Перевод: с испанского на все языки

looming

  • 1 aguas + volver a su cauce

    (n.) = dust + settle
    Ex. It is likely that the library manager who chooses to wait for the dust to settle will find yet another dust storm looming on the horizon.
    * * *
    (n.) = dust + settle

    Ex: It is likely that the library manager who chooses to wait for the dust to settle will find yet another dust storm looming on the horizon.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aguas + volver a su cauce

  • 2 amenazador

    adj.
    threatening, menacing, ominous.
    * * *
    1 threatening, menacing
    * * *
    (f. - amenazadora)
    adj.
    menacing, threatening
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo, amenazante adjetivo threatening, menacing
    * * *
    = ominous, threatening, frowning, forbidding, looming, scary [scarier -comp., scariest -sup.], menacing, nasty looking, portentous.
    Ex. At first blush, nothing seemed particularly ominous about the formation of the ad hoc committee.
    Ex. It is easy to become carried away by the sheer size of the so-called 'information explosion' and to regard the growth of literature as a phenomenon as threatening to civilization as a virulent epidemic or the 'population explosion' in the third world.
    Ex. The impulse to learn is a ruling passion in very few people; in most of us it is so weak that a frowning aspect can discourage it.
    Ex. All those shelves full of books are forbidding, daunting.
    Ex. The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex. The very term 'outsourcing' is seen by many cataloguing departments as a scary word.
    Ex. This is a collection of articles on the theme: Books for children with murderous, shocking, menacing endings.
    Ex. The large and nasty-looking African Buffalo is highly dangerous to humans due to its unpredictable nature.
    Ex. Before me stretched the portentous menacing road of a new decade.
    ----
    * avecinarse de un modo amenazador = loom + large on the horizon.
    * conducta amenazadora = threatening behaviour.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo, amenazante adjetivo threatening, menacing
    * * *
    = ominous, threatening, frowning, forbidding, looming, scary [scarier -comp., scariest -sup.], menacing, nasty looking, portentous.

    Ex: At first blush, nothing seemed particularly ominous about the formation of the ad hoc committee.

    Ex: It is easy to become carried away by the sheer size of the so-called 'information explosion' and to regard the growth of literature as a phenomenon as threatening to civilization as a virulent epidemic or the 'population explosion' in the third world.
    Ex: The impulse to learn is a ruling passion in very few people; in most of us it is so weak that a frowning aspect can discourage it.
    Ex: All those shelves full of books are forbidding, daunting.
    Ex: The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex: The very term 'outsourcing' is seen by many cataloguing departments as a scary word.
    Ex: This is a collection of articles on the theme: Books for children with murderous, shocking, menacing endings.
    Ex: The large and nasty-looking African Buffalo is highly dangerous to humans due to its unpredictable nature.
    Ex: Before me stretched the portentous menacing road of a new decade.
    * avecinarse de un modo amenazador = loom + large on the horizon.
    * conducta amenazadora = threatening behaviour.

    * * *
    adj,
    amenazante adjective threatening, menacing
    * * *

    amenazador
    ◊ - dora, amenazante adjetivo

    threatening, menacing
    amenazador,-ora, amenazante adjetivo threatening, menacing

    ' amenazador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    amenazadora
    - amenazante
    English:
    forbidding
    - menace
    - menacing
    - threatening
    - threateningly
    * * *
    amenazador, -ora adj
    threatening, menacing
    * * *
    adj threatening
    * * *
    : threatening, menacing

    Spanish-English dictionary > amenazador

  • 3 austeridad económica

    (n.) = financial stringency, fiscal austerity, fiscal constraints
    Ex. However, in these days of financial stringency, no library achieves complete self-sufficiency but has to rely on the back-up services of the inter-library loan network.
    Ex. In these times of fiscal austerity there is growing pressure for academic institutions to show positive results.
    Ex. Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.
    * * *
    (n.) = financial stringency, fiscal austerity, fiscal constraints

    Ex: However, in these days of financial stringency, no library achieves complete self-sufficiency but has to rely on the back-up services of the inter-library loan network.

    Ex: In these times of fiscal austerity there is growing pressure for academic institutions to show positive results.
    Ex: Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.

    Spanish-English dictionary > austeridad económica

  • 4 avecinarse de un modo amenazador

    (v.) = loom + large on the horizon, loom + large
    Ex. Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.
    Ex. The philosophy of central collections providing back up for local libraries will loom large on the British library scene for some time.
    * * *
    (v.) = loom + large on the horizon, loom + large

    Ex: Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.

    Ex: The philosophy of central collections providing back up for local libraries will loom large on the British library scene for some time.

