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo to shout

    gritarle a alguien — to shout at somebody; ( para llamarlo) to shout (out) to somebody

    2.
    gritar vt to shout
    * * *
    = cry (out), screech, shout, bellow, scream, yell, howl, call out, yelp, shriek, holler.

    Ex: 'Good grief!', he cried, catching sight of the clock.

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex: 'Didn't Justine Asadorian in the order department used to work in serials?' she almost shouted, with a sudden access of excitement.
    Ex: As when 'Spider!' is bellowed at someone who does not exactly care for arachnids = Como cuando se le grita "¡Una araña!" a alguien que no se asusta de los arácnidos.
    Ex: What's the ordinary response if you're a red-blooded American consumer? I mean, you scream like hell and run to the store and demand your money back.
    Ex: 'I don't want your help, I tell you!' I yelled at him.
    Ex: If we do not listen to other people whispering their prayers today we may have to meet them tomorrow when they are howling their war cries.
    Ex: It was our morning watch; when, soon after the day began to break, a man on the forecastle called out, 'Land ho!'.
    Ex: He yelped in pain and she grabbed his wrists and pinned his arms to the floor.
    Ex: At most summer camps, children shriek, laugh and generally make a ruckus.
    Ex: When McCall finished his book by saying, 'It makes me wanna holler and throw up my hands,' he almost described my reaction perfectly.
    * gritar como alma en pena = scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * gritar como un condenado = scream like + a banshee.
    * gritar como un loco = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, scream like + a banshee, wail like + a banshee.
    * gritar desaforadamente = shout + Posesivo + head off, scream + Posesivo + head off, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs, shout at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + voice, scream at + the top of + Posesivo + lungs.
    * gritar desaforamente = scream at + the top of + Posesivo + head.

    * * *
    gritar [A1 ]
    vi
    to shout
    no hace falta que grites there's no need to shout o yell
    a fuerza de gritar se quedó ronco he shouted himself hoarse
    gritaba de terror/dolor he was shrieking o screaming with terror/pain
    gritaba de alegría she was shouting o whooping for joy
    empezó a gritar pidiendo ayuda he started crying out o yelling o shouting for help
    gritaba como un desaforado he was screaming o shrieking at the top of his voice
    le grité pero no me oyó I shouted to her but she didn't hear me
    ¡a mí no me grites! don't you shout o yell at me!
    ■ gritar
    vt
    to shout
    los manifestantes gritaban consignas en contra del gobierno the demonstrators were shouting anti-government slogans
    -¡cuidado! -gritó watch out! she shouted o cried
    me gritó una serie de insultos he shouted o hurled a series of insults at me
    le fui gritando instrucciones desde la ventana I shouted instructions to him from the window
    * * *

     

    gritar ( conjugate gritar) verbo intransitivo
    to shout;
    no hace falta que grites there's no need to shout o yell;

    gritar de dolor to scream with pain;
    gritar de alegría to shout for joy;
    gritar pidiendo ayuda to shout for help;
    gritarle a algn to shout at sb;

    ( para llamarlo) to shout (out) to sb
    verbo transitivo
    to shout
    gritar verbo transitivo & verbo intransitivo to shout
    Normalmente, cuando quieres gritar a alguien, debes usar la preposición to: Me gritó desde la otra acera. He shouted to me from the other pavement. Sin embargo, si quieres gritar con enfado, debes usar la preposición at: No tienes que gritarme. You don't have to shout at me. También podrías emplear el verbo to cry out, pero recuerda que indica miedo o sorpresa.
    ' gritar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    berrear
    - bramar
    - delante
    - de
    - desaforado
    - desesperación
    - ronco
    English:
    bawl
    - bellow
    - bored
    - call
    - call out
    - cry
    - cry out
    - exclaim
    - holler
    - scream
    - shout
    - shout out
    - stop
    - together
    - whoop
    - would
    - yell
    - bark
    - chant
    - clamor
    - polite
    - shriek
    * * *
    vi
    1. [hablar alto] to shout;
    no grites tanto, habla más bajo don't shout so much, lower your voice a bit
    2. [chillar] to scream, to yell;
    gritó de dolor he cried in pain;
    gritó de alegría he shouted for joy
    vt
    1. [en voz alta]
    gritar algo a alguien to shout sth at sb;
    “¡no cruces!”, me gritó "don't cross!" he shouted at me
    2. [reñir] to shout o yell at;
    ¡no me grites, que no fue culpa mía! don't shout o yell at me, it wasn't my fault!;
    no me gusta que me griten I don't like being shouted at
    * * *
    v/t & v/i shout, yell
    * * *
    : to shout, to scream, to cry
    * * *
    gritar vb to shout

