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inflated

  • 1 abultado

    adj.
    1 bulky, bulging, bossy, bulgy.
    2 bosselated.
    m.
    textured rendering.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: abultar.
    * * *
    1→ link=abultar abultar
    1 bulky, big
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=voluminoso) bulky, unwieldy; [labios, libro] thick; (Med) swollen
    2) (=exagerado) exaggerated
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) <ojos/vientre> bulging; < labios> thick; < cartera> bulging
    b) ( abundante) <deuda/suma> enormous, huge; < porción> generous

    una derrota abultada — (period) a crushing defeat

    c) ( exagerado) <cifra/cantidad> inflated
    * * *
    = unwieldy, lumpy [lumpier -comp., lumpiest -sup.], swollen, bulging, turgid.
    Ex. It is well-established practice to ignore initial articles when they occur as the initial word of a title or subject heading, so that unwieldy sequences do not evolve under such words.
    Ex. Between 9 and 12 months, lumpy or chopped foods, such as vegetables, meats, or cottage cheese, may be introduced.
    Ex. As Feng swept by with an almost inaudible 'Good morning, Jeanne' escaping from her lips, Leforte thought she detected the tell-tale indications of crying on her face -- the red, swollen eyes, the puffiness.
    Ex. Ladies bemoan their fat tummies, wobbly thighs, bulging hips and flabby thighs.
    Ex. I recently found out that ' turgid,' which actually means 'swollen' and that I was confusing it with 'turbid,' a word I've never heard.
    ----
    * cada vez más abultado = swelling.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) <ojos/vientre> bulging; < labios> thick; < cartera> bulging
    b) ( abundante) <deuda/suma> enormous, huge; < porción> generous

    una derrota abultada — (period) a crushing defeat

    c) ( exagerado) <cifra/cantidad> inflated
    * * *
    = unwieldy, lumpy [lumpier -comp., lumpiest -sup.], swollen, bulging, turgid.

    Ex: It is well-established practice to ignore initial articles when they occur as the initial word of a title or subject heading, so that unwieldy sequences do not evolve under such words.

    Ex: Between 9 and 12 months, lumpy or chopped foods, such as vegetables, meats, or cottage cheese, may be introduced.
    Ex: As Feng swept by with an almost inaudible 'Good morning, Jeanne' escaping from her lips, Leforte thought she detected the tell-tale indications of crying on her face -- the red, swollen eyes, the puffiness.
    Ex: Ladies bemoan their fat tummies, wobbly thighs, bulging hips and flabby thighs.
    Ex: I recently found out that ' turgid,' which actually means 'swollen' and that I was confusing it with 'turbid,' a word I've never heard.
    * cada vez más abultado = swelling.

    * * *
    1 ‹ojos/vientre› bulging; ‹labios› thick; ‹cartera› bulging; ‹libro› thick
    2 (abundante) ‹deuda/suma› enormous, huge
    su abultada ficha personal his extensive record
    una derrota abultada ( period); a crushing defeat
    3 (exagerado) ‹cifra/cantidad› inflated
    * * *

    Del verbo abultar: ( conjugate abultar)

    abultado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    abultado    
    abultar
    abultado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    a)ojos/vientre bulging;

    labios thick;
    cartera bulging
    b) ( abundante) ‹deuda/suma enormous, huge

    c) ( exagerado) ‹cifra/cantidad inflated

    abultar ( conjugate abultar) verbo intransitivo


    verbo transitivo ‹cifras/resultados to inflate
    abultado,-a adjetivo bulky, big
    abultar
    I verbo intransitivo to be bulky: este sillón abulta mucho, this armchair takes up a lot of room
    II vtr (una cifra, una noticia) to exaggerate
    ' abultado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abultada
    * * *
    abultado, -a adj
    1. [paquete] bulky;
    [labios] thick; [frente] prominent;
    2. [beneficios, factura] sizeable;
    ganaron por una abultada mayoría they won by a large majority;
    sufrieron una abultada derrota they suffered a heavy defeat
    * * *
    adj
    1 bulging
    2 derrota heavy
    * * *
    abultado, -da adj
    : bulging, bulky

    Spanish-English dictionary > abultado

  • 2 activar

    v.
    1 to activate (alarma, mecanismo).
    María activa la alarma Mary activates the alarm.
    La ambición activa a María Ambition activates Mary=moves Mary to action.
    El desempleo activa el crímen Unemployment activates=triggers crime.
    2 to arouse.
    Lo prohibido activa la pasión Those things forbidden arouse passion.
    * * *
    1 TÉCNICA to activate (acelerar) to expedite
    2 INFORMÁTICA to enable
    3 figurado (avivar) to liven up, quicken
    1 to become activated
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT (=poner en marcha) to activate; [+ trabajo] to expedite, speed up, hurry along; [+ fuego] to brighten up, poke; [+ mercado] to stimulate
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( agilizar) <proceso/crecimiento> to speed up; <economía/producción> to stimulate; < circulación> to stimulate
    b) ( avivar)
    c) ( poner en funcionamiento) < alarma> to activate, trigger; < dispositivo> to activate; < máquina> to set... in motion
    2.
    activarse v pron
    a) alarma to go off; dispositivo to start working
    b) (Méx) obreros/disidentes to take active steps
    * * *
    = activate, initialize, trip, set on, actuate, set in + motion, energise [energize, -USA], drive.
    Nota: Verbo irregular: pasado drove, participio driven.
    Ex. Deferred orders are activated when the 'claim overdue order' function is run.
    Ex. These fields do not need to be initialized.
    Ex. The cord which trips its shutter may reach down a man's sleeve within easy reach of his fingers.
    Ex. You can also select this option on the Setup Options screen to set postings on permanently.
    Ex. CRG has always remained an amateur organization in the sense that it does not dispose of large funds, and its members are actuated by enthusiasm for the subject rather than by the hope of wealth.
    Ex. If someone reports that a member of the staff is drunk while on the job, the supervisor must immediately set in motion the prescribed personnel procedures for verifying the charge, issuing a warning, observing and documenting future performance, and, if necessary, initiating a dismissal action.
    Ex. This will enhance the utility of the public libraries and energise the public librarian as a change agent.
    Ex. The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled ( driven) by foot.
    ----
    * activar una señal = activate + signal.
    * activar un dispositivo de control = set + control.
    * activar un proceso = activate + process.
    * activar un sistema = activate + system.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( agilizar) <proceso/crecimiento> to speed up; <economía/producción> to stimulate; < circulación> to stimulate
    b) ( avivar)
    c) ( poner en funcionamiento) < alarma> to activate, trigger; < dispositivo> to activate; < máquina> to set... in motion
    2.
    activarse v pron
    a) alarma to go off; dispositivo to start working
    b) (Méx) obreros/disidentes to take active steps
    * * *
    = activate, initialize, trip, set on, actuate, set in + motion, energise [energize, -USA], drive.
    Nota: Verbo irregular: pasado drove, participio driven.

    Ex: Deferred orders are activated when the 'claim overdue order' function is run.

    Ex: These fields do not need to be initialized.
    Ex: The cord which trips its shutter may reach down a man's sleeve within easy reach of his fingers.
    Ex: You can also select this option on the Setup Options screen to set postings on permanently.
    Ex: CRG has always remained an amateur organization in the sense that it does not dispose of large funds, and its members are actuated by enthusiasm for the subject rather than by the hope of wealth.
    Ex: If someone reports that a member of the staff is drunk while on the job, the supervisor must immediately set in motion the prescribed personnel procedures for verifying the charge, issuing a warning, observing and documenting future performance, and, if necessary, initiating a dismissal action.
    Ex: This will enhance the utility of the public libraries and energise the public librarian as a change agent.
    Ex: The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled ( driven) by foot.
    * activar una señal = activate + signal.
    * activar un dispositivo de control = set + control.
    * activar un proceso = activate + process.
    * activar un sistema = activate + system.