    Spanish-English dictionary > avecinarse de un modo amenazador

  • 5 cada vez mayor

    (adj.) = escalating, ever-growing, ever-increasing, expanded, growing, increasing, mounting, rising, spiralling [spiraling, -USA], deepening, rapidly growing, expanding, constantly rising, swelling, ever larger [ever-larger], galloping, steadily rising, steadily growing, mushrooming, ever greater, rapidly expanding, ever-widening, burgeoning, heightening
    Ex. Findings emphasised the escalating deprivation of applied social scientists in general and the local government and voluntary sectors in particular.
    Ex. To gauge the full impact on the BNB one must add to these Arabic publications half a dozen books in Kurdish, not forgetting the ever-growing list of translations of oriental works.
    Ex. Up to and including the fourteenth edition progress led to ever-increasing detail.
    Ex. Co-operatives have played a much more extensive role in recent years and are set to continue in their expanded role.
    Ex. Yet another variable factor is the growing presence of full text data bases.
    Ex. The final order on the shelves is the reverse of this, so that an order of increasing speciality is achieved.
    Ex. If the approach is not too blinkered, such situations, on the basis of mounting evidence, quickly lead to the realisation that technological solutions to information problems are at best partial.
    Ex. But the good times ran out and the world recession of the 1970s brought rising inflation, unemployment and increasing pressure for better social services.
    Ex. The ARL Serials Project is an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) designed to combat the spiralling increases in periodicals prices.
    Ex. The period from World War 2 to the present day saw the quickened pace and deepening specialisation of researches.
    Ex. The scheme was designed by the Library of Congress staff to be tailor-made for their own library with its immense and rapidly growing stock and with its bias towards law and the social sciences.
    Ex. There is an expanding interest in the idea of local government information services on the part of public libraries.
    Ex. Recently there has been more than the usual talk about the exceptionally-high and constantly-rising costs of scholarly journals and what scholar, editors, and libraries can do about the situation.
    Ex. By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.
    Ex. Technology plays an ever larger role in the delivery of services in libraries of all sizes.
    Ex. But the introduction of market economics, galloping inflation and the breakdown of old administrative structures are causing problems, especially over funding..
    Ex. Poland is currently enjoying a steadily rising national income, declining inflation, receding unemployment and an educational boom.
    Ex. The strategy is to maintain a steadily growing base line which can expand in better times.
    Ex. The position of the library as source provider has been eroded in an age of information explosions and mushrooming technology.
    Ex. The results has been an ever greater obfuscation of what constitutes the profession of librarianship.
    Ex. A rapidly expanding number of organizations have begun to use high performance, completely digital networks, such as the Internet.
    Ex. The inter-library loan network operates like a spiral with the individual library at the centre and the local, regional, national and international back-up services forming an ever-widening circle around it.
    Ex. It was apparent that the responders to the investigation were somewhat unsure of their future situation relative to the burgeoning information education market = Era claro que los entrevistados en la investigacion no se sentían muy seguros sobre su situación futura en relación con el incipiente mercado de las enseñanzas de documentación.
    Ex. The rising tension over the Olympic torch relay is heightening concerns whether this summer's Games will be clouded by political rancor.
    * * *
    (adj.) = escalating, ever-growing, ever-increasing, expanded, growing, increasing, mounting, rising, spiralling [spiraling, -USA], deepening, rapidly growing, expanding, constantly rising, swelling, ever larger [ever-larger], galloping, steadily rising, steadily growing, mushrooming, ever greater, rapidly expanding, ever-widening, burgeoning, heightening

    Ex: Findings emphasised the escalating deprivation of applied social scientists in general and the local government and voluntary sectors in particular.

