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he is authorized to make decisions

  • 1 facultar

    v.
    1 to authorize.
    este título lo faculta para ejercer en Alemania this qualification allows him to practice in Germany
    2 to enable.
    * * *
    1 to empower, authorize
    * * *
    VT

    facultar a algn para hacer algo(=dar autorización) to authorize sb to do sth, empower sb to do sth; (=dar derecho) to entitle sb to do sth

    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml)

    facultar a alguien para + inf — jefe/presidente to authorize somebody to + inf; carnet/documento to entitle somebody to + inf; ley to allow somebody to + inf

    * * *
    Ex. This empowers them to control their lives and participate actively in the development of a just and peaceful society.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo (frml)

    facultar a alguien para + inf — jefe/presidente to authorize somebody to + inf; carnet/documento to entitle somebody to + inf; ley to allow somebody to + inf

    * * *

    Ex: This empowers them to control their lives and participate actively in the development of a just and peaceful society.

    * * *
    facultar [A1 ]
    vt
    ( frml) facultar a algn PARA + INF to authorize sb to + INF
    no está facultado para girar al descubierto you are not authorized o entitled to overdraw
    el carnet le faculta para entrar gratis the card allows o gives you free admission
    queda facultado para decidir sobre la suerte de la compañía he is empowered o he has powers to decide on the company's fate
    * * *

    facultar ( conjugate facultar) verbo transitivo (frml) facultar a algn para hacer algo [jefe/presidente] to authorize sb to do sth;
    [carnet/documento] to entitle sb to do sth;
    [ ley] to allow sb to do sth
    ' facultar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    capacitar
    * * *
    to authorize;
    este título lo faculta para ejercer en Francia this qualification allows him to practise in France
    * * *
    v/t
    :
    facultar a alguien para hacer algo authorize s.o. to do sth
    * * *
    : to authorize, to empower

    Spanish-English dictionary > facultar

  • 2 bibliotecario digital

    (n.) = digitarian, digital librarian
    Ex. Most UK health care libraries will disappear although there may continue to be a role for the librarian as cybrarian or digitarian.
    Ex. Digital librarians must make decisions about technologies - which to learn and which not, which to use and which to ignore - all day, every day, always keeping the needs of the users foremost.
    * * *
    (n.) = digitarian, digital librarian

    Ex: Most UK health care libraries will disappear although there may continue to be a role for the librarian as cybrarian or digitarian.

    Ex: Digital librarians must make decisions about technologies - which to learn and which not, which to use and which to ignore - all day, every day, always keeping the needs of the users foremost.

    Spanish-English dictionary > bibliotecario digital

  • 3 bibliotecario encargado de las cuestiones digitales

    Ex. Digital librarians must make decisions about technologies - which to learn and which not, which to use and which to ignore - all day, every day, always keeping the needs of the users foremost.
    * * *

    Ex: Digital librarians must make decisions about technologies - which to learn and which not, which to use and which to ignore - all day, every day, always keeping the needs of the users foremost.

    Spanish-English dictionary > bibliotecario encargado de las cuestiones digitales

  • 4 con cinismo

    Ex. As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of 'unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.
    * * *

    Ex: As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of 'unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > con cinismo

  • 5 cortapisa

    f.
    1 limitation, restriction.
    2 condition.
    3 obstacle, impediment.
    * * *
    1 (condición) condition, restriction
    2 (dificultad) difficulty, obstacle
    \
    poner cortapisas to impose conditions
    sin cortapisas with no strings attached
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=restricción) restriction, condition
    2) (=traba) snag, obstacle

    poner cortapisas a algo/algn — to restrict o hold back sth/sb

    3) (=gracia) charm, wit
    * * *

    poner cortapisas a algo/alguien — to put obstacles in the way of something/in somebody's way

    * * *
    ----
    * sin cortapisas = untrammelled.
    * * *

    poner cortapisas a algo/alguien — to put obstacles in the way of something/in somebody's way

    * * *
    * sin cortapisas = untrammelled.
    * * *
    el proyecto pudo llevarse a cabo sin cortapisas they managed to finish the project without any setbacks
    habló sin cortapisas she spoke freely
    le está poniendo demasiadas cortapisas a la iniciativa he is putting up too many obstacles to the plan
    * * *

    cortapisa sustantivo femenino restriction, limitation
    * * *
    limitation, restriction;
    quiere tener poder de decisión, sin ninguna cortapisa he wants complete freedom o a free hand to make decisions;
    poner cortapisas a to hinder, to put obstacles in the way of;
    le pusieron cortapisas por ser mujer they put obstacles in her way o made things difficult for her because she was a woman
    * * *
    f restriction;
    poner cortapisas a fig put obstacles in the way of, obstruct

    Spanish-English dictionary > cortapisa

  • 6 cínicamente

    adv.
    cynically, shamelessly, barefacedly.
    * * *
    * * *
    Ex. As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of 'unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.
    * * *

    Ex: As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of 'unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.

