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irksome

  • 1 criptograma

    m.
    cryptogram.
    * * *
    1 cryptogram
    * * *
    * * *
    masculino cryptogram
    * * *
    Ex. In fact, complete sentences are not always necessary, because phrases can often convey the message, but at the same time a steady diet of rapid fire phrases will soon sound like a cryptogram and will be irksome to read.
    * * *
    masculino cryptogram
    * * *

    Ex: In fact, complete sentences are not always necessary, because phrases can often convey the message, but at the same time a steady diet of rapid fire phrases will soon sound like a cryptogram and will be irksome to read.

    * * *
    cryptogram
    * * *
    cryptogram
    * * *
    m cryptogram

    Spanish-English dictionary > criptograma

  • 2 en cierta medida

    = to some extent, to a certain extent, to some degree
    Ex. To some extent, at least, any theory designed to study this process evolves from practice rather than vice versa.
    Ex. To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.
    Ex. All successful managers are autocratic to some degree.
    * * *
    = to some extent, to a certain extent, to some degree

    Ex: To some extent, at least, any theory designed to study this process evolves from practice rather than vice versa.

    Ex: To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.
    Ex: All successful managers are autocratic to some degree.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en cierta medida

  • 3 en cierto modo

    in a way
    * * *
    = to some extent, after a fashion, to a certain extent, in a manner of speaking, so to speak, to some degree
    Ex. To some extent, at least, any theory designed to study this process evolves from practice rather than vice versa.
    Ex. Koenig had a flat-platen machine working after a fashion in 1811, and a prototype cylinder machine in 1812 = Koenig ya en 1811 tenía una máquina de presión plana que más o menos funcionaba y un prototipo de máquina rotativa en 1812.
    Ex. To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.
    Ex. Now, let me express to you, you have, in a manner of speaking, created quite a tangled ball of yarn in this situation.
    Ex. It has long and effectively been used by many map librarians who felt that in their particular collections of maps the book and the work, so to speak, might be said to coincide, and that the considerations of authorship, editions, translations, and related works were largely negligible.
    Ex. All successful managers are autocratic to some degree.
    * * *
    = to some extent, after a fashion, to a certain extent, in a manner of speaking, so to speak, to some degree

    Ex: To some extent, at least, any theory designed to study this process evolves from practice rather than vice versa.

    Ex: Koenig had a flat-platen machine working after a fashion in 1811, and a prototype cylinder machine in 1812 = Koenig ya en 1811 tenía una máquina de presión plana que más o menos funcionaba y un prototipo de máquina rotativa en 1812.
    Ex: To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.
    Ex: Now, let me express to you, you have, in a manner of speaking, created quite a tangled ball of yarn in this situation.
    Ex: It has long and effectively been used by many map librarians who felt that in their particular collections of maps the book and the work, so to speak, might be said to coincide, and that the considerations of authorship, editions, translations, and related works were largely negligible.
    Ex: All successful managers are autocratic to some degree.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en cierto modo

  • 4 engorroso

    adj.
    difficult, troublesome, cumbersome.
    * * *
    1 familiar bothersome, annoying, awkward
    * * *
    ADJ [asunto] bothersome, trying; [situación, problema] awkward
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < problema> complicated, thorny; < situación> awkward, difficult; < asunto> trying, tiresome
    * * *
    = cumbersome, niggling, fiddly [fiddlier -comp., fiddliest -sup.], unpleasant.
    Ex. Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex. Everything is small and fiddly, and the user has to guess what is what.
    Ex. And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    ----
    * de un modo engorroso = awkwardly, cumbrously.
    * lo engorroso de = cumbersomeness.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < problema> complicated, thorny; < situación> awkward, difficult; < asunto> trying, tiresome
    * * *
    = cumbersome, niggling, fiddly [fiddlier -comp., fiddliest -sup.], unpleasant.

    Ex: Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.

    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex: Everything is small and fiddly, and the user has to guess what is what.
    Ex: And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    * de un modo engorroso = awkwardly, cumbrously.
    * lo engorroso de = cumbersomeness.

    * * *
    ‹problema› complicated, thorny, tricky; ‹situación› awkward, difficult; ‹asunto› trying, tiresome, bothersome
    * * *

    engorroso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo ‹ problema complicated, thorny;


    situación awkward, difficult;
    asunto trying, tiresome
    engorroso,-a adj fam (espinoso, difícil) thorny: es un asunto algo engorroso, it's a thorny issue
    (pesado) tiresome, trying
    ' engorroso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    engorrosa
    English:
    cumbersome
    * * *
    engorroso, -a adj
    [molesto] bothersome; [físicamente] cumbersome;
    la engorrosa tarea de hacer la compra the tedious job of doing the shopping;
    un problema muy engorroso a very awkward problem;
    * * *
    adj tricky
    * * *
    engorroso, -sa adj
    : bothersome
    * * *
    engorroso adj annoying

    Spanish-English dictionary > engorroso

  • 5 evitar

    v.
    1 to avoid, to prevent (impedir) (desastre, accidente).
    podría haberse evitado esta catástrofe this disaster could have been avoided o prevented
    evitar que alguien haga algo to stop o prevent somebody from doing something
    Ricardo previno el accidente Richard prevented the accident.
    María se guarda de decir mentiras Mary takes care not to tell lies.
    2 to avoid (eludir) (cuestión, persona).
    no puede evitarlo he can't help it
    Javier siempre evita encontrarse conmigo Javier always avoids meeting me
    3 to save.
    esto me evita tener que ir this saves me (from) having to go
    * * *
    1 (gen) to avoid
    2 (impedir) to prevent, avoid
    3 (ahorrar) to spare, save
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=eludir) to avoid
    2) (=ahorrar) to save

    me evita (el) tener que... — it saves me having to...

    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (eludir, huir de) to avoid
    b) ( impedir) to avoid, prevent

    para evitar que sufranto avoid o prevent them suffering

    c) ( ahorrar)

    evitarle algo a alguien<molestia/preocupación> to save o spare somebody something