    Ex: To gauge the full impact on the BNB one must add to these Arabic publications half a dozen books in Kurdish, not forgetting the ever-growing list of translations of oriental works.
    Ex: Up to and including the fourteenth edition progress led to ever-increasing detail.
    Ex: Co-operatives have played a much more extensive role in recent years and are set to continue in their expanded role.
    Ex: Yet another variable factor is the growing presence of full text data bases.
    Ex: The final order on the shelves is the reverse of this, so that an order of increasing speciality is achieved.
    Ex: If the approach is not too blinkered, such situations, on the basis of mounting evidence, quickly lead to the realisation that technological solutions to information problems are at best partial.
    Ex: But the good times ran out and the world recession of the 1970s brought rising inflation, unemployment and increasing pressure for better social services.
    Ex: The ARL Serials Project is an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) designed to combat the spiralling increases in periodicals prices.
    Ex: The period from World War 2 to the present day saw the quickened pace and deepening specialisation of researches.
    Ex: The scheme was designed by the Library of Congress staff to be tailor-made for their own library with its immense and rapidly growing stock and with its bias towards law and the social sciences.
    Ex: There is an expanding interest in the idea of local government information services on the part of public libraries.
    Ex: Recently there has been more than the usual talk about the exceptionally-high and constantly-rising costs of scholarly journals and what scholar, editors, and libraries can do about the situation.
    Ex: By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.
    Ex: Technology plays an ever larger role in the delivery of services in libraries of all sizes.
    Ex: But the introduction of market economics, galloping inflation and the breakdown of old administrative structures are causing problems, especially over funding..
    Ex: Poland is currently enjoying a steadily rising national income, declining inflation, receding unemployment and an educational boom.
    Ex: The strategy is to maintain a steadily growing base line which can expand in better times.
    Ex: The position of the library as source provider has been eroded in an age of information explosions and mushrooming technology.
    Ex: The results has been an ever greater obfuscation of what constitutes the profession of librarianship.
    Ex: A rapidly expanding number of organizations have begun to use high performance, completely digital networks, such as the Internet.
    Ex: The inter-library loan network operates like a spiral with the individual library at the centre and the local, regional, national and international back-up services forming an ever-widening circle around it.
    Ex: It was apparent that the responders to the investigation were somewhat unsure of their future situation relative to the burgeoning information education market = Era claro que los entrevistados en la investigacion no se sentían muy seguros sobre su situación futura en relación con el incipiente mercado de las enseñanzas de documentación.
    Ex: The rising tension over the Olympic torch relay is heightening concerns whether this summer's Games will be clouded by political rancor.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cada vez mayor

  • 6 cada vez más abultado

    (adj.) = swelling
    Ex. By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.
    * * *
    (adj.) = swelling

    Ex: By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cada vez más abultado

  • 7 dificultades económicas

    f.pl.
    money problems, money trouble, financial embarrassment.
    * * *
    (n.) = fiscal constraints, fiscal adversity, economic adversity
    Ex. Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.
    Ex. This paper discusses the fiscal adversities facing East Asian collections in the USA.
    Ex. The article has the title 'A radical response to economic adversity'.
    * * *
    (n.) = fiscal constraints, fiscal adversity, economic adversity

    Ex: Fiscal constraints looming large on the horizon for most libraries.

    Ex: This paper discusses the fiscal adversities facing East Asian collections in the USA.
    Ex: The article has the title 'A radical response to economic adversity'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dificultades económicas

  • 8 en formato electrónico

    Ex. By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.
    * * *

    Ex: By far the most difficult new challenge looming for librarianship will be preserving and providing access to 'born-digital' materials, that swelling mass of material that appears only in electronic form.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en formato electrónico

  • 9 en peligro

    = endangered, jeopardised [jeopardized, -USA], at stake, at risk, under threat, under challenge, on the line, on thin ice, on dangerous ground, threatened, in harm's way
    Ex. It asserts that young adult libraries and the services they provide are continously endangered and describes how to come to terms with this problem.
    Ex. And yet the thought of what he was being asked to do to salvage the jeopardized budget outraged his every fiber.
    Ex. But there was a principle at stake here, and she too felt obligated to express her honest thoughts.
    Ex. Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex. Products under threat include; greeting cards, circulars, information sheets, newspapers and magazines.
    Ex. During the previous 10 years the concept of free information services in Australian libraries has come increasingly under challenge.
    Ex. The article 'Assets on the line' discusses some of the disadvantages of manual methods of performing inventories of organization's hardware and software.
    Ex. As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex. On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    Ex. Kids and adults are encouraged to take a dip and raise funds to help protect sea turtles and other threatened marine wildlife.
    Ex. Santa Barbara area canyon's residents are among many Californians living in harm's way in fire-prone areas.
    * * *
    = endangered, jeopardised [jeopardized, -USA], at stake, at risk, under threat, under challenge, on the line, on thin ice, on dangerous ground, threatened, in harm's way

    Ex: It asserts that young adult libraries and the services they provide are continously endangered and describes how to come to terms with this problem.

