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his house

  • 1 ā

       ā    (before consonants), ab (before vowels, h, and some consonants, esp. l, n, r, s), abs (usu. only before t and q, esp. freq. before the pron. te), old af, praep. with abl., denoting separation or departure (opp. ad).    I. Lit., in space, from, away from, out of.    A. With motion: ab urbe proficisci, Cs.: a supero mari Flaminia (est via), leads: Nunc quidem paululum, inquit, a sole, a little out of the sun: usque a mari supero Romam proficisci, all the way from; with names of cities and small islands, or with domo, home (for the simple abl; of motion, away from, not out of, a place); hence, of raising a siege, of the march of soldiers, the setting out of a fleet, etc.: oppidum ab Aeneā fugiente a Troiā conditum: ab Alesiā, Cs.: profectus ab Orico cum classe, Cs.; with names of persons or with pronouns: cum a vobis discessero: videat forte hic te a patre aliquis exiens, i. e. from his house, T.; (praegn.): a rege munera repudiare, from, sent by, N.—    B. Without motion.    1. Of separation or distance: abesse a domo paulisper maluit: tum Brutus ab Romā aberat, S.: hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Cs.: a foro longe abesse: procul a castris hostes in collibus constiterunt, Cs.: cum esset bellum tam prope a Siciliā; so with numerals to express distance: ex eo loco ab milibus passuum octo, eight miles distant, Cs.: ab milibus passuum minus duobus castra posuerunt, less than two miles off, Cs.; so rarely with substantives: quod tanta machinatio ab tanto spatio instrueretur, so far away, Cs.—    2. To denote a side or direction, etc., at, on, in: ab sinistrā parte nudatis castris, on the left, Cs.: ab eā parte, quā, etc., on that side, S.: Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequanis flumen Rhenum, on the side of the Sequani, i. e. their country, Cs.: ab decumanā portā castra munita, at the main entrance, Cs.: crepuit hinc a Glycerio ostium, of the house of G., T.: (cornua) ab labris argento circumcludunt, on the edges, Cs.; hence, a fronte, in the van; a latere, on the flank; a tergo, in the rear, behind; a dextro cornu, on the right wing; a medio spatio, half way.—    II. Fig.    A. Of time.    1. Of a point of time, after: Caesar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dextrum cornu profectus, immediately after, Cs.: ab eo magistratu, after this office, S.: recens a volnere Dido, fresh from her wound, V.: in Italiam perventum est quinto mense a Carthagine, i. e. after leaving, L.: ab his, i. e. after these words, hereupon, O.: ab simili <*>ade domo profugus, i. e. after and in consequence of, L.—    2. Of a period of time, from, since, after: ab hora tertiā bibebatur, from the third hour: ab Sullā et Pompeio consulibus, since the consulship of: ab incenso Capitolio illum esse vigesumum annum, since, S.: augures omnes usque ab Romulo, since the time of: iam inde ab infelici pugnā ceciderant animi, from (and in consequence of), L.; hence, ab initio, a principio, a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, at first: ab integro, anew, afresh: ab... ad, from (a time)... to: cum ab horā septimā ad vesperum pugnatum sit, Cs.; with nouns or adjectives denoting a time of life: iam inde a pueritiā, T.: a pueritiā: a pueris: iam inde ab incunabulis, L.: a parvo, from a little child, or childhood, L.: ab parvulis, Cs.—    B. In other relations.    1. To denote separation, deterring, intermitting, distinction, difference, etc., from: quo discessum animi a corpore putent esse mortem: propius abesse ab ortu: alter ab illo, next after him, V.: Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus, next in rank to, H.: impotentia animi a temperantiā dissidens: alieno a te animo fuit, estranged; so with adjj. denoting free, strange, pure, etc.: res familiaris casta a cruore civili: purum ab humano cultu solum, L.: (opoidum) vacuum ab defensoribus, Cs.: alqm pudicum servare ab omni facto, etc., II.; with substt.: impunitas ab iudicio: ab armis quies dabatur, L.; or verbs: haec a custodiis loca vacabant, Cs.