    * * *
    cynically

    Spanish-English dictionary > cínicamente

  • 7 dar libertad para + Infinitivo

    (v.) = afford + the freedom to + Infinitivo
    Ex. The ability to perform these operations with such relative ease affords the cataloger the freedom to make decisions to restructure the catalog whenever it becomes necessary.
    * * *
    (v.) = afford + the freedom to + Infinitivo

    Ex: The ability to perform these operations with such relative ease affords the cataloger the freedom to make decisions to restructure the catalog whenever it becomes necessary.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar libertad para + Infinitivo

  • 8 dejar en libertad para + Infinitivo

    (v.) = afford + the freedom to + Infinitivo
    Ex. The ability to perform these operations with such relative ease affords the cataloger the freedom to make decisions to restructure the catalog whenever it becomes necessary.
    * * *
    (v.) = afford + the freedom to + Infinitivo

    Ex: The ability to perform these operations with such relative ease affords the cataloger the freedom to make decisions to restructure the catalog whenever it becomes necessary.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dejar en libertad para + Infinitivo

  • 9 despejar una incertidumbre

    (v.) = relieve + uncertainty
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    * * *
    (v.) = relieve + uncertainty

    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).

    Spanish-English dictionary > despejar una incertidumbre

  • 10 enojoso

    adj.
    annoying, irritating, harsh, grating.
    * * *
    1 annoying, irritating
    * * *
    ADJ irritating, annoying
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo (esp AmL) ( violento) awkward; ( aburrido) tedious, tiresome
    * * *
    = annoying, vexing, gnawing.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo (esp AmL) ( violento) awkward; ( aburrido) tedious, tiresome
    * * *
    = annoying, vexing, gnawing.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.

    * * *
    enojoso -sa
    1 (violento) awkward
    2 (aburrido) tedious, tiresome
    * * *

    enojoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo (esp AmL) ( violento) awkward;


    ( aburrido) tedious, tiresome
    enojoso,-a adjetivo
    1 (molesto) annoying
    2 (trabajoso) trying
    ' enojoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    enojosa
    English:
    grating
    * * *
    enojoso, -a adj
    esp Am [delicado, espinoso] awkward;
    la situación era de lo más enojosa it was an extremely awkward situation;
    pongamos fin a este enojoso asunto let's put an end to this unpleasant business
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( delicado) awkward
    2 ( aburrido) tedious, tiresome
    * * *
    enojoso, -sa adj
    fastidioso, molestoso: annoying, irritating
    * * *
    enojoso adj annoying

    Spanish-English dictionary > enojoso

  • 11 fastidioso

    adj.
    1 bothersome, annoying, nagging, pesky.
    2 tiresome, boring, irritating, tedious.
    * * *
    1 (molesto) annoying, irksome
    2 (aburrido) boring, tedious
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=molesto) annoying
    2) (=aburrido) tedious, boring, tiresome
    3) LAm (=quisquilloso) fastidious
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex. He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( molesto) < persona> tiresome, annoying; < trabajo> tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)
    * * *
    = annoying, tiresome, vexatious, vexing, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], nagging, importunate, bothersome, niggling.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Some of their drawbacks make regular use rather tiresome.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex: He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.