    Ex: And yet the thought of what he was being asked to do to salvage the jeopardized budget outraged his every fiber.
    Ex: But there was a principle at stake here, and she too felt obligated to express her honest thoughts.
    Ex: Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex: Products under threat include; greeting cards, circulars, information sheets, newspapers and magazines.
    Ex: During the previous 10 years the concept of free information services in Australian libraries has come increasingly under challenge.
    Ex: The article 'Assets on the line' discusses some of the disadvantages of manual methods of performing inventories of organization's hardware and software.
    Ex: As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex: On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    Ex: Kids and adults are encouraged to take a dip and raise funds to help protect sea turtles and other threatened marine wildlife.
    Ex: Santa Barbara area canyon's residents are among many Californians living in harm's way in fire-prone areas.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en peligro

  • 10 espectro

    m.
    1 spectrum (physics).
    2 specter, ghost (fantasma).
    * * *
    1 FÍSICA spectrum
    2 (fantasma) spectre (US specter), ghost, apparition
    4 (conjunto, serie) range
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM
    1) (Fís) spectrum

    de amplio espectro — wide-ranging, covering a broad spectrum

    2) (=fantasma) spectre, specter (EEUU), ghost
    * * *
    1) (Fís) spectrum; ( gama) spectrum
    2) ( fantasma) specter*, ghost; ( amenaza) specter*
    * * *
    = spectrum [spectra, -pl.], spectre [specter, -USA], wraith, spook, phantasm, phantom.
    Ex. As one respondent from this end of the information spectrum put it, 'Context is all in the information world'.
    Ex. The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex. The article is entitled ' Wraiths, revenants and ritual in medieval culture'.
    Ex. The article 'Ghosts, spooks and spectres' looks briefly at some of the ways in which public librarians have been portrayed in popular fiction.
    Ex. Fourniret is a dangerous man obnubilated by the phantasm of virginity.
    Ex. The phantoms of the book's name are those sensed by amputees who have vividfeeling, even pain, in limbs they know are gone.
    ----
    * cubrir todo el espectro = run + the gamut.
    * espectro político, el = political spectrum, the.
    * un amplio espectro de = a broad band of, a broad spectrum of, a wide band of.
    * un gran espectro de = a wide band of.
    * * *
    1) (Fís) spectrum; ( gama) spectrum
    2) ( fantasma) specter*, ghost; ( amenaza) specter*
    * * *
    = spectrum [spectra, -pl.], spectre [specter, -USA], wraith, spook, phantasm, phantom.

    Ex: As one respondent from this end of the information spectrum put it, 'Context is all in the information world'.

    Ex: The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex: The article is entitled ' Wraiths, revenants and ritual in medieval culture'.
    Ex: The article 'Ghosts, spooks and spectres' looks briefly at some of the ways in which public librarians have been portrayed in popular fiction.
    Ex: Fourniret is a dangerous man obnubilated by the phantasm of virginity.
    Ex: The phantoms of the book's name are those sensed by amputees who have vividfeeling, even pain, in limbs they know are gone.
    * cubrir todo el espectro = run + the gamut.
    * espectro político, el = political spectrum, the.
    * un amplio espectro de = a broad band of, a broad spectrum of, a wide band of.
    * un gran espectro de = a wide band of.

    * * *
    A
    1 ( Fís) spectrum
    2 (gama) spectrum
    el espectro político the political spectrum
    un antibiótico de amplio espectro a broad-spectrum antibiotic
    un amplio espectro de colores a wide range o broad spectrum of colors
    B
    1 (fantasma) specter*, ghost, wraith ( liter)
    2 (amenaza) specter*
    el espectro de la muerte/del hambre the specter of death/of famine
    * * *

    espectro sustantivo masculino
    1 ( gama) spectrum
    2 ( fantasma) specter( conjugate specter), ghost;
    ( amenaza) specter( conjugate specter)
    espectro sustantivo masculino
    1 Fís spectrum
    2 (espíritu, aparición) spectre, US specter
    3 (gama) range
    antibióticos de amplio espectro, broad-spectrum antibiotics
    ' espectro' also found in these entries:
    English:
    specter
    - spectre
    - spectrum
    * * *
    1. Fís spectrum
    espectro luminoso light spectrum;
    espectro solar solar spectrum;
    espectro visible visible spectrum
    2. [gama, abanico] spectrum;
    el espectro político the political spectrum;
    un antibiótico de amplio espectro a broad-spectrum antibiotic
    3. [fantasma] spectre, ghost
    4. [de hambre, guerra] spectre
    * * *
    m
    1 FÍS spectrum;
    un amplio espectro fig a wide range, a broad spectrum
    2 ( fantasma) ghost;
    el espectro de la guerra the specter o Br spectre of war
    * * *
    1) : ghost, specter
    2) : spectrum