—    2. To denote the agent, by: qui (Mars) saepe spoliantem iam evertit et perculit ab abiecto, by the agency of: Laudari me abs te, a laudato viro: si quid ei a Caesare gravius accidisset, at Caesar's hands, Cs.: vetus umor ab igne percaluit solis, under, O.: a populo P. imperia perferre, Cs.: equo lassus ab indomito, H.: volgo occidebantur: per quos et a quibus? by whose hands and upon whose orders? factus ab arte decor, artificial, O.: destitutus ab spe, L.; (for the sake of the metre): correptus ab ignibus, O.; (poet. with abl. of means or instr.): intumuit venter ab undā, O.—Ab with abl. of agent for the dat., to avoid ambiguity, or for emphasis: quibus (civibus) est a vobis consulendum: te a me nostrae consuetudinis monendum esse puto.—    3. To denote source, origin, extraction, from, of: Turnus ab Ariciā, L.: si ego me a M. Tullio esse dicerem: oriundi ab Sabinis, L.: dulces a fontibus undae, V.—With verbs of expecting, fearing, hoping (cf. a parte), from, on the part of: a quo quidem genere, iudices, ego numquam timui: nec ab Romanis vobis ulla est spes, you can expect nothing from the Romans, L.; (ellipt.): haec a servorum bello pericula, threatened by: quem metus a praetore Romano stimulabat, fear of what the praetor might do, L.—With verbs of paying, etc., solvere, persolvere, dare (pecuniam) ab aliquo, to pay through, by a draft on, etc.: se praetor dedit, a quaestore numeravit, quaestor a mensā publicā, by an order on the quaestor: ei legat pecuniam a filio, to be paid by his son: scribe decem (milia) a Nerio, pay by a draft on Nerius, H.; cognoscere ab aliquā re, to know or learn by means of something (but ab aliquo, from some one): id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus cognovisse, Cs.; in giving an etymology: id ab re... interregnum appellatum, L.—Rarely with verbs of beginning and repeating: coepere a fame mala, L.: a se suisque orsus, Ta.—    4. With verbs of freeing from, defending, protecting, from, against: ut a proeliis quietem habuerant, L.: provincia a calamitate est defendenda: sustinere se a lapsu, L.—    5. With verbs and adjectives, to define the respect in which, in relation to, with regard to, in respect to, on the part of: orba ab optimatibus contio: mons vastus ab naturā et humano cultu, S.: ne ab re sint omissiores, too neglectful of money or property, T.: posse a facundiā, in the matter of eloquence, T.; cf. with laborare, for the simple abl, in, for want of: laborare ab re frumentariā, Cs.—    6. In stating a motive, from, out of, on account of, in consequence of: patres ab honore appellati, L.: inops tum urbs ab longinquā obsidione, L.—    7. Indicating a part of the whole, of, out of: scuto ab novissimis uni militi detracto, Cs.: a quibus (captivis) ad Senatum missus (Regulus).—    8. Marking that to which anything belongs: qui sunt ab eā disciplinā: nostri illi a Platone et Aristotele aiunt.—    9. Of a side or party: vide ne hoc totum sit a me, makes for my view: vir ab innocentiā clementissimus, in favor of.—10. In late prose, of an office: ab epistulis, a secretary, Ta. Note. Ab is not repeated with a following pron interrog. or relat.: Arsinoën, Stratum, Naupactum... fateris ab hostibus esse captas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis, quos, etc. It is often separated from the word which it governs: a nullius umquam me tempore aut commodo: a minus bono, S.: a satis miti principio, L.—The poets join a and que, making āque; but in good prose que is annexed to the following abl. (a meque, abs teque, etc.): aque Chao, V.: aque mero, O.—In composition, ab- stands before vowels, and h, b, d, i consonant, l, n, r, s; abs- before c, q, t; b is dropped, leaving as- before p; ā- is found in āfuī, āfore ( inf fut. of absum); and au- in auferō, aufugiō.
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    I
    Ah!; (distress/regret/pity, appeal/entreaty, surprise/joy, objection/contempt)
    II
    by (agent), from (departure, cause, remote origin/time); after (reference)
    III
    ante, abb. a.