    * * *
    1 (molesto) ‹persona› tiresome, annoying; ‹trabajo› tiresome, irksome
    ¡qué ruido más fastidioso! what an irritating noise!, that noise is getting on my nerves o is getting to me! ( colloq)
    este niño está muy fastidioso this child is being very tiresome o ( colloq) is getting on my nerves
    2 (Méx, Per fam) (quisquilloso) fussy ( colloq)
    * * *

    fastidioso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo


    trabajo tiresome, irksome
    b) (Méx, Per fam) ( quisquilloso) fussy (colloq)

    fastidioso,-a adjetivo annoying
    ' fastidioso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    apestosa
    - apestoso
    - bendita
    - bendito
    - fastidiosa
    - gracia
    - molesta
    - molesto
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - suplicio
    - pesado
    English:
    annoying
    - irksome
    - tiresome
    - peevish
    * * *
    fastidioso, -a adj
    1. [molesto] annoying, irritating;
    es un niño muy fastidioso he's a very annoying o irritating child;
    es un dolor muy fastidioso it's a very annoying o irritating pain
    2. [aburrido] boring, tedious
    * * *
    adj annoying
    * * *
    fastidioso, -sa adj
    1) molesto: annoying, bothersome
    2) aburrido: boring
    * * *
    fastidioso adj annoying

    Spanish-English dictionary > fastidioso

  • 12 incapacitado

    adj.
    1 incapacitated, incompetent, disqualified, disabled.
    2 out of commission, on sick leave.
    3 invalid.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: incapacitar.
    * * *
    1 (físicamente) incapacitated, handicapped, disabled; (mentalmente) incapacitated, unfit
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=inadecuado) unfit ( para for)
    2) (=descalificado) disqualified
    3) (=minusválido) handicapped, disabled
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( físicamente) disabled, physically handicapped; ( mentalmente) mentally handicapped
    b) (Der) incapable
    * * *
    = unfit, lame duck.
    Ex. As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of ' unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.
    Ex. Having them call him a lame duck is just one more way for them to underestimate what they are up against.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) ( físicamente) disabled, physically handicapped; ( mentalmente) mentally handicapped
    b) (Der) incapable
    * * *
    = unfit, lame duck.

    Ex: As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of ' unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.

    Ex: Having them call him a lame duck is just one more way for them to underestimate what they are up against.

    * * *
    1 (físicamente) disabled, physically handicapped; (mentalmente) mentally handicapped
    quedó incapacitado a raíz de un accidente he was disabled as a result of an accident
    2 ( Der) incapable
    * * *

    Del verbo incapacitar: ( conjugate incapacitar)

    incapacitado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    incapacitado    
    incapacitar
    incapacitado


    ( mentalmente) mentally handicapped
    incapacitar ( conjugate incapacitar) verbo transitivo [ enfermedad] to incapacitate;

    incapacitado,-a adjetivo
    1 (física, psíquicamente) incapacitated, disabled
    2 (legalmente) disqualified, unfit [para, for]
    incapacitar verbo transitivo
    1 to incapacitate, disable: una depresión lo incapacitó temporalmente para el trabajo, he was temporarily unfit for work due to a depression
    2 (legalmente) to disqualify, make unfit [para, for]

    ' incapacitado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    baldada
    - baldado
    - incapacitada
    English:
    unfit
    - carer
    * * *
    incapacitado, -a
    adj
    1. [físicamente, psicológicamente] unfit;
    quedó incapacitado tras un accidente he was disabled in an accident
    2. Der [para ejercer cargos, votar] disqualified ( para from); [para testar, testificar] incapacitated
    nm,f
    1. [físico] disabled person;
    [psicológico] mentally handicapped person
    2. Der disqualified person, person declared unfit
    * * *
    adj disabled, handicapped;
    * * *
    incapacitado, -da adj
    1) : disqualified
    2) : disabled, handicapped

    Spanish-English dictionary > incapacitado

  • 13 inepto

    adj.
    1 inept, stupid, inapt, unfit.
    2 incapable, uncapable.
    m.
    inept person, loser, no-hoper, non-achiever.
    * * *
    1 (persona) incompetent, inept
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 incompetent person
    * * *
    ADJ inept, incompetent
    * * *
    I
    - ta adjetivo inept, incompetent
    II
    - ta masculino, femenino incompetent
    * * *
    = inept, unfit, bumbler, inadequate, lame, lame duck.
    Ex. In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.
    Ex. As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of ' unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.
    Ex. Henry Ellis is traditionally depicted as a reactionary bumbler who held back reform of the department of printed books.
    Ex. There are no other library facilities in the immediate area, except for a woefully inadequate public library.
    Ex. Democrats are lame, feckless, timid, with no ideas, no vision, no message, and no future.
    Ex. Having them call him a lame duck is just one more way for them to underestimate what they are up against.
    ----
    * inepto social = nerdy [nerdier -comp., nerdiest -sup.], nerd, geek, geeky [geekier -comp., geekiest -sup.].
    * * *
    I
    - ta adjetivo inept, incompetent
    II
    - ta masculino, femenino incompetent
    * * *
    = inept, unfit, bumbler, inadequate, lame, lame duck.

