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little right hand

  • 1 dextella

        dextella ae, f dim.    [dextra], a little right hand: Q. filius illius est dextella.
    * * *

    Latin-English dictionary > dextella

  • 2 dextella

    dextella, ae, f. dim. [dextra], a little right hand:

    Quintus filius illius, ut scribis, est dextella,

    Cic. Att. 14, 20, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > dextella

  • 3 dexter

        dexter tera, terum, and tra, trum, adj.    with comp. dexterior and sup. dextimus, to the right, on the right side, right (opp. laevus, sinister): manus: umeri, Cs.: latus, H.: hostium, Cs.: cornum, T.: cornu, Cs.: acies, L.: dextris adducor litora remis, rowing to the right, O.: Quo tantum dexter abis? so far to the right, V.: Lyncea dexter Occupat, on the right, V.: Dextera Sigaei ara est sacrata, on the right, O.: dexteriore parte, O.: Neu te dexterior (rota) declinet, O.: apud dextimos, on the extreme right, S.—Handy, dexterous, skilful, opportune, suitable: Marius scripti dexter in omne genus, O.: quīs rebus dexter modus, V.: tempus, H.—Of good omen, favorable, propitious: dexter stetit, H.: dexter adi, V.: tempus, H.
    * * *
    dextra -um, dexterior -or -us, dextimus -a -um ADJ
    skillful, dexterous; favorable, fortunate; right, on the right hand

    Latin-English dictionary > dexter

  • 4 dextera or dextra

        dextera or dextra ae, f    [dexter, sc. manus], the right hand: Cedo dextram, T.: eius dextram, prendit, Cs.: per dexteram te istam oro: dexterae, quae fidei testes esse solebant: fidem dextrā dare, N.: si Pergama dextrā Defendi possent, i. e. by valor, V.: ut suā urbs periret dexterā, i. e. by civil war, H.: rubens, H.— The right side: hinc ab dexterā Venire, T.: erat ab dextrā rupes aspera, S.: dextrā sinistrā omnibus occisis, on every side, S.: dextrā laevāque, O.: concede ad dexteram, T.— The hand: omne sacrum rapiente dextrā, H.—Fig., a pledge of friendship: quae (Graecia) tendit dexteram Italiae.

    Latin-English dictionary > dextera or dextra

  • 5 dextrā

        dextrā praep.    [abl. of dextera], on the right of: dextrā viam stratam, L.
    * * *
    right hand, right side; pledge

    Latin-English dictionary > dextrā

  • 6 dextera

    right hand, right side; pledge

    Latin-English dictionary > dextera

  • 7 incentivus

    incentiva, incentivum ADJ
    playing the tune; (of the right-hand tube in pair of pipes - other modulates)

    Latin-English dictionary > incentivus

  • 8 dextera

    the right hand.

    Latin-English dictionary of medieval > dextera

  • 9 accumbo

    ac-cumbo ( adc.), cŭbui, cŭbĭtum, 3, v. n., to lay one's self down at a place; and hence, to lie somewhere.
    I.
    In gen. (so very rare):

    in via,

    Plaut. Most. 1, 4, 13;

    of one swimming: summis in undis,

    Manil. 5, 429.—
    II.
    In part.
    A.
    To recline at table, in the manner in which the Romans (and finally even the Roman women, Val. Max. 2, 1, 2) reclined, after luxury and effeminacy had become prevalent. While they extended the lower part of the body upon the couch (triclinium, lectus triclinaris), they supported the upper part by the left arm upon a cushion (or upon the bosom of the one nearest;

    hence, in sinu accumbere,

    Liv. 39, 43; cf. anakeisthai = einai en tôi kolpôi tinos, Ev. Ioh. 13, 23), the right hand only being used in taking food:

    hoc age, adcumbe,

    Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 15; so id. Most. 1, 3, 150, etc.; Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31; id. Mur. 35; Liv. 28, 18; c. acc.: mensam, Att. ap. Non. 415, 26; Lucil. Sat. 13; ib. 511, 16:

    cotidianis epulis in robore,

    Cic. Mur. 74:

    in convivio,

    id. Verr. 1, 66:

    in epulo,

    Cic. Vatin. 12:

    epulis,

    Verg. A. 1, 79;

    tecum,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 75; absol., Cic. Deiot. 17.—Since three persons usually reclined upon such a couch (cf. Cic. Pis. 27), these expressions arose: in summo (or superiorem, also supra), medium and imum (or infra) adcumbere; and the series began on the left side, since they lay supported by the left arm. The whole arrangement is explained by the following figure: Among the three lecti, the lectus medius was the most honorable; and on each lectus, the locus medius was more honorable than the summus; and this had the preference to the imus or ultimus. The consul or other magistrate usually sat as imus of the lectus medius (fig. no. 6), in order that, by his position at the corner, he might be able, without trouble, to attend to any official business that might occur. The place no. 7 seems, for a similar reason, to have been taken by the host. See on this subject Salmas. Sol. p. 886; Smith's Antiq.; Becker's Gall. 3, p. 206 sq. (2d ed.); and Orell. excurs. ad Hor. S. 2, 8, 20. This statement explains the passages in Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 14; id. Most. 1, 1, 42; id. Stich. 3, 2, 37, etc.; Cic. Att. 1, 9; id. Fam. 9, 26; Sall. Fragm. ap. Serv. ad Verg. A. 1, 702; Hor. S. 2, 8, 20.—
    B.
    In mal. part. (rarely), Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 73; Men. 3, 2, 11; 5, 9, 82.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > accumbo

  • 10 adcumbo

    ac-cumbo ( adc.), cŭbui, cŭbĭtum, 3, v. n., to lay one's self down at a place; and hence, to lie somewhere.
    I.
    In gen. (so very rare):

    in via,

    Plaut. Most. 1, 4, 13;

    of one swimming: summis in undis,

    Manil. 5, 429.—
    II.
    In part.
    A.
    To recline at table, in the manner in which the Romans (and finally even the Roman women, Val. Max. 2, 1, 2) reclined, after luxury and effeminacy had become prevalent. While they extended the lower part of the body upon the couch (triclinium, lectus triclinaris), they supported the upper part by the left arm upon a cushion (or upon the bosom of the one nearest;

    hence, in sinu accumbere,

    Liv. 39, 43; cf. anakeisthai = einai en tôi kolpôi tinos, Ev. Ioh. 13, 23), the right hand only being used in taking food:

    hoc age, adcumbe,

    Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 15; so id. Most. 1, 3, 150, etc.; Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31; id. Mur. 35; Liv. 28, 18; c. acc.: mensam, Att. ap. Non. 415, 26; Lucil. Sat. 13; ib. 511, 16:

    cotidianis epulis in robore,

    Cic. Mur. 74:

    in convivio,

    id. Verr. 1, 66:

    in epulo,

    Cic. Vatin. 12:

    epulis,

    Verg. A. 1, 79;

    tecum,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 75; absol., Cic. Deiot. 17.—Since three persons usually reclined upon such a couch (cf. Cic. Pis. 27), these expressions arose: in summo (or superiorem, also supra), medium and imum (or infra) adcumbere; and the series began on the left side, since they lay supported by the left arm. The whole arrangement is explained by the following figure: Among the three lecti, the lectus medius was the most honorable; and on each lectus, the locus medius was more honorable than the summus; and this had the preference to the imus or ultimus. The consul or other magistrate usually sat as imus of the lectus medius (fig. no. 6), in order that, by his position at the corner, he might be able, without trouble, to attend to any official business that might occur. The place no. 7 seems, for a similar reason, to have been taken by the host. See on this subject Salmas. Sol. p. 886; Smith's Antiq.; Becker's Gall. 3, p. 206 sq. (2d ed.); and Orell. excurs. ad Hor. S. 2, 8, 20. This statement explains the passages in Plaut. Pers. 5, 1, 14; id. Most. 1, 1, 42; id. Stich. 3, 2, 37, etc.; Cic. Att. 1, 9; id. Fam. 9, 26; Sall. Fragm. ap. Serv. ad Verg. A. 1, 702; Hor. S. 2, 8, 20.—
    B.
    In mal. part. (rarely), Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 73; Men. 3, 2, 11; 5, 9, 82.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > adcumbo

  • 11 adoro

    ăd-ōro, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a.
    I.
    In the earliest per., to speak to or accost one, to address; hence, also, to treat of or negotiate a matter with one:

    adorare veteribus est alloqui,

    Serv. ad Verg. A. 10, 677:

    immo cum gemitu populum sic adorat,

    App. Met. 2, p. 127; 3, p. 130: adorare apud antiquos significabat agere: unde et legati oratores dicuntur, quia mandata populi agunt, Paul. ex Fest. p. 19 Müll.; cf. oro and orator.— Hence, also, in judicial lang., to bring an accusation, to accuse; so in the Fragm. of the XII. Tab. lex viii.: SEI (Si) ADORAT FVRTO QVOD NEC MANIFESTVM ERIT, Fest. S. V. NEC, p. 162 Müll.—
    II.
    In the class. per., to speak to one in order to obtain something of him; to ask or entreat one, esp. a deity, to pray earnestly, to beseech, supplicate, implore; constr. with acc., ut, or the simple subj.:

    quos adorent, ad quos precentur et supplicent,

    Liv. 38, 43:

    affaturque deos et sanctum sidus adorat,

    Verg. A. 2, 700:

    in rupes, in saxa (volens vos Turnus adoro) Ferte ratem,

    id. ib. 10, 677:

    Junonis prece numen,

    id. ib. 3, 437:

    prece superos,

    Ov. Tr. 1, 3, 41:

    non te per meritum adoro,

    id. H. 10, 141.—With the thing asked for in the acc. (like rogo, peto, postulo):

    cum hostiā caesā pacem deūm adorāsset,

    Liv. 6, 12 Drak.—With ut:

    adoravi deos, ut, etc.,

    Liv. 7, 40; Juv. 3, 300:

    adorati di, ut bene ac feliciter eveniret,

    Liv. 21, 17:

    Hanc ego, non ut me defendere temptet, adoro,

    Ov. P. 2, 2, 55.—With the subj. without ut, poet.:

    maneat sic semper adoro,

    I pray, Prop. 1, 4, 27.—
    III.
    Hence,
    A.
    Dropping the idea of asking, entreating, to reverence, honor, adore, worship the gods or objects of nature regarded as gods; more emphatic than venerari, and denoting the highest degree of reverence (Gr. proskunein); the habitus adorantium was to put the right hand to the mouth and turn about the entire body to the right (dextratio, q. v.); cf. Plin. 28, 2, 5, § 25; Liv. 5, 21; App. M. 4, 28. —Constr. with acc., dat., with prepp. or absol.
    (α).
    With acc.:

    Auctoremque viae Phoebum taciturnus adorat,

    Ov. M. 3, 18:

    Janus adorandus,

    id. F. 3, 881:

    in delubra non nisi adoraturus intras,

    Plin. Pan. 52:

    large deos adorare,

    Plin. 12, 14, 32, § 62:

    nil praeter nubes et caeli numen adorat,

    Juv. 14, 97:

    adorare crocodilon,

    id. 15, 2.—

    In eccl. Lat. of the worship of the true God: adoravit Israel Deum,

    Vulg. Gen. 47, 31:

    Dominum Deum tuum adorabis,

    ib. Matt. 4, 10:

    Deum adora,

    ib. Apoc. 22, 9;

    so of Christ: videntes eum adoraverunt,

    ib. Matt. 28, 17;

    adorent eum omnes angeli Dei,

    ib. Heb. 1, 6.—
    (β).
    With dat. (eccl.): adorato ( imperat.) Domino Deo tuo, Vulg. Deut. 26, 10:

    nec adorabis deo alieno,

    id. Ital. Ps. 80, 10 Mai (deum alienum, Vulg.):

    qui adorant sculptibus,

    ib. ib. 96, 7 Mai (sculptilia, Vulg.).—
    (γ).
    With prepp. (eccl.):

    si adoraveris coram me,

    Vulg. Luc. 4, 7:

    adorabunt in conspectu tuo,

    ib. Apoc. 15, 4:

    adorent ante pedes tuos,

    ib. ib. 3, 9; 22, 8.—
    (δ).
    Absol. (eccl.):

    Patres nostri in hoc monte adoraverunt,

    Vulg. Joan. 4, 20 bis.; ib. Act. 24, 11.—And,
    B.
    The notion of religious regard being dropped, to reverence, admire, esteem highly:

    adorare priscorum in inveniendo curam,

    Plin. 27, 1, 1, § 1:

    Ennium sicut sacros vetustate lucos adoremus,

    Quint. 10, 1, 88:

    veteris qui tollunt grandia templi pocula adorandae rubiginis,

    Juv. 13, 148:

    nec tu divinam Aeneida tenta, Sed longe sequere et vestigia semper adora,

    Stat. Th. 12, 816.—
    C.
    Under the emperors the Oriental custom being introduced of worshipping the Cæsars with divine ceremony, to worship, to reverence:

    C. Caesarem adorari ut deum constituit, cum reversus ex Syria, non aliter adire ausus esset quam capite velato circumvertensque se, deinde procumbens,

    Suet. Vit. 2; App. M. 4, 28; Min. Fel. 2, 5:

    non salutari, sed adorari se jubet (Alexander),

    Just. 12, 7:

    adorare Caesarum imagines,

    Suet. Calig. 14: coronam a judicibus ad se delatam adoravit, did obeisance before, id. Ner. 12:

    adorare purpuram principis,

    i. e. touched his purple robe and brought it to the mouth in reverence, Amm. 21, 9.—Of adulation to the rabble, to pay court to:

    nec deerat Otho protendens manus, adorare volgum,

    Tac. H. 1, 36.
    This word does not occur in Cic.
    ; for in Arch. 11, 28, where adoravi was given by Mai in Fragm. p. 124, Halm reads adhortatus sum, and B. and K. adornavi.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > adoro

  • 12 circumago

    circum-ăgo, ēgi, actum, 3, v. a.
    I.
    To drive or turn in a circle, turn round (most freq. since the Aug. per.;

    not in Cic. or Quint.): impera suovetaurilia circumagi,

    Cato, R. R. 141, 1.—And with two acc. (on account of circum):

    terram fundumque meum suovetaurilia circumagi jussi,

    Cato, R. R. 141, § 2:

    (annus) qui solstitiali circumagitur orbe,

    Liv. 1, 19, 6:

    chamaeleonis oculos ipsos circumagi totos tradunt,

    Plin. 11, 37, 55, § 152.— Act. in mid. sense (very rare):

    Aegeum pelagus summotas terras hinc ad promunturium, quod Sunium vocatur, magno ambitu mollique circumagit,

    rolls around, surrounds, Mel. 2, 2, 8.—
    2.
    To drive around, produce by going around:

    pinctis bobus... aratro circumagebant sulcum,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 143 Müll.—Hence,
    B.
    T. t., to manumit a slave by turning him round. since the slave, in such a case, was taken by his master with the right hand, and turned around in a circle (cf. vertigo, Casaub. Pers. 5, 75 sq., and Dict. of Antiq.);

    fig.: qui se illi (philosophiae) subjecit et tradidit, statim circumagitur: hoc enim ipsum philosophiae servire libertas est,

    Sen. Ep. 8, 6.—
    C.
    Trop.
    1.
    Of time, with se, or more freq. in pass, to pass away, to be spent (so most freq. in temp. perf. and in Liv.):

    in ipso conatu rerum circumegit se annus,

    Liv. 9, 18, 14:

    sed prius se aestas circumegit, quam, etc.,

    id. 23, 39, 4:

    prius circumactus est annus, quam, etc.,

    id. 6, 38, 1:

    circumactis decem et octo mensibus,

    id. 9, 33, 3; 6, 1, 4; 26, 40, 1; 27, 30, 11; 44, 36, 1; Plin. 7, 16, 17, § 76;

    and in tmesis: circum tribus actis annis,

    Lucr. 5, 881.—In temp. pres.:

    annus, qui solstitiali circumagitur orbe,

    Liv. 1, 19, 6:

    nobis in apparatu ipso annus circumagitur,

    id. 24, 8, 8.—
    2.
    Of the vicissitudes of fortune, etc.:

    cum videamus tot varietates tam volubili orbe circumagi,

    Plin. Ep. 4, 24, 6.—
    II.
    To turn, turn about, wheel around:

    equos frenis,

    Liv. 1, 14, 9; 8, 7, 10; 10, 11, 1; Curt. 3, 11, 14 sq.:

    collum in aversam se,

    Plin. 11, 47, 107, § 256:

    corpora,

    Tac. H. 4, 29:

    se ad dissonos clamores,

    Liv. 4, 28, 2:

    circumagitur, cum venit, imago (in speculis),

    Lucr. 4, 316 (340):

    circumagente se vento,

    Liv. 37, 16, 4:

    aciem,

    id. 42, 64, 5:

    signa,

    id. 10, 36, 9; 6, 24, 7; Curt. 4, 6, 14:

    ut qui (milites) ultimi stabant... verti tamen et in frontem circumagi possent,

    id. 4, 13, 32:

    se,

    to turn about, Plin. 6, 31, 36, § 199; 16, 41, 80, § 220:

    legiones,

    to lead back, Flor. 3, 21, 6. —Hence, prov.:

    circumagetur hic orbis,

    the tide will turn, Liv. 42, 42, 6; cf.

    ' praecipua cenationum rotunda, quae perpetuo diebus ac noctibus vice mundi circumageretur,

    Suet. Ner. 31.—
    2.
    Esp., to agitate, disturb:

    verna (mala) stomacho inutilia sunt, alvom, vesicam circumagunt,

    Plin. 23, 6, 54, § 100.—
    B.
    Trop.:

    hic paululum circumacta fortuna est,

    changes, is changed, Flor. 2, 2, 22:

    sed unā voce, quā Quirites eos pro militibus appellarat, tam facile circumegit et flexit,

    Suet. Caes. 70:

    quo te circumagas?

    whither will you now turn? Juv. 9, 81:

    universum prope humanum genus circumegit in se,

    brought over to his side, Plin. 26, 3, 7, § 13.—
    III.
    (Acc. to circum, II. C.) To run or drive about, proceed from one place to another:

    (milites) huc illuc clamoribus hostium circumagi,

    Tac. H, 3, 73: nil opus est te Circumagi, i. e. that you wander about with me, * Hor. S. 1, 9, 17.—
    B.
    Trop.:

    non pendere ex alterius vultu ac nutu, nec alieni momentis animi circumagi,

    Liv. 39, 5, 3:

    rumoribus vulgi circumagi,

    id. 44, 34, 4; 26, 8, 3.—
    IV.
    Aliquem aliquā re = circumdare, to surround with something:

    fratrem Saturnum muro,

    Lact. 1, 14.—Hence, circumactus, a, um, P. a., bent around, curved (perh. only in the two Plin.):

    in orbem circumactus,

    Plin. 9, 33, 52, § 102; 15, 14, 15, § 51; 16, 34, 62, § 146:

    sensim circumactis curvatisque litoribus,

    Plin. Ep. 6, 16, 12.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > circumago