    2.
    evitarse v pron < problemas> to save oneself
    * * *
    = avoid, bypass [by-pass], eschew, guard against, impede, prevent, shy away from, deflect, forestall, avert, preempt [pre-empt], shun, be shy of + Gerundio, sidestep [side-step], steer + clear of, steer away from, get (a)round, shy from, stay away from, stave off, baulk [balk, -USA], hamstring, ward off, head off, skirt, give + Nombre + a wide berth.
    Ex. This situation requires a very skilled information worker if total disaster is to be avoided.
    Ex. She repeatedly bypassed the catalog because she was an inveterate fiction reader and approached the A section of the fiction shelf expecting to find Sholom Aleichem under ALEICHEM.
    Ex. However, most contributors to the debate about the future of SLIS have eschewed practicalities in favour of sweeping and dramatic generalizations.
    Ex. The system will ask you to enter the new password a second time to help guard against keying errors.
    Ex. In early 1984 we were invited to undertake a survey of the fourteen schools of librarianship and information studies in England and Wales, giving particular attention to the constraints impeding or preventing desirable change.
    Ex. To prevent an entry under the first name(s), these must be entered on a separate line with the subfield code 'j'.
    Ex. Those who conscientiously attempt to keep abreast of current thought might well shy away from an examination calculated to show how much of the previous month's efforts could be produced on call.
    Ex. Questions such as 'Can I help you?' on the part of the librarian are easily deflected by a hasty, perhaps automatic and ill-considered, 'Oh, no thanks' by the user.
    Ex. In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex. He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex. This article concludes that the main value of the indicators is as a management tool, as a means of preempting problems.
    Ex. Traditionally these books have been shunned because of their fragile nature, but librarians are finding that a small collection can enliven story times.
    Ex. Printers or publishers were sometimes shy of giving their real names -- usually because a book was treasonable, or libellous, or a piracy -- and for similar reasons they might give a false place of publication and a false date.
    Ex. This article discusses how to start projects on the right footing by defining objectives and planning properly to help sidestep pitfalls which can be associated with bespoke software development.
    Ex. This entire target market has steered clear of the public library.
    Ex. This article gives guidance for steering away from some of the more obvious pitfalls when buying software.
    Ex. The view of most users is that they can get around the restriction in a number of ways.
    Ex. I have not shied from identifying some of the obstacles to achieving this vision.
    Ex. This, again, is an area most libraries -- at least the ones I'm familiar with -- have tended to stay away from.
    Ex. They resorted to exercising to stave off unwanted weight gain believed to be caused by alcohol use.
    Ex. While many scholars concede that military interventions are sometimes permissible, they balk when it comes to deciding whether they are ever a moral duty.
    Ex. Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex. The most strenuous efforts will not always ensure success, nor the boldest arm of human power ward off the stroke of misfortune.
    Ex. And this stimulus is working in the sense that it has headed off the imminent risk of a deflationary spiral.
    Ex. Bridleways that cross arable land may be legally ploughed up, but not those that skirt a field.
    Ex. Under the new law, motorists must give 'a wide berth' to stationary emergency vehicles displaying blue, red, or amber emergency warning lights.
    ----
    * acto de evitar = avoidance.
    * agacharse para evitar = duck out of + harm's way.
    * el evitar = avoidance.
    * evitar discutir una cuestión = circumvent + issue.
    * evitar el desastre = ward off + disaster.
    * evitar el encuentro con = steer + clear of, give + Nombre + a wide berth, steer away from.
    * evitar el enfrentamiento = avoid + confrontation.
    * evitar el mal = shun + evil.
    * evitar la confrontación = avoid + confrontation.
    * evitar la fama = shun + the public eye, keep out of + the public eye.
    * evitar la publicidad = shun + the public eye, keep out of + the public eye.
    * evitar + Nombre = get (a)round + Nombre.
    * evitar polémicas = eschew + issues.
    * evitar problemas = stay out of + trouble.
    * evitar que = keep from.
    * evitar que + entrar = keep + Nombre + out.
    * evitar que + escapar = keep + Nombre + in.
    * evitar que + Nombre + Subjuntivo = save + Nombre + from + Gerundio.
    * evitar que + salir = keep + Nombre + in.
    * evitar ser afectado = escape + unaffected.
    * evitar temas delicados = eschew + issues.
    * evitar una cuestión = skirt + issue, tiptoe around + issue.
    * evitar una infección = prevent + infection.
    * evitar un error = avoid + error.
    * evitar un problema = avoid + problem.
    * evitar un riesgo = duck + risk.
    * evitar un tema = skirt + issue, tiptoe around + issue.
    * forma de evitar Algo = way round + Algo.
    * forma de evitar una dificultad = way (a)round + difficulty.
    * forma de evitar un problema = way round + problem.
    * intentar evitar = fight + shy of.
    * lo que hay que hacer y lo que hay que evitar = do's and don'ts, rights and wrongs.
    * no poder evitar + Infinitivo = cannot help + Gerundio, cannot help but + Verbo.
    * no poder evitar mencionar = cannot but notice.
    * no pude evitar notar que = couldn't help but notice (that).
    * para evitar su uso indebido por los niños = childproof.
    * proteger Algo para evitar su uso indebido por los niños = childproof.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (eludir, huir de) to avoid
    b) ( impedir) to avoid, prevent

    para evitar que sufranto avoid o prevent them suffering

    c) ( ahorrar)

    evitarle algo a alguien<molestia/preocupación> to save o spare somebody something

    2.
    evitarse v pron < problemas> to save oneself
    * * *
    = avoid, bypass [by-pass], eschew, guard against, impede, prevent, shy away from, deflect, forestall, avert, preempt [pre-empt], shun, be shy of + Gerundio, sidestep [side-step], steer + clear of, steer away from, get (a)round, shy from, stay away from, stave off, baulk [balk, -USA], hamstring, ward off, head off, skirt, give + Nombre + a wide berth.

    Ex: This situation requires a very skilled information worker if total disaster is to be avoided.