    * * *
    activar [A1 ]
    vt
    1
    (estimular): medidas que activarán la economía measures to stimulate o revitalize the economy
    para activar la circulación to stimulate the circulation
    esto ayudará a activar las negociaciones this will help to give fresh impetus to the negotiations
    una ráfaga activó las llamas a gust of wind fanned the flames
    2 (poner en funcionamiento) ‹alarma› to activate, trigger, set off; ‹dispositivo› to activate; ‹máquina› to set … in motion
    3 ( Quím) to activate
    1 «alarma» to go off; «dispositivo» to start working
    2 ( Méx) «obreros/disidentes» to take active steps
    * * *

     

    activar ( conjugate activar) verbo transitivo
    a) ( agilizar) ‹proceso/crecimiento to speed up;

    economía/producción to stimulate;
    circulación to stimulate;
    negociaciones to give fresh impetus to

    dispositivo to activate;
    máquinato set … in motion
    activarse verbo pronominal [ alarma] to go off;
    [ dispositivo] to start working
    activar verbo transitivo
    1 (poner en marcha) to activate
    2 (acelerar, animar) to liven up: la publicidad les ayudó a activar el negocio, the publicity campaign helped them to bolster up business
    ' activar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    estimular
    - mover
    English:
    activate
    - trip
    * * *
    vt
    1. [alarma, mecanismo] to activate
    2. [explosivo] to detonate
    3. [estimular] to stimulate;
    activar los intercambios comerciales to boost o stimulate trade;
    el ejercicio activa la circulación de la sangre exercise stimulates your circulation
    * * *
    v/t
    1 ( estimular) stimulate
    2 bomba activate, set off; sistema de seguridad tb
    trigger
    * * *
    1) : to activate
    2) : to stimulate, to energize
    3) : to speed up

    Spanish-English dictionary > activar

  • 3 ampuloso

    adj.
    bombastic, high-flying, pompous, euphuistic.
    * * *
    1 inflated, pompous, bombastic
    * * *
    ADJ bombastic, pompous
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo pompous, bombastic
    * * *
    = pompous, hyfoluted, flamboyant, ornate, bombastic, portentous.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex. Nathan was known for being the most flamboyant DJ in the area.
    Ex. Some homes are grand, with stately brick, spiraling staircases, ornate fences and multiple entrances.
    Ex. You don't have to be bombastic to be powerful [he says in a loud voice], you can be more intimate [he says in a quieter voice].
    Ex. He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.
    ----
    * estilo ampuloso = turgid style, plethoric style.
    * prosa ampulosa = plethoric prose, turgid prose.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo pompous, bombastic
    * * *
    = pompous, hyfoluted, flamboyant, ornate, bombastic, portentous.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: I can believe that changing the logo broke some hyfoluted view ofthe library.
    Ex: Nathan was known for being the most flamboyant DJ in the area.
    Ex: Some homes are grand, with stately brick, spiraling staircases, ornate fences and multiple entrances.
    Ex: You don't have to be bombastic to be powerful [he says in a loud voice], you can be more intimate [he says in a quieter voice].
    Ex: He is described in the play as a "rather portentous man in his middle fifties but rather provincial in his speech'.
    * estilo ampuloso = turgid style, plethoric style.
    * prosa ampulosa = plethoric prose, turgid prose.

    * * *
    pompous, bombastic
    * * *

    ampuloso,-a adjetivo pompous, bombastic
    ' ampuloso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ampulosa
    English:
    flamboyant
    - turgid
    - verbose
    * * *
    ampuloso, -a adj
    pompous
    * * *
    adj pompous
    * * *
    ampuloso, -sa adj
    grandilocuente: pompous, bombastic

    Spanish-English dictionary > ampuloso

  • 4 blanqueo de dinero

    Ex. There is some potential that money laundering through real estate can distort fair market values by contributing to inflated real estate prices.
    * * *

    Ex: There is some potential that money laundering through real estate can distort fair market values by contributing to inflated real estate prices.

    * * *
    money laundering

    Spanish-English dictionary > blanqueo de dinero

  • 5 burlar

    v.
    1 to evade.
    consiguió burlar a sus perseguidores she managed to outwit her pursuers
    El ladrón burló la seguridad The thief evaded the security measures.
    2 to trick, to put on.
    Silvia burló a Ricardo Silvia tricked Richard.
    3 to get by.
    El auto burló a la policía The car got by the police.
    * * *
    1 to deceive, trick
    2 (eludir) to dodge, evade
    1 to mock (de, -), make fun (de, of), laugh (de, at)
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=engañar) [+ persona] to deceive, trick; [+ enemigo] to outwit; [+ vigilancia] to defeat; [+ bloqueo] to run
    2) (=frustrar) [+ ambición, plan] to thwart, frustrate; [+ esperanzas] to ruin, frustrate
    3) (=seducir) to seduce
    4) * (=saber usar) to know how to use, be able to handle
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < medidas de seguridad> to evade, get around
    b) < enemigo> to outwit
    2.
    burlarse v pron

    burlarse de algo/alguien — to make fun of something/somebody

    * * *
    = mock, hoodwink, outwit, bilk, outfox, outsmart.
    Nota: Literalmente significa "ser más listo que".
    Ex. They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.
    Ex. In turn, a consequential effect is that reference librarians and scholars might end up getting hoodkwinked.
    Ex. Two dangerous trysts are spied upon by a third and hostile party, whose presence is detected by the lovers who act in consort to outwit him.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. It also led to a continuing guerilla war between the authorities and caricaturists who sought to evade, outfox, or entirely defy them.
    Ex. Smart and speedy start-ups blindside mature companies with their inventiveness then grow up into mature companies and are outsmarted in their turn.
    ----
    * burlar el sistema = beat + the system, game + the system.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < medidas de seguridad> to evade, get around
    b) < enemigo> to outwit
    2.
    burlarse v pron

    burlarse de algo/alguien — to make fun of something/somebody

    * * *
    = mock, hoodwink, outwit, bilk, outfox, outsmart.
    Nota: Literalmente significa "ser más listo que".

    Ex: They laughed and screeched and mocked as long as I went on swearing.

    Ex: In turn, a consequential effect is that reference librarians and scholars might end up getting hoodkwinked.
    Ex: Two dangerous trysts are spied upon by a third and hostile party, whose presence is detected by the lovers who act in consort to outwit him.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: It also led to a continuing guerilla war between the authorities and caricaturists who sought to evade, outfox, or entirely defy them.
    Ex: Smart and speedy start-ups blindside mature companies with their inventiveness then grow up into mature companies and are outsmarted in their turn.
    * burlar el sistema = beat + the system, game + the system.

    * * *
    burlar [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹medidas de seguridad/control› to evade, get around
    el barco se fugó burlando la vigilancia de la marina the boat escaped despite being under navy surveillance
    burlarse DE algo/algn to make fun OF sth/sb
    ¡de mí no se burla nadie! no-one makes fun of me!
    * * *

     

    burlar ( conjugate burlar) verbo transitivo


    b) enemigo to outwit

    burlarse verbo pronominal burlarse de algo/algn to make fun of sth/sb
    burlar verbo transitivo
    1 (engañar) to outwit
    2 (esquivar) to evade
    ' burlar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    cheat
    - outwit
    - run
    - out
    * * *
    vt
    [esquivar] to evade; [ley] to flout;
    consiguió burlar a sus perseguidores she managed to outwit her pursuers;
    el ladrón burló los sistemas de seguridad the thief found a way round the security systems;
    burla burlando without anyone noticing
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 riesgo, dificultad get round
    2 ( engañar) trick, take in
    II v/i mock
    * * *
    burlar vt
    engañar: to trick, to deceive
    * * *
    burlar vb
    1. (esquivar) to give the slip [pt. gave; pp. given]
    2. (engañar) to trick

    Spanish-English dictionary > burlar

  • 6 cerrado2

    2 = cliquish, insular, cliquey [cliquy].
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. Within that chummy, insular world of imperial elites, Senator Jaguaribe recoiled in horror at the prospect of a permanent pauper class supported by public funds.
    Ex. She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    ----
    * círculo cerrado de gente = clique.
    * coto cerrado = closed shop.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cerrado2

  • 7 chocar con

    v.
    to collide with, to come into collision with, to bang into, to bash into.
    El auto colisionó con el árbol The car collided with the tree.
    * * *
    (v.) = conflict with, run into, lock + horns (with), grate against, grate on, collide (with)
    Ex. These more detailed sets do not conflict with the more general sets of categories.
    Ex. If they were watching the nimble movements of a compositor as he gathered the types from the hundred and fifty-two boxes of his case, they would run into a ream of wetted paper weighted down with paving stones.
    Ex. Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.
    Ex. The new feminist philosophies of the body tend sometimes to grate against this project by valorizing the body but devalorizing gender.
    Ex. His personality, furthermore, appeared to grate on the average television viewer.
    Ex. The public library is a complex institution, evolving through many decades of human history and colliding today with the perplexing realities of change, declining funding, and shifting purpose.
    * * *
    (v.) = conflict with, run into, lock + horns (with), grate against, grate on, collide (with)

    Ex: These more detailed sets do not conflict with the more general sets of categories.

    Ex: If they were watching the nimble movements of a compositor as he gathered the types from the hundred and fifty-two boxes of his case, they would run into a ream of wetted paper weighted down with paving stones.
    Ex: Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.
    Ex: The new feminist philosophies of the body tend sometimes to grate against this project by valorizing the body but devalorizing gender.
    Ex: His personality, furthermore, appeared to grate on the average television viewer.
    Ex: The public library is a complex institution, evolving through many decades of human history and colliding today with the perplexing realities of change, declining funding, and shifting purpose.