    in calendar expression a. d. = ante diem -- before the day

    Latin-English dictionary > ā

  • 2 ad

       ad praep. with acc.    [cf. Eng. at].—Of approach (opp. to ab, as in to ex).    I. In space, to, toward: retorquet oculos ad urbem: una pars vergit ad septentriones, Cs.: tendens ad sidera palmas, V. —Fig.: ad alia vitia propensior, more inclined to. —Esp., ad dextram, sinistram, or laevam, to or on the right or left: ito ad dextram, T.: alqd ad dextram conspicere, Cs.: non rectā regione... sed ad laevam, L.—Designating the goal, to, toward: ad ripam convenire, Cs.: vocari ad cenam, H.: ad se adferre: reticulum ad narīs sibi admovebat (cf. accedit ad urbem, he approaches the city; and, accedit provinciae, it is added to the province).— Ad me, te, se, for domum meam, tuam, suam (in T. freq.): eamus ad me, T. — With gen., ellipt.: ad Dianae, to the temple of, T.: ad Castoris currere. — Used for dat: litteras dare ad aliquem, to write one a letter (cf. litteras dare alicui, to give a letter to one): domum ad te scribere: ad primam (epistulam) scribere, to answer.—Hence, librum ad aliquem mittere, scribere, to dedicate a book to one. —In titles, ad aliquem signifies to, addressed to.— With names of towns, ad answers to Whither? for the simple acc., i. e. to the vicinity of, to the neighborhood of: ad Aquinum accedere, approach: ut cum suis copiis iret ad Mutinam. — Of hostile movement or protection, against (cf. adversus): veniri ad se existimantes, Cs.: ipse ad hostem vehitur, N.: Romulus ad regem impetum facit (cf. in), L.: clipeos ad tela protecti obiciunt, V.: ad hos casūs provisa praesidia, Cs.—In war, of manner of fighting: ad pedes pugna venerat, was fought out on foot, L.: equitem ad pedes deducere, L.: pugna ad gladios venerat, L. — Emphatic of distance, to, even to, all the way to: a Salonis ad Oricum portūs... occupavit, Cs.: usque a Dianis ad Sinopum navigare. — Fig.: deverberasse usque ad necem, T.: virgis ad necem caedi.—Of nearness or proximity in gen. (cf. apud), near to, by, at, close by: ad forīs adsistere: Ianum ad infimum Argiletum fecit, L.: quod Romanis ad manum domi supplementum esset, at hand, L.: errantem ad flumina, V.; and ellipt.: pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret! — Of persons: qui primum pilum ad Caesarem duxerat, Cs.: ad me fuit, at my house: ad inferos poenas parricidi luent, among.—So, fig.: ad omnīs nationes sanctum, in the judgment of, Cs.: ut esset ad posteros monumentum, etc., L.: ad urbem esse (of a general outside of the walls): ad urbem cum imperio remanere, Cs.—With names of towns and verbs of rest: pons, qui erat ad Genavam, Cs.; and with an ordinal number and lapis: sepultus ad quintum lapidem, N.—    II. In time, about, toward: domum reductus ad vesperum, toward evening.—Till, until, to, even to, up to: usque ad hanc aetatem: ad multam noctem: amant ad quoddam tempus, until: quem ad finem? how long: ad quartam (sc. horam), H. — Hence, ad id (sc. tempus), till then: ad id dubios servare animos, L.— At, on, in, by: ad horam destinatam, at the appointed hour: frumentum ad diem dare. —    III. In number or amount, near, near to, almost, about, toward (cf. circiter): talenta ad quindecim coëgi, T.: annos ad quadraginta natus.—Adverb.: occisis ad hominum milibus quattuor, Cs.: ad duo milia et trecenti occisi, L.—Of a limit, to, unto, even to (rare): (viaticum) ad assem perdere, to the last farthing, H.: ad denarium solvere. —Esp., ad unum, to a single one, without exception: omnes ad unum idem sentiunt: exosus ad unum Troianos, V. —    IV. In other relations, with regard to, in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in: ad honorem antecellere: nihil ad rem pertinet.—Ellipt.: rectene an secus, nihil ad nos: Quid ad praetorem? quid ad rem? i. e. what difference does it make? H.: quibus (auxiliaribus) ad pugnam confidebat, Cs.: ad speciem ornatus, ad sensum acerbus: mentis ad omnia caecitas: ad cetera paene gemelli, H.: facultas ad dicendum.—With words denoting measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., according to, agreeably to, after: taleis ad certum pondus examinatis, Cs.: ad cursūs lunae describit annum, L.: canere ad tibiam: carmen castigare ad unguem, to perfection (see unguis), H.: ad istorum normam sapientes: ad specus angustiae vallium (i. e. ad specuum similitudinem angustae valles), Cs. — With the cause or reason, according to, at, on, in consequence of, for, in order to: ad horum proces in Boeotiam duxit, on their entreaty, L.: dictis ad fallendum instructis, L.: causae ad discordiam, to produce dissension, T.: ad facinora incendere, S.: ad speciem tabernaculis relictis, for appearance, Cs.: ad id, for this use, as a means to that end, L.: ad id ipsum, for that my purpose, L.: delecto milite ad navīs, marines, L.: puer ad cyathum statuetur, H.: biiugi ad frena leones, yoked in pairs with bits, V.: res quae sunt ad incendia, Cs.: ad communem salutem utilius.—In comparison, to, compared with, in comparison with: terra ad universi caeli complexum: nihil ad tuum equitatum, Caesar.—    V. In adverbial phrases, ad omnia, withal, to crown all: ad omnia tantum advehi auri, etc., L.—Ad hoc and ad haec, moreover, besides, in addition: ad hoc, quos... postremo omnes, quos, etc., S. — Ad id quod, beside that (rare): ad id quod... indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur, L. — Ad tempus, at a definite, fixed time, C., L.; at a fit, appropriate time, L.; for some time, for a short time, L.; according to circumstances. — Ad praesens, for the moment, for a short time.—Ad locum, on the spot: ut ad locum miles esset paratus, L.—Ad verbum, word for word, literally. — Ad summam, on the whole, generally, in general; in a word, in short, C., H.—Ad extremum, ad ultimum, ad postremum, at the end, finally, at last; of place, at the extremity, at the top, at the end: ad extremum (teli) unde ferrum exstabat, L.; of time, at last, finally: ad extremum incipit philosophari; of order, finally, lastly; to the last degree, quite, L. — Quem ad finem? to what limit? how far? how long? Note.—a. Ad rarely follows its acc: quam ad, T.: quos ad, C.: ripam ad Araxis, Ta.—b. In composition, ad- stands before vowels, b, d, f, h, i consonant, m, n, q, v, and mostly before l, r, s; acbefore c; but very often ad- before cl-, cr-, and cu-; ag- or ad- before g; ap- or ad- before p; atbefore t; but a- or ad- before gn, sp, sc, st.
    * * *
    I II
    to, up to, towards; near, at; until, on, by; almost; according to; about w/NUM