    Spanish-English dictionary > gritar

  • 7 menospreciar

    v.
    1 to scorn, to despise.
    2 to underestimate, to belittle, to cold-shoulder, to cry down.
    * * *
    1 (despreciar) to despise, scorn
    2 (no valorar) to undervalue, underrate
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=despreciar) to scorn, despise
    2) (=ofender) to slight
    3) (=subestimar) to underrate, underestimate
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( despreciar) <persona/obra> to despise, look down on
    b) ( subestimar) to underestimate
    * * *
    = underrate, disparage, denigrate, scorn, belittle, deprecate, have + contempt for, despise, dismiss with + the wave of the hand, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon.
    Ex. Its contribution in this context should not be underrated.
    Ex. For whatever reason, Shera chose to disparage rather than to take seriously the substance of Briet's ideas.
    Ex. This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex. Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex. Citing a renowned author merely to gain personal respectability for an otherwise mediocre piece of research belittles the work of the cited author.
    Ex. In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex. The androgynous dandy lived the idea of beauty, had contempt for bourgeois values, and was elitist and estranged from women.
    Ex. By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex. International 'rules' are often dismissed with the wave of the hand or a snort of contempt one week, and gilded and placed on a pedestal the next.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    ----
    * menospreciar a la gente = look down + Posesivo + nose at people.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( despreciar) <persona/obra> to despise, look down on
    b) ( subestimar) to underestimate
    * * *
    = underrate, disparage, denigrate, scorn, belittle, deprecate, have + contempt for, despise, dismiss with + the wave of the hand, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon.

    Ex: Its contribution in this context should not be underrated.

    Ex: For whatever reason, Shera chose to disparage rather than to take seriously the substance of Briet's ideas.
    Ex: This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex: Marshall Edmonds seemed pathetic to her, a person more to be pitied than to be scorned.
    Ex: Citing a renowned author merely to gain personal respectability for an otherwise mediocre piece of research belittles the work of the cited author.
    Ex: In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex: The androgynous dandy lived the idea of beauty, had contempt for bourgeois values, and was elitist and estranged from women.
    Ex: By this later period pressmen in England were despised as mere 'horses', the 'great guzzlers of beer' who were rebuked by the young Benjamin Franklin for their mindless intemperance.
    Ex: International 'rules' are often dismissed with the wave of the hand or a snort of contempt one week, and gilded and placed on a pedestal the next.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    * menospreciar a la gente = look down + Posesivo + nose at people.

    * * *
    vt
    1 (despreciar) ‹persona/obra› to despise, scorn, look down on
    2 (subestimar) to underestimate
    menospreciar el valor de algo to underestimate the value of sth
    no lo menosprecies don't underestimate o underrate him
    * * *

    menospreciar ( conjugate menospreciar) verbo transitivo
    a) ( despreciar) ‹persona/obra to despise, look down on


    menospreciar verbo transitivo
    1 (despreciar) to scorn, disdain
    2 (infravalorar) to underestimate
    ' menospreciar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    despreciar
    - desdeñar
    English:
    demean
    - despise
    - devalue
    - disparage
    - put down
    - belittle
    - denigrate
    * * *
    1. [despreciar] to scorn, to despise
    2. [infravalorar] to undervalue
    * * *
    v/t
    1 ( subestimar) underestimate
    2 ( desdeñar) look down on
    * * *
    1) despreciar: to scorn, to look down on
    2) : to underestimate, to undervalue

    Spanish-English dictionary > menospreciar

  • 8 mirar con desprecio

    (v.) = look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    * * *
    (v.) = look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon

    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.

    Ex: The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mirar con desprecio

  • 9 mirar por encima del hombro

    (v.) = look over + Posesivo + shoulders, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon
    Ex. The way in which users are using the CD-ROM service was investigated by talking to them and looking over their shoulders during searches.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.
    * * *
    (v.) = look over + Posesivo + shoulders, look down + Posesivo + nose at, look down on/upon

    Ex: The way in which users are using the CD-ROM service was investigated by talking to them and looking over their shoulders during searches.

