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further their own interests

  • 1 aprovecharse

    1 (de alguien) to take advantage (de, of); (de algo) to make the most (de, of)
    * * *
    to take advantage, exploit
    * * *
    VPR
    1) (=abusar) to take advantage

    lo puedes usar, pero sin aprovecharte — you can use it but don't take advantage

    2) Esp (=sacar provecho de) to make the most of
    3) [en sentido sexual]

    aprovecharse de[+ adulto] to take advantage of; [+ niño] to abuse

    * * *
    (v.) = profit, screw, further + Posesivo + own interest, milk
    Ex. In what respects can a student profit from a knowledge of abstracts and by developing abstracting skills?.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Are you being screwed electronically? -- ethical issues in an electronic age'.
    Ex. Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex. A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.
    * * *
    aprovecharse(de)
    (v.) = take + advantage (of), piggyback [piggy-back], cash in on, prey on/upon, tap into, leverage, make + an opportunity (out) of, ride (on) + Posesivo + coattails

    Ex: It is not surprising that the networks discussed later have all taken advantage of computer processing in some form or another.

    Ex: His logic is simple: People need the help of others to be truly creative -- thought breeds thought and ideas 'piggyback' on other ideas.
    Ex: At the same time, veteran fiction writers and new authors cashing in on fame from other media continued to rule the lists.
    Ex: From being a predator, England was becoming a major commercial power on whose ships others preyed.
    Ex: It is clear that a powerful and mysterious force is pushing seniors toward greater volunteer involvement, and nonprofit groups should tap into this particularly civic age group before the Indian summer of volunteering reaches its end.
    Ex: Information seeking in electronic environments will become a collaboration among end user and various electronic systems such that users leverage their heuristic power and machines leverage algorithmic power.
    Ex: Unfortunately, there are some trying to make an opportunity out of this very turbulant situation.
    Ex: Riding the coattails of Barack Obama, Democrats picked up seven seats held by Republicans in Tuesday's election to match the seven it gained two years ago.

    (v.) = profit, screw, further + Posesivo + own interest, milk

    Ex: In what respects can a student profit from a knowledge of abstracts and by developing abstracting skills?.

    Ex: The article is entitled 'Are you being screwed electronically? -- ethical issues in an electronic age'.
    Ex: Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex: A satisfactory balance between public and private involvement has not yet been reached and the companies involved are milking public funds.

    * * *

    ■aprovecharse verbo reflexivo to use to one's advantage, to take advantage: se aprovechó de Juan, she took advantage of Juan
    aprovéchate de mi buen humor y pídeme lo que quieras, make the most of my good mood and ask for anything you want
    ' aprovecharse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abusar
    - sangrar
    - sardina
    - aprovechar
    English:
    cash in
    - draw on
    - exploit
    - play on
    - play upon
    - advantage
    - cash
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [sacar provecho] to take advantage (de of);
    nos aprovechamos de que teníamos coche para ir a la ciudad we took advantage of the fact that we had a car to go to the city;
    se aprovechó de que nadie vigilaba para salir sin pagar she took advantage of the fact that nobody was watching to leave without paying;
    aprovecharse de las desgracias ajenas to benefit from other people's misfortunes
    2. [abusar de alguien] to take advantage (de of);
    todo el mundo se aprovecha de la ingenuidad de Marta everyone takes advantage of Marta's gullible nature;
    fue acusado de aprovecharse de una menor he was accused of child abuse
    * * *
    v/r take advantage (de of)
    * * *
    vr
    aprovecharse de : to take advantage of, to exploit
    * * *
    aprovecharse vb to take advantage [pt. took; pp. taken]

    Spanish-English dictionary > aprovecharse

  • 2 egoísta

    adj.
    selfish, egocentric, egoistic, egoistical.
    f. & m.
    selfish person, egoist, self-seeker.
    * * *
    1 selfish, egoistic, egoistical
    1 egoist, selfish person
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ egoistical, selfish
    2.
    SMF egoist, selfish person
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo selfish, egotistic

    no seas egoistón — (fam) don't be mean (colloq)