    Ex: In frequent cases, unionization is brought on by the inept or irresponsible action of management.

    Ex: As Townsend cynically writes, a committee developed to make decisions is a group of ' unfits appointed by the incompetent to do the unnecessary'.
    Ex: Henry Ellis is traditionally depicted as a reactionary bumbler who held back reform of the department of printed books.
    Ex: There are no other library facilities in the immediate area, except for a woefully inadequate public library.
    Ex: Democrats are lame, feckless, timid, with no ideas, no vision, no message, and no future.
    Ex: Having them call him a lame duck is just one more way for them to underestimate what they are up against.
    * inepto social = nerdy [nerdier -comp., nerdiest -sup.], nerd, geek, geeky [geekier -comp., geekiest -sup.].

    * * *
    inepto1 -ta
    inept, incompetent
    inepto2 -ta
    masculine, feminine
    incompetent
    * * *

    inepto
    ◊ -ta adjetivo

    inept, incompetent
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    incompetent
    inepto,-a
    I adjetivo inept, incompetent
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino incompetent person: es un inepto para los negocios, he's inept when it comes to business

    ' inepto' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    inepta
    - negada
    - negado
    - nula
    - nulo
    - incapaz
    English:
    bad
    - inefficient
    - inept
    - inadequate
    - unfit
    * * *
    inepto, -a
    adj
    incompetent, inept
    nm,f
    incompetent o inept person
    * * *
    I adj inept, incompetent
    II m, inepta f incompetent fool
    * * *
    inepto, -ta adj
    : inept, incompetent

    Spanish-English dictionary > inepto

  • 14 irritante

    adj.
    irritating.
    m.
    irritant.
    * * *
    1 irritating, aggravating, annoying
    * * *
    1.
    2.
    * * *
    I
    a) <situación/actitud> irritating, annoying
    b) (Med) irritant
    II
    masculino irritant
    * * *
    = irritating, irksome, vexing, jarring, grating, exasperating, smarting.
    Ex. We want the understanding that we are not some irritating adjunct to bookstores but an alternate way.
    Ex. The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. The protagonist experiences a jarring descent from the heights of literary distinction at court to the coarseness of common experience.
    Ex. Sanborn was infamous for his grating personality, editorial liberties and inaccurate accounts of people and events.
    Ex. While information appliances will proliferate, they will not lessen the perception of an exasperating electronic environment.
    Ex. At 11:30 I was feeling that all was well with the world, and then at 11:35 I'm all tightened to a smarting tension by having been treated like scum.
    * * *
    I
    a) <situación/actitud> irritating, annoying
    b) (Med) irritant
    II
    masculino irritant
    * * *
    = irritating, irksome, vexing, jarring, grating, exasperating, smarting.

    Ex: We want the understanding that we are not some irritating adjunct to bookstores but an alternate way.

    Ex: The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: The protagonist experiences a jarring descent from the heights of literary distinction at court to the coarseness of common experience.
    Ex: Sanborn was infamous for his grating personality, editorial liberties and inaccurate accounts of people and events.
    Ex: While information appliances will proliferate, they will not lessen the perception of an exasperating electronic environment.
    Ex: At 11:30 I was feeling that all was well with the world, and then at 11:35 I'm all tightened to a smarting tension by having been treated like scum.

    * * *
    1 ‹situación/actitud› irritating, annoying
    2 ( Med) irritant
    irritant
    * * *

    irritante adjetivo ‹situación/actitud irritating, annoying
    ' irritante' also found in these entries:
    English:
    aggravating
    - bratty
    - constant
    - grating
    - irritating
    - irritant
    * * *
    irritating, annoying
    * * *
    adj tb MED irritating
    * * *
    : irritating
    * * *
    irritante adj irritating