    Ex: She repeatedly bypassed the catalog because she was an inveterate fiction reader and approached the A section of the fiction shelf expecting to find Sholom Aleichem under ALEICHEM.
    Ex: However, most contributors to the debate about the future of SLIS have eschewed practicalities in favour of sweeping and dramatic generalizations.
    Ex: The system will ask you to enter the new password a second time to help guard against keying errors.
    Ex: In early 1984 we were invited to undertake a survey of the fourteen schools of librarianship and information studies in England and Wales, giving particular attention to the constraints impeding or preventing desirable change.
    Ex: To prevent an entry under the first name(s), these must be entered on a separate line with the subfield code 'j'.
    Ex: Those who conscientiously attempt to keep abreast of current thought might well shy away from an examination calculated to show how much of the previous month's efforts could be produced on call.
    Ex: Questions such as 'Can I help you?' on the part of the librarian are easily deflected by a hasty, perhaps automatic and ill-considered, 'Oh, no thanks' by the user.
    Ex: In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex: He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex: This article concludes that the main value of the indicators is as a management tool, as a means of preempting problems.
    Ex: Traditionally these books have been shunned because of their fragile nature, but librarians are finding that a small collection can enliven story times.
    Ex: Printers or publishers were sometimes shy of giving their real names -- usually because a book was treasonable, or libellous, or a piracy -- and for similar reasons they might give a false place of publication and a false date.
    Ex: This article discusses how to start projects on the right footing by defining objectives and planning properly to help sidestep pitfalls which can be associated with bespoke software development.
    Ex: This entire target market has steered clear of the public library.
    Ex: This article gives guidance for steering away from some of the more obvious pitfalls when buying software.
    Ex: The view of most users is that they can get around the restriction in a number of ways.
    Ex: I have not shied from identifying some of the obstacles to achieving this vision.
    Ex: This, again, is an area most libraries -- at least the ones I'm familiar with -- have tended to stay away from.
    Ex: They resorted to exercising to stave off unwanted weight gain believed to be caused by alcohol use.
    Ex: While many scholars concede that military interventions are sometimes permissible, they balk when it comes to deciding whether they are ever a moral duty.
    Ex: Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex: The most strenuous efforts will not always ensure success, nor the boldest arm of human power ward off the stroke of misfortune.
    Ex: And this stimulus is working in the sense that it has headed off the imminent risk of a deflationary spiral.
    Ex: Bridleways that cross arable land may be legally ploughed up, but not those that skirt a field.
    Ex: Under the new law, motorists must give 'a wide berth' to stationary emergency vehicles displaying blue, red, or amber emergency warning lights.
    * acto de evitar = avoidance.
    * agacharse para evitar = duck out of + harm's way.
    * el evitar = avoidance.
    * evitar discutir una cuestión = circumvent + issue.
    * evitar el desastre = ward off + disaster.
    * evitar el encuentro con = steer + clear of, give + Nombre + a wide berth, steer away from.
    * evitar el enfrentamiento = avoid + confrontation.
    * evitar el mal = shun + evil.
    * evitar la confrontación = avoid + confrontation.
    * evitar la fama = shun + the public eye, keep out of + the public eye.
    * evitar la publicidad = shun + the public eye, keep out of + the public eye.
    * evitar + Nombre = get (a)round + Nombre.
    * evitar polémicas = eschew + issues.
    * evitar problemas = stay out of + trouble.
    * evitar que = keep from.
    * evitar que + entrar = keep + Nombre + out.
    * evitar que + escapar = keep + Nombre + in.
    * evitar que + Nombre + Subjuntivo = save + Nombre + from + Gerundio.
    * evitar que + salir = keep + Nombre + in.
    * evitar ser afectado = escape + unaffected.
    * evitar temas delicados = eschew + issues.
    * evitar una cuestión = skirt + issue, tiptoe around + issue.
    * evitar una infección = prevent + infection.
    * evitar un error = avoid + error.
    * evitar un problema = avoid + problem.
    * evitar un riesgo = duck + risk.
    * evitar un tema = skirt + issue, tiptoe around + issue.
    * forma de evitar Algo = way round + Algo.
    * forma de evitar una dificultad = way (a)round + difficulty.
    * forma de evitar un problema = way round + problem.
    * intentar evitar = fight + shy of.
    * lo que hay que hacer y lo que hay que evitar = do's and don'ts, rights and wrongs.
    * no poder evitar + Infinitivo = cannot help + Gerundio, cannot help but + Verbo.
    * no poder evitar mencionar = cannot but notice.
    * no pude evitar notar que = couldn't help but notice (that).
    * para evitar su uso indebido por los niños = childproof.
    * proteger Algo para evitar su uso indebido por los niños = childproof.

    * * *
    evitar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 (eludir, huir de) to avoid
    evita entrar en discusiones con él avoid getting into arguments with him
    para evitar problemas decidí no ir to avoid problems I decided not to go
    ¿por qué me estás evitando? why are you avoiding me?
    2 (impedir) to avoid, prevent
    se podría haber evitado la tragedia the tragedy could have been avoided o averted o prevented
    haremos lo posible para evitarlo we'll do everything we can to avoid o prevent it
    para evitar que sufran to avoid o prevent them suffering
    3 (ahorrar) to save
    una simple llamada nos habría evitado muchas molestias a simple phone call would have saved us a lot of trouble
    así les evitarás muchos quebraderos de cabeza that way you'll save them a lot of worry
    por esta ruta evitas tener que pasar por el centro if you go this way you avoid going through o it saves you going through the center
    ‹problemas› to save oneself
    evítese la molestia de ir a la tienda avoid the inconvenience of going to the store
    si aceptas, te evitarás muchos problemas if you accept, you'll save yourself a lot of problems
    me evitaría tener que pintarlo it would save me having to paint it
    * * *

     

    Multiple Entries:
    evitar    
    evitar algo
    evitar ( conjugate evitar) verbo transitivo
    a) (eludir, huir de) to avoid;



    para evitar que sufran to avoid o prevent them suffering

    c) ( remediar):

    me puse a llorar, no lo puede evitar I started to cry, I couldn't help it

    d) ( ahorrar) evitarle algo a algn ‹molestia/preocupación› to save o spare sb sth

    evitarse verbo pronominal ‹ problemas to save oneself;

    evitar verbo transitivo
    1 to avoid: no pude evitar reírme, I couldn't help laughing
    2 (una enfermedad, etc) to prevent
    (una desgracia) to avert
    3 (a una persona) to avoid ➣ Ver nota en avoid

    ' evitar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ahorrar
    - alarde
    - carcajada
    - contemporizar
    - hincapié
    - mortificar
    - mortificarse
    - murmuración
    - para
    - remediar
    - aglomeración
    - huir
    English:
    avert
    - avoid
    - breath
    - bypass
    - cheat
    - clampdown
    - clear
    - deny
    - get round
    - harm
    - head off
    - hedge
    - help
    - loophole
    - miss
    - pair off
    - prevent
    - pussyfoot
    - save
    - scandal
    - should
    - stave off
    - steer
    - step in
    - way
    - get
    - guard
    - keep
    - rat
    - shun
    - stave
    - unavoidably
    * * *
    vt
    1. [impedir] [desastre, accidente] to avoid, to prevent;
    ¿podría haberse evitado esta catástrofe ecológica? could this environmental disaster have been avoided o prevented?;
    evitar que alguien haga algo to stop o prevent sb from doing sth;
    no pude evitar que se pelearan I couldn't stop o prevent them from having a fight;
    hemos de evitar que se extienda el incendio we have to stop the fire spreading
    2. [eludir] [problema, cuestión, persona] to avoid;
    siempre me está evitando she's always trying to avoid me;
    Javier siempre evita encontrarse conmigo Javier always avoids meeting me;
    yo evité hablar del tema I kept o steered clear of the subject;
    no puede evitarlo he can't help it;
    no puedo evitar ser como soy I can't help (being) the way I am
    3. [ahorrar] to save;
    esta máquina nos evitaría mucho trabajo this machine would save us a lot of work;
    esto me evita tener que ir this gets me out of going, this saves me (from) having to go
    * * *
    v/t
    1 avoid;
    no puedo evitarlo I can’t help it
    2 ( impedir) prevent
    3 molestias save
    * * *
    evitar vt
    1) : to avoid
    2) prevenir: to prevent
    3) eludir: to escape, to elude
    * * *
    evitar vb
    1. (en general) to avoid
    2. (impedir) to prevent
    3. (ahorrar) to save

    Spanish-English dictionary > evitar

  • 6 fastidioso

    adj.
    1 bothersome, annoying, nagging, pesky.
    2 tiresome, boring, irritating, tedious.
    * * *
    1 (molesto) annoying, irksome
    2 (aburrido) boring, tedious
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=molesto) annoying
    2) (=aburrido) tedious, boring, tiresome
    3) LAm (=quisquilloso) fastidious
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex. He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex: He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.