    Spanish-English dictionary > espectro

  • 11 fantasma1

    1 = ghost, spectre [specter, -USA], wraith, spook, phantasm, phantom.
    Ex. Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).
    Ex. The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex. The article is entitled ' Wraiths, revenants and ritual in medieval culture'.
    Ex. The article 'Ghosts, spooks and spectres' looks briefly at some of the ways in which public librarians have been portrayed in popular fiction.
    Ex. Fourniret is a dangerous man obnubilated by the phantasm of virginity.
    Ex. The phantoms of the book's name are those sensed by amputees who have vividfeeling, even pain, in limbs they know are gone.
    ----
    * cazar fantasmas = chase + phantoms, grasp at + shadows.
    * perseguir fantasmas = chase + phantoms, grasp at + shadows.
    * pueblo fantasma = ghost town.
    * ver un fantasma = see + a ghost.

    Spanish-English dictionary > fantasma1

  • 12 gravitar

    v.
    to gravitate (physics).
    El satélite gravita The satellite gravitates.
    * * *
    1 FÍSICA to gravitate
    2 (apoyarse en) to rest ( sobre, on)
    3 figurado (amenazar) to loom ( sobre, over)
    * * *
    VI
    1) (Fís) to gravitate ( hacia towards)
    2) (=girar) to rotate
    3)

    gravitar sobre algn/algo — (=apoyarse) to rest on sb/sth; (=caer sobre) to bear down on sb/sth; (fig) (=pesar sobre) to be a burden to sb/sth; (=amenazar) to loom over sb/sth

    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    1)
    b)

    gravitar en torno a algo conflicto to center* around something; polémica to center* on something

    2)
    a) ( apoyarse) peso/carga to rest
    b) ( influir)

    gravitar sobre or en algo — to influence o affect something

    c) peligro/amenaza

    gravitar sobre or en algo — to hang over something

    * * *
    Ex. Kinetic energy does not gravitate in the same way that rest mass does.
    ----
    * gravitar en torno a = centre around/on/upon.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo
    1)
    b)

    gravitar en torno a algo conflicto to center* around something; polémica to center* on something

    2)
    a) ( apoyarse) peso/carga to rest
    b) ( influir)

    gravitar sobre or en algo — to influence o affect something

    c) peligro/amenaza

    gravitar sobre or en algo — to hang over something

    * * *

    Ex: Kinetic energy does not gravitate in the same way that rest mass does.

    * gravitar en torno a = centre around/on/upon.

    * * *
    gravitar [A1 ]
    vi
    A
    1 ( Fís) to gravitate
    2 (centrarse) to be centered
    el conflicto gravita en torno a la capital the conflict is centered around the capital
    B
    1 (apoyarse) «peso/carga» to rest
    toda la responsabilidad gravita sobre él all the responsibility rests on his shoulders
    2 «factores»: gravitar SOBRE or EN algo; to influence o affect sth
    los factores que gravitan sobre esta disminución the factors influencing o affecting this reduction
    3 «peligro/amenaza»: gravitar SOBRE or EN algo; to hang OVER sth
    * * *

    gravitar verbo intransitivo
    1 Fís to gravitate 2 gravitar sobre, (descansar, apoyarse en) to rest on
    (cernirse) to hang over: gravita sobre él la acusación de asesinato, the accusation of murder hangs over him
    ' gravitar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    gravitate
    * * *
    1. Fís to gravitate
    2. [centrarse] to centre, to be centred;
    su novela gravita en torno al problema colonial his novel centres o is centred around the colonial problem
    3.
    gravitar sobre [recaer] to rest on;
    la bóveda gravita sobre los arbotantes the vault rests on o is supported by the flying buttresses;
    sobre mí gravita toda la responsabilidad all the responsibility rests on my shoulders
    4.
    gravitar sobre [pender] to hang o loom over;
    la desgracia gravita sobre el pueblo disaster is looming for the town
    * * *
    v/i
    1 FÍS gravitate;
    gravitar alrededor de fig center round, Br
    centre around
    2 ( recaer) rest ( sobre on)
    * * *
    1) : to gravitate
    2)
    gravitar sobre : to rest on
    3)
    gravitar sobre : to loom over

    Spanish-English dictionary > gravitar

  • 13 hacer realidad Algo

    (v.) = make + Nombre + a reality
    Ex. The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    * * *
    (v.) = make + Nombre + a reality

    Ex: The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hacer realidad Algo

  • 14 inminente

    adj.
    imminent, impending.
    * * *
    1 imminent
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo imminent, impending
    * * *
    = imminent, impending, looming, over the horizon, on the horizon.
    Ex. Faster material and lenses, more automatic cameras, finer-grained sensitive compounds to allow an extension of the minicamera idea, are all imminent.
    Ex. This expansion together with the impending amalgamation with other colleges placed ever increasing and severe restraints upon the full development of the library service.
    Ex. The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex. This article surveys the changes which have already occurred and those which are just over the horizon.
    Ex. The author concludes with descriptions of advances in the technology currently on the horizon.
    ----
    * ser inminente = be on the cards.
    * * *
    adjetivo imminent, impending
    * * *
    = imminent, impending, looming, over the horizon, on the horizon.