    Spanish-English dictionary > irritante

  • 15 molesto

    adj.
    1 annoying, cumbersome, bothersome, embarrassing.
    2 upset, irritated, angry, annoyed.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: molestar.
    * * *
    1 annoying, troublesome
    2 (enfadado) annoyed
    3 (incómodo) uncomfortable
    4 MEDICINA sore
    los puntos ya han cicatrizado, pero todavía está molesto the stitches have healed, but he's still sore
    \
    estar molesto,-a con alguien to be upset with somebody
    ser molesto to be a nuisance
    * * *
    (f. - molesta)
    adj.
    1) annoyed, bothered
    2) annoying, bothersome
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=que causa molestia) [tos, picor, ruido, persona] irritating, annoying; [olor, síntoma] unpleasant

    es sumamente molesto que... — it's extremely irritating o annoying that...

    lo único molesto es el viaje — the only nuisance is the journey, the only annoying thing is the journey

    2) (=que incomoda) [asiento, ropa] uncomfortable; [tarea] annoying; [situación] awkward, embarrassing
    3) (=incómodo) [persona] uncomfortable

    me sentía molesto en la fiestaI felt uneasy o uncomfortable at the party

    me siento molesto cada vez que me hace un regaloI feel awkward o embarrassed whenever she gives me a present

    4) (=enfadado) [persona] annoyed

    ¿estás molesto conmigo por lo que dije? — are you annoyed at me for what I said?

    5) (=disgustado) [persona] upset

    ¿estás molesta por algo que haya pasado? — are you upset about something that's happened?

    * * *
    - ta adjetivo
    1)
    a) [SER] ( fastidioso) <ruido/tos> annoying, irritating; <sensación/síntoma> unpleasant

    resulta molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultosit's a nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage

    b) [ESTAR] (incómodo, dolorido)
    c) [SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing
    2) [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset; ( irritado) annoyed

    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste — he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    * * *
    = annoying, cumbersome, onerous, uncomfortable, uneasy, vexatious, irksome, vexing, untoward, disruptive, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], distracting, off-putting, ill-at-ease, nagging, obtrusive, importunate, bothersome, exasperated, niggling, miffed, troublesome.
    Ex. Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.
    Ex. Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.
    Ex. Sub-arrangement under an entry term can alleviate the onerous task of scanning long lists of entries under the same keyword.
    Ex. And making matters worse, this uncomfortable group sat in a suburban sitting-room flooded with afternoon sunlight like dutifully polite guests at a formal coffee party.
    Ex. Hawthorne gave an uneasy laugh, which was merely the outlet for her disappointment.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex. Make sure everyone involved is aware of timetable and room changes and any other administrative abnormalities; and as far as possible prevent any untoward interruptions.
    Ex. The crisis in South African education -- particularly black education -- has resulted from the disruptive effects of apartheid.
    Ex. the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex. I think that Mr. Scilken's point was that there's so much material on the traditional three-by-five card that it's less useful, that it's distracting, in fact, and does a disservice to the public library.
    Ex. Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex. One quite serious barrier to improvement is the reluctance of users to tell librarians of their feelings, but perhaps it is expecting too much of them to complain that they are ill-at-ease.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. But the present revision, incorporating ISBD, will literally clutter the entries with obtrusive redundancies and esoterics that will only obscure the content of the entries and obstruct the use of the catalog.
    Ex. She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex. He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex. He was drumming on his desk with exasperated fingers, his mouth quirked at the corners, as if saying: 'Wriggle out of that!'.
    Ex. I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex. These are just superfluous rantings of miffed children.
    Ex. Measures to prevent such incidents include fitting burglar alarms in libraries and taking quick and decisive action against troublesome users.
    ----
    * comportamiento molesto = disruptive behaviour.
    * de un modo molesto = annoyingly.
    * espíritu molesto = poltergeist.
    * estar molesto = be displeased, get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, put off.
    * lo molesto de = cumbersomeness.
    * personas molestas, las = nuisance, the.
    * sentirse molesto = stir + uneasily, look + uncomfortable, feel + wrong.
    * sentirse molesto por = be embarrassed at.
    * ser algo molesto = be a thorn in + Posesivo + side.
    * ser molesto = be disturbing.
    * verdad molesta = inconvenient truth.
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo
    1)
    a) [SER] ( fastidioso) <ruido/tos> annoying, irritating; <sensación/síntoma> unpleasant

    resulta molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultosit's a nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage

    b) [ESTAR] (incómodo, dolorido)
    c) [SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing
    2) [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset; ( irritado) annoyed

    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste — he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    * * *
    = annoying, cumbersome, onerous, uncomfortable, uneasy, vexatious, irksome, vexing, untoward, disruptive, gnawing, pesky [peskier -comp., peskiest -sup.], distracting, off-putting, ill-at-ease, nagging, obtrusive, importunate, bothersome, exasperated, niggling, miffed, troublesome.