    Spanish-English dictionary > chocar con

  • 8 engreído

    adj.
    vain, cocky, proud, bigheaded.
    f. & m.
    swell-headed person, conceited person, swellhead.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: engreír.
    * * *
    1 vain, conceited, stuck-up
    * * *
    engreído, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (=vanidoso) vain, stuck-up *
    2) LAm (=afectuoso) affectionate; (=mimado) spoiled, spoilt
    2.
    SM / F bighead *, spoiled brat
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( vanidoso) conceited, bigheaded (colloq)
    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled*
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( vanidoso) bighead (colloq)
    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled* brat
    * * *
    = conceited, self-inflated, stuck-up, self-important, cocky [cockier -comp., cockiest -sup.], high-blown, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, haughty [haughtier -comp., haughtiest -sup.], hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], cocksure, supercilious, big-headed.
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. library users were stereotyped as old people, intellectuals, uninteresting people, shy or stuck-up people and people afraid of life.
    Ex. He was described as 'a self-important, self-righteous blowhard, puffing his filthy pipe, patches on the elbows of his well-worn tweed jacket, decked out in the cliche costume of the shabby liberal icon'.
    Ex. Bold, ambitious and in-your-face I've always considered them to be just too cocky by half.
    Ex. In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex. It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex. Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex. The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex. The only blot on his escutcheon is, that after his great success he grew to be haughty and insolent in his demands.
    Ex. Wine lovers get the urge to splurge and celebrate, often in hoity-toity restaurants.
    Ex. The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex. The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.
    Ex. A commenter took me to task for being supercilious and said it was inconsistent with my religion.
    Ex. I alwasy knew she was a pain in the arse, without knowing her you can just tell, by the way she behaves, that she is big-headed and thinks she's god's gift to the human race.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( vanidoso) conceited, bigheaded (colloq)
    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled*
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( vanidoso) bighead (colloq)
    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled* brat
    * * *
    = conceited, self-inflated, stuck-up, self-important, cocky [cockier -comp., cockiest -sup.], high-blown, snobbish, snobby [snobbier -comp., snobbiest -sup.], snob, haughty [haughtier -comp., haughtiest -sup.], hoity-toity, vain [vainer -comp., vainest -sup.], cocksure, supercilious, big-headed.

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex: library users were stereotyped as old people, intellectuals, uninteresting people, shy or stuck-up people and people afraid of life.
    Ex: He was described as 'a self-important, self-righteous blowhard, puffing his filthy pipe, patches on the elbows of his well-worn tweed jacket, decked out in the cliche costume of the shabby liberal icon'.
    Ex: Bold, ambitious and in-your-face I've always considered them to be just too cocky by half.
    Ex: In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex: It was possible to identify 3 main groups who display 3 different types of attitude -- participative, delegative and ' snobbish'.
    Ex: Every one looked like death warmed up, including the snobby staff who I found far from welcoming.
    Ex: The biggest faux pas according to snobs who take such things seriously is calling a sofa a couch or a setee.
    Ex: The only blot on his escutcheon is, that after his great success he grew to be haughty and insolent in his demands.
    Ex: Wine lovers get the urge to splurge and celebrate, often in hoity-toity restaurants.
    Ex: The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex: The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.
    Ex: A commenter took me to task for being supercilious and said it was inconsistent with my religion.
    Ex: I alwasy knew she was a pain in the arse, without knowing her you can just tell, by the way she behaves, that she is big-headed and thinks she's god's gift to the human race.

    * * *
    engreído1 -da
    1 (vanidoso, presumido) conceited, bigheaded ( colloq)
    2 ( Per) (mimado) spoiled*
    engreído2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    1 (vanidoso) bighead ( colloq)
    2 ( Per) (mimado) spoiled* brat
    * * *

    Del verbo engreír: ( conjugate engreír)

    engreído es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    engreído    
    engreír
    engreído
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    a) ( vanidoso) conceited, bigheaded (colloq)

    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled( conjugate spoiled)

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    a) ( vanidoso) bighead (colloq)

    b) (Per) ( mimado) spoiled brat

    engreído,-a adjetivo conceited
    ' engreído' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    además
    - cambio
    - corte
    - engreída
    - estiramiento
    - fatua
    - fatuo
    - parecer
    - ufana
    - ufano
    - creído
    - pituco
    - presumido
    - sobrado
    English:
    bighead
    - bigheaded
    - cocksure
    - fatuous
    - self-important
    - smug
    - toffee-nosed
    - conceited
    - puffed
    - self
    * * *
    engreído, -a
    adj
    1. [creído] conceited, full of one's own importance
    2. Perú [mimado] spoiled
    nm,f
    1. [creído] conceited person;
    ser un engreído to be very conceited
    2. Perú [mimado]
    ser un engreído to be spoiled
    * * *
    adj conceited
    * * *
    engreído, -da adj
    presumido, vanidoso: vain, conceited, stuck-up

    Spanish-English dictionary > engreído

  • 9 estafar

    v.
    to swindle.
    estafó cien millones a la empresa he defrauded the company of a hundred million
    El pillo defraudó a la tienda The thief defrauded the store.
    * * *
    1 to swindle, trick, cheat, defraud
    \
    me han estafado familiar I've been done, I've been had
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT to swindle, defraud, twist *

    estafar algo a algn — to swindle sb out of sth, defraud sb of sth

    ¡me han estafado! — I've been done! *

    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) (Der) to swindle, defraud

    estafarle algo a alguien — to defraud somebody of something, swindle somebody out of something

    b) (fam) ( timar) to rip... off (colloq), to con (colloq)
    * * *
    = cheat (on), defraud, rip off, swindle, shortchange, bilk, humbug, con, hoax.
    Ex. Students who cheat on literature searching, for instance, will not get the full benefit of the course.
    Ex. The librarian wishes to maximise access to information while not defrauding authors and publishers.
    Ex. Thee reader is being ripped off by bookselling chains demanding so-called 'bungs' for prime space.
    Ex. It is evident that the candidates for everlasting youth will be eternally swindled.
    Ex. Banning's decision to hold up Madison and Jefferson as models without discussing in some depth the practical ways in which they politicked shortchanges the reader.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. More persons, on the whole, are humbugged by believing in nothing than by believing in too much.
    Ex. A number of victims have contacted police after seeing Masterson's mug shot and recognizing him as the man who conned them.
    Ex. He hoaxed the popular media into thinking that he had burnt a million quid for the publicity it would, and has continued to, generate.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) (Der) to swindle, defraud

    estafarle algo a alguien — to defraud somebody of something, swindle somebody out of something

    b) (fam) ( timar) to rip... off (colloq), to con (colloq)
    * * *
    = cheat (on), defraud, rip off, swindle, shortchange, bilk, humbug, con, hoax.

    Ex: Students who cheat on literature searching, for instance, will not get the full benefit of the course.

    Ex: The librarian wishes to maximise access to information while not defrauding authors and publishers.
    Ex: Thee reader is being ripped off by bookselling chains demanding so-called 'bungs' for prime space.
    Ex: It is evident that the candidates for everlasting youth will be eternally swindled.
    Ex: Banning's decision to hold up Madison and Jefferson as models without discussing in some depth the practical ways in which they politicked shortchanges the reader.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: More persons, on the whole, are humbugged by believing in nothing than by believing in too much.
    Ex: A number of victims have contacted police after seeing Masterson's mug shot and recognizing him as the man who conned them.
    Ex: He hoaxed the popular media into thinking that he had burnt a million quid for the publicity it would, and has continued to, generate.

    * * *
    estafar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ( Der) to swindle, defraud estafarle algo A algn to defraud sb OF sth, swindle sb OUT OF sth
    le estafó a la empresa varios millones de pesos he defrauded the company of several million pesos, he swindled the company out of several million pesos
    2 ( fam) (timar) to rip … off ( colloq), to con ( colloq)
    ¡qué manera de estafar a la gente! what a con o rip-off! ( colloq)
    * * *

    estafar ( conjugate estafar) verbo transitivo
    a) (Der) to swindle, defraud;

    estafarle algo a algn to defraud sb of sth, swindle sb out of sth
    b) (fam) ( timar) to rip … off (colloq), to con (colloq)

    estafar verbo transitivo to swindle, cheat, trick: estafaron a un pensionista y le dejaron sin sus ahorros, they swindled the pensioner out of his entire savings
    ' estafar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    defraudar
    - timar
    - engañar
    - robar
    English:
    chisel
    - con
    - defraud
    - diddle
    - fiddle
    - rook
    - swindle
    - trick
    - cheat
    - rip
    * * *
    1. [timar, robar] to swindle;
    [a empresa, organización] to defraud;
    estafó millones a la empresa he defrauded the company of millions
    2. Fam [cobrar abusivamente] to rip off;
    ¿10.000 por esta camisa? a ti te han estafado 10,000 for that shirt? you've been ripped off o had
    * * *
    v/t swindle, cheat;
    estafar algo a alguien cheat s.o. out of sth, defraud s.o. of sth
    * * *
    defraudar: to swindle, to defraud
    * * *
    estafar vb to swindle

    Spanish-English dictionary > estafar

  • 10 etéreo

    adj.
    ethereal, intangible, immaterial, impalpable.
    * * *
    1 ethereal
    * * *
    * * *
    - rea adjetivo ethereal
    * * *
    = ethereal, lissom(e).
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. She is not just lissome and beautiful, but also cultured, artful, expressive, and energetic.
    ----
    * volverse etéreo = etherealise [etherealize, -USA].
    * * *
    - rea adjetivo ethereal
    * * *
    = ethereal, lissom(e).

