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hurly-burly

  • 1 ajetreado

    adj.
    hectic, helter-skelter.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: ajetrear.
    * * *
    1→ link=ajetrearse ajetrearse
    1 busy, hectic
    * * *
    ADJ busy
    * * *
    - da adjetivo hectic, busy
    * * *
    = busy [busier -comp., busiest -sup.], hectic, hard-driving, hurly-burly.
    Ex. The variety of reader places in a library adds interest to the interior but also provide for the many preferences of the users, some of whom seem to prefer a very busy location.
    Ex. The hectic pace of developments in IT applications has raised many sensitive issues for educators.
    Ex. Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex. Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo hectic, busy
    * * *
    = busy [busier -comp., busiest -sup.], hectic, hard-driving, hurly-burly.

    Ex: The variety of reader places in a library adds interest to the interior but also provide for the many preferences of the users, some of whom seem to prefer a very busy location.

    Ex: The hectic pace of developments in IT applications has raised many sensitive issues for educators.
    Ex: Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex: Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.

    * * *
    hectic, busy
    * * *

    Del verbo ajetrearse: ( conjugate ajetrearse)

    ajetreado es:

    el participio

    ajetreado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    hectic, busy
    ajetreado,-a adjetivo (very) busy, hectic

    ' ajetreado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ajetreada
    - movida
    - movido
    - loco
    English:
    busy
    - hectic
    * * *
    ajetreado, -a adj
    busy;
    he tenido un día muy ajetreado I've had a very busy day
    * * *
    ajetreado, -da adj
    : hectic, busy
    * * *
    ajetreado adj busy [comp. busier; superl. busiest] / hectic

    Spanish-English dictionary > ajetreado

  • 2 ajetreo

    m.
    1 running around, hard work (gestiones, molestias).
    2 hustle, rush, bustle, chores.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: ajetrear.
    * * *
    1 activity, bustle
    * * *
    SM (=actividad) hustle and bustle; (=labor) drudgery, hard work
    * * *
    masculino hustle and bustle
    * * *
    = bustle, flurry of activity, hustle and bustle, whirr of activity, hurly-burly, comings and goings.
    Ex. The overall plan of the library is to provide an atmosphere of spaciousness and calm, in contrast to the urban bustle outside = El proyecto general de la biblioteca es ofrecer un ambiente de amplitud y calma, en contraste con el bullicio urbano exterior.
    Ex. In all this flurry of activity in the early seventies public libraries were not only ignored but showed little interest, in spite of the fact that inroads were being made into their traditional library functions.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. The wedding day morning is usually a whirr of activity -- everybody running here and there.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    Ex. The Governor believes his comings and goings should be secret from taxpayers.
    * * *
    masculino hustle and bustle
    * * *
    = bustle, flurry of activity, hustle and bustle, whirr of activity, hurly-burly, comings and goings.

    Ex: The overall plan of the library is to provide an atmosphere of spaciousness and calm, in contrast to the urban bustle outside = El proyecto general de la biblioteca es ofrecer un ambiente de amplitud y calma, en contraste con el bullicio urbano exterior.

    Ex: In all this flurry of activity in the early seventies public libraries were not only ignored but showed little interest, in spite of the fact that inroads were being made into their traditional library functions.
    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: The wedding day morning is usually a whirr of activity -- everybody running here and there.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    Ex: The Governor believes his comings and goings should be secret from taxpayers.

    * * *
    con tanto ajetreo es imposible concentrarse it's impossible to concentrate with all this activity going on
    el ajetreo de los grandes almacenes the hustle and bustle of the department stores
    * * *

    Del verbo ajetrearse: ( conjugate ajetrearse)

    me ajetreo es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    se ajetreó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    ajetreo sustantivo masculino
    hustle and bustle;

    ajetreo sustantivo masculino activity, hard work, bustle

    ' ajetreo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    tejemaneje
    - vértigo
    - vorágine
    - trote
    English:
    bustle
    - hustle
    * * *
    con tanto ajetreo me olvidé de llamarle things were so hectic that I forgot to phone him;
    hoy hay mucho ajetreo en la oficina there's a lot going on o happening in the office today;
    el ajetreo de la ciudad the hustle and bustle of the city
    * * *
    m bustle
    * * *
    : hustle and bustle, fuss

    Spanish-English dictionary > ajetreo

  • 3 alborotado

    adj.
    excited, disorderly, agitated, restless.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: alborotar.
    * * *
    1→ link=alborotar alborotar
    1 (agitado) agitated, excited
    2 (ruidoso) noisy, rowdy
    3 (desordenado) untidy, messy
    4 (irreflexivo) reckless, rash
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona] (=excitado) agitated, excited; (=ruidoso) noisy; (=precipitado) hasty; (=impetuoso) reckless; (=amotinado) riotous
    2) [período] troubled, eventful
    3) [mar] rough
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    1)
    a) ( nervioso) agitated; (animado, excitado) excited
    b) ( ruidoso) noisy, rowdy; ( amotinado) riotous
    2) < mar> rough; < pelo> untidy, disheveled*
    3) ( precipitado) hasty, rash
    * * *
    = disorderly, abuzz, hurly-burly.
    Ex. As expected, students in disorderly schools tend to have higher misbehavior and lower achievement.
    Ex. She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex. Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    1)
    a) ( nervioso) agitated; (animado, excitado) excited
    b) ( ruidoso) noisy, rowdy; ( amotinado) riotous
    2) < mar> rough; < pelo> untidy, disheveled*
    3) ( precipitado) hasty, rash
    * * *
    = disorderly, abuzz, hurly-burly.