    Ex: Inconsistencies are mostly merely annoying, although it can be difficult to be sure whether a group of citations which look similar all relate to the same document.

    Ex: Any shelf arrangement systems which do not permit ready location of specific documents are cumbersome for the user or member of staff seeking a specific document.
    Ex: Sub-arrangement under an entry term can alleviate the onerous task of scanning long lists of entries under the same keyword.
    Ex: And making matters worse, this uncomfortable group sat in a suburban sitting-room flooded with afternoon sunlight like dutifully polite guests at a formal coffee party.
    Ex: Hawthorne gave an uneasy laugh, which was merely the outlet for her disappointment.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of vexatious litigants, pyramidologists, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: The old common press was a brilliant and deservedly successful invention, but by the end of the eighteenth century its limitations were beginning to seem irksome.
    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    Ex: Make sure everyone involved is aware of timetable and room changes and any other administrative abnormalities; and as far as possible prevent any untoward interruptions.
    Ex: The crisis in South African education -- particularly black education -- has resulted from the disruptive effects of apartheid.
    Ex: the underlying mood of the movement is a gnawing impatience with the system.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Small solutions to everyday problems: those pesky URLs'.
    Ex: I think that Mr. Scilken's point was that there's so much material on the traditional three-by-five card that it's less useful, that it's distracting, in fact, and does a disservice to the public library.
    Ex: Some children are prepared to patronize the shop, and use it in quite a different way, when they find the library (however well run) stuffy or off-putting.
    Ex: One quite serious barrier to improvement is the reluctance of users to tell librarians of their feelings, but perhaps it is expecting too much of them to complain that they are ill-at-ease.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: But the present revision, incorporating ISBD, will literally clutter the entries with obtrusive redundancies and esoterics that will only obscure the content of the entries and obstruct the use of the catalog.
    Ex: She concludes that this problem probes the importunate boundaries separating man from beast and the natural from the monstrous.
    Ex: He shows a masterly command of imagery throughout, but his style has always left little margin for error, and the errors here are bothersome.
    Ex: He was drumming on his desk with exasperated fingers, his mouth quirked at the corners, as if saying: 'Wriggle out of that!'.
    Ex: I always have this niggling doubt about companies that don't provide a telephone number on their websites.
    Ex: These are just superfluous rantings of miffed children.
    Ex: Measures to prevent such incidents include fitting burglar alarms in libraries and taking quick and decisive action against troublesome users.
    * comportamiento molesto = disruptive behaviour.
    * de un modo molesto = annoyingly.
    * espíritu molesto = poltergeist.
    * estar molesto = be displeased, get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, put off.
    * lo molesto de = cumbersomeness.
    * personas molestas, las = nuisance, the.
    * sentirse molesto = stir + uneasily, look + uncomfortable, feel + wrong.
    * sentirse molesto por = be embarrassed at.
    * ser algo molesto = be a thorn in + Posesivo + side.
    * ser molesto = be disturbing.
    * verdad molesta = inconvenient truth.

    * * *
    molesto -ta
    A
    1 [ SER]
    (fastidioso): tengo una tos sumamente molesta I have o I've got a really irritating o annoying cough
    es una sensación muy molesta it's a very uncomfortable o unpleasant feeling
    no es grave, pero los síntomas son muy molestos it's nothing serious, but the symptoms are very unpleasant
    la máquina hace un ruido de lo más molesto the machine makes a very irritating o annoying o tiresome noise
    ¡es tan molesto que te estén interrumpiendo cada cinco minutos! it's so annoying o trying o tiresome o irritating when people keep interrupting you every five minutes
    resulta muy molesto tener que viajar con tantos bultos it's a real nuisance o it's very inconvenient having to travel with so much baggage
    ¿podría abrir la ventana, si no es molesto? would you be so kind as to open the window?
    2 [ ESTAR]
    (incómodo, dolorido): está bastante molesto he's in some pain
    pasó la noche bastante molesto he had a rather uncomfortable night
    está molesto por la anestesia he's in some discomfort because of the anesthetic
    3 [ SER] (violento, embarazoso) awkward
    es una situación muy molesta it's a very awkward o embarrassing situation
    me hace sentir muy molesta que esté constantemente regalándome cosas it's very embarrassing the way she's always giving me presents, she's always giving me presents, and it makes me feel very awkward o embarrassed
    me resulta muy molesto tener que trabajar con ella cuando no nos hablamos I find it awkward working with her when we're not even on speaking terms
    B [ ESTAR] (ofendido) upset
    está molesto con ellos porque no fueron a su boda he's upset o put out o peeved because they didn't go to his wedding
    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste he's very upset about what you did
    * * *