  • 13 dexter

    dexter, tĕra, tĕrum, and more freq. tra, trum ( dat. plur. fem.: dextrabus manibus, Liv. Andron. ap. Non. 493, 20.— Comp. dextĕrĭor; sup. dextĭmus), adj. [dex-ter, root dek-, Gr. dekomai, whence daktulos, digitus; cf. Germ. Finger, from fangen; cf. also Sanscr. dakshinas, on the right hand, and Gr. dex-ios], to the right, on the right side, right (opp. laevus, sinister).
    I.
    Prop.:

    ut ante oculos fuerit qui dexter hic idem nunc sit laevus,

    Lucr. 4, 302:

    manus,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 49; 50; id. Capt. 2, 3, 82; Cic. Div. 1, 23, 46:

    pars membrorum (opp. laeva),

    Lucr. 4, 293:

    umeri,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 50, 2:

    latus,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 16, 6; Ov. M. 13, 730 et saep.:

    cornu,

    Ter. Eun. 4, 7, 5; Caes. B. G. 1, 52, 2; 2, 23, 4 et saep.:

    ala,

    Liv. 31, 21:

    acies,

    id. 27, 48 et saep.: dextrarum tibiarum genus est, quae dextra tenentur, Paul. ex Fest. p. 74, 5 Müll. et saep.:

    dextra ejus (fluminis) accolunt Deximontani,

    Plin. 6, 23, 26, § 99.— Comp. in signification = dexter, but spoken of two only:

    in dexteriore parte, opp. sinisteriore,

    Varr. L. L. 9, § 34 Müll.; so,

    pars, opp. laeva,

    Ov. M. 7, 241:

    rota, opp. sinisterior,

    id. ib. 2, 138:

    armus,

    id. ib. 12, 303:

    umerus,

    Suet. Claud. 7:

    latus,

    id. Galb. 21: cornu, Galba ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 30, 3 et saep.— Sup.: dextimus, a, um, an ancient and rare form, in signif. i. q. dexter: dextima via, Varr. ap. Non. 94, 30:

    apud dextimos,

    Sall. J. 100, 2.—
    II.
    Trop. (perh. not in ante-Aug. prose).
    1.
    Handy, dexterous, skilful; opportune, proper, suitable, fitting:

    rem ita dexter egit, ut, etc.,

    Liv. 8, 36:

    et Marius scriptis dexter in omne genus,

    Ov. Pont. 4, 16, 24:

    quis rebus dexter modus,

    Verg. A. 4, 294:

    tempus,

    Hor. S. 2, 1, 18.—
    2.
    (Since the Greeks regarded an omen on the right as favorable) favorable, propitious, fortunate: dextra auspicia prospera, Paul. ex Fest. p. 74, 4 Müll.; cf.

    omen,

    Val. Fl. 1, 245:

    dexter adi,

    Verg. A. 8, 302; cf.:

    dexter ac volens assit (numen),

    Quint. 4 prooem. 5:

    Jove,

    Pers. 5, 114:

    sidere,

    Stat. S. 3, 4, 63 et saep.—Hence,

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > dexter

  • 14 dextera

    dextĕra or dextra, ae, f. (as in most langg.; cf. Gr. dexia, Germ. die Rechte, etc.; sc. manus), the right hand (freq. a sign of greeting, of fidelity; a symbol of strength, courage, etc.).
    A.
    Prop.:

    cedo sis dexteram,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 102; Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 84:

    quod ego te per hanc dextram oro,

    id. And. 1, 5, 54; cf.:

    per dexteram te istam oro, quam, etc.,

    Cic. Deiot. 3; cf. also Sall. J. 10, 3; Hor. Ep. 1, 7, 94 al.; and:

    dexterae, quae fidei testes esse solebant,

    Cic. Phil. 11, 2, 5:

    fidem more Persarum dextra dare,

    Nep. Dat. 10, 1:

    vos libertatem atque patriam in dextris vostris portare,

    Sall. C. 58, 8; cf. Verg. A. 2, 291; Hor. Epod. 7, 10; Ov. M. 13, 176; Sil. 1, 77 et saep.: miserat civitas Lingonum vetere instituto dona legionibus dextras, hospitii insigne, a pair of hands clasped in each other, made of gold, silver, etc., Tac. H. 1, 54; cf. id. ib. 2, 8 (so in Gr. dexian pempein and pherein).— Prov.: dextra tenet calamum;

    strictum tenet altera ferrum,

    Ov. H. 11, 3.—
    2.
    Transf.
    a.
    The right side:

    picus et cornix est ab laeva, corvus porro ab dextera,

    Plaut. As. 2, 1, 12; cf. Cic. Div. 1, 39, 85:

    ab dextera,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 89; id. Mil. 3, 1, 13; Ter. And. 4, 3, 19; Sall. C. 59, 2; Ov. M. 2, 5 al.:

    ilico equites jubet dextera inducere,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 88; so,

    dexterā,

    id. ib. 177; Caes. B. C. 2, 15, 3; Sall. J. 101, 9; Liv. 21, 43 et saep.:

    specta ad dexteram,

    Plaut. Poen. 3, 4, 1; so,

    ad dexteram,

    id. Rud. 1, 2, 67; Ter. And. 4, 4, 12; Att. ap. Cic. [p. 568] Div. 1, 22 fin.; Cic. Univ. 13; Caes. B. C. 1, 69, 3 et saep.—
    b.
    Poet., the hand, in gen.:

    omne sacrum rapiente dextra,

    Hor. Od. 3, 3, 52; id. S. 2, 1, 54.—
    B.
    Trop., pledge of friendship:

    renovare dextras,

    Tac. A. 2, 58; cf.:

    Graecia tendit dexteram Italiae suumque ei praesidium pollicetur,

    Cic. Phil. 10, 4, 9:

    nec veriti dominorum fallere dextras,

    Verg. A. 6, 613; cf. id. ib. 3, 610; Nep. Dat. 10, 1; Just. 11, 15, 13:

    ne fas, fidem, dextras, deos testes fallat,

    Liv. 29, 24.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > dextera

  • 15 Mucius

    Mūcĭus, a ( Mutius, Lact. 5, 13, 13), the name of a Roman gens. The most celebrated are,
    1.
    C. Mucius Scaevola, who altempted to assassinate Porsena, and, on being apprehended, burned off his right hand, Liv. 2, 12; Cic. Sest. 21, 48; id. Par. 1, 2, 12; Flor. 1, 10; Sen. Ep. 24, 5; 66. 51; Sil. 8, 386; Lact. l. l.—
    2.
    Q. Mucius Scaevola, a governor in Asia, Cic. Caecil. 17, 57. —
    3.
    Q. Mucius Scaevola, an augur, the husband of Lælia, Cic. Brut. 58, 211; id. Phil. 8, 10, 31.—
    4.
    P. Mucius Scaevola, a friend of the Gracchi, and an enemy of the younger Scipio Africanus, Cic. Rep. 1, 19, 31; Pers. 1, 114; Juv. 1, 154.—In fem., Mūcĭa, the wife of Cn. Pompeius, afterwards divorced from him, Cic. Fam. 5, 2, 6; id. Att. 1, 12, 3.—Hence,
    II.
    Mūcĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Mucius, Mucian: Mucia prata trans Tiberim, dicta a Mucio, cui a populo data fuerant, Paul. ex Fest. p. 144 Müll.—
    B.
    Subst.: Mūcĭa, ōrum, n. (sc. festa), a festival kept by the Asiatics in commemoration of the good government of Q. Mucius Scaevola, the Mucius festival, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 21, § 51.— Mūcĭ-ānus ( Mut-), a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Mucius, Mucian:

    cautio,

    Dig. 35, 1, 99:

    satisdatio,

    ib. 104: exitus, i. e. the death of Q. Mucius Scaevola, who was slain in the temple of Vesta by Damasippus, Cic. Att. 9, 12, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Mucius

  • 16 Scaevola

    Scaevŏla (in the Fast. Capit. also written Scaevŭla), ae, m. [prop. a dim. of 3. Scaeva, the Left-handed].
    1.
    A surname of C. Mucius, who made his way into the camp of Porsenna to kill him, and, on being discovered, burned off his own right hand, Liv. 2, 12 sq.; Flor. 1, 10; Cic. Sest. 21, 48; Sil. 8, 386 al.—
    2.
    After his time, a frequent surname in the gens Mucia; so, P. Mucius Scaevola, consul A. U. C. 621, a friend of Tiberius Gracchus, Cic. Ac. 2, 5, 13 (cf. id. de Or. 2, 70, 285); id. Planc. 36, 88; id. Rep. 1, 19, 31.—
    3.
    Q. Mucius Scaevola, an augur, the most famous jurist of Cicero ' s time, son-inlaw of C. Laelius, Cic. Lael. 1; id. Leg. 1, 4, 13; id. Rep. 1, 12, 18; id. Brut. 26, 101 sq.; 58, 212; Liv. Epit. 86; Vell. 2, 26; Flor. 3, 21.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Scaevola

  • 17 Scaevula

    Scaevŏla (in the Fast. Capit. also written Scaevŭla), ae, m. [prop. a dim. of 3. Scaeva, the Left-handed].
    1.
    A surname of C. Mucius, who made his way into the camp of Porsenna to kill him, and, on being discovered, burned off his own right hand, Liv. 2, 12 sq.; Flor. 1, 10; Cic. Sest. 21, 48; Sil. 8, 386 al.—
    2.
    After his time, a frequent surname in the gens Mucia; so, P. Mucius Scaevola, consul A. U. C. 621, a friend of Tiberius Gracchus, Cic. Ac. 2, 5, 13 (cf. id. de Or. 2, 70, 285); id. Planc. 36, 88; id. Rep. 1, 19, 31.—
    3.
    Q. Mucius Scaevola, an augur, the most famous jurist of Cicero ' s time, son-inlaw of C. Laelius, Cic. Lael. 1; id. Leg. 1, 4, 13; id. Rep. 1, 12, 18; id. Brut. 26, 101 sq.; 58, 212; Liv. Epit. 86; Vell. 2, 26; Flor. 3, 21.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Scaevula

  • 18 adeo

    1.
    ăd-ĕo, ĭī, and rarely īvi, ĭtum (arch. adirier for adiri, Enn. Rib. Trag. p. 59), 4, v. n. and a. (acc. to Paul. ex Fest. should be accented a/deo; v. Fest. s. v. adeo, p. 19 Müll.; cf. the foll. word), to go to or approach a person or thing (syn.: accedo, aggredior, advenio, appeto).
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen., constr.
    (α).
    With ad (very freq.): sed tibi cautim est adeundum ad virum, Att. ap. Non. 512, 10:

    neque eum ad me adire neque me magni pendere visu'st,

    Plaut. Cur. 2, 2, 12:

    adeamne ad eam?