    Ex: Faster material and lenses, more automatic cameras, finer-grained sensitive compounds to allow an extension of the minicamera idea, are all imminent.

    Ex: This expansion together with the impending amalgamation with other colleges placed ever increasing and severe restraints upon the full development of the library service.
    Ex: The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex: This article surveys the changes which have already occurred and those which are just over the horizon.
    Ex: The author concludes with descriptions of advances in the technology currently on the horizon.
    * ser inminente = be on the cards.

    * * *
    imminent, impending
    * * *

    inminente adjetivo imminent, impending
    ' inminente' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    intensificación
    English:
    immediate
    - imminent
    - impending
    - premonition
    * * *
    imminent, impending
    * * *
    adj imminent
    * * *
    : imminent

    Spanish-English dictionary > inminente

  • 15 licencia estándar

    Ex. Among issues looming for CD-ROM are the degree to which downloading data and reusing it constitute infringement, whether some networking arrangements violate fair use and boilerplate licensing enforceable in different states.
    * * *

    Ex: Among issues looming for CD-ROM are the degree to which downloading data and reusing it constitute infringement, whether some networking arrangements violate fair use and boilerplate licensing enforceable in different states.

    Spanish-English dictionary > licencia estándar

  • 16 nubarrones + formarse en el horizonte

    (n.) = dust storm + loom in the horizon
    Ex. It is likely that the library manager who chooses to wait for the dust to settle will find yet another dust storm looming on the horizon.
    * * *
    (n.) = dust storm + loom in the horizon

    Ex: It is likely that the library manager who chooses to wait for the dust to settle will find yet another dust storm looming on the horizon.

    Spanish-English dictionary > nubarrones + formarse en el horizonte

  • 17 prepararse

    VPR
    1) (=disponerse) to get ready

    venga, prepárate, que nos vamos — come on, get ready, we're going

    se preparaba a salir de casa cuando sonó el teléfonohe was just about o getting ready to leave the house when the telephone rang

    prepararse para — to get ready for, prepare for

    2) (=estudiar) [+ discurso] to prepare; [+ examen] to prepare for, study for

    no me había preparado bien el examen — I hadn't done enough preparation for the exam, I hadn't prepared o studied properly for the exam

    3) (=formarse) to prepare
    4) (=aproximarse) [problemas, tormenta] to loom
    * * *
    (v.) = do + homework, brace + Reflexivo, get + ready
    Ex. The article ' Doing your homework: market research in uncharted waters' provides a detailed review of the motivations for using market research within the data base publishing industry.
    Ex. She braced herself, afraid that from some obscure motive of propriety or self-protection he would turn on her.
    Ex. For ages men have known that women take forever to get ready and now there is proof.
    * * *
    (v.) = do + homework, brace + Reflexivo, get + ready

    Ex: The article ' Doing your homework: market research in uncharted waters' provides a detailed review of the motivations for using market research within the data base publishing industry.

    Ex: She braced herself, afraid that from some obscure motive of propriety or self-protection he would turn on her.
    Ex: For ages men have known that women take forever to get ready and now there is proof.

    * * *

    ■prepararse verbo reflexivo
    1 to prepare oneself, get ready
    2 Dep to train
    ' prepararse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    alistarse
    - fondo
    - mentalizar
    - preparar
    English:
    brace
    - disproportionate
    - do
    - prepare
    - ready
    - train
    - gear
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [disponerse] to prepare oneself, to get ready ( para for);
    ¡prepárate! [disponte] get ready!;
    como no esté terminado para mañana, prepárate it had better be ready by tomorrow, or else…;
    se prepara para el examen she's preparing for the exam;
    prepararse para hacer algo to prepare o get ready to do sth;
    prepárate para oír una buena/mala noticia are you ready for some good/bad news?;
    prepárate para aburrirte como una ostra get ready o prepare yourself to be bored to death
    2. [entrenarse] [equipo, deportista] to train;
    prepararse para algo/para hacer algo to train for sth/to do sth;
    se prepara para las olimpiadas she's in training for the Olympics;
    se preparó a fondo para el campeonato she prepared thoroughly for the championships
    3. [fraguarse] [tormenta, nevada] to be on its way;
    se estaba preparando una verdadera tormenta política a major political storm was brewing o on its way
    * * *
    v/r
    1 get ready ( para for), prepare o.s. ( para for)
    2 de tormenta, crisis be brewing
    * * *
    vr
    * * *
    1. (en general) to prepare yourself / to get ready
    2. (entrenarse) to train