     

    Del verbo molestar: ( conjugate molestar)

    molesto es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    molestó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    molestar    
    molesto    
    molestó
    molestar ( conjugate molestar) verbo transitivo
    1

    perdone que lo moleste sorry to trouble o bother you


    2 (ofender, disgustar) to upset
    verbo intransitivo
    1 ( importunar):
    ¿le molesta si fumo? do you mind if I smoke?;

    me molesta su arrogancia her arrogance irritates o annoys me;
    no me duele, pero me molesta it doesn't hurt but it's uncomfortable
    2 ( fastidiar) to be a nuisance;
    no quiero molesto I don't want to be a nuisance o to cause any trouble

    molestarse verbo pronominal
    1 ( disgustarse) to get upset;
    molestose POR algo to get upset about sth;
    molestose CON algn to get annoyed with sb
    2 ( tomarse el trabajo) to bother, trouble oneself (frml);

    se molestó en venir hasta aquí a avisarnos she took the trouble to come all this way to tell us
    molesto
    ◊ -ta adjetivo

    1 [SER]
    a) ( fastidioso) ‹ruido/tos annoying, irritating;

    sensación/síntoma unpleasant
    b) (violento, embarazoso) awkward, embarrassing

    2 [ESTAR] ( ofendido) upset;
    ( irritado) annoyed;
    está muy molesto por lo que hiciste he's very upset/annoyed about what you did

    molestar verbo transitivo
    1 (causar enojo, incomodidad) to disturb, bother: ¿le molestaría contestar a unas preguntas?, would you mind answering some questions?
    me molesta que grites, it annoys me when you shout
    2 (causar dolor, incomodidad) to hurt
    molesto,-a adjetivo
    1 (incómodo) uncomfortable: me encuentro algo molesto después de esa metedura de pata, I feel uncomfortable after that gaffe
    2 (fastidioso) annoying, pestering: es un ruido muy molesto, it's an annoying noise
    3 (enfadado, disgustado) annoyed o cross: ¿no estarás molesta por lo que he dicho?, you're not upset about what I said, are you?
    ' molesto' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acalorada
    - acalorado
    - disgustarse
    - enojosa
    - enojoso
    - fastidiada
    - fastidiado
    - molesta
    - molestarse
    - pesada
    - pesado
    - poca
    - poco
    - puñetera
    - puñetero
    - sacudir
    - suplicio
    - fastidioso
    - fregado
    - latoso
    - molestar
    - mosqueado
    English:
    annoying
    - bother
    - hot
    - imposition
    - irksome
    - irritating
    - miffed
    - obtrusive
    - off-putting
    - peeved
    - troublesome
    - uncomfortable
    - unwelcome
    - would
    - intrusive
    - put
    - uneasy
    * * *
    molesto, -a adj
    1.
    ser molesto [incordiante] [costumbre, tos, ruido] to be annoying;
    [moscas] to be a nuisance; [calor, humo, sensación] to be unpleasant; [ropa, zapato] to be uncomfortable;
    es muy molesto tener que mandar callar constantemente it's very annoying to have to be constantly telling you to be quiet;
    tengo un dolor molesto en la espalda I've got an ache in my back which is causing me some discomfort
    2.
    ser molesto [inoportuno] [visita, llamada] to be inconvenient;
    [pregunta] to be awkward
    3.
    ser molesto [embarazoso] to be embarrassing;
    esta situación empieza a resultarme un poco molesta this situation is beginning to make me feel a bit uncomfortable
    4.
    estar molesto [irritado] to be rather upset;
    está molesta porque no la invitamos a la fiesta she's upset because we didn't invite her to the party;
    están molestos por sus declaraciones they are upset by what he has been saying
    5.
    estar molesto [con malestar, incomodidad] [por la fiebre, el dolor] to be in some discomfort;
    no tenía que haber comido tanto, ahora estoy molesto I shouldn't have eaten so much, it's made me feel rather unwell;
    ¿no estás molesto con tanta ropa? aren't you uncomfortable in all those clothes?
    * * *
    adj
    1 ( fastidioso) annoying
    2 ( incómodo) inconvenient
    3 ( embarazoso) embarrassing
    * * *
    molesto, -ta adj
    1) enojado: bothered, annoyed
    2) fastidioso: bothersome, annoying
    * * *
    molesto adj
    1. (que fastidia) annoying
    2. (disgustado) annoyed