    * * *
    1 (molesto) ‹persona› tiresome, annoying; ‹trabajo› tiresome, irksome
    ¡qué ruido más fastidioso! what an irritating noise!, that noise is getting on my nerves o is getting to me! ( colloq)
    este niño está muy fastidioso this child is being very tiresome o ( colloq) is getting on my nerves
    2 (Méx, Per fam) (quisquilloso) fussy ( colloq)
    * * *

    fastidioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo


    trabajo tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)

    fastidioso,-a adjetivo annoying
    ' fastidioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    apestosa
    - apestoso
    - bendita
    - bendito
    - fastidiosa
    - gracia
    - molesta
    - molesto
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - suplicio
    - pesado
    English:
    annoying
    - irksome
    - tiresome
    - peevish
    * * *
    fastidioso, -a adj
    1. [molesto] annoying, irritating;
    es un niño muy fastidioso he's a very annoying o irritating child;
    es un dolor muy fastidioso it's a very annoying o irritating pain
    2. [aburrido] boring, tedious
    * * *
    adj annoying
    * * *
    fastidioso, -sa adj
    1) molesto: annoying, bothersome
    2) aburrido: boring
    * * *
    fastidioso adj annoying

    Spanish-English dictionary > fastidioso

  • 7 gacho

    adj.
    1 turned-down, drooping, bowed, downturned.
    2 ugly, awful.
    3 third-rate.
    4 annoying, bothersome, irritating, irksome.
    m.
    slouch hat.
    * * *
    1 drooping, bent
    \
    a gachas on all fours
    con la cabeza gacha with one's head bowed
    con las orejas gachas figurado with one's tail between one's legs
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=encorvado) bent down, turned downward; [cuerno] down-curved; [orejas] drooping, floppy

    salió con las orejas gachas o con la cabeza gacha — he went out all down in the mouth *

    2)

    ir a gachas* to go on all fours

    3) Méx * (=feo) nasty, ugly; (=sin suerte) unlucky
    * * *
    - cha adjetivo
    1)
    a) < orejas> drooping (before n)
    b)

    a gachas — ( agachado) crouching; ( a gatas) on all fours

    2) (Méx fam) (malo, feo) terrible, awful; (desagradable, molesto) annoying
    * * *
    ----
    * con las orejas gachas = depressed.
    * oreja gacha = drop ear.
    * * *
    - cha adjetivo
    1)
    a) < orejas> drooping (before n)
    b)

    a gachas — ( agachado) crouching; ( a gatas) on all fours

    2) (Méx fam) (malo, feo) terrible, awful; (desagradable, molesto) annoying
    * * *
    * con las orejas gachas = depressed.
    * oreja gacha = drop ear.
    * * *
    A
    1 ‹orejas› drooping ( before n)
    un sombrero de alas gachas a hat with a turned-down brim
    con la cabeza gacha with his head bowed, hanging his head
    2
    a gachas (agachado) crouching; (a gatas) on all fours
    B
    1 ( Méx fam) (malo, feo) terrible, awful
    la película estaba gachísima the movie was terrible o awful o was the pits ( colloq)
    2 ( Méx fam) (desagradable, molesto) annoying
    ¡qué gacho! tengo que rehacerlo what a drag! o how annoying! I have to do it all over again ( colloq)
    su novia es bien gacha his girlfriend is a real pain in the neck ( colloq)
    ( RPl)
    slouch hat
    * * *

    Multiple Entries:
    gacho    
    gachó
    gacho
    ◊ - cha adjetivo

    a) orejas drooping ( before n);


    b)



    ( a gatas) on all fours
    gacho,-a
    I adj (cabeza) bowed, (orejas) drooping: llevaba la cabeza gacha, his head was hanging down
    II gachas fpl oatmeal porridge
    gachó m fam man: nos sentamos a hablar con un par de gachós, we sat down to chat to a couple of blokes
    ' gachó' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    gacha
    - gacho
    English:
    droop
    * * *
    gacho, -a adj
    1. [caído] drooping;
    caminaba con la cabeza gacha he was walking along with his head bowed o hanging his head
    2. Méx Fam [persona] nasty, rotten;
    cómprame un helado, no seas gacho don't be rotten, buy me an ice cream
    3. Méx Fam [objeto] awful, ghastly;
    siempre lleva ropa muy gacha he always dresses in awful o ghastly clothes
    4. Méx Fam [feo] ugly as sin
    * * *
    adj
    1 turned downward;
    con la cabeza gacha hanging one’s head
    2 Méx fam ( cutre) ugly, horrible
    * * *
    gacho, - cha adj
    1) : drooping, turned downward
    2) Mex fam : nasty, awful
    3)
    ir a gachas fam : to go on all fours

    Spanish-English dictionary > gacho

  • 8 inconscientemente

    adv.
    unconsciously, unwittingly (sin darse cuenta).
    * * *
    1 inadvertently, unknowingly, unwittingly
    * * *
    ADV
    1) (=sin saber) unconsciously
    2) (=sin querer) unwittingly
    3) (=sin pensar) thoughtlessly
    * * *
    adverbio unconsciously, unwittingly
    * * *
    = unconsciously, unwittingly, unknowingly.
    Ex. He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex. Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.
    Ex. The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.
    * * *
    adverbio unconsciously, unwittingly
    * * *
    = unconsciously, unwittingly, unknowingly.

    Ex: He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.

    Ex: Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.
    Ex: The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.

    * * *
    unconsciously, unwittingly
    * * *
    [sin darse cuenta] unconsciously, unwittingly

    Spanish-English dictionary > inconscientemente

  • 9 irritante

    adj.
    irritating.
    m.
    irritant.
    * * *
    1 irritating, aggravating, annoying
    * * *
    1.
    2.
    * * *
    I
    a) <situación/actitud> irritating, annoying
    b) (Med) irritant
    II
    masculino irritant
    * * *
    = irritating, irksome, vexing, jarring, grating, exasperating, smarting.
    Ex. We want the understanding that we are not some irritating adjunct to bookstores but an alternate way.
    Ex. The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. The protagonist experiences a jarring descent from the heights of literary distinction at court to the coarseness of common experience.
    Ex. Sanborn was infamous for his grating personality, editorial liberties and inaccurate accounts of people and events.
    Ex. While information appliances will proliferate, they will not lessen the perception of an exasperating electronic environment.
    Ex. At 11:30 I was feeling that all was well with the world, and then at 11:35 I'm all tightened to a smarting tension by having been treated like scum.
    * * *
    I
    a) <situación/actitud> irritating, annoying
    b) (Med) irritant
    II
    masculino irritant
    * * *
    = irritating, irksome, vexing, jarring, grating, exasperating, smarting.

    Ex: We want the understanding that we are not some irritating adjunct to bookstores but an alternate way.

    Ex: The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: The protagonist experiences a jarring descent from the heights of literary distinction at court to the coarseness of common experience.
    Ex: Sanborn was infamous for his grating personality, editorial liberties and inaccurate accounts of people and events.
    Ex: While information appliances will proliferate, they will not lessen the perception of an exasperating electronic environment.
    Ex: At 11:30 I was feeling that all was well with the world, and then at 11:35 I'm all tightened to a smarting tension by having been treated like scum.