    Ter. And. 4, 1, 15; id. Eun. 3, 5, 30: aut ad consules aut ad te aut ad Brutum adissent, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 208, 5:

    ad M. Bibulum adierunt, id. Fragm. ap. Arus. p. 213 Lind.: ad aedis nostras nusquam adiit,

    Plaut. Aul. 1, 1, 24:

    adibam ad istum fundum,

    Cic. Caec. 29 —
    (β).
    With in: priusquam Romam atque in horum conventum adiretis, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 11, § 26 ed. Halm.—Esp.: adire in jus, to go to law:

    cum ad praetorem in jus adissemus,

    Cic. Verr. 4, § 147; id. Att. 11, 24; Caes. B. C. 1, 87, and in the Plebiscit. de Thermens. lin. 42: QVO DE EA RE IN IOVS ADITVM ERIT, cf. Dirks., Versuche S. p. 193.—
    (γ).
    Absol.:

    adeunt, consistunt, copulantur dexteras,

    Plaut. Aul. 1, 2, 38:

    eccum video: adibo,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 5.—
    (δ).
    With acc.:

    ne Stygeos adeam non libera manes,

    Ov. M. 13, 465:

    voces aetherias adiere domos,

    Sil. 6, 253:

    castrorum vias,

    Tac. A. 2, 13:

    municipia,

    id. ib. 39:

    provinciam,

    Suet. Aug. 47:

    non poterant adire eum,

    Vulg. Luc. 8, 19:

    Graios sales carmine patrio,

    to attain to, Verg. Cat. 11, 62; so with latter supine:

    planioribus aditu locis,

    places easier to approach, Liv. 1, 33.—With local adv.:

    quoquam,

    Sall. J. 14:

    huc,

    Plaut. Truc. 2, 7, 60.—
    B.
    Esp.,
    1.
    To approach one for the purpose of addressing, asking aid, consulting, and the like, to address, apply to, consult (diff. from aggredior, q. v.). —Constr. with ad or oftener with acc.; hence also pass.:

    quanto satius est, adire blandis verbis atque exquaerere, sintne illa, etc.,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 35:

    aliquot me adierunt,

    Ter. And. 3, 3, 2:

    adii te heri de filia,

    id. Hec. 2, 2, 9: cum pacem peto, cum placo, cum adeo, et cum appello meam, Lucil. ap. Non. 237, 28:

    ad me adire quosdam memini, qui dicerent,

    Cic. Fam. 3, 10:

    coram adire et alloqui,

    Tac. H. 4, 65.— Pass.:

    aditus consul idem illud responsum retulit,

    when applied to, Liv. 37, 6 fin.:

    neque praetores adiri possent,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 5.—Hence: adire aliquem per epistulam, to address one in writing, by a letter:

    per epistulam, aut per nuntium, quasi regem, adiri eum aiunt,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 6, 9 and 10; cf. Tac. A. 4, 39; id. H. 1, 9.—So also: adire deos, aras, deorum sedes, etc., to approach the gods, their altars, etc., as a suppliant (cf.:

    acced. ad aras,

    Lucr. 5, 1199): quoi me ostendam? quod templum adeam? Att. ap. Non. 281, 6:

    ut essent simulacra, quae venerantes deos ipsos se adire crederent,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 27:

    adii Dominum et deprecatus sum,

    Vulg. Sap. 8, 21:

    aras,

    Cic. Phil. 14, 1:

    sedes deorum,

    Tib. 1, 5, 39:

    libros Sibyllinos,

    to consult the Sibylline Books, Liv. 34, 55; cf. Tac. A. 1, 76:

    oracula,

    Verg. A. 7, 82.—
    2.
    To go to a thing in order to examine it, to visit:

    oppida castellaque munita,

    Sall. J. 94:

    hiberna,

    Tac. H. 1, 52.—
    3.
    To come up to one in a hostile manner, to assail, attack:

    aliquem: nunc prior adito tu, ego in insidiis hic ero,

    Ter. Ph. 1, 4, 52:

    nec quisquam ex agmine tanto audet adire virum,

    Verg. A. 5, 379:

    Servilius obvia adire arma jubetur,

    Sil. 9, 272.
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    To go to the performance of any act, to enter upon, to undertake, set about, undergo, submit to (cf.: accedo, aggredior, and adorior).—With ad or the acc. (class.):

    nunc eam rem vult, scio, mecum adire ad pactionem,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 25:

    tum primum nos ad causas et privatas et publicas adire coepimus,

    Cic. Brut. 90:

    adii causas oratorum, id. Fragm. Scaur. ap. Arus. p. 213 Lind.: adire ad rem publicam,

    id. de Imp. Pomp. 24, 70:

    ad extremum periculum,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 7.—With acc.:

    periculum capitis,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 38:

    laboribus susceptis periculisque aditis,

    id. Off. 1, 19:

    in adeundis periculis,

    id. ib. 24; cf.:

    adeundae inimicitiae, subeundae saepe pro re publica tempestates,

    id. Sest. 66, 139: ut vitae periculum aditurus videretur, Auct. B. G. 8, 48: maximos labores et summa pericula. Nep. Timol. 5:

    omnem fortunam,

    Liv. 25, 10:

    dedecus,

    Tac. A. 1, 39:

    servitutem voluntariam,

    id. G. 24:

    invidiam,

    id. A. 4, 70:

    gaudia,

    Tib. 1, 5, 39.—Hence of an inheritance, t. t., to enter on:

    cum ipse hereditatem patris non adisses,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 16; so id. Arch. 5; Suet. Aug. 8 and Dig.;

    hence also: adire nomen,

    to assume the name bequeathed by will, Vell. 2, 60.—
    B.
    Adire manum alicui, prov., to deceive one, to make sport of (the origin of this phrase is unc.; Acidalius conjectures that it arose from some artifice practised in wrestling, Wagner ad Plaut. Aul. 2, 8, 8):

    eo pacto avarae Veneri pulcre adii manum,

    Plaut. Poen. 2, 11; so id. Aul. 2, 8, 8; id. Cas. 5, 2, 54; id. Pers. 5, 2, 18.
    2.
    ăd-ĕō̆, adv. [cf. quoad and adhuc] (acc. to Festus, it should be accented adéo, v. the preced. word; but this distinction is merely a later invention of the grammarians; [p. 33] cf. Gell. 7, 7).
    I.
    In the ante-class. per.,
    A.
    To designate the limit of space or time, with reference to the distance passed through; hence often accompanied by usque (cf. ad), to this, thus far, so far, as far.
    1.
    Of space:

    surculum artito usque adeo, quo praeacueris,

    fit in the scion as far as you have sharpened it, Cato, R. R. 40, 3.— Hence: res adeo rediit, the affair has gone so far (viz., in deterioration, “cum aliquid pejus exspectatione contigit,” Don. ad Ter. Ph. 1, 2, 5):

    postremo adeo res rediit: adulescentulus saepe eadem et graviter audiendo victus est,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 61; cf. id. Ph. 1, 2, 5.—
    2.
    Of time, so long ( as), so long ( till), strengthened by usque, and with dum, donec, following, and in Cic. with quoad:

    merces vectatum undique adeo dum, quae tum haberet, peperisset bona,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 76; 3, 4, 72; id. Am. 1, 2, 10 al.:

    nusquam destitit instare, suadere, orare, usque adeo donec perpulit,

    Ter. And. 4, 1, 36; Cato, R. R. 67; id. ib. 76:

    atque hoc scitis omnes usque adeo hominem in periculo fuisse, quoad scitum sit Sestium vivere,

    Cic. Sest. 38, 82.—
    B.
    For the purpose of equalizing two things in comparison, followed by ut: in the same degree or measure or proportion... in which; or so very, so much, so, to such a degree... as (only in comic poets), Plaut. Ep. 4, 1, 38:

    adeon hominem esse invenustum aut infelicem quemquam, ut ego sum?