    Spanish-English dictionary > molesto

  • 16 norma absoluta

    (n.) = ironclad rule, steadfast rule
    Ex. Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex. This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.
    * * *
    (n.) = ironclad rule, steadfast rule

    Ex: Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.

    Ex: This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > norma absoluta

  • 17 norma inflexible

    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule
    Ex. As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.
    Ex. Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex. This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.
    * * *
    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule

    Ex: As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.

    Ex: Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex: This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > norma inflexible

  • 18 norma que se puede aplicar a rajatabla

    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule
    Ex. As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.
    Ex. Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex. This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.
    * * *
    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule

    Ex: As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.

    Ex: Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex: This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > norma que se puede aplicar a rajatabla

  • 19 norma rígida

    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule
    Ex. As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.
    Ex. Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex. This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.
    * * *
    (n.) = hard and fast rule, ironclad rule, steadfast rule

    Ex: As in most other aspects of UDC, there is no hard and fast rule which can be relied upon to predict the occurrence of special auxiliaries.

    Ex: Enslaved by public opinion and the ironclad rules that govern theatrical practice, she must forfeit something to survive.
    Ex: This shows that, in the absence of a steadfast rule on covering the misbehavior of journalists, newspapers inevitably make decisions relative to their own organizational interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > norma rígida

  • 20 paralizador

    adj.
    paralyzing, paralysing, immobilizing, paralyzant.
    m.
    paralyzer.
    * * *
    - dora, paralizante adjetivo paralyzing (before n)
    * * *
    = paralysing [paralyzing, -USA].
    Ex. Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).
    ----
    * arma paralizadora mediante proyectil = stun gun.
    * arma paralizadora sin proyectil = taser.
    * * *
    - dora, paralizante adjetivo paralyzing (before n)
    * * *
    = paralysing [paralyzing, -USA].

    Ex: Knowing precisely who is responsible for specific library services and who will make decisions relieves the uncertainty that can be particularly vexing to a neophyte (and paralyzing to library services).

    * arma paralizadora mediante proyectil = stun gun.
    * arma paralizadora sin proyectil = taser.

    * * *
    paralyzing ( before n)
    * * *
    paralizador, -ora, paralizante adj
    paralysing

    Spanish-English dictionary > paralizador

См. также в других словарях:

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  • field captain — Sports. a member of a team taking active part in a game who is authorized to make decisions for the team, esp. in regard to planning plays, deciding whether to accept penalties called by an official against the opponents, etc. * * * …   Universalium

  • control group — The officers and agents of a corporation authorized to make decisions. Anno: 98 ALR2d 245 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

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  • education — /ej oo kay sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life. 2. the act or process of… …   Universalium

  • United Nations — 1. an international organization, with headquarters in New York City, formed to promote international peace, security, and cooperation under the terms of the charter signed by 51 founding countries in San Francisco in 1945. Abbr.: UN Cf. General… …   Universalium

  • France — /frans, frahns/; Fr. /frddahonns/, n. 1. Anatole /ann nann tawl /, (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844 1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel prize 1921. 2. a republic in W Europe. 58,470,421; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris. 3.… …   Universalium

  • ZIONISM — This article is arranged according to the following outline: the word and its meaning forerunners ḤIBBAT ZION ROOTS OF ḤIBBAT ZION background to the emergence of the movement the beginnings of the movement PINSKER S AUTOEMANCIPATION settlement… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • United Kingdom — a kingdom in NW Europe, consisting of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: formerly comprising Great Britain and Ireland 1801 1922. 58,610,182; 94,242 sq. mi. (244,100 sq. km). Cap.: London. Abbr.: U.K. Official name, United Kingdom of Great… …   Universalium


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