    Ex: As expected, students in disorderly schools tend to have higher misbehavior and lower achievement.

    Ex: She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex: Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.

    * * *
    A
    1 (nervioso) agitated; (animado, excitado) excited
    2 ‹grupo/muchedumbre› (ruidoso) noisy, rowdy; (amotinado) riotous
    B
    1 ‹mar› rough, choppy
    2 ‹pelo› untidy, disheveled*
    C (precipitado) hasty, reckless, rash
    * * *

    Del verbo alborotar: ( conjugate alborotar)

    alborotado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    alborotado    
    alborotar
    alborotado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    1

    (animado, excitado) excited

    ( amotinado) riotous
    2 mar rough;
    pelo untidy, disheveled( conjugate disheveled)
    alborotar ( conjugate alborotar) verbo intransitivo
    to make a racket
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( agitar) to agitate, get … agitated;

    ( excitar) to get … excited

    alborotarse verbo pronominal
    a) ( agitarse) to get agitated o upset;

    ( excitarse) to get excited

    alborotado,-a adjetivo
    1 worked up, agitated
    2 (desordenado) untidy, messy
    3 (mar) rough
    (tiempo) stormy
    alborotar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 (causar agitación) to agitate, work up
    2 (revolver, desordenar) to make untidy, turn upside down
    II vi (causar jaleo) to kick up a racket
    ' alborotado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    alborotada
    - desordenada
    - desordenado
    English:
    ruffled
    - disorderly
    - excited
    - tousled
    - wind
    * * *
    alborotado, -a adj
    1. [agitado] rowdy;
    los niños están alborotados con la excursión the children are all excited about the trip;
    los ánimos están alborotados feelings are running high
    2. [pelo] dishevelled
    3. [mar] rough
    4. Cuba [sexualmente] sex-starved
    * * *
    I adj
    1 rowdy
    2 ( imprudente) reckless
    II partalborotar
    * * *
    alborotado, -da adj
    1) : excited, agitated
    2) : rowdy, unruly

    Spanish-English dictionary > alborotado

  • 4 alboroto

    m.
    1 din (ruido).
    2 fuss, to-do (jaleo).
    3 lot of noise, brawl, riot, bustle.
    4 frolic, noise, hullabaloo.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: alborotar.
    * * *
    1 (gritería) din, racket, row
    2 (desorden) uproar, commotion, disturbance
    3 (sobresalto) shock, alarm
    * * *
    noun m.
    2) riot
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=disturbio) disturbance; (=vocerío) racket, row; (=jaleo) uproar; (=motín) riot; (=pelea) brawl
    2) (=susto) scare, alarm
    3) pl alborotos CAm (=rosetas de maíz) popcorn sing
    * * *
    a) (agitación, nerviosismo) agitation; ( excitación) excitement
    b) ( ruido) racket
    c) (disturbio, jaleo) disturbance, commotion; ( motín) riot
    * * *
    = fuss, buzz, hype, the, uproar, hoopla, hue and cry, hubbub, spin, commotion, hilarity, rumpus, racket, fracas, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly, riot.
    Ex. Hernandez decided that if he wished to survive in this restrictive atmosphere his options were clearly the following: don't make waves, do a good job with no fuss of which he could be proud, and try to gain Balzac's respect.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Turf wars in the playback software arena: Microsoft Netshow, Windows Multimedia Player, and all that buzz'.
    Ex. However, given the hype about the networking of public libraries in the US, it is perhaps surprising to note that only 21% have some form of connection to the Internet.
    Ex. The film tells of the uproar the librarian created when he extended an invitation to an advocate of theories on black inferiority to address a high school assembly.
    Ex. Amid the hoopla, she hasn't forgotten its roots.
    Ex. There was no great hue and cry from the coastal community when the two papers appeared in print.
    Ex. And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.
    Ex. In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex. She pleaded, futilely, in broken French, until an elderly man, hearing the commotion, came to her rescue.
    Ex. The author combines southern warmth with unabashed emotion and side-splitting hilarity.
    Ex. Then reading of this story aloud to young children as they look at the pictures, needs a firm, quiet voice, until that glorious wordless pictorial passage showing the 'wild rumpus,' when at least one reader discovers it is necessary to give a one-man vocal performance of some rumbustious classical music as accompaniment to the viewing of those pages.
    Ex. He says the library science degree is a racket; that there's nothing taught in library school that can't be better learned on the job.
    Ex. There are, as I see it, approximately three positions one can take on the matter, each with its own adherents in the current fracas.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    Ex. The subjects referred to recur frequently in the writings of the 'socially committed' -- drugs, sex, racism, student unrest, riots, scandals in government, conservation, the role of women in society are among them.
    ----
    * causar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * provocar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * * *
    a) (agitación, nerviosismo) agitation; ( excitación) excitement
    b) ( ruido) racket
    c) (disturbio, jaleo) disturbance, commotion; ( motín) riot
    * * *
    = fuss, buzz, hype, the, uproar, hoopla, hue and cry, hubbub, spin, commotion, hilarity, rumpus, racket, fracas, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly, riot.