    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.

    Ex: She is not just lissome and beautiful, but also cultured, artful, expressive, and energetic.
    * volverse etéreo = etherealise [etherealize, -USA].

    * * *
    1 ( liter) (vaporoso) ethereal ( liter)
    2 ( Fís, Quím) ethereal
    * * *

    etéreo
    ◊ - rea adjetivo

    ethereal
    etéreo,-a adjetivo ethereal

    ' etéreo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    etérea
    English:
    ethereal
    - intangible
    - dreamy
    * * *
    etéreo, -a adj
    ethereal
    * * *
    adj ethereal
    * * *
    etéreo, - rea adj
    : ethereal, heavenly

    Spanish-English dictionary > etéreo

  • 11 exactitud

    f.
    1 accuracy, precision.
    no lo sé con exactitud I don't know exactly
    2 exactness, correctness, accuracy, good timing.
    * * *
    1 (fidelidad) exactness; (precisión) accuracy
    \
    con exactitud accurately
    * * *
    noun f.
    accuracy, exactitude
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=precisión) accuracy

    con exactitud[saber, calcular, precisar] exactly

    2) (=veracidad) accuracy
    3) (=fidelidad) accuracy
    * * *
    a) ( precisión) accuracy, precision
    b) (veracidad, rigor) accuracy
    * * *
    = accuracy, correctness, exactness, unambiguity, preciseness, rightness.
    Ex. This information should be double-checked for accuracy before being confirmed by entry of a 'y'.
    Ex. Only entries without cross-references and notes may be changed because the system cannot judge the correctness of the cross-references and notes for the changed entry.
    Ex. Research into controlled and free language is essential for achiever greater exactness in on-line searching.
    Ex. The unambiguity of the description of individual documents should become the main aim of all efforts to standardise bibliographic description.
    Ex. Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.
    Ex. The quiet and hallowed stacks provide comfort and solace to the bibliophile and a sense of rightness and order to the librarian.
    ----
    * con exactitud = precisely.
    * con poca exactitud = loosely.
    * * *
    a) ( precisión) accuracy, precision
    b) (veracidad, rigor) accuracy
    * * *
    = accuracy, correctness, exactness, unambiguity, preciseness, rightness.

    Ex: This information should be double-checked for accuracy before being confirmed by entry of a 'y'.

    Ex: Only entries without cross-references and notes may be changed because the system cannot judge the correctness of the cross-references and notes for the changed entry.
    Ex: Research into controlled and free language is essential for achiever greater exactness in on-line searching.
    Ex: The unambiguity of the description of individual documents should become the main aim of all efforts to standardise bibliographic description.
    Ex: Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.
    Ex: The quiet and hallowed stacks provide comfort and solace to the bibliophile and a sense of rightness and order to the librarian.
    * con exactitud = precisely.
    * con poca exactitud = loosely.

    * * *
    1
    (precisión): la exactitud de sus cálculos the accuracy o precision of her calculations
    utiliza el vocabulario con mucha exactitud she uses words with great precision o exactness o exactitude
    las órdenes se han cumplido con exactitud the orders have been carried out to the letter
    2 (veracidad, rigor) accuracy
    * * *

    exactitud sustantivo femenino
    a) ( precisión) accuracy, precision;


    b) (veracidad, rigor) accuracy

    exactitud f (precisión) accuracy
    ♦ Locuciones: con exactitud, exactly: no puedo decirte con exactitud dónde vive, I can't tell you precisely where he lives
    ' exactitud' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    precisión
    - religiosa
    - religioso
    - rigurosamente
    - precisar
    English:
    accuracy
    - exactitude
    - faithfully
    - strictness
    - pin
    * * *
    1. [precisión] accuracy, precision;
    describa con exactitud lo ocurrido describe exactly what happened;
    no lo sé con exactitud I don't know exactly
    2. [rigor] rigorousness
    * * *
    f accuracy; de medida accuracy, precision
    * * *
    precisión: accuracy, precision, exactitude
    * * *
    exactitud n (precisión) accuracy / precision

    Spanish-English dictionary > exactitud

  • 12 exagerado

    adj.
    1 exaggerated, far-fetched, exaggerating, inflated.
    2 exaggerated.
    3 overreacted, over-reacted.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: exagerar.
    * * *
    1→ link=exagerar exagerar
    1 (gen) exaggerated; (historia) far-fetched
    2 (excesivo) excessive
    3 (precio) exorbitant
    4 (gesto) flamboyant
    \
    ser exagerado,-a (persona) to exaggerate
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona] [en los gestos] prone to exaggeration; [en el vestir] over-dressed, dressy

    ¡qué exagerado eres!, ¡no seas exagerado! — don't exaggerate!, you do exaggerate!

    2) [gesto] theatrical
    3) (=excesivo) [precio] excessive, steep
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) < persona>
    b) <historia/relato> exaggerated
    c) ( excesivo) < precio> exorbitant, excessive; <cariño/castigo> excessive; < moda> extravagant, way-out (colloq)
    * * *
    = exaggerated, far-fetched [farfetched], hyperbolic, over-the-top.
    Ex. Your exaggerated coughs and annoyed looks and the oh so dramatic flailing about of your hands and arms when he lights up drive him up a wall.
    Ex. If the situation arises in Britain as in the United States, where there is a proliferation of TV channels, and many local television stations, then it is perhaps not too far-fetched to imagine some of these transmitting either specialized or local teletext information.
    Ex. The best known of these empirical hyperbolic distributions in library context is that of Bradford.
    Ex. It seems all Hollywood can do now is take an original classic and flog it to death with over-the-top special effects.
    ----
    * alcanzar proporciones exageradas = reach + epic proportions.
    * demasiado exagerado = overly-exaggerated.
    * exagerado (con respecto a) = out of all proportion (to), out of (all) proportion (to).
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) < persona>
    b) <historia/relato> exaggerated
    c) ( excesivo) < precio> exorbitant, excessive; <cariño/castigo> excessive; < moda> extravagant, way-out (colloq)
    * * *
    exagerado (con respecto a)
    = out of all proportion (to), out of (all) proportion (to)

    Ex: Certainly the study of management has developed out of all proportion to its relevance for the majority of assistant librarians.

    Ex: Technical difficulties and operational costs are out of proportion to the financial gains.

    = exaggerated, far-fetched [farfetched], hyperbolic, over-the-top.

    Ex: Your exaggerated coughs and annoyed looks and the oh so dramatic flailing about of your hands and arms when he lights up drive him up a wall.

    Ex: If the situation arises in Britain as in the United States, where there is a proliferation of TV channels, and many local television stations, then it is perhaps not too far-fetched to imagine some of these transmitting either specialized or local teletext information.
    Ex: The best known of these empirical hyperbolic distributions in library context is that of Bradford.
    Ex: It seems all Hollywood can do now is take an original classic and flog it to death with over-the-top special effects.
    * alcanzar proporciones exageradas = reach + epic proportions.
    * demasiado exagerado = overly-exaggerated.
    * exagerado (con respecto a) = out of all proportion (to), out of (all) proportion (to).

    * * *
    1 ‹persona›
    ¡qué exagerado eres! no había ni 50 personas don't exaggerate o you do exaggerate! there weren't even 50 people there
    es muy exagerada con la comida she always makes far too much food
    2 (excesivo) ‹precio› exorbitant, excessive; ‹cariño› excessive; ‹moda› extravagant, way-out ( colloq)
    * * *

     

    Del verbo exagerar: ( conjugate exagerar)

    exagerado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    exagerado    
    exagerar
    exagerado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    a) persona›:

    ¡qué exagerado eres! you do exaggerate!

    b)historia/relato exaggerated

    c) ( excesivo) ‹ precio exorbitant;

    cariño/castigo excessive;
    moda extravagant, way-out (colloq)
    exagerar ( conjugate exagerar) verbo transitivosuceso/noticia to exaggerate
    verbo intransitivo ( al hablar) to exaggerate;
    ( al hacer algo) to overdo it, go over the top (colloq)
    exagerado,-a adj (persona, historia) exaggerated
    (cálculo, cantidad) excessive
    exagerar verbo transitivo to exaggerate
    ' exagerado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    desorbitada
    - desorbitado
    - exagerada
    - prurito
    - salvajada
    - teatral
    - abultado
    - cuentista
    English:
    extravagant
    - fulsome
    - inflated
    - intense
    - top
    - camp
    - excessive
    - far
    * * *
    exagerado, -a adj
    1. [persona]
    es muy exagerado [en sus cálculos, valoraciones] he exaggerates a lot;
    [en sus acciones] he really goes too far, he really overdoes it; [en sus reacciones] he overreacts a lot;
    ¡qué exagerado eres! no había tanta gente you're always exaggerating! there weren't as many people as that
    2. [cifra, reacción, gesto] exaggerated;
    [precio] exorbitant;
    había una cantidad exagerada de comida there was an enormous amount of food;
    muestran exagerada cautela they are excessively cautious
    * * *
    adj exaggerated;
    ¡eres un exagerado! you always overdo things o go too far!; al contar una anécdota you do exaggerate!
    * * *
    exagerado, -da adj
    1) : exaggerated
    2) : excessive
    * * *
    exagerado adj excessive
    ¡no seas exagerado! don't exaggerate!