    Latin-English dictionary > ad

  • 3 aedēs

        aedēs is, f
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    temple, shrine; tomb; apartment, room; house (pl.), abode, dwelling; household

    Latin-English dictionary > aedēs

  • 4 aedēs

        aedēs aedium, f    see aedis.
    * * *
    temple, shrine; tomb; apartment, room; house (pl.), abode, dwelling; household

    Latin-English dictionary > aedēs

  • 5 aedicula

        aedicula ae, f    dim. (aedes), a small temple, chapel, niche, C., L.— Plur, a small dwelling, T., C.
    * * *
    small room/house/buillding/shrine; chapel, tomb, sepulcher; niche, closet

    Latin-English dictionary > aedicula

  • 6 aedificātiō

        aedificātiō ōnis, f    [aedifico], the process of building: intermissa.—A building, structure, edifice: omnis.— Plur: privatae, Ta.
    * * *
    house; building, edifice, group of buildings, built-up area; act of building; edification, explanation; building up (argument)

    Latin-English dictionary > aedificātiō

  • 7 aedis or aedēs

        aedis or aedēs is ( acc plur. usu aedīs), f    [AID-], a dwelling of the gods, temple, sanctuary (usu. a single edifice without partitions, while templum is a larger structure): Minervae: aedīs sacras incendere: in aede sonare (of poems), to be recited in the temple, H.: vacua Romanis vatibus, i. e. the Library in the Palatine Temple of Apollo, H.—Esp., a private chapel, sanctuary in a dwelling: decora, H.— Sing, a room, apartment, Cu.— Plur, a dwelling for men, house, habitation: matrona in aedibus, T.: regiae: ex aedibus Cethegi alqd ferre: domus salutantum totis vomit aedibus undam, i. e. from all parts, V.: cavae aedes, the vaulted mansion, V.—Poet., the cells (of bees), V.