    II
    masculino y femenino (Psic) egotist
    * * *
    = selfish, egoistic, egotistical, egoist, self-serving, self-focusing, self-focused, egotistic, egotist.
    Ex. Like little children they're selfish, demanding, and dependent.
    Ex. Idealistic theoretical slogans abound but an egoistic, suspicious and lax attitude on the part of decision makers towards resource sharing has not been overcome.
    Ex. Some critics have portrayed Christopher Columbus as egotistical, inept, brutal, and even sadistic.
    Ex. Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex. At the same time he warns against self-serving marketing.
    Ex. We can all do the same for each other provided we have discovered how to talk in a way that gets beyond the self-focusing use of literature.
    Ex. In either case we are making use of the book for our own ends: our reading has become self-focused.
    Ex. The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex. One nice thing about egotists is that they don't talk about other people.
    ----
    * de modo egoísta = selfishly.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo selfish, egotistic

    no seas egoistón — (fam) don't be mean (colloq)

    II
    masculino y femenino (Psic) egotist
    * * *
    = selfish, egoistic, egotistical, egoist, self-serving, self-focusing, self-focused, egotistic, egotist.

    Ex: Like little children they're selfish, demanding, and dependent.

    Ex: Idealistic theoretical slogans abound but an egoistic, suspicious and lax attitude on the part of decision makers towards resource sharing has not been overcome.
    Ex: Some critics have portrayed Christopher Columbus as egotistical, inept, brutal, and even sadistic.
    Ex: Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex: At the same time he warns against self-serving marketing.
    Ex: We can all do the same for each other provided we have discovered how to talk in a way that gets beyond the self-focusing use of literature.
    Ex: In either case we are making use of the book for our own ends: our reading has become self-focused.
    Ex: The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic and self-complacent is erroneous.
    Ex: One nice thing about egotists is that they don't talk about other people.
    * de modo egoísta = selfishly.

    * * *
    selfish, egoistic, egotistic
    no seas egoistón ( fam); don't be mean ( colloq)
    ( Psic) egoist, egotist
    es una egoísta she is very selfish
    * * *

     

    egoísta adjetivo
    selfish, egotistic
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino (Psic) egotist;

    egoísta
    I adjetivo egoistic, selfish
    II mf egoist, selfish person

    ' egoísta' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    buitre
    - interesada
    - interesado
    - acaparador
    - mezquindad
    - puro
    - volver
    English:
    ax
    - axe
    - egoist
    - possessive
    - selfish
    - unselfish
    * * *
    adj
    egoistic, selfish;
    ¡mira que eres egoísta! you're so selfish!;
    era muy egoísta con sus hermanos he was very selfish towards his brothers and sisters
    nmf
    egotist, selfish person;
    ser un egoísta to be very selfish, to be an egotist
    * * *
    I adj selfish, egoistic
    II m/f egoist
    * * *
    : selfish, egoistic
    : egoist, selfish person
    * * *
    egoísta1 adj selfish
    egoísta2 n selfish person

    Spanish-English dictionary > egoísta

  • 3 hipócrita

    adj.
    hypocritical, double-faced, false, hypocrite.
    f. & m.
    hypocrite, dissembler, imposter.
    * * *
    1 hypocritical
    1 hypocrite
    * * *
    1.
    2.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo hypocritical
    II
    masculino y femenino hypocrite
    * * *
    = hypocritical, hypocrite, wolf in sheep's clothing.
    Ex. This eminent scientist added that it would be hypocritical to ignore the fact that authors do receive payment.
    Ex. Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex. China accuses the Dalai Lama of being a wolf in sheep's clothing who propagates the independence of Tibet.
    ----
    * ridículamente hipócrita = grotesquely hypocritical.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo hypocritical
    II
    masculino y femenino hypocrite
    * * *
    = hypocritical, hypocrite, wolf in sheep's clothing.

    Ex: This eminent scientist added that it would be hypocritical to ignore the fact that authors do receive payment.

    Ex: Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    Ex: China accuses the Dalai Lama of being a wolf in sheep's clothing who propagates the independence of Tibet.
    * ridículamente hipócrita = grotesquely hypocritical.