    Spanish-English dictionary > exagerado

  • 13 exagerar

    v.
    to exaggerate.
    yo creo que exageras I think you're exaggerating
    no exageremos, no fue para tanto let's not exaggerate, it wasn't that bad
    tantas precauciones, ¿no estás exagerando un poco? aren't you going a bit too far with o overdoing it with all these precautions?
    María magnificó sus sentimientos Mary exaggerated her feelings.
    * * *
    1 to exaggerate
    1 to exaggerate
    2 (abusar) to overdo it, do too much
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    2.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <suceso/noticia> to exaggerate
    2.
    exagerar vi ( al hablar) to exaggerate; ( al hacer algo)

    tampoco hay que exagerar, no tienes que acabarlo todo hoy — there's no need to overdo it, you don't have to finish it all today

    * * *
    = exaggerate, overstate, inflate, make + a mountain out of a molehill, overplay + Posesivo + hand, go + overboard, dramatise [dramatize, -USA], get + worked up about nothing, fret about + nothing, hype.
    Ex. Users do not find this intolerable, so it may be that we tend to exaggerate the hostility that would be aroused by a similar approach in library catalogues.
    Ex. There is a tendency for people interviewed to overstate their use of public libraries.
    Ex. However, their average results were considerably inflated by one query which retrieved 412 items.
    Ex. 'After all,' he thought to himself, 'I may be making a mountain out of a molehill in this thing'.
    Ex. Whatever the situation, prepared for or unexpected, it is always too easy to overplay one's hand, praising a book so extravagantly, so effusively, that many children are put off.
    Ex. The article ' Going overboard with micros in the small library' offers guidelines for the small library on approaching the subject of microcomputers.
    Ex. This article describes how a group of 12-18 teenage volunteers formed a group to dramatise children's books for young children and their parents at a public library.
    Ex. Here's why I think this really was a mistake, and why we're getting worked up about nothing in this particular instance.
    Ex. I suggest that we are fretting about nothing and that we would do well to go with the flow and let the systems be introduced, as has been proposed.
    Ex. The field is clouded by manufacturers hyping their own products and industry factions spin-doctoring new technologies.
    ----
    * exagerar las cualidades de Algo = oversell.
    * exagerar los méritos de Algotiene = oversell.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <suceso/noticia> to exaggerate
    2.
    exagerar vi ( al hablar) to exaggerate; ( al hacer algo)

    tampoco hay que exagerar, no tienes que acabarlo todo hoy — there's no need to overdo it, you don't have to finish it all today

    * * *
    = exaggerate, overstate, inflate, make + a mountain out of a molehill, overplay + Posesivo + hand, go + overboard, dramatise [dramatize, -USA], get + worked up about nothing, fret about + nothing, hype.

    Ex: Users do not find this intolerable, so it may be that we tend to exaggerate the hostility that would be aroused by a similar approach in library catalogues.

    Ex: There is a tendency for people interviewed to overstate their use of public libraries.
    Ex: However, their average results were considerably inflated by one query which retrieved 412 items.
    Ex: 'After all,' he thought to himself, 'I may be making a mountain out of a molehill in this thing'.
    Ex: Whatever the situation, prepared for or unexpected, it is always too easy to overplay one's hand, praising a book so extravagantly, so effusively, that many children are put off.
    Ex: The article ' Going overboard with micros in the small library' offers guidelines for the small library on approaching the subject of microcomputers.
    Ex: This article describes how a group of 12-18 teenage volunteers formed a group to dramatise children's books for young children and their parents at a public library.
    Ex: Here's why I think this really was a mistake, and why we're getting worked up about nothing in this particular instance.
    Ex: I suggest that we are fretting about nothing and that we would do well to go with the flow and let the systems be introduced, as has been proposed.
    Ex: The field is clouded by manufacturers hyping their own products and industry factions spin-doctoring new technologies.
    * exagerar las cualidades de Algo = oversell.
    * exagerar los méritos de Algotiene = oversell.

    * * *
    exagerar [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹suceso/noticia› to exaggerate
    estás exagerando la importancia del asunto you're exaggerating o overstating the importance of the matter
    ■ exagerar
    vi
    (al hablar) to exaggerate
    (al hacer algo): tampoco hay que exagerar, no tienes que acabarlo todo hoy there's no need to overdo it, you don't have to finish it all today
    * * *

    Multiple Entries:
    exagerar    
    exagerar algo
    exagerar ( conjugate exagerar) verbo transitivosuceso/noticia to exaggerate
    verbo intransitivo ( al hablar) to exaggerate;
    ( al hacer algo) to overdo it, go over the top (colloq)
    exagerar verbo transitivo to exaggerate
    ' exagerar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    dramatizar
    - magnificar
    - tinta
    - agrandar
    - tendencia
    English:
    dramatize
    - embellish
    - embroider
    - exaggerate
    - magnify
    - overdo
    - overstate
    - pile on
    - stretch
    - blow
    - over
    - proportion
    * * *
    vt
    to exaggerate;
    la oposición exagera la trascendencia de este asunto the opposition has blown this issue out of proportion
    vi
    1. [al describir, calificar] to exaggerate;
    yo creo que exageras I think you're exaggerating;
    no exageremos, no fue para tanto let's not exaggerate, it wasn't that bad
    2. [al actuar] to go too far, to overdo it ( con with);
    tantas precauciones, ¿no estás exagerando un poco? aren't you going a bit too far with o overdoing it with all these precautions?
    * * *
    v/t exaggerate
    * * *
    : to exaggerate
    * * *
    exagerar vb to exaggerate

    Spanish-English dictionary > exagerar

  • 14 excesivo

    adj.
    1 excessive, beyond measure, unconscionable, immoderate.
    2 hypernomic.
    * * *
    1 excessive
    * * *
    (f. - excesiva)
    adj.
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo excessive
    * * *
    = excessive, overwide [over-wide], overkill, unreasonable, inordinate, extortionate, unconscionable, overabundant, bloated, over-the-top, outrageous, excess.
    Ex. Excessive emphasis on the need to exact payment will stifle the flow of information.
    Ex. Overall, neither system proved ideal: LEXINET was deficient as regards lack of accessibility and excessive ambiguity; while the manual system gave rise to an over-wide variation of terms.
    Ex. Full USMARC is overkill for many library operations.
    Ex. However, in general, it is unreasonable to expect a user to know the ISBN of a book.
    Ex. Sometimes cataloguers will spend an inordinate length of time searching for the best heading.
    Ex. This is an important and interesting book, but given that much of the material has previously been published, the price seems extortionate.
    Ex. Slowly -- but not without sustained and unconscionable injustices to Native and African Americans -- the United States grew from a republic into a more inclusive democracy.
    Ex. He contends, however, that the seemingly formless, overabundant, inchoate texture of the novel might also suggest a valid mode for the novelization of slavery.
    Ex. They are are notorious for their inefficiency, conservatism, bloated bureaucracy, and obsoleteness.
    Ex. It seems all Hollywood can do now is take an original classic and flog it to death with over-the-top special effects.
    Ex. There must be few other ways of leaving oneself so vulnerable to the slings and arrows of outrageous (or outraged) critics.
    Ex. The aim of the present study is to examine whether work-related factors contribute to excess male mortality.
    ----
    * capacidad excesiva = overcapacity [over-capacity].
    * carga excesiva = overload.
    * consumidor excesivo = overspender [over-spender].
    * dependencia excesiva = over reliance [over-reliance].
    * de un modo excesivo = extortionately.
    * énfasis excesivo = overemphasis [over-emphasis].
    * estimulación excesiva = overstimulation.
    * estímulo excesivo = overstimulation.
    * precio excesivo = steep price.
    * simplificación excesiva = oversimplification [over-simplification].
    * uso excesivo = prodigality.
    * * *
    adjetivo excessive
    * * *
    = excessive, overwide [over-wide], overkill, unreasonable, inordinate, extortionate, unconscionable, overabundant, bloated, over-the-top, outrageous, excess.

    Ex: Excessive emphasis on the need to exact payment will stifle the flow of information.