    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The problem with that is that most literate societies look down on people who can't read well.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mirar por encima del hombro

  • 10 mofar

    v.
    1 to deride, to jeer, to scoff.
    2 to mock, to ridicule, to flout.
    3 to sneer, to scoff, to behave with contempt.
    * * *
    1.
    VI to mock, scoff, sneer
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    = mock.
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    ----
    * mofarse = sneer, scoff, jeer, snicker, snigger.
    * mofarse de = make + a joke about, ridicule, make + mockery of, poke + fun at, thumb + Posesivo + nose at, make + fun of, sneer at, scoff at.
    * * *
    = mock.

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.

    * mofarse = sneer, scoff, jeer, snicker, snigger.
    * mofarse de = make + a joke about, ridicule, make + mockery of, poke + fun at, thumb + Posesivo + nose at, make + fun of, sneer at, scoff at.

    Spanish-English dictionary > mofar

  • 11 pedante

    adj.
    1 pretentious.
    2 pedantic, vain, bookish, pedant.
    f. & m.
    1 pretentious person.
    2 pedant, dry-as-dust, dryasdust, popinjay.
    * * *
    1 pedantic, pompous
    1 pedant
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ [gen] pedantic; (=pomposo) pompous, conceited
    2.
    SMF pedant
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo pedantic
    II
    masculino y femenino pedant
    * * *
    = pompous, pedant, pedantic, pretentious, hyfoluted, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, hoity-toity, portentous.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. Librarians are expected, by their popular media image, to be fussy, nit-picking, pedants.
    Ex. He didn't react quite as strongly as Voltaire, but he thought it poor stuff: artificial, pedantic, dull.
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex. It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex. Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex. The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo pedantic
    II
    masculino y femenino pedant
    * * *
    = pompous, pedant, pedantic, pretentious, hyfoluted, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, hoity-toity, portentous.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: Librarians are expected, by their popular media image, to be fussy, nit-picking, pedants.
    Ex: He didn't react quite as strongly as Voltaire, but he thought it poor stuff: artificial, pedantic, dull.
    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex: I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex: It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex: Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex: The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.

    * * *
    (detallista) pedantic; (presuntuoso) pompous
    pedant
    * * *

    pedante adjetivo
    pedantic
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino
    pedant
    pedante
    I adjetivo pedantic
    II mf pedant
    ' pedante' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    repipi
    English:
    fastidious
    - pedantic
    - should
    * * *
    adj
    pretentious
    nmf
    pretentious person
    * * *
    I adj
    1 ( perfeccionista) pedantic
    2 ( presuntuoso) pretentious
    II m/f
    1 ( perfeccionista) pedant
    2 ( presuntuoso) pretentious individual
    * * *
    pedante adj
    : pedantic
    pedante nmf
    : pedant

    Spanish-English dictionary > pedante

  • 12 presumido

    adj.
    conceited, arrogant, vain, assuming.
    f. & m.
    conceited person, swell-headed person, vain person, poseur.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: presumir.
    * * *
    1 (arrogante) conceited; (en el vestir) vain
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (arrogante) conceited person; (en el vestir) vain person
    * * *
    (f. - presumida)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ (=creído) conceited; (=coqueto) vain
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( engreído) conceited, full of oneself; ( arrogante) arrogant
    b) ( coqueto) vain
    * * *
    = conceited, smug, presumptuous, self-important, high-blown, hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], poseur.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. A little later in the same document, in a passage dealing in a rather smug way with the then infant county libraries we read that the purpose of such libraries should be to relieve the tedium of idle hours quite irrespective of intellectual profit or educational gain.
    Ex. Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex. He was described as 'a self-important, self-righteous blowhard, puffing his filthy pipe, patches on the elbows of his well-worn tweed jacket, decked out in the cliche costume of the shabby liberal icon'.
    Ex. In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex. This is an interesting little town wholly populated by poseurs and backpackers with a few salty sea dogs thrown in for good measure.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( engreído) conceited, full of oneself; ( arrogante) arrogant
    b) ( coqueto) vain
    * * *
    = conceited, smug, presumptuous, self-important, high-blown, hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], poseur.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: A little later in the same document, in a passage dealing in a rather smug way with the then infant county libraries we read that the purpose of such libraries should be to relieve the tedium of idle hours quite irrespective of intellectual profit or educational gain.
    Ex: Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex: He was described as 'a self-important, self-righteous blowhard, puffing his filthy pipe, patches on the elbows of his well-worn tweed jacket, decked out in the cliche costume of the shabby liberal icon'.
    Ex: In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex: This is an interesting little town wholly populated by poseurs and backpackers with a few salty sea dogs thrown in for good measure.