    * * *
    ‹persona/actitud/comentario› hypocritical
    es tan hipócrita he's such a hypocrite, he's so hypocritical
    hypocrite
    * * *

    hipócrita adjetivo
    hypocritical
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino
    hypocrite
    hipócrita
    I adjetivo hypocritical: me parece una actitud muy hipócrita, I thinks that's a very hypocritical attitude
    II mf hypocrite: no les hagas caso, son una panda de hipócritas, don't pay any attention to them, they're a bunch of hypocrites
    ' hipócrita' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    doble
    - mustio
    English:
    hypocrite
    - hypocritical
    - two-faced
    * * *
    adj
    hypocritical;
    es muy hipócrita she's a real hypocrite, she's really hypocritical
    nmf
    hypocrite
    * * *
    I adj hypocritical
    II m/f hypocrite
    * * *
    : hypocritical
    : hypocrite

    Spanish-English dictionary > hipócrita

  • 4 moralmente corrupto

    (adj.) = morally-corrupt
    Ex. Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.
    * * *

    Ex: Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > moralmente corrupto

  • 5 coincidir con los intereses de uno

    (v.) = match + interests
    Ex. The result shows, inter alia, an increasing interest in computer-based information work and that most graduates were able to find posts that matched their interests.
    * * *
    (v.) = match + interests

    Ex: The result shows, inter alia, an increasing interest in computer-based information work and that most graduates were able to find posts that matched their interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > coincidir con los intereses de uno

  • 6 cooperación institucional

    f.
    institutional cooperation.
    * * *
    Ex. It is in their interests to promote budget increases and institutional cooperation necessary to expand the public library's value to them.
    * * *

    Ex: It is in their interests to promote budget increases and institutional cooperation necessary to expand the public library's value to them.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cooperación institucional

  • 7 cosas

    f.pl.
    things, articles, stuff, doings.
    pres.subj.
    2nd person singular (tú) Present Subjunctive of Spanish verb: coser.
    * * *
    1 familiar (manías) hang-ups
    * * *
    = stuff, matters, bits and pieces
    Ex. Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.
    Ex. If there must be formal introductions and votes of thanks, at least see that there are no lengthy public speeches that pre-empt the visitor's reason for being there at all, and that matters are kept as unembarrassing as possible.
    Ex. At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    * * *
    = stuff, matters, bits and pieces

    Ex: Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.

    Ex: If there must be formal introductions and votes of thanks, at least see that there are no lengthy public speeches that pre-empt the visitor's reason for being there at all, and that matters are kept as unembarrassing as possible.
    Ex: At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cosas

  • 8 dispersión

    f.
    dispersion, scatter, disbandment, scattering.
    * * *
    1 (separación) dispersion; (esparcimiento) scattering
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=acto) [de grupo, multitud] dispersion; [de manifestación] breaking up; [de energía, neutrones] diffusion
    2) (=resultado) dispersal
    * * *
    a) ( de manifestación) dispersion, breaking up
    * * *
    = dispersement, scatter, scattering, dispersal, dispersion, sprawl.
    Ex. Increasing competition and the 'global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.
    Ex. As we proceed down the citation order, the concepts in each successively cited facet are liable to an increasingly higher degree of scatter.
    Ex. All the concepts in the second cited facet will be liable to scattering.
    Ex. The results of citation studies suggest that the dispersal of political science articles is high.
    Ex. It was found that the dispersion of citations to periodicals conformed to a general law of distribution described by the Yule curve.
    Ex. The library has developed a unique system of cooperation and coordination in response to its size and sprawl.
    ----
    * bomba de dispersión = cluster bomb, cluster munition.
    * diagrama de dispersión = scattergram.
    * dispersión alfabética = alphabetical scatter.
    * dispersión bibliográfica = bibliographic scattering.
    * dispersión de Bradford, la = Bradford distribution, the.
    * dispersión de caja = cash float, petty cash.
    * dispersión de frecuencias = frequency distribution.
    * dispersión temática = subject dispersion.
    * dispersión urbana = suburban sprawl, urban sprawl.
    * ley de dispersión = law of scattering.
    * Ley de Dispersión de Bradford = Bradford's distribution law, Bradford's Law of Scatter, Bradford's Law of Scattering.
    * * *
    a) ( de manifestación) dispersion, breaking up
    * * *
    = dispersement, scatter, scattering, dispersal, dispersion, sprawl.

    Ex: Increasing competition and the 'global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.