    Ex: Hernandez decided that if he wished to survive in this restrictive atmosphere his options were clearly the following: don't make waves, do a good job with no fuss of which he could be proud, and try to gain Balzac's respect.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'Turf wars in the playback software arena: Microsoft Netshow, Windows Multimedia Player, and all that buzz'.
    Ex: However, given the hype about the networking of public libraries in the US, it is perhaps surprising to note that only 21% have some form of connection to the Internet.
    Ex: The film tells of the uproar the librarian created when he extended an invitation to an advocate of theories on black inferiority to address a high school assembly.
    Ex: Amid the hoopla, she hasn't forgotten its roots.
    Ex: There was no great hue and cry from the coastal community when the two papers appeared in print.
    Ex: And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.
    Ex: In our media saturated world of high-blown hype and suffocating spin they do their best to tell you the truth.
    Ex: She pleaded, futilely, in broken French, until an elderly man, hearing the commotion, came to her rescue.
    Ex: The author combines southern warmth with unabashed emotion and side-splitting hilarity.
    Ex: Then reading of this story aloud to young children as they look at the pictures, needs a firm, quiet voice, until that glorious wordless pictorial passage showing the 'wild rumpus,' when at least one reader discovers it is necessary to give a one-man vocal performance of some rumbustious classical music as accompaniment to the viewing of those pages.
    Ex: He says the library science degree is a racket; that there's nothing taught in library school that can't be better learned on the job.
    Ex: There are, as I see it, approximately three positions one can take on the matter, each with its own adherents in the current fracas.
    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    Ex: The subjects referred to recur frequently in the writings of the 'socially committed' -- drugs, sex, racism, student unrest, riots, scandals in government, conservation, the role of women in society are among them.
    * causar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.
    * provocar un gran alboroto = make + a splash.

    * * *
    A
    1 (agitación, nerviosismo) agitation; (excitación) excitement
    2 (ruido) racket
    B
    1 (disturbio, jaleo) disturbance, commotion, ruckus ( AmE colloq)
    2 (motín) riot
    * * *

    Del verbo alborotar: ( conjugate alborotar)

    alboroto es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    alborotó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    alborotar    
    alboroto
    alborotar ( conjugate alborotar) verbo intransitivo
    to make a racket
    verbo transitivo
    a) ( agitar) to agitate, get … agitated;

    ( excitar) to get … excited

    alborotarse verbo pronominal
    a) ( agitarse) to get agitated o upset;

    ( excitarse) to get excited

    alboroto sustantivo masculino
    a) (agitación, nerviosismo) agitation;

    ( excitación) excitement

    c) (disturbio, jaleo) disturbance, commotion;

    ( motín) riot
    alborotar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 (causar agitación) to agitate, work up
    2 (revolver, desordenar) to make untidy, turn upside down
    II vi (causar jaleo) to kick up a racket
    alboroto sustantivo masculino
    1 (jaleo) din, racket
    2 (disturbios) disturbance, uproar
    ' alboroto' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    alteración
    - armar
    - gresca
    - mogollón
    - organizarse
    - barullo
    - bochinche
    - bronca
    - escándalo
    - jaleo
    - tumulto
    English:
    commotion
    - disturbance
    - excitement
    - fuss
    - hubbub
    - pandemonium
    - rowdy
    - uproar
    - up
    * * *
    nm
    1. [ruido] din;
    había mucho alboroto en la calle there was a lot of noise in the street
    2. [jaleo] fuss, to-do;
    se armó un gran alboroto there was a huge fuss;
    se produjeron alborotos callejeros there were street disturbances
    alborotos nmpl
    CAm popcorn
    * * *
    m commotion
    * * *
    1) : disturbance, ruckus
    2) motín: riot
    * * *
    1. (jaleo) racket
    2. (disturbio) disturbance / riot

    Spanish-English dictionary > alboroto

  • 5 baraúnda

    f.
    racket, din, hurly-burly, pother.
    * * *
    1→ link=barahúnda barahúnda
    * * *
    * * *
    * * *
    Ex. He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.
    * * *
    * * *

    Ex: He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.