    * * *
    1 (engreído) conceited, full of oneself; (arrogante) arrogant
    2 (coqueto) vain
    * * *

     

    Del verbo presumir: ( conjugate presumir)

    presumido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    presumido    
    presumir
    presumido
    ◊ -da adjetivo


    ( arrogante) arrogant

    presumir ( conjugate presumir) verbo intransitivo
    to show off;
    presumido DE algo ‹ de dinero› ( hablando) to boast o brag about sth;
    ( enseñándolo) to flash sth around;

    verbo transitivo: se presume una reacción violenta there is likely to be a violent reaction;
    era de presumido occurriría it was quite predictable what would happen
    presumido,-a
    I adjetivo vain
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino vain person, familiar poser
    presumir
    I vtr (sospechar) to predict, suppose
    II verbo intransitivo
    1 (de una cualidad) to fancy oneself as: presume de listo, he thinks he's very smart
    2 (de una posesión) to boast [de, about]: le gusta presumir de coche, he likes to show off his car

    ' presumido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    presumida
    - presuntuosa
    - presuntuoso
    - autosuficiente
    - vanidoso
    English:
    overconfident
    - toffee-nosed
    - vain
    - self
    * * *
    presumido, -a
    adj
    1. [jactancioso]
    ser presumido to be a show-off
    2. [vanidoso] vain
    nm,f
    1. [jactancioso] show-off
    2. [vanidoso]
    ser un presumido to be vain
    * * *
    I adj
    1 ( creído) conceited
    2 ( coqueto) vain
    II m, presumida f bighead
    * * *
    presumido, -da adj
    vanidoso: conceited, vain
    * * *
    presumido adj vain

    Spanish-English dictionary > presumido

  • 13 presuntuoso

    adj.
    1 conceited, arrogant, assuming, vain.
    2 pompous, highfaluting, lavish, highfalutin.
    m.
    self-conceited person, snob.
    * * *
    1 (presumido) conceited, vain; (arrogante) presumptuous
    * * *
    ADJ (=vanidoso) conceited, presumptuous; (=pretencioso) pretentious
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo conceited, vain
    * * *
    = conceited, pompous, presumptuous, immodest, pretentious, stuck-up, hyfoluted, high-blown, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], poseur, cocksure, big-headed, portentous.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex. The author reviews an article by Tom Eadie, ' Immodest proposals: user instruction for students does not work'.
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. library users were stereotyped as old people, intellectuals, uninteresting people, shy or stuck-up people and people afraid of life.
    Ex. I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex. In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex. It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex. Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex. The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex. This is an interesting little town wholly populated by poseurs and backpackers with a few salty sea dogs thrown in for good measure.
    Ex. The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.
    Ex. I alwasy knew she was a pain in the arse, without knowing her you can just tell, by the way she behaves, that she is big-headed and thinks she's god's gift to the human race.
    Ex. He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo conceited, vain
    * * *
    = conceited, pompous, presumptuous, immodest, pretentious, stuck-up, hyfoluted, high-blown, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], poseur, cocksure, big-headed, portentous.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex: Many feel that it is presumptuous to think that a 150- to 250-word abstract can carry enough information from a well-written 3,000-word paper to be of much use except as a guide.
    Ex: The author reviews an article by Tom Eadie, ' Immodest proposals: user instruction for students does not work'.
    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex: library users were stereotyped as old people, intellectuals, uninteresting people, shy or stuck-up people and people afraid of life.
    Ex: I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex: In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex: It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex: Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex: The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex: This is an interesting little town wholly populated by poseurs and backpackers with a few salty sea dogs thrown in for good measure.
    Ex: The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.
    Ex: I alwasy knew she was a pain in the arse, without knowing her you can just tell, by the way she behaves, that she is big-headed and thinks she's god's gift to the human race.
    Ex: He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.

    * * *
    conceited, vain
    * * *

    presuntuoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    conceited, vain
    presuntuoso,-a adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino
    1 (presumido) vain, conceited
    2 (pretencioso) pretentious, showy

    ' presuntuoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    chula
    - chulo
    - presuntuosa
    - suficiente
    - ufana
    - ufano
    English:
    bumptious
    - immodest
    - jumped up
    - pompous
    - pretentious
    - upstart
    - conceited
    * * *
    presuntuoso, -a
    adj
    [vanidoso] conceited; [pretencioso] pretentious
    nm,f
    conceited person
    * * *
    adj conceited
    * * *
    presuntuoso, -sa adj
    : conceited
    * * *
    presuntuoso adj boastful