    Latin-English dictionary > aedis or aedēs

  • 8 agō

        agō ēgī, āctus (old inf pass. agier), ere    [1 AG-], to put in motion, move, lead, drive, tend, conduct: bos Romam acta, L.: capellas, V.: pecus visere montīs, H.: ante se Thyum, N.: in exsilium, L.: Iris nubibus acta, borne on, V.: alqm in crucem, to crucify: Illum aget Fama, will carry, H.: quo hinc te agis? whither are you going? T.: se primus agebat, strode in front, V.: capellas potum, V.—Prov.: agas asellum, i. e. if you can't afford an ox, drive an ass. — Pass., to go, march: quo multitudo agebatur, L.: citius agi vellet agmen, march on quicker, L.: raptim agmine acto, L.— Esp., to drive away, carry off, steal, rob, plunder: pecoris praedas, S.; freq. with ferre, to rob, plunder: ferre agere plebem plebisque res, L.: res sociorum ferri agique vidit, L.—To chase, pursue, hunt: apros, V.: cervum, V. — Fig.: dum haec crimina agam ostiatim, track out from house to house: ceteros ruerem, agerem, T.: palantīs Troas, V.—To move, press, push forward, advance, bring up: multa undique portari atque agi, Cs.: vineis ad oppidum actis, pushed forward, Cs.: moles, Cu.: cloaca maxima sub terram agenda, to be carried under ground, L.: cuniculos ad aerarium, drive: per glaebas radicibus actis, O.: pluma in cutem radices egerit, struck deep root, O.: vera gloria radices agit: tellus Fissa agit rimas, opens in fissures, O.: in litus navīs, beached, L.: navem, to steer, H.: currūs, to drive, O.: per agmen limitem ferro, V.: vias, make way, V.: (sol) amicum Tempus agens, bringing the welcome hour (of sunset), H.—To throw out, stir up: spumas ore, V.: spumas in ore: se laetus ad auras Palmes agit, shoots up into the air, V.—Animam agere, to expire: nam et agere animam et efflare dicimus; cf. et gestum et animam ageres, i. e. exert yourself in gesturing and risk your life. — Fig., to lead, direct, guide: (poëmata), animum auditoris, H.— To move, impel, excite, urge, prompt, induce, rouse, drive: quae te Mens agit in facinus? O.: ad illa te, H.: eum praecipitem: viros spe praedae diversos agit, leads astray, S.: bonitas, quae nullis casibus agitur, N.: quemcunque inscitia veri Caecum agit, blinds, H.: quibus actus fatis, V.: seu te discus agit, occupies, H.: nos exquirere terras, V.: desertas quaerere terras agimur, V. — To pursue for harm, persecute, disturb, vex, attack, assail: reginam stimulis, V.: agentia verba Lycamben, H.: diris agam vos, H.: quam deus ultor agebat, O.—To pursue, carry on, think, reflect, deliberate, treat, represent, exhibit, exercise, practise, act, perform, deliver, pronounce: nihil, to be idle: omnia per nos, in person: agendi tempus, a time for action: industria in agendo: apud primos agebat, fought in the van, S.: quae continua bella agimus, are busy with, L.: (pes) natus rebus agendis, the metre appropriate to dramatic action, H.: Quid nunc agimus? what shall we do now? T.: quid agam, habeo, i. e. I know what to do, T.: quid agitur? how are you? T.: quid agis, dulcissime rerum? i. e. how are you? H.: vereor, quid agat Ino, what is to become of: quid agis? what do you mean? nihil agis, it is of no use, T.: nihil agis, dolor, quamvis, etc.: cupis abire, sed nihil agis, usque tenebo, you cannot succeed, H.: ubi blanditiis agitur nihil, O.—Esp., hoc or id agere, to give attention to, mind, heed: hocine agis, an non? are you attending? T.: id quod et agunt et moliuntur, their purpose and aim: qui id egerunt, ut gentem conlocarent, etc., aimed at this: sin autem id actum est, ut, etc., if it was their aim: summā vi agendum esse, ut, etc., L.: certiorem eum fecit, id agi, ut pons dissolveretur, it was planned, N.: Hoc age, ne, etc., take care, H.: alias res agis, you are not listening, T.: aliud agens ac nihil eius modi cogitans, bent on other plans: animadverti eum alias res agere, paid no attention: vides, quam alias res agamus, are otherwise occupied: populum aliud nunc agere, i. e. are indifferent.—To perform, do, transact: ne quid negligenter: suum negotium, attend to his own business: neque satis constabat, quid agerent, what they were at, Cs.: agentibus divina humanaque consulibus, busy with auspices and affairs, L.: per litteras agere, quae cogitas, carry on, N.: (bellum) cum feminis, Cu.: conventum, to hold an assize: ad conventūs agendos, to preside at, Cs.: census actus eo anno, taken, L.