    * * *
    * * *
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > baraúnda

  • 6 barullo

    m.
    1 din, racket (ruido).
    armar barullo to make a racket
    2 mess (desorden).
    3 turmoil, hurly-burly, hubbub, racket.
    * * *
    1 noise, din, racket
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=alboroto) racket; (=confusión) confusion
    2)

    a barullo — in abundance, in great quantities

    * * *
    1) ( alboroto) racket (colloq), ruckus (AmE)
    2) ( desorden) muddle, mess; ( confusión)

    me armé un barulloI got all muddled up o (AmE) messed up (colloq)

    * * *
    = hubbub, rumpus, racket, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.
    Ex. And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.
    Ex. Then reading of this story aloud to young children as they look at the pictures, needs a firm, quiet voice, until that glorious wordless pictorial passage showing the 'wild rumpus,' when at least one reader discovers it is necessary to give a one-man vocal performance of some rumbustious classical music as accompaniment to the viewing of those pages.
    Ex. He says the library science degree is a racket; that there's nothing taught in library school that can't be better learned on the job.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    * * *
    1) ( alboroto) racket (colloq), ruckus (AmE)
    2) ( desorden) muddle, mess; ( confusión)

    me armé un barulloI got all muddled up o (AmE) messed up (colloq)

    * * *
    = hubbub, rumpus, racket, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.

    Ex: And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.

    Ex: Then reading of this story aloud to young children as they look at the pictures, needs a firm, quiet voice, until that glorious wordless pictorial passage showing the 'wild rumpus,' when at least one reader discovers it is necessary to give a one-man vocal performance of some rumbustious classical music as accompaniment to the viewing of those pages.
    Ex: He says the library science degree is a racket; that there's nothing taught in library school that can't be better learned on the job.
    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.

    * * *
    A (alboroto) racket ( colloq), ruckus ( AmE)
    estos niños siempre están armando barullo these children are always making a racket o creating a ruckus
    B (desorden) muddle, mess
    (confusión): en el barullo me dejé el bolso in the confusion I left my bag behind
    me armé un barullo I got into a mess o muddle ( colloq), I got all muddled up o ( AmE) messed up ( colloq)
    a barullo ( fam); galore
    en enero hay rebajas a barullo there are loads of sales o sales galore in January ( colloq)
    * * *

    barullo sustantivo masculino ( alboroto) racket (colloq), ruckus (AmE);
    ( desorden) muddle, mess
    barullo m (ruido) row, din
    (lío, embrollo, confusión) confusion
    ' barullo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    belén
    - constante
    - zafarrancho
    - bochinche
    English:
    hubbub
    - din
    - scramble
    * * *
    Fam
    1. [ruido] din, racket;
    el barullo del tráfico no me deja dormir the din of the traffic is keeping me awake;
    armar barullo to make a racket
    2. [desorden] mess;
    hay un barullo de papeles encima de la mesa there are papers all over the desk;
    se armó un barullo con los números he got into a real mess o muddle with the figures;
    con tanta información tengo un barullo en la cabeza my head is in a muddle with so much information
    * * *
    m uproar, racket
    * * *
    bulla: racket, ruckus
    * * *
    1. (ruido) racket / row
    2. (confusión) confusion / muddle

    Spanish-English dictionary > barullo

  • 7 bullicio

    m.
    1 hustle and bustle.
    2 noise, riot, bustling, frolic.
    * * *
    1 (ruido) noise, racket
    2 (tumulto) bustle, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=ruido) din, hubbub
    2) (=actividad) activity, bustle
    3) (=confusión) confusion
    4) (=disturbio) disturbance
    * * *
    a) ( ruido) racket, noise
    b) (jaleo, actividad)
    * * *
    = bustle, hustle and bustle, hubbub, hurly-burly.
    Ex. The overall plan of the library is to provide an atmosphere of spaciousness and calm, in contrast to the urban bustle outside = El proyecto general de la biblioteca es ofrecer un ambiente de amplitud y calma, en contraste con el bullicio urbano exterior.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    * * *
    a) ( ruido) racket, noise
    b) (jaleo, actividad)
    * * *
    = bustle, hustle and bustle, hubbub, hurly-burly.

    Ex: The overall plan of the library is to provide an atmosphere of spaciousness and calm, in contrast to the urban bustle outside = El proyecto general de la biblioteca es ofrecer un ambiente de amplitud y calma, en contraste con el bullicio urbano exterior.

    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: And arming himself with patience and piety he tarried awhile until the hubbub was stilled.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.

    * * *
    1 (ruido) racket, noise, ruckus ( AmE colloq)
    2
    (jaleo, actividad): el bullicio de la gran ciudad the hustle and bustle of the city, the hurly-burly of city life
    * * *

    bullicio sustantivo masculino
    a) ( ruido) noise, racket (colloq)

    b) ( actividad):


    bullicio sustantivo masculino hubbub
    ' bullicio' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    animación
    - bronca
    English:
    action
    - activity
    - bustle
    - commotion
    - hustle
    * * *
    1. [de ciudad, mercado] hustle and bustle
    2. [de multitud] hubbub
    * * *
    m
    1 ( ruido) hubbub, din
    2 ( actividad) bustle
    * * *
    1) : ruckus, uproar
    2) : hustle and bustle
    * * *
    1. (ruido) noise / racket
    2. (actividad) hustle and bustle