    Ex: Overall, neither system proved ideal: LEXINET was deficient as regards lack of accessibility and excessive ambiguity; while the manual system gave rise to an over-wide variation of terms.
    Ex: Full USMARC is overkill for many library operations.
    Ex: However, in general, it is unreasonable to expect a user to know the ISBN of a book.
    Ex: Sometimes cataloguers will spend an inordinate length of time searching for the best heading.
    Ex: This is an important and interesting book, but given that much of the material has previously been published, the price seems extortionate.
    Ex: Slowly -- but not without sustained and unconscionable injustices to Native and African Americans -- the United States grew from a republic into a more inclusive democracy.
    Ex: He contends, however, that the seemingly formless, overabundant, inchoate texture of the novel might also suggest a valid mode for the novelization of slavery.
    Ex: They are are notorious for their inefficiency, conservatism, bloated bureaucracy, and obsoleteness.
    Ex: It seems all Hollywood can do now is take an original classic and flog it to death with over-the-top special effects.
    Ex: There must be few other ways of leaving oneself so vulnerable to the slings and arrows of outrageous (or outraged) critics.
    Ex: The aim of the present study is to examine whether work-related factors contribute to excess male mortality.
    * capacidad excesiva = overcapacity [over-capacity].
    * carga excesiva = overload.
    * consumidor excesivo = overspender [over-spender].
    * dependencia excesiva = over reliance [over-reliance].
    * de un modo excesivo = extortionately.
    * énfasis excesivo = overemphasis [over-emphasis].
    * estimulación excesiva = overstimulation.
    * estímulo excesivo = overstimulation.
    * precio excesivo = steep price.
    * simplificación excesiva = oversimplification [over-simplification].
    * uso excesivo = prodigality.

    * * *
    excessive
    30 euros me parece excesivo 30 euros seems excessive to me
    el camión llevaba un peso excesivo the truck was overloaded o overweight
    el celo excesivo con que protege a sus hijos her over-protective attitude toward(s) her children
    no mostró excesivo entusiasmo por el proyecto he wasn't overly enthusiastic o he didn't show a great deal of enthusiasm about the project
    * * *

    excesivo adjetivo
    excessive
    excesivo,-a adjetivo excessive
    ' excesivo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    brutal
    - derroche
    - etílica
    - etílico
    - excesiva
    - faraónica
    - faraónico
    - fuerte
    - tremenda
    - tremendo
    - abuso
    - exagerado
    English:
    excessive
    - exorbitant
    - extravagant
    - fulsome
    - hard
    - immoderate
    - inflated
    - punitive
    - steep
    - undue
    - unreasonable
    - extortionate
    - inordinate
    - loosely
    * * *
    excesivo, -a adj
    excessive;
    se pagan precios excesivos people pay inflated prices, Br people pay over the odds;
    protegen al niño de un modo excesivo they are overprotective of the boy;
    no tuvo excesiva suerte en semifinales she didn't do too well in the semifinals
    * * *
    adj excessive
    * * *
    excesivo, -va adj
    : excessive
    * * *
    excesivo adj excessive

    Spanish-English dictionary > excesivo

  • 15 exclusivista

    adj.
    clannish, cliquish.
    f. & m.
    exclusivist, classicist, elitist.
    * * *
    1 exclusivist
    1 exclusivist
    * * *
    ADJ [club] exclusive, select; [grupo] clannish; [actitud] snobbish
    * * *
    adjetivo exclusivist
    * * *
    = cliquish, cliquey [cliquy], insular.
    Ex. Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.
    Ex. She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex. Within that chummy, insular world of imperial elites, Senator Jaguaribe recoiled in horror at the prospect of a permanent pauper class supported by public funds.
    * * *
    adjetivo exclusivist
    * * *
    = cliquish, cliquey [cliquy], insular.

    Ex: Book clubs do not have to be cliquish, pretentious, stuffily self-inflated, or bolt-holes for ethereal literary spirits.

    Ex: She worked at a local clothing company for a while and found the other staff and managers to all be very cliquey, bitchy and rather shallow.
    Ex: Within that chummy, insular world of imperial elites, Senator Jaguaribe recoiled in horror at the prospect of a permanent pauper class supported by public funds.

    * * *
    exclusivist
    * * *
    adj
    exclusivist
    nmf
    exclusivist

    Spanish-English dictionary > exclusivista

  • 16 fastidioso

    adj.
    1 bothersome, annoying, nagging, pesky.
    2 tiresome, boring, irritating, tedious.
    * * *
    1 (molesto) annoying, irksome
    2 (aburrido) boring, tedious
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=molesto) annoying
    2) (=aburrido) tedious, boring, tiresome
    3) LAm (=quisquilloso) fastidious
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex. He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex: He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.

    * * *
    1 (molesto) ‹persona› tiresome, annoying; ‹trabajo› tiresome, irksome
    ¡qué ruido más fastidioso! what an irritating noise!, that noise is getting on my nerves o is getting to me! ( colloq)
    este niño está muy fastidioso this child is being very tiresome o ( colloq) is getting on my nerves
    2 (Méx, Per fam) (quisquilloso) fussy ( colloq)
    * * *

    fastidioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo


    trabajo tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)

    fastidioso,-a adjetivo annoying
    ' fastidioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    apestosa
    - apestoso
    - bendita
    - bendito
    - fastidiosa
    - gracia
    - molesta
    - molesto
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - suplicio
    - pesado
    English:
    annoying
    - irksome
    - tiresome
    - peevish
    * * *
    fastidioso, -a adj
    1. [molesto] annoying, irritating;
    es un niño muy fastidioso he's a very annoying o irritating child;
    es un dolor muy fastidioso it's a very annoying o irritating pain
    2. [aburrido] boring, tedious
    * * *
    adj annoying
    * * *
    fastidioso, -sa adj
    1) molesto: annoying, bothersome
    2) aburrido: boring
    * * *
    fastidioso adj annoying

    Spanish-English dictionary > fastidioso

  • 17 fomentar

    v.
    1 to encourage, to foster.
    2 to promote, to boost, to advance, to be conducive to.
    Ella alienta un ideal She fosters=nurtures an ideal.
    * * *
    1 to promote, encourage, foster
    * * *
    verb
    1) to foster, promote
    * * *
    VT
    1) [+ desarrollo, investigación, ahorro, inversión, participación] to encourage; [+ turismo, industria] to promote, boost; [+ competitividad, producción] to boost; [+ odio, violencia] to foment
    2) (Med) to foment, warm
    3) (=incubar)
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1) <industria/turismo> to promote; <ahorro/inversión> to encourage, boost; <disturbio/odio> to incite, foment (frml)

    hay que fomentarles el gusto por la músicaone has to foster o encourage an interest in music in them

    2) (Med) to foment
    * * *
    = advance, boost, cultivate, encourage, foster, further, nurture, promote, abet, foment, spur, elicit, stimulate, drive.
    Nota: Verbo irregular: pasado drove, participio driven.
    Ex. In addition to continuing and advancing programs begun prior to his directorship, Mr. Welsh has initiated the Cataloging in Publication program (CIP).
    Ex. If the title is selected by a book club this helps boost the print-run and overall sales.
    Ex. Such familiarity can be cultivated with experience, and will consider the following features of data bases.
    Ex. A common catalogue encourages users to regard the different information carrying media as part of range of media.
    Ex. Among Mr. Welsh's professional activities and accomplishments are his successful efforts to foster an increased two-way communication between LC's Processing Department and his professional colleagues in the field.
    Ex. IFLA's International Office for Universal Bibliographic Control was established in order to further international control of bibliographic records.
    Ex. Studying the leisure reading preferences of teens can help library media specialists develop collections and programs that nurture a lifelong love of reading.
    Ex. Initially, it is necessary that the scheme be published and available for purchase, and that its use is generally promoted.
    Ex. This article questions the pricing policies of some publishers for journals suggesting that librarians have inadvertently aided and abetted them in some cases.
    Ex. The formats that emerge can be used by libraries, publishers, and information utilities worldwide to convert printed works to electronic forms or to create original works in electric format, and thus foment the creation of networked electronic library collections.
    Ex. Spurred by press comments on dumping of withdrawn library books in rubbish skips, Birkerd Library requested the Ministry of Culture's permission to sell withdrawn materials.
    Ex. This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex. An alertness to work in related fields may stimulate creativity in disseminating ideas from one field of study to another, for both the researcher and the manager.
    Ex. The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled ( driven) by foot.
    ----
    * fomentar apoyo = build + support.
    * fomentar el conocimiento = advance + knowledge.
    * fomentar el debate = foster + discussion.
    * fomentar el interés = raise + interest, foster + interest.
    * fomentar interés = build + interest.
    * fomentar la competencia = cultivate + competition.
    * fomentar la lectura = promote + reading.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1) <industria/turismo> to promote; <ahorro/inversión> to encourage, boost; <disturbio/odio> to incite, foment (frml)

    hay que fomentarles el gusto por la músicaone has to foster o encourage an interest in music in them

    2) (Med) to foment
    * * *
    = advance, boost, cultivate, encourage, foster, further, nurture, promote, abet, foment, spur, elicit, stimulate, drive.
    Nota: Verbo irregular: pasado drove, participio driven.