    * * *
    1 ‹situación/actitud› irritating, annoying
    2 ( Med) irritant
    irritant
    * * *

    irritante adjetivo ‹situación/actitud irritating, annoying
    ' irritante' also found in these entries:
    English:
    aggravating
    - bratty
    - constant
    - grating
    - irritating
    - irritant
    * * *
    irritating, annoying
    * * *
    adj tb MED irritating
    * * *
    : irritating
    * * *
    irritante adj irritating

    Spanish-English dictionary > irritante

  • 10 molesto

    adj.
    1 annoying, cumbersome, bothersome, embarrassing.
    2 upset, irritated, angry, annoyed.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: molestar.
    * * *
    1 annoying, troublesome
    2 (enfadado) annoyed
    3 (incómodo) uncomfortable
    4 MEDICINA sore
    los puntos ya han cicatrizado, pero todavía está molesto the stitches have healed, but he's still sore
    \
    estar molesto,-a con alguien to be upset with somebody
    ser molesto to be a nuisance
    * * *
    (f. - molesta)
    adj.
    1) annoyed, bothered
    2) annoying, bothersome
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=que causa molestia) [tos, picor, ruido, persona] irritating, annoying; [olor, síntoma] unpleasant

    es sumamente molesto que... — it's extremely irritating o annoying that...

    lo único molesto es el viaje — the only nuisance is the journey, the only annoying thing is the journey

    2) (=que incomoda) [asiento, ropa] uncomfortable; [tarea] annoying; [situación] awkward, embarrassing
    3) (=incómodo) [persona] uncomfortable

    me sentía molesto en la fiestaI felt uneasy o uncomfortable at the party

    me siento molesto cada vez que me hace un regaloI feel awkward o embarrassed whenever she gives me a present

    4) (=enfadado) [persona] annoyed

    ¿estás molesto conmigo por lo que dije? — are you annoyed at me for what I said?

    5) (=disgustado) [persona] upset

    ¿estás molesta por algo que haya pasado? — are you upset about something that's happened?

    * * *
    - ta adjetivo
    1)
    a) [SER] ( fastidioso) <ruido/tos> annoying, irritating; <sensación/síntoma> unpleasant

    resulta molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultosit's a nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage

    b) [ESTAR] (incómodo, dolorido)
    c) [SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing
    2) [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset; ( irritado) annoyed

    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste — he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    * * *
    = annoying, cumbersome, onerous, uncomfortable, uneasy, vexatious, irksome, vexing, untoward, disruptive, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], distracting, off-putting, ill-at-ease, nagging, obtrusive, importunate, bothersome, exasperated, niggling, miffed, troublesome.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.
    Ex. Sub-arrangement under an entry term can alleviate the onerous task of scanning long lists of entries under the same keyword.
    Ex. And making matters worse, this uncomfortable group sat in a suburban sitting-room flooded with afternoon sunlight like dutifully polite guests at a formal coffee party.
    Ex. Hawthorne gave an uneasy laugh, which was merely the outlet for her disappointment.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. Make sure everyone involved is aware of timetable and room changes and any other administrative abnormalities; and as far as possible prevent any untoward interruptions.
    Ex. The crisis in South African education -- particularly black education -- has resulted from the disruptive effects of apartheid.
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex. I think that Mr. Scilken's point was that there's so much material on the traditional three-by-five card that it's less useful, that it's distracting, in fact, and does a disservice to the public library.
    Ex. Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex. One quite serious barrier to improvement is the reluctance of users to tell librarians of their feelings, but perhaps it is expecting too much of them to complain that they are ill-at-ease.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. But the present revision, incorporating ISBD, will literally clutter the entries with obtrusive redundancies and esoterics that will only obscure the content of the entries and obstruct the use of the catalog.
    Ex. She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex. He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex. He was drumming on his desk with exasperated fingers, his mouth quirked at the corners, as if saying: 'Wriggle out of that!'.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex. These are just superfluous rantings of miffed children.
    Ex. Measures to prevent such incidents include fitting burglar alarms in libraries and taking quick and decisive action against troublesome users.
    ----
    * comportamiento molesto = disruptive behaviour.
    * de un modo molesto = annoyingly.
    * espíritu molesto = poltergeist.
    * estar molesto = be displeased, get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, put off.
    * lo molesto de = cumbersomeness.
    * personas molestas, las = nuisance, the.
    * sentirse molesto = stir + uneasily, look + uncomfortable, feel + wrong.
    * sentirse molesto por = be embarrassed at.
    * ser algo molesto = be a thorn in + Posesivo + side.
    * ser molesto = be disturbing.
    * verdad molesta = inconvenient truth.
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo
    1)
    a) [SER] ( fastidioso) <ruido/tos> annoying, irritating; <sensación/síntoma> unpleasant

    resulta molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultosit's a nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage

    b) [ESTAR] (incómodo, dolorido)
    c) [SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing
    2) [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset; ( irritado) annoyed

    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste — he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    * * *
    = annoying, cumbersome, onerous, uncomfortable, uneasy, vexatious, irksome, vexing, untoward, disruptive, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], distracting, off-putting, ill-at-ease, nagging, obtrusive, importunate, bothersome, exasperated, niggling, miffed, troublesome.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.
    Ex: Sub-arrangement under an entry term can alleviate the onerous task of scanning long lists of entries under the same keyword.
    Ex: And making matters worse, this uncomfortable group sat in a suburban sitting-room flooded with afternoon sunlight like dutifully polite guests at a formal coffee party.
    Ex: Hawthorne gave an uneasy laugh, which was merely the outlet for her disappointment.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: Make sure everyone involved is aware of timetable and room changes and any other administrative abnormalities; and as far as possible prevent any untoward interruptions.
    Ex: The crisis in South African education -- particularly black education -- has resulted from the disruptive effects of apartheid.
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex: I think that Mr. Scilken's point was that there's so much material on the traditional three-by-five card that it's less useful, that it's distracting, in fact, and does a disservice to the public library.
    Ex: Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex: One quite serious barrier to improvement is the reluctance of users to tell librarians of their feelings, but perhaps it is expecting too much of them to complain that they are ill-at-ease.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: But the present revision, incorporating ISBD, will literally clutter the entries with obtrusive redundancies and esoterics that will only obscure the content of the entries and obstruct the use of the catalog.
    Ex: She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex: He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex: He was drumming on his desk with exasperated fingers, his mouth quirked at the corners, as if saying: 'Wriggle out of that!'.
    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex: These are just superfluous rantings of miffed children.
    Ex: Measures to prevent such incidents include fitting burglar alarms in libraries and taking quick and decisive action against troublesome users.
    * comportamiento molesto = disruptive behaviour.
    * de un modo molesto = annoyingly.
    * espíritu molesto = poltergeist.
    * estar molesto = be displeased, get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, put off.
    * lo molesto de = cumbersomeness.
    * personas molestas, las = nuisance, the.
    * sentirse molesto = stir + uneasily, look + uncomfortable, feel + wrong.
    * sentirse molesto por = be embarrassed at.
    * ser algo molesto = be a thorn in + Posesivo + side.
    * ser molesto = be disturbing.
    * verdad molesta = inconvenient truth.