    Spanish-English dictionary > bullicio

  • 8 bullicioso

    adj.
    1 noisy, bustling, boisterous, riotous.
    2 lively, riproaring.
    * * *
    1 (ruidoso) noisy
    2 (animado) lively; (con ajetreo) busy
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=ruidoso) [lugar] noisy; [niño] boisterous
    2) (=con actividad) busy, bustling
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo <calle/barrio> busy, noisy; < niño> boisterous
    * * *
    = lively [livelier -comp., liveliest -sup.], hard-driving, roaring, bustling, boisterous, abuzz, rumbustious, hurly-burly.
    Ex. But in the country the processes of printing always provoke such lively curiosity that the customers preferred to go in by a glazed door set in the shop-front and giving onto the street.
    Ex. Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex. Today, with its population of almost 80,000, Wexler bears little resemblance to the roaring lumber center it became in the middle decades of the nineteenth century.
    Ex. The article 'A bustling New York ALA show' describes the vendor exhibits at the American Library Association Annual Conference in New York.
    Ex. These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex. She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo <calle/barrio> busy, noisy; < niño> boisterous
    * * *
    = lively [livelier -comp., liveliest -sup.], hard-driving, roaring, bustling, boisterous, abuzz, rumbustious, hurly-burly.

    Ex: But in the country the processes of printing always provoke such lively curiosity that the customers preferred to go in by a glazed door set in the shop-front and giving onto the street.

    Ex: Dexter Basil Rundle is a vice-president of the Garrett National Bank in Garrett, a practical, progressive, hard-driving city of 122,680 in the Midwest.
    Ex: Today, with its population of almost 80,000, Wexler bears little resemblance to the roaring lumber center it became in the middle decades of the nineteenth century.
    Ex: The article 'A bustling New York ALA show' describes the vendor exhibits at the American Library Association Annual Conference in New York.
    Ex: These comedies, especially the seven he created in his glory years, lurch breathlessly in every direction, simultaneously sophisticated and boisterous, urbane and philistine.
    Ex: She is keeping New York abuzz by shrouding the launch of 'Talk,' her new magazine, in mystery.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.

    * * *
    ‹calle/barrio› busy, noisy; ‹niño› boisterous
    * * *

    bullicioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    noisy

    ' bullicioso' also found in these entries:
    English:
    boisterous
    - bustling
    - noisy
    - riotous
    - rip-roaring
    * * *
    bullicioso, -a
    adj
    1. [agitado] [reunión, multitud] noisy;
    [calle, mercado] busy, bustling
    2. [inquieto] rowdy, boisterous
    nm,f
    boisterous person
    * * *
    adj bustling
    * * *
    bullicioso, -sa adj
    : noisy, busy, turbulent

    Spanish-English dictionary > bullicioso

  • 9 tumulto

    m.
    1 riot, disturbance (disturbio).
    2 uproar, tumult (alboroto).
    3 turmoil, boisterousness, riot, commotion.
    * * *
    1 tumult, commotion
    * * *
    SM turmoil, tumult; (Pol) (=motín) riot, disturbance
    * * *
    masculino ( multitud) crowd; ( alboroto) commotion
    * * *
    = uproar, tumult, crowd, maddening crowd, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.
    Ex. The film tells of the uproar the librarian created when he extended an invitation to an advocate of theories on black inferiority to address a high school assembly.
    Ex. This volume of essays looks to the formative processes that have shaped human relations in the midst of this century's tumult of wars, revolutions, and international confrontation.
    Ex. The second example specifies, 'far adj3 crowd', that the two words, 'far' and 'crowd', must appear within 3 words of one another.
    Ex. Traffic in the morning, trash at the end of the day, and a chaos of people trying to navigate the maddening crowd in between.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    ----
    * tumulto + acabar = tumult + die.
    * * *
    masculino ( multitud) crowd; ( alboroto) commotion
    * * *
    = uproar, tumult, crowd, maddening crowd, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.

    Ex: The film tells of the uproar the librarian created when he extended an invitation to an advocate of theories on black inferiority to address a high school assembly.

    Ex: This volume of essays looks to the formative processes that have shaped human relations in the midst of this century's tumult of wars, revolutions, and international confrontation.
    Ex: The second example specifies, 'far adj3 crowd', that the two words, 'far' and 'crowd', must appear within 3 words of one another.
    Ex: Traffic in the morning, trash at the end of the day, and a chaos of people trying to navigate the maddening crowd in between.
    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    * tumulto + acabar = tumult + die.

    * * *
    (multitud) crowd; (alboroto) commotion, tumult
    había un tumulto de gente en la estación there was a crowd of people in the station, the station was crowded with people
    se encontraron en medio del tumulto they met in the midst of all the commotion
    la policía sofocó los tumultos the police quelled the disturbances
    * * *

    tumulto sustantivo masculino ( multitud) crowd;
    ( alboroto) commotion, tumult
    tumulto sustantivo masculino tumult, uproar
    ' tumulto' also found in these entries:
    English:
    melee
    - tumult
    - uproar
    - up
    * * *
    1. [alboroto] commotion, tumult;
    la presencia del cantante causó un tumulto the presence of the singer caused a commotion
    2. [disturbio] riot, disturbance
    3. [multitud] crowd, throng;
    intentó abrirse paso entre el tumulto de periodistas she tried to make her way through the throng of reporters;
    se formó un tumulto frente a la casa a crowd formed in front of the house
    * * *
    m uproar
    * * *
    1) alboroto: commotion, tumult
    2) motín: riot
    3) multitud: crowd