    Spanish-English dictionary > prepararse

  • 18 terreno peligroso

    = on thin ice, slippery ground, on dangerous ground
    Ex. As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex. The book stands on the slippery ground between the picaresque and the Puritan repentance narratives such as the Pilgrim's Progress.
    Ex. On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    * * *
    = on thin ice, slippery ground, on dangerous ground

    Ex: As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.

    Ex: The book stands on the slippery ground between the picaresque and the Puritan repentance narratives such as the Pilgrim's Progress.
    Ex: On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.

    Spanish-English dictionary > terreno peligroso

  • 19 terreno resbaladizo

    = on thin ice, slippery ground, on dangerous ground
    Ex. As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex. The book stands on the slippery ground between the picaresque and the Puritan repentance narratives such as the Pilgrim's Progress.
    Ex. On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    * * *
    = on thin ice, slippery ground, on dangerous ground

    Ex: As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.

    Ex: The book stands on the slippery ground between the picaresque and the Puritan repentance narratives such as the Pilgrim's Progress.
    Ex: On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.

    Spanish-English dictionary > terreno resbaladizo

  • 20 fantasma

    adj.
    phantom, solitary, abandoned.
    f. & m.
    show-off (informal) (fanfarrón). (peninsular Spanish)
    m.
    1 ghost, phantom (espectro).
    2 show-off.
    * * *
    1 (espectro) phantom, ghost
    2 familiar (fanfarrón) braggart, show-off
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    1. SM
    1) (=aparición) ghost, phantom liter
    2) (TV) ghost
    2.
    SMF Esp * (=fanfarrón) boaster, braggart
    3. ADJ INV
    1) (=abandonado) ghost antes de s
    2) (=inexistente) phantom antes de s

    compañía fantasmabogus o dummy company

    * * *
    I
    1)
    a) ( aparición) ghost
    b) ( amenaza) specter*
    2) (TV) ghost
    3) fantasma masculino y femenino (Esp fam) ( fanfarrón) show-off (colloq)
    II
    adjetivo bogus; gabinete, etc
    * * *
    I
    1)
    a) ( aparición) ghost
    b) ( amenaza) specter*
    2) (TV) ghost
    3) fantasma masculino y femenino (Esp fam) ( fanfarrón) show-off (colloq)
    II
    adjetivo bogus; gabinete, etc
    * * *
    fantasma1
    1 = ghost, spectre [specter, -USA], wraith, spook, phantasm, phantom.

    Ex: Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).

    Ex: The automated catalogue became a spectre of looming change because the same electronic advances that made the online catalogue a reality promised even greater transformations = El catálogo automatizado se convirtió en un espectro del inminente cambio ya que los mismos avances electrónicos que hicieron realidad el catálogo en línea prometían transformaciones aún mayores.
    Ex: The article is entitled ' Wraiths, revenants and ritual in medieval culture'.
    Ex: The article 'Ghosts, spooks and spectres' looks briefly at some of the ways in which public librarians have been portrayed in popular fiction.
    Ex: Fourniret is a dangerous man obnubilated by the phantasm of virginity.
    Ex: The phantoms of the book's name are those sensed by amputees who have vividfeeling, even pain, in limbs they know are gone.
    * cazar fantasmas = chase + phantoms, grasp at + shadows.
    * perseguir fantasmas = chase + phantoms, grasp at + shadows.
    * pueblo fantasma = ghost town.
    * ver un fantasma = see + a ghost.

    fantasma2
    2 = show-off, showboat, hot dog, braggart.

    Ex: The ebullient Mr Wang is a chatterbox and a bit of a show-off.

    Ex: Steve knows that he is a ' showboat, a little bit of a prick,' but he also knows that it's too late for a man in his fifties to change.
    Ex: Jerry Hairston is a bit of a hot dog and needs to be reined in at times.
    Ex: Palma, described by many as an indiscreet braggart, told people at the gun range that the group was preparing for clandestine trips to Cuba.
    * ser un fantasma = be all mouth.