    Ter. And. 1, 5, 10.—Also followed by quasi, when the comparison relates to similarity:

    gaudere adeo coepit, quasi qui cupiunt nuptias,

    in the same manner as those rejoice who desire marriage, Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 12.—
    C.
    (Only in the comic poets) = ad haec, praeterea, moreover, besides, too: ibi tibi adeo lectus dabitur, ubi tu haud somnum capias ( beside the other annoyances), a bed, too, shall be given you there, etc., Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 80.—Hence also with etiam:

    adeo etiam argenti faenus creditum audio,

    besides too, id. Most. 3, 1, 101.—
    D.
    (Only in the comic poets.) Adeo ut, for this purpose that, to the end that:

    id ego continuo huic dabo, adeo me ut hic emittat manu,

    Plaut. Rud. 5, 3, 32:

    id adeo te oratum advenio, ut, etc.,

    id. Aul. 4, 10, 9:

    adeo ut tu meam sententiam jam jam poscere possis, faciam, etc.,

    id. ib. 3, 2, 26 (where Wagner now reads at ut):

    atque adeo ut scire possis, factum ego tecum hoc divido,

    id. Stich. 5, 4, 15. (These passages are so interpreted by Hand, I. p. 138; others regard adeo here = quin immo.)—
    E.
    In narration, in order to put one person in strong contrast with another. It may be denoted by a stronger emphasis upon the word to be made conspicuous, or by yet, on the contrary, etc.:

    jam ille illuc ad erum cum advenerit, narrabit, etc.: ille adeo illum mentiri sibi credet,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 4 sq.; so id. Merc. 2, 1, 8 al.
    II.
    To the Latin of every period belongs the use of this word,
    A.
    To give emphasis to an idea in comparison, so, so much, so very, with verbs, adjectives, and substantives:

    adeo ut spectare postea omnīs oderit,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 65:

    neminem quidem adeo infatuare potuit, ut ei nummum ullum crederet,

    Cic. Fl. 20, 47:

    adeoque inopia est coactus Hannibal, ut, etc.,

    Liv. 22, 32, 3 Weiss.:

    et voltu adeo modesto, adeo venusto, ut nil supra,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 92:

    nemo adeo ferus est, ut, etc.,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 39.—With usque:

    adeo ego illum cogam usque, ut mendicet meus pater,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 4, 10:

    usque adeo turbatur,

    even so much, so continually, Verg. E. 1, 12; Curt. 10, 1, 42; Luc. 1, 366.—In questions:

    adeone me fuisse fungum, ut qui illi crederem?

    Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3, 49:

    adeone hospes hujus urbis, adeone ignarus es disciplinae consuetudinisque nostrae, ut haec nescias?

    Cic. Rab. 10, 28; so id. Phil. 2, 7, 15; id. Fam. 9, 10; Liv. 2, 7, 10; 5, 6, 4.—With a negative in both clauses, also with quin in the last:

    non tamen adeo virtutum sterile saeculum, ut non et bona exempla prodiderit,

    Tac. H. 1, 3; so Suet. Oth. 9:

    verum ego numquam adeo astutus fui, quin, etc.,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 2, 13.—

    Sometimes the concluding clause is to be supplied from the first: quis genus Aeneadum, quis Trojae nesciat urbem?... non obtusa adeo gestamus pectora Poeni, viz.,

    that we know not the Trojans and their history, Verg. A. 1, 565:

    adeo senuerunt Juppiter et Mars?

    Juv. 6, 59.—Hence (post-Cic.): adeo non ut... adeo nihil ut... so little that, so far from that... (in reference to which, it should be noticed that in Latin the negative is blended with the verb in one idea, which is qualified by adeo) = tantum abest ut: haec dicta adeo nihil moverunt quemquam, ut legati prope violati sint, these words left them all so unmoved that, etc., or had so little effect, etc., Liv. 3, 2, 7: qui adeo non tenuit iram, ut gladio cinctum in senatum venturum se esse palam diceret, who restrained his anger so little that, etc. (for, qui non—tenuit iram adeo, ut), id. 8, 7, 5; so 5, 45, 4; Vell. 2, 66, 4: Curt. 3, 12, 22.—Also with contra in the concluding clause:

    apud hostes Afri et Carthaginienses adeo non sustinebant, ut contra etiam pedem referrent,

    Liv. 30, 34, 5. —
    B.
    Adeo is placed enclitically after its word, like quidem, certe, and the Gr. ge, even, indeed, just, precisely. So,
    1.
    Most freq. with pronouns, in order to render prominent something before said, or foll., or otherwise known (cf. in Gr. egôge, suge, autos ge, etc., Viger. ed. Herm. 489, vi. and Zeun.): argentariis male credi qui aiunt, nugas praedicant: nam et bene et male credi dico; id adeo hodie ego expertus sum, just this (touto ge), Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 1; so id. Aul. 2, 4, 10; 4, 2, 15; id. Am. 1, 1, 98; 1, 2, 6; id. Ep. 1, 1, 51; 2, 2, 31; 5, 2, 40; id. Poen. 1, 2, 57: plerique homines, quos, cum nihil refert, pudet;

    ubi pudendum'st ibi eos deserit pudor, is adeo tu es,

    you are just such a one, id. Ep. 2, 1, 2:

    cui tu obsecutus, facis huic adeo injuriam,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 68: tute adeo jam ejus verba audies, you yourself shall hear what he has to say (suge akousêi), Ter. And. 3, 3, 27: Dolabella tuo nihil scito mihi esse jucundius: hanc adeo habebo gratiam illi, i. e. hanc, quae maxima est, gratiam (tautên ge tên charin), Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 16:

    haec adeo ex illo mihi jam speranda fuerunt,

    even this, Verg. A. 11, 275.—It is often to be translated by the intensive and, and just, etc. (so esp. in Cic. and the histt.): id adeo, si placet, considerate, just that (touto ge skopeite), Cic. Caec. 30, 87:

    id adeo ex ipso senatus consulto cognoscite,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 64, 143; cf. id. Clu. 30, 80:

    ad hoc quicumque aliarum atque senatus partium erant, conturbari remp., quam minus valere ipsi malebant. Id adeo malum multos post annos in civitatem reverterat,

    And just this evil, Sall. C. 37, 11; so 37, 2; id. J. 68, 3; Liv. 2, 29, 9; 4, 2, 2: id adeo manifestum erit, si cognoverimus, etc., and this, precisely this, will be evident, if, etc., Quint. 2, 16, 18 Spald.—It is rarely used with ille:

    ille adeo illum mentiri sibi credet,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 6.—Sometimes with the rel. pron.: quas adeo haud quisquam liber umquam tetigit, Plaut: Poen. 1, 2, 57; Cic. Fin. 2, 12, 37. —With interrog. pron.:

    Quis adeo tam Latinae linguae ignarus est, quin, etc.,

    Gell. 7, 17.—Adeo is joined with the pers. pron. when the discourse passes from one person to another, and attention is to be particularly directed to the latter: Juppiter, tuque adeo summe Sol, qui res omnes inspicis, and thou especially, and chiefly thou, Enn. ap. Prob.:

    teque adeo decus hoc aevi inibit,

    Verg. E. 4, 11; id. G. 1, 24: teque, Neptune, invoco, vosque adeo venti, Poët. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 34, 73;

    and without the copulative: vos adeo... item ego vos virgis circumvinciam,

    Plaut. Rud. 3, 4, 25.— Ego adeo often stands for ego quidem, equidem (egôge):

    tum libertatem Chrysalo largibere: ego adeo numquam accipiam,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 7, 30; so id. Mil. 4, 4, 55; id. Truc. 4, 3, 73:

    ego adeo hanc primus inveni viam,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 16:

    nec me adeo fallit,

    Verg. A. 4, 96.—Ipse adeo (autos ge), for the sake of emphasis:

    atque hercle ipsum adeo contuor,

    Plaut. As. 2, 3, 24:

    ipsum adeo praesto video cum Davo,

    Ter. And. 2, 5, 4:

    ipse adeo senis ductor Rhoeteus ibat pulsibus,

    Sil. 14, 487.—
    2.
    With the conditional conjj. si, nisi, etc. (Gr. ei ge), if indeed, if truly:

    nihili est autem suum qui officium facere immemor est, nisi adeo monitus,

    unless, indeed, he is reminded of it, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 2: Si. Num illi molestae quippiam hae sunt nuptiae? Da. Nihil Hercle: aut si adeo, bidui est aut tridui haec sollicitudo, and if, indeed, etc. (not if also, for also is implied in aut), Ter. And. 2, 6, 7.—
    3.
    With adverbs: nunc adeo (nun ge), Plaut. As. 3, 1, 29; id. Mil. 2, 2, 4; id. Merc. 2, 2, 57; id. Men. 1, 2, 11; id. Ps. 1, 2, 52; id. Rud. 3, 4, 23; Ter. And. 4, 5, 26; Verg. A. 9, 156: jam adeo (dê ge), id. ib. 5, 268; Sil. 1, 20; 12, 534; Val. Fl. 3, 70. umquam adeo, Plaut. Cas. 5, 4, 23:

    inde adeo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 1:

    hinc adeo,

    Verg. E. 9, 59: sic adeo (houtôs ge), id. A. 4, 533; Sil. 12, 646:

    vix adeo,

    Verg. A. 6, 498:

    non adeo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 57; Verg. A. 11, 436. —
    4.
    With adjectives = vel, indeed, even, very, fully:

    quot adeo cenae, quas deflevi, mortuae!