    Spanish-English dictionary > tumulto

  • 10 tumultuoso

    adj.
    1 tumultuous, turbulent, hurly-burly.
    2 overcrowded.
    * * *
    1 tumultuous, riotous
    * * *
    ADJ tumultuous; pey riotous, disorderly
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo tumultuous
    * * *
    = tumultuous, hurly-burly.
    Ex. Surely these innovations already have and will continue to bring deep and wide-sweeping change to our profession - and because of their rapidity, these changes will be sudden and often tumultuous.
    Ex. Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo tumultuous
    * * *
    = tumultuous, hurly-burly.

    Ex: Surely these innovations already have and will continue to bring deep and wide-sweeping change to our profession - and because of their rapidity, these changes will be sudden and often tumultuous.

    Ex: Its principles of living close to the natural world and striving for balance in all that we do provide an antidote to our hurly-burly existence.

    * * *
    tumultuous
    * * *

    tumultuoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    tumultuous
    tumultuoso,-a adjetivo tumultuous, uproarious

    ' tumultuoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    tumultuosa
    English:
    tumultuous
    * * *
    tumultuoso, -a adj
    1. [calle] crowded, teeming;
    [espectáculo, reunión] rowdy, tumultuous
    2. [mar, aguas] rough, stormy
    * * *
    adj uproarious
    * * *
    tumultuoso, -sa adj
    : tumultuous

    Spanish-English dictionary > tumultuoso

  • 11 vorágine

    f.
    maelstrom, whirlpool.
    * * *
    1 vortex, whirlpool
    * * *
    SF [de mar, río] whirlpool, vortex, maelstrom frm; [de odio, destrucción, confusión] maelstrom; [de actividad, publicidad] whirl
    * * *
    femenino (liter) ( en el mar) whirlpool; ( situación confusa) maelstrom (liter)
    * * *
    = maelstrom, whirlpool, whirl, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.
    Ex. Specific types of information are considered imperative to decipher the intricate process of surviving in a modern, mid-nineties maelstrom of socio-economic crises.
    Ex. The most recent drawings refer explicitly to landscapes, with waterfalls, mountains, and whirlpools.
    Ex. Like a whirl of shiny flakes sparkling in a snow globe, Hubble catches an instantaneous glimpse of many hundreds of thousands of stars.
    Ex. The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex. No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.
    * * *
    femenino (liter) ( en el mar) whirlpool; ( situación confusa) maelstrom (liter)
    * * *
    = maelstrom, whirlpool, whirl, hustle and bustle, hurly-burly.

    Ex: Specific types of information are considered imperative to decipher the intricate process of surviving in a modern, mid-nineties maelstrom of socio-economic crises.

    Ex: The most recent drawings refer explicitly to landscapes, with waterfalls, mountains, and whirlpools.
    Ex: Like a whirl of shiny flakes sparkling in a snow globe, Hubble catches an instantaneous glimpse of many hundreds of thousands of stars.
    Ex: The article ' Hustle and bustle or solemn silence?' argues that changes in society require a re-examination of the library's role.
    Ex: No, the hurly-burly of politics holds no enchantment for me, I in fact have a deep rooted scepticism and I am disillusioned about politics.

    * * *
    1 (en el mar) whirlpool
    2 (situación confusa) whirl, maelstrom ( liter)
    * * *

    vorágine sustantivo femenino
    1 (ajetreo) hustle and bustle, hurly-burly
    2 (remolino de agua) whirlpool
    ' vorágine' also found in these entries:
    English:
    vortex
    - whirl
    * * *
    1. [confusión] confusion, whirl;
    atrapado en la vorágine de la gran ciudad trapped in the hectic whirl of life in the big city
    2. [remolino] whirlpool
    * * *
    f ( remolino) whirlpool; fig
    whirl
    * * *
    : whirlpool, maelstrom

    Spanish-English dictionary > vorágine

  • 12 zapatiesta

    1 familiar hurly-burly
    * * *
    = ruckus.
    Ex. Sometime back a heroine created a ruckus by saying that the actor acted fresh with her by biting her lips in a smooching scene.
    * * *

    Ex: Sometime back a heroine created a ruckus by saying that the actor acted fresh with her by biting her lips in a smooching scene.

    * * *
    ( Esp)
    uproar, commotion, ruckus ( AmE colloq)
    * * *
    f famtrapatiesta

    Spanish-English dictionary > zapatiesta

  • 13 torbellino

    m.
    1 whirlwind (remolino) (of air).
    2 whirlwind.
    3 whirlwind (persona inquieta).
    4 live wire.
    * * *
    1 (de viento) whirlwind; (de agua) whirlpool; (de polvo) whirl, cloud
    2 figurado (abundancia de cosas) whirl, turmoil, welter
    3 figurado (persona) live wire, human dynamo
    \
    * * *
    SM
    1) [de viento] whirlwind; [de polvo] dust cloud
    2) [de cosas] whirl
    3) (=persona) whirlwind
    * * *
    a) ( de viento) whirlwind, twister (AmE); ( de polvo) dust storm
    b) ( de actividad) whirl
    c) ( persona inquieta) bundle of energy
    * * *
    a) ( de viento) whirlwind, twister (AmE); ( de polvo) dust storm
    b) ( de actividad) whirl
    c) ( persona inquieta) bundle of energy
    * * *
    torbellino1
    1 = maelstrom, vortex [vortexes/vortices, -pl.], whirlwind, whirlpool, whirl.