    Ex: In addition to continuing and advancing programs begun prior to his directorship, Mr. Welsh has initiated the Cataloging in Publication program (CIP).

    Ex: If the title is selected by a book club this helps boost the print-run and overall sales.
    Ex: Such familiarity can be cultivated with experience, and will consider the following features of data bases.
    Ex: A common catalogue encourages users to regard the different information carrying media as part of range of media.
    Ex: Among Mr. Welsh's professional activities and accomplishments are his successful efforts to foster an increased two-way communication between LC's Processing Department and his professional colleagues in the field.
    Ex: IFLA's International Office for Universal Bibliographic Control was established in order to further international control of bibliographic records.
    Ex: Studying the leisure reading preferences of teens can help library media specialists develop collections and programs that nurture a lifelong love of reading.
    Ex: Initially, it is necessary that the scheme be published and available for purchase, and that its use is generally promoted.
    Ex: This article questions the pricing policies of some publishers for journals suggesting that librarians have inadvertently aided and abetted them in some cases.
    Ex: The formats that emerge can be used by libraries, publishers, and information utilities worldwide to convert printed works to electronic forms or to create original works in electric format, and thus foment the creation of networked electronic library collections.
    Ex: Spurred by press comments on dumping of withdrawn library books in rubbish skips, Birkerd Library requested the Ministry of Culture's permission to sell withdrawn materials.
    Ex: This article looks at ways in which librarians in leadership roles can elicit the motivation, commitment, and personal investment of members of the organisation.
    Ex: An alertness to work in related fields may stimulate creativity in disseminating ideas from one field of study to another, for both the researcher and the manager.
    Ex: The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled ( driven) by foot.
    * fomentar apoyo = build + support.
    * fomentar el conocimiento = advance + knowledge.
    * fomentar el debate = foster + discussion.
    * fomentar el interés = raise + interest, foster + interest.
    * fomentar interés = build + interest.
    * fomentar la competencia = cultivate + competition.
    * fomentar la lectura = promote + reading.

    * * *
    fomentar [A1 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹industria› to promote; ‹turismo› to promote, encourage, boost; ‹ahorro/inversión› to encourage, boost; ‹disturbio/odio› to incite, foment ( frml)
    hay que fomentarles el gusto por la música one has to foster o encourage an interest in music in them
    2 (fundar) to found
    B ( Med) to foment
    * * *

     

    fomentar ( conjugate fomentar) verbo transitivoindustria/turismo to promote;
    ahorro/inversión to encourage, boost;
    disturbio/odio to incite, foment (frml);
    interés/afición to encourage
    fomentar verbo transitivo to promote
    ' fomentar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    alimentar
    English:
    boost
    - develop
    - encourage
    - foster
    - promote
    - stir up
    - advance
    - whip
    * * *
    1. [favorecer] to encourage, to promote;
    medidas para fomentar el ahorro measures to encourage saving;
    una campaña para fomentar la lectura a campaign to encourage o promote reading
    2. Carib, Méx [organizar] to open, to set up
    * * *
    v/t solidaridad foster; COM promote; rebelión foment, incite
    * * *
    1) : to foment, to stir up
    2) promover: to promote, to foster
    * * *
    fomentar vb to promote

    Spanish-English dictionary > fomentar

  • 18 forcejear con

    (v.) = wrestle with, lock + horns (with)
    Ex. Librarians believe they will have to wrestle with limited opportunities for career advancement = Los bibliotecarios piensan que tendrán que hacer frente a oportunidades limitadas para su promoción profesional.
    Ex. Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.
    * * *
    (v.) = wrestle with, lock + horns (with)

    Ex: Librarians believe they will have to wrestle with limited opportunities for career advancement = Los bibliotecarios piensan que tendrán que hacer frente a oportunidades limitadas para su promoción profesional.

    Ex: Although the movie has a well-defined sense of character and dramatic incident, a handsome and clear visual presentation, and an interesting feel for inflated men locking horns, it lacks thematic preciseness.

    Spanish-English dictionary > forcejear con

  • 19 globo

    m.
    1 the globe (la Tierra).
    globo terráqueo o terrestre globe
    2 balloon.
    globo aerostático hot-air balloon
    globo sonda weather balloon
    3 round glass lampshade.
    4 sphere (esfera).
    5 lob, pop fly.
    * * *
    1 (esfera) globe, sphere
    2 (tierra) globe
    3 (de aire) balloon
    4 (pantalla de lámpara) globe, glass lampshade
    5 argot (condón) rubber, johnny
    6 (de tebeo) speech balloon
    \
    globo aerostático hot air balloon, hydrogen balloon
    globo ocular eyeball
    globo terráqueo / globo terrestre globe
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM
    1) [de aire] balloon

    globo de barrera, globo de protección — barrage-balloon

    globo dirigible — airship, dirigible

    globo sonda (Pol) —

    2) (=esfera) globe, sphere

    globo del ojo, globo ocular — eyeball

    globo terráqueo, globo terrestre — globe

    3) [en un cómic] balloon
    4) [de chicle] bubble
    5) ** [con drogas]
    6) (Ftbl, Tenis) lob
    7) ** (=preservativo) condom, rubber **, safe (EEUU) **
    8) pl globos ** (=pechos) boobs **
    9)
    * * *
    1)
    a) (Jueg) balloon

    estar como un globo — (fam) to be like a barrel (colloq)

    b) ( de chicle) bubble
    c) ( en comics) speech balloon o bubble
    d) ( de lámpara) globe
    2) (Aviac, Meteo) balloon
    3) ( mundo) world, globe (journ)

    globo terráqueo or terrestre — globe

    4) (Dep) ( en béisbol) fly; ( en tenis) lob; ( en rugby) up-and-under
    5) (Esp fam) ( preservativo) rubber (AmE colloq), johnny (BrE colloq)
    * * *
    = globe, balloon.
    Ex. A globe is a model of a celestial body, usually the earth or the celestial sphere, depicted on the surface of a sphere.
    Ex. 'That's not realistic,' he said and looked at her, as if to indicate that the balloon of her argument had suddenly had a pin stuck in it, and was expiring with a hiss.
    ----
    * globo aerostático = hot-air balloon.
    * globo de aire caliente = hot-air balloon.
    * globo, el = globe, the.
    * globo ocular = eyeball.
    * globo publicitario = advertising balloon.
    * * *
    1)
    a) (Jueg) balloon

    estar como un globo — (fam) to be like a barrel (colloq)

    b) ( de chicle) bubble
    c) ( en comics) speech balloon o bubble
    d) ( de lámpara) globe
    2) (Aviac, Meteo) balloon
    3) ( mundo) world, globe (journ)

    globo terráqueo or terrestre — globe

    4) (Dep) ( en béisbol) fly; ( en tenis) lob; ( en rugby) up-and-under
    5) (Esp fam) ( preservativo) rubber (AmE colloq), johnny (BrE colloq)
    * * *
    el globo
    (n.) = globe, the

    Ex: South Asia must make efforts to reach other parts of the globe in order to make the information age truly viable.

    = globe, balloon.

    Ex: A globe is a model of a celestial body, usually the earth or the celestial sphere, depicted on the surface of a sphere.

    Ex: 'That's not realistic,' he said and looked at her, as if to indicate that the balloon of her argument had suddenly had a pin stuck in it, and was expiring with a hiss.
    * globo aerostático = hot-air balloon.
    * globo de aire caliente = hot-air balloon.
    * globo, el = globe, the.
    * globo ocular = eyeball.
    * globo publicitario = advertising balloon.