    * * *
    molesto -ta
    A
    1 [ SER]
    (fastidioso): tengo una tos sumamente molesta I have o I've got a really irritating o annoying cough
    es una sensación muy molesta it's a very uncomfortable o unpleasant feeling
    no es grave, pero los síntomas son muy molestos it's nothing serious, but the symptoms are very unpleasant
    la máquina hace un ruido de lo más molesto the machine makes a very irritating o annoying o tiresome noise
    ¡es tan molesto que te estén interrumpiendo cada cinco minutos! it's so annoying o trying o tiresome o irritating when people keep interrupting you every five minutes
    resulta muy molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultos it's a real nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage
    ¿podría abrir la ventana, si no es molesto? would you be so kind as to open the window?
    2 [ ESTAR]
    (incómodo, dolorido): está bastante molesto he's in some pain
    pasó la noche bastante molesto he had a rather uncomfortable night
    está molesto por la anestesia he's in some discomfort because of the anesthetic
    3 [ SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward
    es una situación muy molesta it's a very awkward o embarrassing situation
    me hace sentir muy molesta que esté constantemente regalándome cosas it's very embarrassing the way she's always giving me presents, she's always giving me presents, and it makes me feel very awkward o embarrassed
    me resulta muy molesto tener que trabajar con ella cuando no nos hablamos I find it awkward working with her when we're not even on speaking terms
    B [ ESTAR] (ofendido) upset
    está molesto con ellos porque no fueron a su boda he's upset o put out o peeved because they didn't go to his wedding
    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste he's very upset about what you did
    * * *

     

    Del verbo molestar: ( conjugate molestar)

    molesto es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    molestó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    molestar    
    molesto    
    molestó
    molestar ( conjugate molestar) verbo transitivo
    1

    perdone que lo moleste sorry to trouble o bother you


    2 (ofender, disgustar) to upset
    verbo intransitivo
    1 ( importunar):
    ¿le molesta si fumo? do you mind if I smoke?;

    me molesta su arrogancia her arrogance irritates o annoys me;
    no me duele, pero me molesta it doesn't hurt but it's uncomfortable
    2 ( fastidiar) to be a nuisance;
    no quiero molesto I don't want to be a nuisance o to cause any trouble

    molestarse verbo pronominal
    1 ( disgustarse) to get upset;
    molestose POR algo to get upset about sth;
    molestose CON algn to get annoyed with sb
    2 ( tomarse el trabajo) to bother, trouble oneself (frml);

    se molestó en venir hasta aquí a avisarnos she took the trouble to come all this way to tell us
    molesto
    ◊ -ta adjetivo

    1 [SER]
    a) ( fastidioso) ‹ruido/tos annoying, irritating;

    sensación/síntoma unpleasant
    b) (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing

    2 [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset;
    ( irritado) annoyed;
    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    molestar verbo transitivo
    1 (causar enojo, incomodidad) to disturb, bother: ¿le molestaría contestar a unas preguntas?, would you mind answering some questions?
    me molesta que grites, it annoys me when you shout
    2 (causar dolor, incomodidad) to hurt
    molesto,-a adjetivo
    1 (incómodo) uncomfortable: me encuentro algo molesto después de esa metedura de pata, I feel uncomfortable after that gaffe
    2 (fastidioso) annoying, pestering: es un ruido muy molesto, it's an annoying noise
    3 (enfadado, disgustado) annoyed o cross: ¿no estarás molesta por lo que he dicho?, you're not upset about what I said, are you?
    ' molesto' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acalorada
    - acalorado
    - disgustarse
    - enojosa
    - enojoso
    - fastidiada
    - fastidiado
    - molesta
    - molestarse
    - pesada
    - pesado
    - poca
    - poco
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - sacudir
    - suplicio
    - fastidioso
    - fregado
    - latoso
    - molestar
    - mosqueado
    English:
    annoying
    - bother
    - hot
    - imposition
    - irksome
    - irritating
    - miffed
    - obtrusive
    - off-putting
    - peeved
    - troublesome
    - uncomfortable
    - unwelcome
    - would
    - intrusive
    - put
    - uneasy
    * * *
    molesto, -a adj
    1.
    ser molesto [incordiante] [costumbre, tos, ruido] to be annoying;
    [moscas] to be a nuisance; [calor, humo, sensación] to be unpleasant; [ropa, zapato] to be uncomfortable;
    es muy molesto tener que mandar callar constantemente it's very annoying to have to be constantly telling you to be quiet;
    tengo un dolor molesto en la espalda I've got an ache in my back which is causing me some discomfort
    2.
    ser molesto [inoportuno] [visita, llamada] to be inconvenient;
    [pregunta] to be awkward
    3.
    ser molesto [embarazoso] to be embarrassing;
    esta situación empieza a resultarme un poco molesta this situation is beginning to make me feel a bit uncomfortable
    4.
    estar molesto [irritado] to be rather upset;
    está molesta porque no la invitamos a la fiesta she's upset because we didn't invite her to the party;
    están molestos por sus declaraciones they are upset by what he has been saying
    5.
    estar molesto [con malestar, incomodidad] [por la fiebre, el dolor] to be in some discomfort;
    no tenía que haber comido tanto, ahora estoy molesto I shouldn't have eaten so much, it's made me feel rather unwell;
    ¿no estás molesto con tanta ropa? aren't you uncomfortable in all those clothes?
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( fastidioso) annoying
    2 ( incómodo) inconvenient
    3 ( embarazoso) embarrassing
    * * *
    molesto, -ta adj
    1) enojado: bothered, annoyed
    2) fastidioso: bothersome, annoying
    * * *
    molesto adj
    1. (que fastidia) annoying
    2. (disgustado) annoyed

    Spanish-English dictionary > molesto

  • 11 odiosidad

    f.
    1 hatefulness, odiousness, odium.
    2 irksome, annoyance. (Andes & Caribbean)
    * * *
    SF
    1) [gen] odiousness, hatefulness; (=repelencia) nastiness
    2) Arg, Chile, Perú (=molestia) nuisance, annoyance
    * * *
    Ex. They torture television viewers with highly annoying advertisements that are only topped by the obnoxiousness of their actual product.
    * * *

    Ex: They torture television viewers with highly annoying advertisements that are only topped by the obnoxiousness of their actual product.

    Spanish-English dictionary > odiosidad

  • 12 organismo centralizado

    Ex. To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.
    * * *

    Ex: To a certain extent librarians have found their dependence on centralised bodies irksome.