— Of public transactions, to manage, transact, do, discuss, speak, deliberate: quae (res) inter eos agi coeptae, negotiations begun, Cs.: de condicionibus pacis, treat, L.: quorum de poenā agebatur, L.— Hence, agere cum populo, of magistrates, to address the people on a law or measure (cf. agere ad populum, to propose, bring before the people): cum populo de re p.—Of a speaker or writer, to treat, discuss, narrate: id quod agas, your subject: bella per quartum iam volumen, L.: haec dum agit, during this speech, H.—In law, to plead, prosecute, advocate: lege agito, go to law, T.: causam apud iudices: aliter causam agi, to be argued on other grounds: cum de bonis et de caede agatur, in a cause relating to, etc.: tamquam ex syngraphā agere cum populo, to litigate: ex sponso egit: agere lege in hereditatem, sue for: crimen, to press an accusation: partis lenitatis et misericordiae, to plead the cause of mercy: ii per quos agitur, the counsel: causas, i. e. to practise law: me agente, while I am counsel: ii apud quos agitur, the judges; hence, of a judge: rem agere, to hear: reos, to prosecute, L.: alqm furti, to accuse of theft. —Pass., to be in suit, be in question, be at stake: non capitis eius res agitur, sed pecuniae, T.: aguntur iniuriae sociorum, agitur vis legum.—To represent, act, perform, of an orator: cum dignitate.—Of an actor: fabulam, T.: partīs, to assume a part, T.: Ballionem, the character of: gestum agere in scena, appear as actors: canticum, L. — Fig.: lenem mitemque senatorem, act the part of, L.: noluit hodie agere Roscius: cum egerunt, when they have finished acting: triumphum, to triumph, O.: de classe populi R. triumphum, over, etc.: ex Volscis et ex Etruriā, over, etc., L.: noctu vigilias, keep watch: alta silentia, to be buried in silence, O.: arbitria victoriae, to exercise a conqueror's prerogative, Cu.: paenitentiam, to repent, Cu.: oblivia, to forget, O.: gratias (poet. grates) agere, to give thanks, thank: maximas tibi gratias: alcui gratias quod fecisset, etc., Cs.: grates parenti, O. — Of time, to spend, pass, use, live through: cum dis aevom: securum aevom, H.: dies festos, celebrate: ruri vitam, L.: otia, V.: quartum annum ago et octogesimum, in my eightyfourth year: ver magnus agebat orbis, was experiencing, V.— Pass: mensis agitur hic septimus, postquam, etc., going on seven months since, T.: bene acta vita, well spent: tunc principium anni agebatur, L.: melior pars acta (est) diei, is past, V. — Absol, to live, pass time, be: civitas laeta agere, rejoiced, S.—Meton., to treat, deal, confer, talk with: quae (patria) tecum sic agit, pleads: haec inter se dubiis de rebus, V.: Callias quidam egit cum Cimone, ut, etc., tried to persuade C., N.: agere varie, rogando alternis suadendoque coepit, L.—With bene, praeclare, male, etc., to deal well or ill with, treat or use well or ill: praeclare cum eis: facile est bene agere cum eis.— Pass impers., to go well or ill with one, be well or badly off: intelleget secum esse actum pessime: in quibus praeclare agitur, si, etc., who are well off, if, etc.—Poet.: Tros Tyriusque mihi nullo discrimine agetur, will be treated, V.— Pass, to be at stake, be at hazard, be concerned, be in peril: quasi mea res minor agatur quam tua, T.: in quibus eorum caput agatur: ibi rem frumentariam agi cernentes, L.: si sua res ageretur, if his interests were involved: agitur pars tertia mundi, is at risk, O.: non agitur de vectigalibus, S.—Praegn., to finish, complete, only pass: actā re ad fidem pronius est, after it is done, L.: iucundi acti labores, past: ad impediendam rem actam, an accomplished fact, L.— Prov.: actum, aiunt, ne agas, i. e. don't waste your efforts, T.: acta agimus: Actum est, it is all over, all is lost, T.: iam de Servio actum rati, L.: acta haec res est, is lost, T.: tantā mobilitate sese Numidae agunt, behave, S.: ferocius agunt equites, L.: quod nullo studio agebant, because they were careless, Cs.: cum simulatione agi timoris iubet, Cs.—Imper. as interj, come now, well, up: age, da veniam filio, T.: en age, rumpe moras, V.: agite dum, L.: age porro, tu, cur, etc.? age vero, considerate, etc.: age, age, iam ducat: dabo, good, T.: age, sit ita factum.
    * * *
    agere, egi, actus V
    drive, urge, conduct; spend (time w/cum); thank (w/gratias); deliver (speech)