    Spanish-English dictionary > presuntuoso

  • 14 pretencioso

    adj.
    1 pretentious, assuming, high-flying, la-di-da.
    2 pretentious, doggy.
    * * *
    1 pretentious
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 pretentious person
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=vanidoso) pretentious, presumptuous; (=fanfarrón) showy
    2) LAm (=presumido) vain, stuck-up *
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) < casa> pretentious, showy; <persona/película> pretentious
    b) (Chi) ( vainidoso) vain
    * * *
    = pretentious, hyfoluted, hoity-toity, hoity-toity, high-flown.
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex. Wine lovers get the urge to splurge and celebrate, often in hoity-toity restaurants.
    Ex. It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex. Disaffected and literally unliterary pubescent readers were expected to be hooked by his high-flown style.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) < casa> pretentious, showy; <persona/película> pretentious
    b) (Chi) ( vainidoso) vain
    * * *
    = pretentious, hyfoluted, hoity-toity, hoity-toity, high-flown.

    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.

    Ex: I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex: Wine lovers get the urge to splurge and celebrate, often in hoity-toity restaurants.
    Ex: It's the kind of barn where you can learn to ride without feeling mocked or like some hoity-toities are looking down their nose at you.
    Ex: Disaffected and literally unliterary pubescent readers were expected to be hooked by his high-flown style.

    * * *
    A ‹casa› pretentious, showy; ‹persona/película› pretentious
    B ( AmL) (vanidoso) vain
    * * *

    pretencioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo ‹casa/película pretentious

    pretencioso,-a adjetivo pretentious

    ' pretencioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    presuntuosa
    - presuntuoso
    - pretenciosa
    English:
    pretentious
    * * *
    pretencioso, -a
    adj
    pretentious
    nm,f
    pretentious person
    * * *
    adj pretentious
    * * *
    pretencioso, -sa adj
    : pretentious

    Spanish-English dictionary > pretencioso

  • 15 operación ficticia

    • dummy transaction
    • mocked transaction
    • washed transaction
    • washed-out face
    • washed-up

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > operación ficticia

  • 16 ser objeto de burla

    • be laughed at
    • be laughed upon
    • be mocked at
    • be mocked upon
    • be the laughingstock

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > ser objeto de burla

  • 17 operación ficticia

    f.
    dummy transaction, mocked transaction, washed transaction.

    Spanish-English dictionary > operación ficticia

См. также в других словарях:

  • Mocked — Mock Mock, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mocked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mocking}.] [F. moquer, of uncertain origin; cf. OD. mocken to mumble, G. mucken, OSw. mucka.] 1. To imitate; to mimic; esp., to mimic in sport, contempt, or derision; to deride by mimicry …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mocked — mÉ‘k /mÉ’k n. scorn, ridicule, mockery v. jeer; mimic; imitate; scorn; ridicule adj. imitation, false, fake …   English contemporary dictionary

  • mocked at — did not take seriously, derided, disparaged …   English contemporary dictionary

  • mocked — past of mock …   Useful english dictionary

  • Man Mocked by Two Women — Women Laughing , 1821–1823. 125.4cm x 65.4cm, Oil on gesso transferred to linen. Museo del Prado, Madrid Man Mocked by Two Women or Women Laughing or (Spanish: Dos Mujeres y un hombre) or The Ministration[1] (Spanish: Dos Mujeres Y Un Hombre) are …   Wikipedia

  • made a fool of him — mocked him, made fun of him …   English contemporary dictionary

  • South Park themes — South Park frequently tackles controversial political issues, racism, gay rights, the environment, disability, censorship, and religion. The show typically lampoons extremist views on issues and points out hypocrisy or illogical proofs of a… …   Wikipedia

  • Mock — Mock, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mocked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mocking}.] [F. moquer, of uncertain origin; cf. OD. mocken to mumble, G. mucken, OSw. mucka.] 1. To imitate; to mimic; esp., to mimic in sport, contempt, or derision; to deride by mimicry.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mocking — Mock Mock, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mocked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mocking}.] [F. moquer, of uncertain origin; cf. OD. mocken to mumble, G. mucken, OSw. mucka.] 1. To imitate; to mimic; esp., to mimic in sport, contempt, or derision; to deride by mimicry …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Private Eye — For other uses, see Private eye (disambiguation). Private Eye Cover of Private Eye from July 2011 Type …   Wikipedia

  • Dead Ringers (comedy) — Dead Ringers Dead Ringers Title Card Genre Comedy Format Sketch show Created by …   Wikipedia

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