    how very many suppers, Plaut. Stich. 1, 3, 59: quotque adeo fuerint, qui temnere superbum... Lucil. ap. Non. 180, 2: nullumne malorum finem adeo poenaeque dabis (adeo separated from nullum by poet. license)? wilt thou make no end at all to calamity and punishment? Val. Fl. 4, 63:

    trīs adeo incertos caeca caligine soles erramus,

    three whole days we wander about, Verg. A. 3, 203; 7, 629.—And with comp. or the adv. magis, multo, etc.:

    quae futura et quae facta, eloquar: multo adeo melius quam illi, cum sim Juppiter,

    very much better, Plaut. Am. 5, 2, 3; so id. Truc. 2, 1, 5:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam aliā ullā culpā meā, contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15.—
    5.
    With the conjj. sive, aut, vel, in order to annex a more important thought, or to make a correction, or indeed, or rather, or even only:

    sive qui ipsi ambīssent, seu per internuntium, sive adeo aediles perfidiose quoi duint,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 71:

    si hercle scivissem, sive adeo joculo dixisset mihi, se illam amare,

    id. Merc. 5, 4, 33; so id. Truc. 4, 3, 1; id. Men. 5, 2, 74; Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 9: nam si te tegeret pudor, sive adeo cor sapientia imbutum foret, Pacuv. ap. Non. 521, 10:

    mihi adeunda est ratio, quā ad Apronii quaestum, sive adeo, quā ad istius ingentem immanemque praedam possim pervenire,

    or rather, Cic. Verr 2, 3, 46, 110; Verg. A. 11, 369; so, atque adeo:

    ego princeps in adjutoribus atque adeo secundus,

    Cic. Att. 1, 17, 9.—
    6.
    With the imperative, for emphasis, like tandem, modo, dum, the Germ. so, and the Gr. ge (cf. L. and S.), now, I pray:

    propera adeo puerum tollere hinc ab janua,

    Ter. And. 4, 4, 20 (cf. xullabete g auton, Soph. Phil. 1003).—
    C.
    Like admodum or nimis, to give emphasis to an idea (for the most part only in comic poets, and never except with the positive of the adj.; cf. Consent. 2023 P.), indeed, truly, so very, so entirely:

    nam me ejus spero fratrem propemodum jam repperisse adulescentem adeo nobilem,

    so very noble, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 123:

    nec sum adeo informis,

    nor am I so very ugly, Verg. E. 2, 25:

    nam Caii Luciique casu non adeo fractus,

    Suet. Aug. 65:

    et merito adeo,

    and with perfect right, Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 42:

    etiam num credis te ignorarier aut tua facta adeo,

    do you, then, think that they are ignorant of you or your conduct entirely? id. Ph. 5, 8, 38.—
    D.
    To denote what exceeds expectation, even: quam omnium Thebis vir unam esse optimam dijudicat, quamque adeo cives Thebani rumificant probam, and whom even the Thebans (who are always ready to speak evil of others) declare to be an honest woman, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 44.— Hence also it denotes something added to the rest of the sentence, besides, too, over and above, usually in the connection: -que adeo (rare, and never in prose; cf.

    adhuc, I.): quin te Di omnes perdant qui me hodie oculis vidisti tuis, meque adeo scelestum,

    and me too, Plaut. Rud. 4, 4, 122; cf. id. 4, 2, 32:

    haec adeo tibi me, ipsa palam fari omnipotens Saturnia jussit,

    Verg. A. 7, 427.
    III.
    After Caesar and Cicero (the only instance of this use adduced from Cicero's works, Off. 1, 11, 36, being found in a passage rejected by the best critics, as B. and K.).
    A.
    For adding an important and satisfactory reason to an assertion, and then it always stands at the beginning of the clause, indeed, for:

    cum Hanno perorāsset, nemini omnium cum eo certare necesse fuit: adeo prope omnis senatus Hannibalis erat: the idea is,

    Hanno's speech, though so powerful, was ineffectual, and did not need a reply; for all the senators belonged to the party of Hannibal, Liv. 21, 11, 1; so id. 2, 27, 3; 2, 28, 2; 8, 37, 2; Tac. Ann. 1, 50, 81; Juv. 3, 274; 14, 233.—Also for introducing a parenthesis: sed ne illi quidem ipsi satis mitem gentem fore (adeo ferocia atque indomita [p. 34] ingenia esse) ni subinde auro... principum animi concilientur, Liv. 21, 20, 8; so id. 9, 26, 17; 3, 4, 2; Tac. A. 2, 28.—
    B.
    When to a specific fact a general consideration is added as a reason for it, so, thus (in Livy very often):

    haud dubius, facilem in aequo campi victoriam fore: adeo non fortuna modo, sed ratio etiam cum barbaris stabat,

    thus not only fortune, but sagacity, was on the side of the barbarians, Liv. 5, 38, 4:

    adeo ex parvis saepe magnarum momenta rerum pendent,

    id. 27, 9, 1; so id. 4, 31, 5; 21, 33, 6; 28, 19; Quint. 1, 12, 7; Curt. 10, 2, 11; Tac. Agr. 1:

    adeo in teneris consuescere multum est,

    Verg. G. 2, 272.—
    C.
    In advancing from one thought to another more important = immo, rather, indeed, nay: nulla umquam res publica ubi tantus paupertati ac parsimoniae honos fuerit: adeo, quanto rerum minus, tanto minus cupiditatis erat, Liv. praef. 11; so Gell. 11, 7; Symm. Ep. 1, 30, 37.—
    D.
    With a negative after ne—quidem or quoque, so much the more or less, much less than, still less (post-Aug.):

    hujus totius temporis fortunam ne deflere quidem satis quisquam digne potuit: adeo nemo exprimere verbis potest,

    still less can one describe: it by words, Vell. 2, 67, 1:

    ne tecta quidem urbis, adeo publicum consilium numquam adiit,

    still less, Tac. A. 6, 15; so id. H. 3, 64; Curt. 7, 5, 35:

    favore militum anxius et superbia viri aequalium quoque, adeo superiorum intolerantis,

    who could not endure his equals even, much less his superiors, Tac. H. 4, 80.—So in gen., after any negative: quaelibet enim ex iis artibus in paucos libros contrahi solet: adeo infinito spatio ac traditione opus non est, so much the less is there need, etc., Quint. 12, 11, 16; Plin. 17, 12, 35, § 179; Tac. H. 3, 39.—(The assumption of a causal signif. of adeo = ideo, propterea, rests upon false readings. For in Cael. Cic. Fam. 8, 15 we should read ideo, B. and K., and in Liv. 24, 32, 6, ad ea, Weiss.).—See more upon this word in Hand, Turs. I. pp. 135-155.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > adeo

  • 19 causa

    causa (by Cicero, and also a little after him, caussa, Quint. 1, 7, 20; so Fast. Praenest. pp. 321, 322; Inscr. Orell. 3681; 4077; 4698 al.; in Mon. Ancyr. 3, 1 dub.), ae, f. [perh. root cav- of caveo, prop. that which is defended or protected; cf. cura], that by, on account of, or through which any thing takes place or is done; a cause, reason, motive, inducement; also, in gen., an occasion, opportunity (opp. effectis, Quint. 6, 3, 66; 7, 3, 29:

    factis,

    id. 4, 2, 52; 12, 1, 36 al.; very freq. in all periods, and in all kinds of discourse. In its different meanings syn. with ratio, principium, fons, origo, caput; excusatio, defensio; judicium, controversia, lis; partes, actio; condicio, negotium, commodum, al.).
    I.
    In gen.: causa ea est, quae id efficit, cujus est causa; ut vulnus mortis; cruditas morbi;

    ignis ardoris. Itaque non sic causa intellegi debet, ut quod cuique antecedat, id ei causa sit, sed quod cuique efficienter antecedat,

    Cic. Fat. 15, 34:

    justa et magna et perspicua,

    id. Rosc. Am. 14, 40: id. Phil. 2, 22, 53; id. Att. 16, 7, 6:

    sontica causa, v. sonticus.—Followed by a particle of cause: causa, quamobrem, etc.,

    Ter. And. 5, 1, 18; id. Eun. 1, 2, 65; id. [p. 304] Heaut. 2, 3, 95; id. Hec. 3, 3, 22; 3, 5, 2; 4, 4, 73; Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 44:

    causa, quare, etc.,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 20, 60:

    causa, cur, etc.,

    id. Ac. 1, 3, 10; Quint. 11, 3, 16; 2, 3, 11; Hor. C. 1, 16, 19 al.:

    causa quod, etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 46, § 109; id. Phil. 6, 1, 1; Quint. 2, 1, 1; 5, 10, 30 al.:

    ut, etc.,

    Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 7; Ter. Eun. 3, 3, 6; Cic. Fam. 1, 8, 4 al.:

    haud causa quin, etc.,

    Plaut. Most. 2, 2, 4:

    quae causa est quin,

    id. Capt. 2, 2, 103:

    quid causae est quin,

    Ter. And. 3, 4, 21; Cic. Tusc. 5, 11, 32; Hor. S. 1, 1, 20:

    nulla causa est quin,

    Cic. Fam. 2, 17, 1:

    causa quominus,

    Sall. C. 51, 41; Liv. 34, 56, 9:

    causa ne,

    id. 34, 39, 9:

    nihil causae est cur non, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 59:

    causae propter quas, etc.,

    id. 4, 2, 12; 5, 7, 24; 8, 6, 23.—With gen. obj.:

    is, qui causa mortis fuit,

    Cic. Phil. 9, 3, 7; Liv. 21, 21, 1; Quint. 7, 3, 18; 7, 4, 42:

    salutis,

    Lucr. 3, 349:

    morbi,

    id. 3, 502; Verg. G. 4, 397; Hor. C. 2, 2, 14:

    nos causa belli sumus,

    Liv. 1, 13, 3:

    causa mortis fuistis,

    Quint. 7, 3, 32; Sen. Ira, 2, 27, 3:

    explicandae philosophiae,

    Cic. Div. 2, 2, 6:

    nec vero umquam bellorum civilium semen et causa deerit,

    id. Off. 2, 8, 29; so,

    belli,

    Sall. C. 2, 2; Verg. A. 7, 553; Hor. C. 2, 1, 2; id. S. 1, 3, 108; id. Ep. 1, 2, 9:

    felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas,

    Verg. G. 2, 490:

    vera objurgandi causa,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 131; cf. with ad:

    causa ad objurgandum,

    id. ib. 1, 1, 123; id. Hec. 4, 4, 71; and poet. with inf.:

    consurgere in arma,

    Verg. A. 10, 90:

    perire,

    Tib. 3, 2, 30:

    gestare carinas,

    Luc. 5, 464.— With prepp.:

    cum causā,

    with good reason, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 8, § 21; id. de Or. 2, 60, 247; Varr. R. R. 1, 17, 4:

    sine causā,

    without good reason, Cic. Div. 2, 28, 61; id. Fat. 9, 18; id. de Or. 2, 60, 246; id. Att. 13, 22, 1; Caes. B. G. 1, 14; Nep. Alcib. 6, 2; Quint. 1, 10, 35; 1, 12, 9:

    his de causis,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 6:

    id nisi gravi de causā non fecisset,

    id. ib. 7, 7, 3:

    justis de causis,

    id. Fam. 5, 20, 2:

    quā de causā,

    id. Off. 1, 41, 147; id. Ac. 1, 12, 43; Caes. B. G. 1, 1:

    quibus de causis,

    Quint. 4, 2, 15;

    less freq. in ante-Aug. prose: quā ex causa,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 7, 13; id. Mur. 17, 36; but very freq. in Quint., Sen., and the younger Plin.; so,

    nullā aliā ex causā,

    Sen. Ep. 29, 1:

    multis ex causis,

    Quint. 5, 12, 3:

    quibus ex causis,

    id. 4, 2, 15; Plin. Ep. 6, 6, 8:

    ex plurimis causis,

    id. ib. 1, 3, 6:

    ex his (causis),

    id. ib. 5, 8, 6:—ob eam causam scribo, ut, etc., Cic. Fam. 1, 8, 4:

    illa festinatio fuit ob illam causam, ne, etc.,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 40, § 99; Nep. Milt. 6, 2:

    ob eam causam, quia, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 3, 20, 51:

    ob eas causas,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 10:

    ob eam ipsam causam,

    Cic. Brut. 7, 29:

    quam ob causam,

    Nep. Paus. 2, 6:

    propter eam quam dixi causam,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 46, § 110:

    causae propter quas,

    Quint. 4, 2, 12.—In causā esse, to be the cause of, responsible for, etc. (rare):

    in causā haec sunt,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 1, 1:

    vim morbi in causā esse, quo serius perficeretur,

    Liv. 40, 26, 5:

    verecundiam multis in causā fuisse, ut, etc.,

    Quint. 12, 5, 2; Plin. Ep. 6, 10, 3; 7, 5, 1; Plin. 9, 30, 49, § 94; cf.:

    tarditatis causa in senatu fuit,

    Liv. 4, 58, 4.—
    b.
    Causā, in abl. with gen. or possess. adj. (usu. put after the noun), as patris causā, meā causā, on account of, for the sake of (in the best prose, almost always referring to the future, and implying a purpose; cf. propter with acc. of the pre-existing cause or motive):

    honoris tui causā huc ad te venimus,

    Plaut. Poen. 3, 3, 25; Ter. Phorm. 5, 7, 35; Cic. Fam. 13, 26, 2 al.:

    animi causa, v. animus, II., etc.: exempli causā, v. exemplum: causā meā,

    Plaut. Most. 5, 2, 47; id. Poen. 1, 2, 160; id. Am. 1, 3, 42 al.; Ter. Heaut. prol. 41; 5, 5, 23 al.;

    causā meāpte,

    id. ib. 4, 3, 8:

    nostra causa,

    id. Phorm. 4, 4, 14; Cic. Ac. 2, 38, 120; Quint. 7, 4, 9:

    vestrā magis hoc causā volebam quam meā,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 35. 162:

    aliena potius causa quam sua,

    Quint. 3, 7, 16.—Put before the noun:

    rastros capsit causă potiendi agri,

    Enn. Ann. 324 Vahl.:

    quidquid hujus feci, causā virginis Feci,

    Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 122; so Liv. 26, 32, 6; 31, 12, 4; 39, 14, 8; 40, 41 fin.; 40, 44, 10.—Rarely with propter in the same sense:

    vestrarum sedum templorumque causā, propter salutem meorum civium,

    Cic. Sest. 20, 45.—With gen. of pers. or reflex. pron. instead of possess. very rare (v. Lahmeyer ad Cic. Lael. 16, 57):

    quod illi semper sui causā fecerant,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 52, § 121.
    II.
    Esp.
    A.
    = justa causa, good reason, just cause, full right:

    cum causā accedere ad accusandum,

    with good reason, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 8, § 21; so,

    cum causā,

    id. de Or. 2, 60, 247; Varr. R. R. 1, 17, 4; 3, 16, 7;

    and the contrary: sine causā,

    without good reason, Cic. Div. 2, 28, 61; id. de Or. 2, 60, 246; Caes. B. G. 1, 14; Nep. Alcib. 6, 2 al.—
    B.
    An apology, excuse, Cato, R. R. 2, 2; Plaut. Capt. 3, 4, 92; Ter. Phorm. 2, 1, 42; Cic. Fam. 16, 19 fin.; Verg. A. 9, 219 al.—
    C.
    Causam alicui dare alicujus rei, occasion:

    qui (Nebatius) mihi dedit causam harum litterarum,

    Cic. Fam. 11, 27, 8;

    for which poët.: Bacchus et ad culpam causas dedit,

    Verg. G. 2, 455 Forbig. ad loc.—
    D.
    A feigned cause, a pretext, pretence, = praetextus, prophasis:

    habere causam,

    Plaut. As. 4, 1, 44:

    fingere falsas causas,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 71; id. And. 1, 3, 8 Ruhnk.; 4, 1, 18; id. Phorm. 2, 1, 4:

    fingit causas ne det,

    id. Eun. 1, 2, 58; cf. Tib. 1, 6, 11:

    morae facere,

    to pretend reasons for the delay, Sall. J. 36, 2:

    inferre causam,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 39, 2:

    causam interponere,

    Nep. Them. 7, 1; cf. id. Milt. 4, 1:

    bellandi,

    id. Ham. 3, 1:

    belli,

    Tac. A. 12, 45:

    jurgii,

    Phaedr. 1, 1, 4 al. (On the other hand, causa, a true cause, is opp. to praetextus, a pretext, Suet. Caes. 30.)—So freq. per causam, under the pretext, Caes. B. C. 3, 24; 3, 76; 3, 87; Liv. 2, 32, 1 Drak.; 22, 61, 8; Suet. Caes. 2; id. Oth. 3; id. Vesp. 1; Tib. 1, 6, 26; Ov. H. 20, 140; id. Tr. 2, 452.—
    E.
    In judic. lang. t. t., a cause, judicial process, lawsuit:

    privatae,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 3, 4:

    publicae,

    id. de Or. 3, 20, 74; id. Rosc. Am. 21, 59:

    capitis aut famae,

    id. Fam. 9, 21, 1:

    causam agere,

    id. de Or. 2, 48, 199; Quint. 6, 1, 54; 7, 2, 55; 10, 7, 30;

    11, 1, 67 et saep.: constituere,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 1, § 1:

    perorare,

    id. Quint. 24, 77:

    defendere,

    Quint. 3, 6, 9; 12, 1, 24; 12, 1, 37; Suet. Caes. 49:

    exponere,

    Quint. 2, 5, 7:

    perdere,

    Cic. Rosc. Com. 4, 10:

    obtinere,

    id. Fam. 1, 4, 1:

    tenere (= obticere),

    Ov. M. 13, 190: causā cadere, v. cado, II.: causam dicere, to defend one ' s self, or to make a defence (as an advocate), Cic. Rosc. Am. 5, 12 and 13; 21, 54; id. Sest. 8, 18; id. Quint. 8, 31; Liv. 29, 19, 5; Quint. 5, 11, 39; 8, 2, 24; Suet. Caes. 30 et saep.— Poet.: causa prior, the first part of the process, i. e. the trial, Ov. M. 15, 37.—Hence,
    2.
    Out of the sphere of judicial proceedings, the party, faction, cause that one defends:

    ne condemnare causam illam, quam secutus esset, videretur, etc.,

    Cic. Lig. 9, 27 sq.:

    suarum partium causa,

    Quint. 3, 8, 57:

    causa Caesaris melior,

    id. 5, 11, 42; Tac. A. 1, 36 al. —Hence,
    b.
    Meton.
    (α).
    A relation of friendship, connection:

    quīcum tibi adfininitas, societas, omnes denique causae et necessitudines veteres intercedebant,

    Cic. Quint. 15, 48:

    explicare breviter, quae mihi sit ratio et causa cum Caesare,

    id. Prov. Cons. 17, 40; id. Fam. 13, 19, 1.—
    (β).
    In gen., = condicio, a condition, state, situation, relation, position:

    ut nonnumquam mortem sibi ipse consciscere aliquis debeat, alius in eādem causā non debeat: num enim aliā in causā M. Cato fuit, alia ceteri, qui se in Africā Caesari tradiderunt?