    Spanish-English dictionary > organismo centralizado

  • 13 prevenir

    v.
    1 to prevent.
    Ricardo previno el accidente Richard prevented the accident.
    2 to warn.
    te prevengo de que la carretera es muy mala be warned that the road is very bad
    Ricardo previno a María del peligro Richard warned Mary of the danger.
    3 to foresee, to anticipate.
    4 to make it impossible to, to make it difficult to.
    Lisa previno ejecutar el programa Lisa made it impossible to execute the..
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ VENIR], like link=venir venir
    1 (evitar) to avoid, prevent
    2 (advertir) to warn
    \
    más vale prevenir que curar prevention is better than cure
    * * *
    verb
    2) warn
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=evitar) to prevent; (=prever) to foresee, anticipate
    2) (=advertir) to warn

    prevenir a algn — to warn sb, put sb on his guard (contra, de against, about)

    3) (=predisponer) to prejudice, bias ( a favor de in favour of) ( en contra de against)
    4) (=preparar) to prepare, get ready ( para for)
    5) (=proveer)
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <enfermedad/accidente> to prevent
    b) (advertir, alertar) to warn
    2.
    prevenirse v pron

    prevenirse CONTRA algoto take preventive o preventative measures against something, take precautions against something

    * * *
    = caution (against), forewarn, preclude, prevent, sound + a note of caution, sound + a word of caution, forestall, avert, sound + a wake-up call, ward off, admonish, head off, thwart.
    Ex. We may be fooling ourserlves and I would caution public libraries, school libraries and libraries in general that indeed one code might not satisfy all our needs.
    Ex. I think a person would be derelict in his or her duty not to forewarn someone about a problem.
    Ex. His obsessive concern for detail precluded the delegation of responsibility to others.
    Ex. To prevent an entry under the first name(s), these must be entered on a separate line with the subfield code 'j'.
    Ex. Ranganathan himself sounds a note of caution when he warns that, because the use of this device requires an uncommon degree of `spiritual insight', any notation suggested by it should be discussed widely before being finalized.
    Ex. A word of caution must also be sounded over the word 'Kommune' which is found in some Scandinavian countries.
    Ex. In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex. He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex. The article 'Robert Nawrocki sounds a wake-up call for records managers' reports an interview with the President of ARMA (Association of Records Managers and Administrators) International.
    Ex. The most strenuous efforts will not always ensure success, nor the boldest arm of human power ward off the stroke of misfortune.
    Ex. For nearly half a century librarians have been admonished to use history as a means to prevent mistakes and solve problems.
    Ex. And this stimulus is working in the sense that it has headed off the imminent risk of a deflationary spiral.
    Ex. A public library's design can go far in either reinforcing or thwarting the intimacy of reading and in determining its success -- functionally, aesthetically and financially.
    ----
    * más vale prevenir que curar = a stitch in time saves nine, better (to be) safe than sorry.
    * prevenir contra = ward against.
    * prevenir en contra de = ward against.
    * prevenir una infección = prevent + infection.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <enfermedad/accidente> to prevent
    b) (advertir, alertar) to warn
    2.
    prevenirse v pron

    prevenirse CONTRA algoto take preventive o preventative measures against something, take precautions against something

    * * *
    = caution (against), forewarn, preclude, prevent, sound + a note of caution, sound + a word of caution, forestall, avert, sound + a wake-up call, ward off, admonish, head off, thwart.

    Ex: We may be fooling ourserlves and I would caution public libraries, school libraries and libraries in general that indeed one code might not satisfy all our needs.

    Ex: I think a person would be derelict in his or her duty not to forewarn someone about a problem.
    Ex: His obsessive concern for detail precluded the delegation of responsibility to others.
    Ex: To prevent an entry under the first name(s), these must be entered on a separate line with the subfield code 'j'.
    Ex: Ranganathan himself sounds a note of caution when he warns that, because the use of this device requires an uncommon degree of `spiritual insight', any notation suggested by it should be discussed widely before being finalized.
    Ex: A word of caution must also be sounded over the word 'Kommune' which is found in some Scandinavian countries.
    Ex: In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex: He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex: The article 'Robert Nawrocki sounds a wake-up call for records managers' reports an interview with the President of ARMA (Association of Records Managers and Administrators) International.
    Ex: The most strenuous efforts will not always ensure success, nor the boldest arm of human power ward off the stroke of misfortune.
    Ex: For nearly half a century librarians have been admonished to use history as a means to prevent mistakes and solve problems.
    Ex: And this stimulus is working in the sense that it has headed off the imminent risk of a deflationary spiral.
    Ex: A public library's design can go far in either reinforcing or thwarting the intimacy of reading and in determining its success -- functionally, aesthetically and financially.
    * más vale prevenir que curar = a stitch in time saves nine, better (to be) safe than sorry.
    * prevenir contra = ward against.
    * prevenir en contra de = ward against.
    * prevenir una infección = prevent + infection.

    * * *
    vt
    1 ‹enfermedad/accidente/desgracia› to prevent
    ayuda a prevenir la caries it helps prevent tooth decay
    más vale prevenir que curar prevention is better than cure
    más vale prevenir que lamentar better safe than sorry
    2 (advertir, alertar) to warn
    previnieron a los conductores del mal estado de las carreteras drivers were warned of the bad state of the roads
    prevenirse CONTRA algo to take preventive o preventative measures AGAINST sth, take precautions AGAINST sth
    * * *

     

    prevenir ( conjugate prevenir) verbo transitivo
    a)enfermedad/accidente to prevent

    b) (advertir, alertar) to warn

    prevenirse verbo pronominal prevenirse CONTRA algo to take preventive o preventative measures against sth, take precautions against sth
    prevenir verbo transitivo
    1 (enfermedades, etc) to prevent: más vale prevenir que curar, prevention is better than cure
    2 (advertir, alertar) to warn: me previno contra él, she warned me about him
    te prevengo de que no estoy muy dispuesta a ir, I want you to know that I'm not very inclined to go
    ' prevenir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    advertir
    - avisar
    - salud
    - ir
    English:
    avert
    - forestall
    - forewarn
    - precaution
    - prevent
    - ward off
    - warn
    - head
    - safe
    * * *
    vt
    1. [evitar] to prevent;
    para prevenir la gripe to prevent flu;
    un medicamento que previene contra la malaria a medicine that protects against malaria;
    más vale prevenir que curar prevention is better than cure
    2. [avisar] to warn;
    te prevengo de que la carretera es muy mala be warned that the road is very bad
    3. [prever] to foresee, to anticipate
    4. [predisponer]
    prevenir a alguien contra algo/alguien to prejudice sb against sth/sb
    * * *
    v/t
    1 ( evitar) prevent;
    más vale prevenir que curar prevention is better than cure
    2 ( avisar) warn ( contra against)
    * * *
    prevenir {87} vt
    1) : to prevent
    2) : to warn
    * * *
    prevenir vb (evitar) to prevent

    Spanish-English dictionary > prevenir

  • 14 sin darse cuenta

    = inadvertently, unwittingly, unknowingly, without realising, without noticing, unconsciously
    Ex. Use this operator carefully -- you may inadvertently eliminate relevant records.
    Ex. Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.
    Ex. The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.
    Ex. Similarly, an English woman visiting Italy who touches her earlobes a lot, without realising the cultural significance of this action, would be behaving flirtatiously in that context.
    Ex. They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex. He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    * * *
    = inadvertently, unwittingly, unknowingly, without realising, without noticing, unconsciously

    Ex: Use this operator carefully -- you may inadvertently eliminate relevant records.