    * * *
    A
    1 ( Jueg) balloon
    echar globos ( Col); to daydream
    estar como un globo ( fam); to be like a barrel ( colloq)
    2 (de chicle) bubble
    3 (en comics) speech balloon o bubble
    Compuesto:
    tool tip
    4 (de una lámpara) spherical glass lampshade, globe
    Compuesto:
    eyeball
    B ( Aviac, Meteo) balloon
    Compuestos:
    hot-air balloon
    captive balloon
    weather balloon
    observation balloon
    C
    1 (mundo) world, globe ( journ)
    globo terráqueo or terrestre globe
    D ( Dep) (en béisbol) fly; (en tenis) lob; (en rugby) up-and-under
    E ( Esp fam)
    1 (preservativo) condom, rubber ( AmE colloq), johnny ( BrE colloq)
    2
    (enfado): se agarró un globo de mucho cuidado he hit the roof ( colloq), he had a fit ( colloq)
    anda con un globo tremendo she's in a really foul o bad mood
    3
    (de alcohol, drogas): anoche ibas con un globo impresionante you were high as a kite last night ( colloq), you were really out of your head last night (sl)
    * * *

     

    globo sustantivo masculino
    1
    a) (Aviac, Jueg, Meteo) balloon;

    globo aerostático/sonda hot-air/observation balloon



    d)


    2 ( mundo) world;
    tb

    globo sustantivo masculino
    1 (con aire) balloon
    2 (esfera) globe
    globo terráqueo, (mapa esférico) globe
    (Tierra) the Globe
    pez globo, globe-fish
    3 (lámpara, tulipa esférica) globe, glass lampshade
    4 Anat globo ocular, eyeball
    ' globo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    achatamiento
    - aeronave
    - elevarse
    - hinchar
    - inflar
    - lastre
    - ocular
    - pinchar
    - reventar
    - reventarse
    - soplar
    - terráquea
    - terráqueo
    - ascender
    - barquilla
    - desinflar
    - elevar
    - estallar
    - ir
    English:
    balloon
    - bubble
    - burst
    - deflate
    - eyeball
    - globe
    - inflated
    - let down
    - pop
    - pump up
    - weather balloon
    - eye
    - hot
    - lob
    * * *
    globo nm
    1. [Tierra] globe, Earth
    globo terráqueo globe;
    2. [aeróstato] balloon;
    Col
    echar globos to ponder
    globo aerostático hot-air balloon;
    globo sonda weather balloon;
    Fig
    lanzar un globo sonda to fly a kite
    3. [juguete] balloon
    4. Dep [disparo] [en tenis, fútbol] lob;
    [en rugby] up-and-under
    5. [lámpara] round glass lampshade
    6. [en cómic] speech bubble, balloon
    Informát globos de ayuda balloon help
    7. Anat globo ocular eyeball
    8. [de chicle] bubble;
    hacer globos to blow bubbles
    9. Esp Fam [preservativo] rubber, Br johnny
    10. Esp Fam
    globos [pechos] melons
    11. Esp Fam [borrachera]
    agarrar un globo to get smashed
    12. Esp Fam [por drogas] high;
    coger un globo to get high
    13. Esp Fam [enfado]
    coger un globo to go ballistic
    * * *
    m
    1 aerostático, de niño balloon
    2 terrestre globe
    3 DEP lob
    * * *
    globo nm
    1) : globe, sphere
    2) : balloon
    3)
    globo ocular : eyeball
    * * *
    globo n balloon

    Spanish-English dictionary > globo

  • 20 hinchado

    adj.
    1 swollen, bloated, bulging, baggy.
    2 intumescent.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: hinchar.
    * * *
    1→ link=hinchar hinchar
    1 (inflado) inflated, blown up
    2 (piel) swollen, puffed up; (estómago) bloated
    3 figurado (persona) vain, conceited
    4 figurado (estilo, lenguaje) pompous, bombastic
    * * *
    (f. - hinchada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=inflamado) swollen
    2) (=vanidoso) [persona] swollen-headed, conceited; [estilo] pompous, high-flown
    * * *
    - da adjetivo <vientre/pierna> swollen; <estilo/lenguaje> overblown
    * * *
    = inflated, puffy [puffier -comp., puffiest -sup.], bulging, turgid.
    Ex. The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled (driven) by foot.
    Ex. The puffy white clouds more suggestive of cotton candy than cumulonimbus.
    Ex. Ladies bemoan their fat tummies, wobbly thighs, bulging hips and flabby thighs.
    Ex. I recently found out that ' turgid,' which actually means 'swollen' and that I was confusing it with 'turbid,' a word I've never heard.
    ----
    * con los ojos hinchados = bleary-eyed.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo <vientre/pierna> swollen; <estilo/lenguaje> overblown
    * * *
    = inflated, puffy [puffier -comp., puffiest -sup.], bulging, turgid.

    Ex: The notation 796.33 is used for sporst involving an inflated ball propelled (driven) by foot.

    Ex: The puffy white clouds more suggestive of cotton candy than cumulonimbus.
    Ex: Ladies bemoan their fat tummies, wobbly thighs, bulging hips and flabby thighs.
    Ex: I recently found out that ' turgid,' which actually means 'swollen' and that I was confusing it with 'turbid,' a word I've never heard.
    * con los ojos hinchados = bleary-eyed.

    * * *
    1 ‹vientre/pierna› swollen
    2 ‹estilo/lenguaje› overblown
    * * *

     

    Del verbo hinchar: ( conjugate hinchar)

    hinchado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    hinchado    
    hinchar
    hinchado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹vientre/pierna swollen;


    estilo/lenguaje overblown
    hinchar ( conjugate hinchar) verbo transitivo (Esp) ‹ globo to inflate (frml), to blow up;
    rueda to inflate, pump up;
    suceso/noticia› (fam) to blow … up (colloq)
    verbo intransitivo (CS fam) ( fastidiar) [ persona] to be a pain in the ass (AmE vulg) o (BrE vulg) arse;
    (+ me/te/le etc)
    me hincha su actitud his attitude really pisses me off (sl)

    hincharse verbo pronominal
    a) [vientre/pierna] (+ me/te/le etc) to swell up

    b) (fam) ( enorgullecerse) to swell with pride

    c) (Esp fam) ( hartarse) hinchadose de algo ‹de pasteles/ostras› to stuff oneself with sth

    hinchado,-a adjetivo
    1 (de aire) inflated, blown up
    2 Med (inflamado) swollen, puffed up
    (estómago) bloated
    3 fig (grandilocuente, afectado) bombastic, pompous
    hinchar verbo transitivo
    1 (un globo) to inflate, blow up
    2 fig (una historia, un presupuesto) to inflate, exaggerate: hincharon un poco los hechos para darle más interés a la historia, they embellished the facts a bit to make the story more interesting
    ' hinchado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abotargada
    - abotargado
    - esteroide
    - hinchada
    English:
    bloated
    - inflated
    - puffy
    - swollen
    - puffed
    * * *
    hinchado, -a adj
    1. [rueda, globo] inflated
    2. [cara, tobillo] swollen
    3. [engreído] [persona] bigheaded, conceited;
    [lenguaje, estilo] bombastic
    * * *
    adj swollen
    * * *
    hinchado, -da adj
    1) : swollen, inflated
    2) : pompous, overblown

    Spanish-English dictionary > hinchado

См. также в других словарях:

  • inflated — inflated, flatulent, tumid, turgid mean filled with something insubstantial (as air or vapor). Inflated implies expansion by the introduction of something (as a gas) lacking in substance to the point where the walls are stretched taut or tension… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • inflated — in‧flat‧ed [ɪnˈfleɪtd] adjective [only before a noun] inflated prices, sums etc are unreasonably high: • These company directors are paid grossly inflated salaries. * * * inflated UK US /ɪnˈfleɪtɪd/ adjective ► an inflated price or value is… …   Financial and business terms

  • Inflated — In*flat ed, a. 1. Filled, as with air or gas; blown up; distended; as, a balloon inflated with gas. [1913 Webster] 2. Turgid; swelling; puffed up; bombastic; pompous; as, an inflated style. [1913 Webster] Inflated and astrut with self conceit.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inflated — I (bombastic) adjective altiloquent, altisonant, artificial, declamatory, flatulent, fustian, grandiloquent, high flown, high sounding, inflatus, magniloquent, mouthy, oratorical, ostentatious, overblown, pedantic, pompous, pretentious,… …   Law dictionary

  • inflated — [adj] exaggerated aggrandized, amplified, augmented, aureate, bloated, bombastic, diffuse, dilated, distended, dropsical, enlarged, euphuistic, extended, filled, flatulent, flowery, fustian, grandiloquent, grown, magnified, magniloquent,… …   New thesaurus

  • inflated — [in flāt′id] adj. 1. puffed out; swollen 2. pompous; bombastic; high flown 3. increased or raised beyond what is normal or valid 4. characterized or caused by inflation …   English World dictionary

  • inflated — in|flat|ed [ınˈfleıtıd] adj 1.) inflated prices, amounts etc are high and unreasonable grossly/vastly/hugely inflated ▪ company directors on grossly inflated salaries 2.) inflated ideas, opinions etc about someone or something make them seem… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • inflated — in|flat|ed [ ın fleıtəd ] adjective 1. ) inflated prices or amounts are higher than they should be: vastly inflated stock prices 2. ) making something seem better or more important than it really is: He has an inflated opinion of his own ability …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • inflated — adjective 1 inflated prices, sums etc are unreasonably high: These company directors are paid grossly inflated salaries. 2 inflated ideas, opinions etc about something make it seem more important than it really is: people with an inflated idea of …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • inflated — adjective 1) an inflated balloon Syn: blown up, aerated, filled, puffed up/out, pumped up; distended, expanded, engorged, swollen 2) inflated prices Syn: high, sky high, excessive …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • inflated — UK [ɪnˈfleɪtɪd] / US [ɪnˈfleɪtəd] adjective 1) inflated prices or amounts are higher than they should be vastly inflated salaries 2) making something seem better or more important than it really is He has an inflated opinion of his own skill. 3)… …   English dictionary

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