    Latin-English dictionary > agō

  • 9 aliēnus

        aliēnus    [alius].    I. Adj. with comp. and sup, of another, belonging to another, not one's own, foreign, alien, strange: res: puer, the child of another, T.: mos, T.: menses, of other climes, V.: pecuniae: in alienis finibus decertare, Cs.: salus, of others, Cs.: alienis manibus, by the hands of others, L.: insolens in re alienā, in dealing with other men's property: mālis ridens alienis, i. e. a forced laugh, H.: mulier, another man's wife: alieni viri sermones, of another woman's husband, L.: vestigia viri alieni, one not my husband, L.: volnus, intended for another, V.: alienam personam ferre, to assume a false character, L.: cornua, i. e. those of a stag, O.: alieno Marte pugnare (equites), i. e. on foot, L.: aes alienum, another's money, i. e. debt: aes alienum alienis nominibus, debts contracted on the security of others, S.: recte facere alieno metu, fear of another, T.: crevit ex metu alieno audacia, another's fear, L.: sacerdotium genti haud alienum, foreign to, L. — Alien from, not related, not allied, not friendly, strange: ab nostrā familiā, T.: omnia alienissimis crediderunt, to utter strangers, Cs.: ne a litteris quidem alienus, not unversed in.—Strange, unsuitable, incongruous, inadequate, inconsistent, unseasonable, different from: dignitatis alicuius: neque aliena consili (domus), not inconvenient for consultation, S.: illi causae: alienum maiestate suā: aliena huius existimatione suspicio: domus magis his aliena malis, freer from, H.: alienum a vitā meā, T.: a dignitate: non alienum esse videtur, proponere, etc., Cs.: non alienum videtur,... docere, N. — Averse, hostile, unfriendly, unfavorable to: (Caesar) a me: voluntates, unfriendliness: mens, hostility, S.: alieno a te animo: a causā nobilitatis, opposed to: a Murenā nullā re alienus, in nc respect unfriendly: alienum suis rationibus, dangerous to his plans, S.: alieno esse animo in Caesarem, Cs.: alieno loco proelium committunt, unfavorable, Cs.: alienissimo sibi loco conflixit, N. —Of time, unfitting, inconvenient, unfavorable, unseasonable: ad iudicium corrumpendum tempus: ad committendum proelium alienum esse tempus, Cs.: alieno tempore defendisse: alienore aetate, at a less suitable age, T.—Of the mind, estranged, disordered: illis aliena mens erat, qui, etc., S.—    II. Substt.:
    * * *
    I
    aliena -um, alienior -or -us, alienissimus -a -um ADJ
    foreign; unconnected; another's; contrary; unworthy; averse, hostile; mad
    II
    foreigner; outsider; stranger to the family; person/slave of another house

    Latin-English dictionary > aliēnus

  • 10 aliēnus

        aliēnus ī, m    one of another house, a stranger to the family, foreigner, alien: eiectus ad alienos: alienum post mortem expetunt, a foreigner: in alienos, in suos inruebat: heres hic alienior institutus est, this more distant relation. —
    * * *
    I
    aliena -um, alienior -or -us, alienissimus -a -um ADJ
    foreign; unconnected; another's; contrary; unworthy; averse, hostile; mad
    II
    foreigner; outsider; stranger to the family; person/slave of another house

    Latin-English dictionary > aliēnus

  • 11 ante-fīxus

        ante-fīxus adj.    [ante + figo], fastened before: truncis arborum antefixa ora, i. e. skulls, Ta. — Plur n. as subst, little images on the front of a house or temple, L.