    Ex: Specific types of information are considered imperative to decipher the intricate process of surviving in a modern, mid-nineties maelstrom of socio-economic crises.

    Ex: The vortex of socio-economic change in the UK has caused, inter alia, libraries to be regarded as a drain on the ratepayer's pocket.
    Ex: The article 'Harnessing the whirlwind of information technologies' discusses new technologies and their impact on the health library.
    Ex: The most recent drawings refer explicitly to landscapes, with waterfalls, mountains, and whirlpools.
    Ex: Like a whirl of shiny flakes sparkling in a snow globe, Hubble catches an instantaneous glimpse of many hundreds of thousands of stars.

    torbellino2

    Ex: The book likens the early adolescent years to a roller coaster, often unpredictable but exciting and filled with possibility.

    torbellino3

    Ex: The man is a live wire of nerves and predictable unpredictability.

    * * *
    1 (de viento) whirlwind, twister ( AmE); (de polvo) dust storm
    pasó como un torbellino she rushed past like a whirlwind
    2 (de actividad) hurly-burly, whirl
    un torbellino de sentimientos muy confusos a turmoil o whirl of confused emotions
    el torbellino de la gran ciudad the hurly-burly o the hustle and bustle of the big city
    3 (persona inquieta) bundle of energy
    * * *

    torbellino sustantivo masculino

    ( de polvo) dust storm


    torbellino sustantivo masculino
    1 (remolino de viento) whirlwind, US twister
    2 fig (agitación) whirl
    (de sentimientos) turmoil
    ' torbellino' also found in these entries:
    English:
    whirl
    - whirlwind
    - eddy
    * * *
    1. [remolino] [de aire] whirlwind;
    [de agua] whirlpool; [de polvo] dust cloud
    2. [mezcla confusa] [de actividad, emociones] whirlwind;
    su vida es un torbellino her life is a whirlwind of activity
    3. [persona inquieta] whirlwind;
    es un torbellino de energías she is a bundle of energy
    * * *
    m whirlwind
    * * *
    : whirlwind

    Spanish-English dictionary > torbellino

  • 14 alboroto

    • brawl
    • bustle
    • bustling
    • charivari
    • commotion
    • disturbance
    • fracas
    • frolic
    • fuss
    • gambol
    • hue and cry
    • hullabaloo
    • hurly-burly
    • lot of noise
    • melée
    • nofault automobile insurance
    • noise
    • noise about
    • racket
    • rampage
    • rinse through
    • rinsings
    • riot
    • riot act
    • riot police
    • rioter
    • rioting
    • riotous
    • rout
    • row
    • rowdyism
    • rumpus
    • uproar
    • whoop-de-do
    • whoop-de-doo

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > alboroto

  • 15 baraúnda

    • din
    • hurly-burly
    • pother

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > baraúnda

  • 16 barullo

    • hubbub
    • hurly-burly
    • melée
    • troubled financial situation
    • troubleshoot
    • turmoil

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > barullo

  • 17 batahola

    • bustle
    • bustling
    • din
    • frolic
    • gambol
    • hurly-burly

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > batahola

  • 18 tumulto

    • boisterousness
    • commotion
    • hurly-burly
    • rinse through
    • rinsings
    • riot
    • riot act
    • rout
    • tumult
    • turmoil
    • uproar

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > tumulto

  • 19 corpulento

    adj.
    1 stout, burly, heavily built, heavy-set.
    2 hefty, bulky.
    3 solid, sturdy.
    4 full-bodied.
    * * *
    1 corpulent, stocky, stout
    * * *
    (f. - corpulenta)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] burly, heavily-built; [árbol] stout, solid, massive
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo <persona/animal> hefty, burly; < árbol> solid, sturdy
    * * *
    = hefty [heftier -comp., heftiest -sup.], strong [stronger -comp., strongest -sup.].
    Ex. This new font had increased contrast and x-height in the lower case and a hefty set of capitals = Este nuevo tipo de letra había aumentado el contraste y el ojo medio de las minúsculas y las mayúsculas eran voluminosas.
    Ex. In fact, the 1979 index figures show a strong contrast between the hardback and paperback turnovers, with the hardback market being down and the paperback market up.
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo <persona/animal> hefty, burly; < árbol> solid, sturdy
    * * *
    = hefty [heftier -comp., heftiest -sup.], strong [stronger -comp., strongest -sup.].

    Ex: This new font had increased contrast and x-height in the lower case and a hefty set of capitals = Este nuevo tipo de letra había aumentado el contraste y el ojo medio de las minúsculas y las mayúsculas eran voluminosas.