    * * *
    A
    1 (aparición) ghost
    dicen que en el castillo hay fantasmas the castle is said to have ghosts o to be haunted
    el fantasma de la ópera the Phantom of the Opera
    2 (amenaza) specter*
    torturado por el fantasma del cáncer haunted by the specter of cancer
    B (TV) ghost
    C
    1 (fanfarrón) show-off ( colloq)
    2 (persona misteriosa) mysterious character, mystery ( colloq)
    bogus
    subvenciones para empleados fantasmas subsidies for bogus employees o for employees who do/did not exist
    * * *

     

    fantasma sustantivo masculino

    b) ( amenaza) specter( conjugate specter)

    fantasma
    I sustantivo masculino
    1 (aparición) ghost, phantom
    2 (recuerdos, etc) tienes que deshacerte de tus fantasmas, you must lay the ghosts of your past
    3 fam (fanfarrón) show-off, loud-mouth
    4 (amenaza) specter o spectre: el fantasma de la guerra planeaba sobre el país, the spectre of war loomed over the country
    II adjetivo
    1 (irreal, falso) un buque fantasma, an enchanted ship
    2 (despoblado) un pueblo fantasma, a ghost town
    ' fantasma' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    corpórea
    - corpóreo
    - sugestión
    - aparecer
    - coco
    - desvanecerse
    - encanto
    - espantar
    - espectro
    English:
    apparition
    - bombed-out
    - ghost
    - ghost town
    - haunt
    - phantom
    - sink
    - specter
    - spectre
    - spirit
    - front
    - show
    * * *
    adj
    1. [deshabitado]
    pueblo/barco fantasma ghost town/ship
    2. [que no existe]
    una noticia fantasma a false report;
    una empresa fantasma a bogus company;
    el informe fantasma sobre la recuperación económica the mythical report on the economic turnaround
    3. Esp Fam
    es muy fantasma [fanfarrón] he's a real show-off
    4. RP Fam
    es muy fantasma [atontado] she's absolutely crazy
    nm
    1. [espectro] ghost, phantom;
    se le apareció el fantasma de un pirata the ghost of a pirate appeared to him
    el Fantasma de la Ópera the Phantom of the Opera
    2. [amenaza] spectre;
    el fantasma de la guerra civil/del desempleo the spectre of civil war/unemployment
    3. Am TV ghost
    nmf
    1. Esp Fam [fanfarrón] show-off
    2. RP Fam [atontado] loony
    * * *
    I m ghost; fig
    specter, Br
    spectre
    II m/f fam
    show-off fam
    * * *
    : ghost, phantom
    * * *
    fantasma1 adj ghost
    1. (aparición) ghost
    ¿crees en los fantasmas? do you believe in ghosts?
    2. (fanfarrón) show off

    Spanish-English dictionary > fantasma

См. также в других словарях:

  • Looming — (deutsch Schöpfung) ist die älteste und bedeutendste Literaturzeitschrift Estlands. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Literaturzeitschrift 2 Chefredakteure 3 Literatur 4 Weblinks …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Looming — is a term found in the study of Perception, as it relates directly to Psychology. Looming refers to the rapid expansion in the size of any given object, so that its image becomes increasingly large on the perceiver s retina. In other words, when… …   Wikipedia

  • Looming — Loom ing, n. The indistinct and magnified appearance of objects seen in particular states of the atmosphere. See {Mirage}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Looming — (engl., spr. lūming), Kimmung, Luftspiegelung (s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • looming — index forthcoming, future, imminent, inevitable, instant, pending (imminent), prospective Burton s Le …   Law dictionary

  • Looming — Loom Loom (l[=oo]m), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Loomed} (l[=oo]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Looming}.] [OE. lumen to shine, Icel. ljoma; akin to AS. le[ o]ma light, and E. light; or cf. OF. lumer to shine, L. luminare to illumine, lumen light; akin to E.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • looming — Mirage Mi rage , n. [F., fr. mirer to look at carefully, to aim, se mirer to look at one s self in a glass, to reflect, to be reflected, LL. mirare to look at. See {Mirror}.] An optical effect, sometimes seen on the ocean, but more frequently in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • looming — adj. Looming is used with these nouns: ↑crisis, ↑disaster, ↑recession, ↑shortage, ↑showdown, ↑spectre …   Collocations dictionary

  • looming — /looh ming/, n. a mirage in which objects below the horizon seem to be raised above their true positions. [1620 30; LOOM2 + ING1] * * * …   Universalium

  • looming — Synonyms and related words: about to be, already in sight, approaching, at hand, brewing, close, close at hand, coming, fata morgana, forthcoming, future, gathering, going to happen, immediate, imminent, impendent, impending, in danger imminent,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • looming — (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. rising, appearing, emerging; see imminent …   English dictionary for students

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