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 112; so Caes. B. G. 4, 4 Herz.:

    (Regulus) erat in meliore causā quam, etc.,

    Cic. Off. 3, 27, 100; id. Agr. 3, 2, 9 (where for causa in the foll. clause is condicio):

    atque in hoc genere mea causa est, ut, etc.,

    id. Fam. 2, 4, 1; cf. id. ib. 9, 13, 1.—
    (γ).
    = negotium, a cause, business undertaken for any one, an employment:

    cui senatus dederat publice causam, ut mihi gratias ageret,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 73, § 170:

    quod nemo eorum rediisset, qui super tali causā eodem missi erant,

    Nep. Paus. 4, 1.—
    F.
    In medic. lang., a cause for disease:

    causam metuere,

    Cels. 3, 3; so Sen. Cons. ad Marc. 11 fin.; Plin. 28, 15, 61, § 218.—Hence in late Lat. for disease, Cael. Aur. Tard. 5, 10, 95; id. Acut. 2, 29, 157; Veg. 1, 25, 1; 3, 6, 11; 3, 45, 5; 4, 4, 2 al.—
    G.
    That which lies at the basis of a rhetorical representation, matter, subject, hupothesis, Cic. Top. 21, 79; id. Inv. 1, 6, 8; Auct. Her. 1, 11, 18; Quint. 3, 5, 7 sq.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > causa

  • 20 ā

       ā    (before consonants), ab (before vowels, h, and some consonants, esp. l, n, r, s), abs (usu. only before t and q, esp. freq. before the pron. te), old af, praep. with abl., denoting separation or departure (opp. ad).    I. Lit., in space, from, away from, out of.    A. With motion: ab urbe proficisci, Cs.: a supero mari Flaminia (est via), leads: Nunc quidem paululum, inquit, a sole, a little out of the sun: usque a mari supero Romam proficisci, all the way from; with names of cities and small islands, or with domo, home (for the simple abl; of motion, away from, not out of, a place); hence, of raising a siege, of the march of soldiers, the setting out of a fleet, etc.: oppidum ab Aeneā fugiente a Troiā conditum: ab Alesiā, Cs.: profectus ab Orico cum classe, Cs.; with names of persons or with pronouns: cum a vobis discessero: videat forte hic te a patre aliquis exiens, i. e. from his house, T.; (praegn.): a rege munera repudiare, from, sent by, N.—    B. Without motion.    1. Of separation or distance: abesse a domo paulisper maluit: tum Brutus ab Romā aberat, S.: hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Cs.: a foro longe abesse: procul a castris hostes in collibus constiterunt, Cs.: cum esset bellum tam prope a Siciliā; so with numerals to express distance: ex eo loco ab milibus passuum octo, eight miles distant, Cs.: ab milibus passuum minus duobus castra posuerunt, less than two miles off, Cs.; so rarely with substantives: quod tanta machinatio ab tanto spatio instrueretur, so far away, Cs.—    2. To denote a side or direction, etc., at, on, in: ab sinistrā parte nudatis castris, on the left, Cs.: ab eā parte, quā, etc., on that side, S.: Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequanis flumen Rhenum, on the side of the Sequani, i. e. their country, Cs.: ab decumanā portā castra munita, at the main entrance, Cs.: crepuit hinc a Glycerio ostium, of the house of G., T.: (cornua) ab labris argento circumcludunt, on the edges, Cs.; hence, a fronte, in the van; a latere, on the flank; a tergo, in the rear, behind; a dextro cornu, on the right wing; a medio spatio, half way.—    II. Fig.    A. Of time.    1. Of a point of time, after: Caesar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dextrum cornu profectus, immediately after, Cs.: ab eo magistratu, after this office, S.: recens a volnere Dido, fresh from her wound, V.: in Italiam perventum est quinto mense a Carthagine, i. e. after leaving, L.: ab his, i. e. after these words, hereupon, O.: ab simili <*>ade domo profugus, i. e. after and in consequence of, L.—    2. Of a period of time, from, since, after: ab hora tertiā bibebatur, from the third hour: ab Sullā et Pompeio consulibus, since the consulship of: ab incenso Capitolio illum esse vigesumum annum, since, S.: augures omnes usque ab Romulo, since the time of: iam inde ab infelici pugnā ceciderant animi, from (and in consequence of), L.; hence, ab initio, a principio, a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, at first: ab integro, anew, afresh: ab... ad, from (a time)... to: cum ab horā septimā ad vesperum pugnatum sit, Cs.; with nouns or adjectives denoting a time of life: iam inde a pueritiā, T.: a pueritiā: a pueris: iam inde ab incunabulis, L.: a parvo, from a little child, or childhood, L.: ab parvulis, Cs.—    B. In other relations.    1. To denote separation, deterring, intermitting, distinction, difference, etc., from: quo discessum animi a corpore putent esse mortem: propius abesse ab ortu: alter ab illo, next after him, V.: Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus, next in rank to, H.: impotentia animi a temperantiā dissidens: alieno a te animo fuit, estranged; so with adjj. denoting free, strange, pure, etc.: res familiaris casta a cruore civili: purum ab humano cultu solum, L.: (opoidum) vacuum ab defensoribus, Cs.: alqm pudicum servare ab omni facto, etc., II.; with substt.: impunitas ab iudicio: ab armis quies dabatur, L.; or verbs: haec a custodiis loca vacabant, Cs.—    2. To denote the agent, by: qui (Mars) saepe spoliantem iam evertit et perculit ab abiecto, by the agency of: Laudari me abs te, a laudato viro: si quid ei a Caesare gravius accidisset, at Caesar's hands, Cs.: vetus umor ab igne percaluit solis, under, O.: a populo P. imperia perferre, Cs.: equo lassus ab indomito, H.: volgo occidebantur: per quos et a quibus? by whose hands and upon whose orders? factus ab arte decor, artificial, O.: destitutus ab spe, L.; (for the sake of the metre): correptus ab ignibus, O.; (poet. with abl. of means or instr.): intumuit venter ab undā, O.—Ab with abl. of agent for the dat., to avoid ambiguity, or for emphasis: quibus (civibus) est a vobis consulendum: te a me nostrae consuetudinis monendum esse puto.—    3. To denote source, origin, extraction, from, of: Turnus ab Ariciā, L.: si ego me a M. Tullio esse dicerem: oriundi ab Sabinis, L.: dulces a fontibus undae, V.—With verbs of expecting, fearing, hoping (cf. a parte), from, on the part of: a quo quidem genere, iudices, ego numquam timui: nec ab Romanis vobis ulla est spes, you can expect nothing from the Romans, L.; (ellipt.): haec a servorum bello pericula, threatened by: quem metus a praetore Romano stimulabat, fear of what the praetor might do, L.—With verbs of paying, etc., solvere, persolvere, dare (pecuniam) ab aliquo, to pay through, by a draft on, etc.: se praetor dedit, a quaestore numeravit, quaestor a mensā publicā, by an order on the quaestor: ei legat pecuniam a filio, to be paid by his son: scribe decem (milia) a Nerio, pay by a draft on Nerius, H.; cognoscere ab aliquā re, to know or learn by means of something (but ab aliquo, from some one): id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus cognovisse, Cs.; in giving an etymology: id ab re... interregnum appellatum, L.—Rarely with verbs of beginning and repeating: coepere a fame mala, L.: a se suisque orsus, Ta.—    4. With verbs of freeing from, defending, protecting, from, against: ut a proeliis quietem habuerant, L.: provincia a calamitate est defendenda: sustinere se a lapsu, L.—    5. With verbs and adjectives, to define the respect in which, in relation to, with regard to, in respect to, on the part of: orba ab optimatibus contio: mons vastus ab naturā et humano cultu, S.: ne ab re sint omissiores, too neglectful of money or property, T.: posse a facundiā, in the matter of eloquence, T.; cf. with laborare, for the simple abl, in, for want of: laborare ab re frumentariā, Cs.—    6. In stating a motive, from, out of, on account of, in consequence of: patres ab honore appellati, L.: inops tum urbs ab longinquā obsidione, L.—    7. Indicating a part of the whole, of, out of: scuto ab novissimis uni militi detracto, Cs.: a quibus (captivis) ad Senatum missus (Regulus).—    8. Marking that to which anything belongs: qui sunt ab eā disciplinā: nostri illi a Platone et Aristotele aiunt.—    9. Of a side or party: vide ne hoc totum sit a me, makes for my view: vir ab innocentiā clementissimus, in favor of.—10. In late prose, of an office: ab epistulis, a secretary, Ta. Note. Ab is not repeated with a following pron interrog. or relat.: Arsinoën, Stratum, Naupactum... fateris ab hostibus esse captas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis, quos, etc. It is often separated from the word which it governs: a nullius umquam me tempore aut commodo: a minus bono, S.: a satis miti principio, L.—The poets join a and que, making āque; but in good prose que is annexed to the following abl. (a meque, abs teque, etc.): aque Chao, V.: aque mero, O.—In composition, ab- stands before vowels, and h, b, d, i consonant, l, n, r, s; abs- before c, q, t; b is dropped, leaving as- before p; ā- is found in āfuī, āfore ( inf fut. of absum); and au- in auferō, aufugiō.
    * * *
    I
    Ah!; (distress/regret/pity, appeal/entreaty, surprise/joy, objection/contempt)
    II
    by (agent), from (departure, cause, remote origin/time); after (reference)
    III
    ante, abb. a.

    in calendar expression a. d. = ante diem -- before the day

    Latin-English dictionary > ā

См. также в других словарях:

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  • right — I UK [raɪt] / US adverb *** 1) exactly Their office is right in the middle of town. The keys were right here a minute ago. Am I late? No, you re right on time. right behind/in front of: Don t worry – I m right behind you. 2) immediately I knew… …   English dictionary

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  • Little Samson — Infobox VG| title = Little Samson developer = Takeru publisher = Taito designer = engine = released = June 26 1992 (Japan) October 22 1992 (U.S.) March 18 1993 (Europe) genre = Action modes = Single player ratings = platforms = NES media = 3… …   Wikipedia

  • right*/*/*/ — [raɪt] adv I 1) exactly Their office is right in the middle of town.[/ex] ‘Am I late? ‘No, you re right on time. [/ex] Don t worry – I m right behind you.[/ex] 2) immediately I liked her right from the start.[/ex] Paul arrived right after… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

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