    Latin-English dictionary > ante-fīxus

  • 12 apodȳtērium

        apodȳtērium ī, n, ἀποδυτήριον, an undressing-room (in a bath-house).
    * * *

    Latin-English dictionary > apodȳtērium

  • 13 apothēca

        apothēca ae, f, ἀποτηήκη, a repository, storehouse, magazine, warehouse, C.; esp. for wine, H.
    * * *
    store-house, store-room, repository; wine-cellar

    Latin-English dictionary > apothēca

  • 14 apud

        apud    older
    * * *
    at, by, near, among; at the house of; before, in the presence/writings/view of

    Latin-English dictionary > apud

  • 15 aput

        aput    praep. with acc, with, at, by, near.    I. Of persons, before, in the presence of, to: apud alquem sedere: me: alquem apud aliquos vituperare: causam apud iudices defendere: verba apud senatum fecit. — Among, with: quae apud eos gerantur, cognoscere, Cs.: apud quos consul fuerat: apud exercitum esse. — At the house of: apud me sis volo, T.: apud Domitium cenare: apud quem erat educatus, in whose family: apud se in castris, at his quarters, Cs. — Fig., with, in the view or mind of, among, over, in the opinion of: Itane parvam mihi fidem esse apud te? T.: apud Helvetios nobilissimus, Cs.: apud alquem multum valere, N. — In the power of, in the possession of, with esse: omnis gratia, potentia, honos... apud eos sunt, S.: par gloria apud Hannibalem... erat, L.: erat ei... apud me relicuom pauxillulum Nummorum, a balance due him, T.: (signa) deposita apud amicos.—With pron reflex., at home, in one's senses, sane (colloq.): non sum apud me, T.: fac apud te ut sies, T. — In the writings of: apud Xenophontem Cyrus dicit: apud quosdam acerbior in conviciis narrabatur, Ta. — In the time of, among: apud maiores nostros. —    II. Of place, at, near, in: apud forum, T.: apud Tenedum pugna navalis: nuntius victoriae apud Cannas, L.: apud oppidum morati, Cs.: non apud Anienem, sed in urbe. — Fig., of time: apud saeclum prius, T.
    * * *
    at, by, near, among; at the house of; before, in presence/writings/view/eyes of

    Latin-English dictionary > aput

  • 16 ārea

        ārea ae, f    [3 AR-], ground (for a house), a building - site: Ponendae domo quaerenda, H.: Iovis templique eius, L. — An open space, court, play - ground: campus et areae, H. — A raceground, O.— A threshing-floor: Libycae (as prov. of abundance), H.: frumentum ex areā metiri.— Fig., a field for effort: scelerum.
    * * *
    I II
    open space; park, playground; plot; threshing floor; courtyard; site; bald spot

    Latin-English dictionary > ārea

  • 17 argentārius

        argentārius adj.    [argentum], of money: cura, care of money, T.: taberna, a banker's shop, L.— As subst m., a money - changer, banker, C. — As subst f. (sc. taberna), a banking-house, bank, L. — (Sc. ars) the business of a banker: argentariam facere. — (Sc. fodina) a silver-mine, L.
    * * *
    I
    banker, financial agent; money changer
    II
    argentaria, argentarium ADJ
    pertaining to silver or money, silver-; monetary, financial; banker's, banking-
    III

    Latin-English dictionary > argentārius

  • 18 ātriēnsis

        ātriēnsis is, m    [atrium], a steward, chief servant.
    * * *
    steward; servant in charge of household administration, major-domo; house-slave

    Latin-English dictionary > ātriēnsis

  • 19 ātrium

        ātrium ī, n    [AID-], a room which contains the hearth, fore-court, hall, principal room, H.—Plur., of one room (poet.): longa, V.: marmore tecta, O.—In a temple or palace, the main hall: Libertatis: regium, L.— An auction room: migrare in atria, Iu.: atria auctionaria.— Plur, a dwelling, house (poet.): atria vestra ruent, O.
    * * *
    atrium, reception hall in a Roman house; auction room; palace (pl.), house

    Latin-English dictionary > ātrium

  • 20 aula

        aula ae (gen. aulāī, V.), f, αὐλή, a court, fore-court, yard: immanis ianitor aulae, i. e. Cerberus, H.: mediā in aulā, O.—For cattle, H.—An inner court of a house, hall, V.: lectus genialis in aulā est, H.—A palace, residence, royal court: illā se iactet in aulā Aeolus, in his residence, V.: invidendus, H.: laeta Priami, H.: discors, i. e. the courtiers, Ta.: puer ex aulā, a page, H.—Poet., of the cell of the queen-bee: aulas et cerea regna refingunt, V.—Princely power, royalty: auctoritas aulae.
    * * *
    hall; church/temple; palace/castle; inner/royal court; courtiers; royal power

    Latin-English dictionary > aula

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