    Ex: In fact, the 1979 index figures show a strong contrast between the hardback and paperback turnovers, with the hardback market being down and the paperback market up.

    * * *
    A ‹persona› hefty, burly, heavily built; ‹animal› hefty, bulky; ‹árbol› solid, sturdy
    B ‹vino› full-bodied
    * * *

    corpulento
    ◊ -ta adjetivo ‹persona/animal hefty, burly;


    árbol solid, sturdy
    corpulento,-a adjetivo corpulent, stout
    ' corpulento' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    corpulenta
    - hermoso
    English:
    corpulent
    - portly
    - stout
    - bulky
    - heavily
    - hefty
    * * *
    corpulento, -a adj
    [persona] heavily built, burly; [animal] bulky
    * * *
    adj solidly built, burly
    * * *
    corpulento, -ta adj
    robusto: robust, stout, sturdy

    Spanish-English dictionary > corpulento

  • 20 fornido

    adj.
    strong, brawny, able-bodied, stalwart.
    * * *
    1 strapping, hefty
    * * *
    ADJ (=corpulento) strapping, hefty; (=apuesto) well-built
    * * *
    - da adjetivo well-built, big, hefty
    * * *
    = brawny [brawnier -comp., brawniest -sup.], sturdy [sturdier -comp., sturdiest -sup.], stalwart.
    Ex. This revolutionary syndicalist union consistently supported the most downtrodden & oppressed, & encouraged a cult of the unspoiled, heroic brawny proletarian with raw courage & 'natural' virtues.
    Ex. Here came every sort of human ingredient -- sturdy homesteaders, skilled craftsmen, precious scoundrels.
    Ex. In the past decade or so, much stalwart work has been done in order to provide non-textbook reading material for primary school children.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo well-built, big, hefty
    * * *
    = brawny [brawnier -comp., brawniest -sup.], sturdy [sturdier -comp., sturdiest -sup.], stalwart.

    Ex: This revolutionary syndicalist union consistently supported the most downtrodden & oppressed, & encouraged a cult of the unspoiled, heroic brawny proletarian with raw courage & 'natural' virtues.

    Ex: Here came every sort of human ingredient -- sturdy homesteaders, skilled craftsmen, precious scoundrels.
    Ex: In the past decade or so, much stalwart work has been done in order to provide non-textbook reading material for primary school children.

    * * *
    fornido -da
    well-built, big, hefty
    * * *
    fornido, -a adj
    well-built
    * * *
    adj well-built
    * * *
    fornido, -da adj
    : well-built, burly, hefty

    Spanish-English dictionary > fornido

См. также в других словарях:

  • Hurly-burly — Hur ly bur ly, n. [Reduplicated fr. OE. hurly confusion: cf. F. hurler to howl, yell, L. ululare; or cf. E. hurry.] Tumult; bustle; confusion. Shak. [1913 Webster] All places were filled with tumult and hurly burly. Knolles. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hurly-burly — [hʉr′lē bʉr′lē] n. pl. hurly burlies [prob. extended < HURLY] a turmoil; uproar; hubbub; confusion adj. disorderly and confused …   English World dictionary

  • Hurly Burly — (engl.), 1) arges Getös; 2) Alles durch einander, wie Kraut u. Rüben; 3) Freudengeschrei der englischen Matrosen; 4) ohne alle Umstände, gerade zu …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • hurly-burly — also hurlyburly, 1530s, apparently an alteration of phrase hurling and burling, reduplication of 14c. hurling commotion, tumult, verbal noun of HURL (Cf. hurl) (q.v.). Hurling time was the name applied by chroniclers to the period of tumult and… …   Etymology dictionary

  • hurly-burly — ► NOUN ▪ busy, boisterous activity. ORIGIN from HURL(Cf. ↑hurl) …   English terms dictionary

  • hurly-burly — [[t]hɜ͟ː(r)li bɜː(r)li[/t]] N SING: usu the N, oft N of n (emphasis) If you talk about the hurly burly of a situation, you are emphasizing how noisy or busy it is. No one expects him to get involved in the hurly burly of campaigning …   English dictionary

  • hurly-burly — noun Etymology: probably alteration & reduplication of hurling, gerund of hurl Date: 1539 uproar, tumult • hurly burly adjective …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hurly-burly — hur|ly bur|ly [ˈhə:li ˌbə:li US ˌhə:rli ˈbə:rli] n [U] [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Probably from hurl] a lot of busy noisy activity ▪ the hurly burly of city life …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hurly-burly — noun (U) a lot of busy, noisy activity: the hurly burly of city life …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • hurly-burly — /herr lee berr lee, berr /, n., pl. hurly burlies, adj. n. 1. noisy disorder and confusion; commotion; uproar; tumult. adj. 2. full of commotion; tumultuous. [1520 30; alter. of hurling (and) burling, rhyming phrase based on HURLING in its (now… …   Universalium

  • hurly-burly — n. (Colloq.) Hurl, hurly, turmoil, tumult, commotion, confusion, bustle, disturbance …   New dictionary of synonyms

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