    Ex: Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.
    Ex: The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.
    Ex: Similarly, an English woman visiting Italy who touches her earlobes a lot, without realising the cultural significance of this action, would be behaving flirtatiously in that context.
    Ex: They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex: He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.

    Spanish-English dictionary > sin darse cuenta

  • 15 sin percatarse

    = without realising, without noticing, unconsciously, unknowingly, unwittingly
    Ex. Similarly, an English woman visiting Italy who touches her earlobes a lot, without realising the cultural significance of this action, would be behaving flirtatiously in that context.
    Ex. They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex. He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex. The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.
    Ex. Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.
    * * *
    = without realising, without noticing, unconsciously, unknowingly, unwittingly

    Ex: Similarly, an English woman visiting Italy who touches her earlobes a lot, without realising the cultural significance of this action, would be behaving flirtatiously in that context.

    Ex: They gradually soak up language, discovering the rules by which it works almost without noticing it.
    Ex: He often did this, almost unconsciously, to avert an immediate sign of reaction to an irksome confrontation.
    Ex: The ways in which library professionals -- knowingly and unknowingly -- undermine intellectual freedom are discussed = Se analizan las formas en las que los profesionales de las bibliotecas, consciente o inconscientemente, socavan la libertad intelectual.
    Ex: Wittingly or unwittingly, they mask other questions that users do not know how to ask or are uncertain that they want to divulge to someone else.

    Spanish-English dictionary > sin percatarse

  • 16 tedioso

    adj.
    tedious, uninteresting, annoying, dull.
    * * *
    1 tedious, boring
    * * *
    (f. - tediosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo tedious, boring
    * * *
    = tedious, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], wearying, irritable.
    Ex. In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.
    Ex. The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex. Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex. A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex. Many librarians worry that the public, collective image of librarians is associated with the crone -- an older, single woman who is irritable and protective of her domain.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo tedious, boring
    * * *
    = tedious, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], wearying, irritable.

    Ex: In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.

    Ex: The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex: Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex: A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex: Many librarians worry that the public, collective image of librarians is associated with the crone -- an older, single woman who is irritable and protective of her domain.

    * * *
    tedioso -sa
    tedious, boring
    * * *

    tedioso,-a adjetivo boring, tedious
    ' tedioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aburrida
    - aburrido
    - tediosa
    English:
    irksome
    - tedious
    - tiresome
    * * *
    tedioso, -a adj
    tedious
    * * *
    adj tedious
    * * *
    tedioso, -sa adj
    : tedious, boring
    tediosamente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > tedioso

  • 17 jodón

    adj.
    1 annoying, irksome, irritating, troublesome.
    2 proficient, skilled, skillful, skilful.
    * * *
    - dona adjetivo (AmL arg) (fastidioso, pesado)
    * * *
    - dona adjetivo (AmL arg) (fastidioso, pesado)
    * * *
    A
    ( AmL arg) (fastidioso, pesado): ¡no seas jodona! don't be a pain! ( colloq), don't be a pain in the ass ( AmE) o ( BrE) arse! (sl)
    B
    ( Méx fam) (listo, hábil): parece jodona con la guitarra she seems to be pretty good on the guitar ( colloq)
    * * *
    jodón, -ona nm,f
    1. Am muy Fam [persona fastidiosa] pain in the Br arse o US ass
    2. Méx Vulg [mala persona] bastard
    3. RP muy Fam [bromista] joker, live wire

    Spanish-English dictionary > jodón

  • 18 sangrón

    adj.
    annoying, bothersome, irritating, irksome.
    m.
    pain in the neck, annoying individual, drag, pest.
    * * *
    I
    - grona adjetivo (Méx fam) annoying
    II
    - grona masculino, femenino (Méx fam) nuisance
    * * *
    I
    - grona adjetivo (Méx fam) annoying
    II
    - grona masculino, femenino (Méx fam) nuisance
    * * *
    ( Méx fam) annoying
    masculine, feminine
    nuisance, pain in the neck ( colloq)
    * * *

    sangrón
    ◊ - grona adjetivo (Méx fam) annoying

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino (Méx fam) nuisance

    * * *
    sangrón, -ona adj
    CAm, Col, Méx Fam [persona] nasty

    Spanish-English dictionary > sangrón

  • 19 cargante *

    ADJ [discurso, personaje] annoying; [tarea] irksome; [persona] trying

    ¡qué tío más cargante! — what a pain that bloke is! *

    Spanish-English dictionary > cargante *

  • 20 empreñador *

    ADJ irksome, vexatious

    Spanish-English dictionary > empreñador *

См. также в других словарях:

  • Irksome — Irk some, a. 1. Wearisome; tedious; disagreeable or troublesome by reason of long continuance or repetition; as, irksome hours; irksome tasks. [1913 Webster] For not to irksome toil, but to delight, He made us. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Weary;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • irksome — irksome, tiresome, wearisome, tedious, boring mean burdensome because tiring or boring or both. A person or thing is irksome that inspires distaste, reluctance, or impatience because of its demand for effort not made easy by interest {the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • irksome — I adjective annoying, boresome, boring, bothersome, distressing, gravis, irritating, jejune, molestus, odiosus, tiresome, tiring, troublesome, weariful, wearing, wearisome, wearying II index i …   Law dictionary

  • irksome — bothersome, burdensome, early 15c., from IRK (Cf. irk) + SOME (Cf. some). Related: Irksomely; irksomeness …   Etymology dictionary

  • irksome — [adj] annoying aggravating, boring, bothersome, burdensome, irritating, tedious, tiresome, troublesome, troubling, vexing; concept 529 …   New thesaurus

  • irksome — [ʉrk′səm] adj. [ME irksum: see IRK & SOME1] that tends to irk; tiresome or annoying irksomely adv. irksomeness n …   English World dictionary

  • irksome — adj. (formal) irksome to + inf. (it is irksome to listen to his constant complaints) * * * [ ɜːks(ə)m] (formal) irksome to + inf. (it is irksome to listen to his constant complaints) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • irksome — [[t]ɜ͟ː(r)ksəm[/t]] ADJ GRADED If something is irksome, it irritates or annoys you. [FORMAL] ...the irksome regulations. Syn: infuriating …   English dictionary

  • irksome — adjective Date: 15th century tending to irk ; tedious < an irksome task > • irksomely adverb • irksomeness noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • irksome — irksomely, adv. irksomeness, n. /errk seuhm/, adj. 1. annoying; irritating; exasperating; tiresome: irksome restrictions. 2. Obs. causing weariness or disgust. [1400 50; late ME; see IRK, SOME1] * * * …   Universalium

  • irksome — adjective /ˈɚksəm/ Disagreeable or troublesome by reason of long continuance or repetition; bothersome; annoying; irritating; wearisome; tedious. He has this irksome habit of racing up to red lights, so he has to brake heavily. See …   Wiktionary

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