    Ex: As we proceed down the citation order, the concepts in each successively cited facet are liable to an increasingly higher degree of scatter.
    Ex: All the concepts in the second cited facet will be liable to scattering.
    Ex: The results of citation studies suggest that the dispersal of political science articles is high.
    Ex: It was found that the dispersion of citations to periodicals conformed to a general law of distribution described by the Yule curve.
    Ex: The library has developed a unique system of cooperation and coordination in response to its size and sprawl.
    * bomba de dispersión = cluster bomb, cluster munition.
    * diagrama de dispersión = scattergram.
    * dispersión alfabética = alphabetical scatter.
    * dispersión bibliográfica = bibliographic scattering.
    * dispersión de Bradford, la = Bradford distribution, the.
    * dispersión de caja = cash float, petty cash.
    * dispersión de frecuencias = frequency distribution.
    * dispersión temática = subject dispersion.
    * dispersión urbana = suburban sprawl, urban sprawl.
    * ley de dispersión = law of scattering.
    * Ley de Dispersión de Bradford = Bradford's distribution law, Bradford's Law of Scatter, Bradford's Law of Scattering.

    * * *
    1 (de una manifestación) dispersion, breaking up
    2 (de la atención) wandering, straying
    3 ( Fís) diffusion
    * * *
    1. [de objetos] scattering;
    [de luz, sonido, ondas] scattering, dispersal
    2. [de gentío] dispersal;
    [de manifestación] breaking up, dispersal; [de un pueblo] scattering
    3. [de persona] lack of concentration;
    debemos evitar la dispersión de esfuerzos we mustn't squander our efforts;
    debes centrarte en algo, tu problema es la dispersión you need to focus on something, you spread yourself too widely
    4. Fís dispersion
    * * *
    f dispersion
    * * *
    dispersión nf, pl - siones : dispersion

    Spanish-English dictionary > dispersión

  • 9 estereotipar

    v.
    to stereotype.
    * * *
    1 to stereotype
    * * *
    VT
    1) [+ gesto, frase] to stereotype
    2) (Tip) to stereotype
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to stereotype
    * * *
    Ex. But, while people are complimented by having their interests recognized, very often they deeply resent being summarily categorized or stereotyped.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to stereotype
    * * *

    Ex: But, while people are complimented by having their interests recognized, very often they deeply resent being summarily categorized or stereotyped.

    * * *
    vt
    A (tipificar) to stereotype
    intenta no estereotipar a sus personajes she tries not to make her characters into stereotypes
    B ( Impr) to stereotype
    * * *
    1. [convertir en cliché] to stereotype
    2. Imprenta to stereotype
    * * *
    v/t stereotype
    * * *
    : to stereotype

    Spanish-English dictionary > estereotipar

  • 10 falso

    adj.
    1 false, fake, dummy, counterfeit.
    2 false, delusory, misleading.
    3 false, liar, deceitful, fake.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: falsar.
    * * *
    1 (no verdadero) false, untrue
    2 (moneda) false, counterfeit; (cuadro, sello) forged
    3 (persona) insincere, false; (sonrisa) false
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (persona) insincere person
    \
    dar un paso en falso (tropezar) to trip, stumble 2 (cometer un error) to make a mistake, make a wrong move
    en falso (con falsedad) falsely 2 (sin apoyo) without proper support
    jurar en falso to commit perjury
    falsa alarma false alarm
    * * *
    (f. - falsa)
    adj.
    1) false, untrue
    2) fake
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) [acusación, creencia, rumor] false

    falso testimonio — perjury, false testimony

    2) [firma, pasaporte, joya] false, fake; [techo] false; [cuadro] fake; [moneda] counterfeit
    3) (=insincero) [persona] false, insincere; [sonrisa] false
    4) [caballo] vicious
    5)

    en falso: coger a algn en falso — to catch sb in a lie

    dar un paso en falso — (lit) to trip; (fig) to take a false step

    2.
    SM CAm, Méx false evidence
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    1)
    a) < billete> counterfeit, forged; < cuadro> forged; < documento> false, forged; <diamante/joya> fake; <cajón/techo> false
    b) ( insincero) < persona> insincere, false; <sonrisa/promesa> false
    2)
    a) ( no cierto) <dato/nombre/declaración> false

    eso es falso — that is not true, that is untrue

    b)

    en falso: jurar en falso to commit perjury; golpear en falso — to miss the mark

    * * *
    = dummy, false, sham, spurious, unauthentic, faked, untrue, bogus, deceitful, pseudo, fake, two-faced, inauthentic, phony [phoney], meretricious, counterfeit, insincere, hocus pocus, specious, dishonest, mendacious, delusional.
    Ex. DOBIS/LIBIS, therefore, assigns them the dummy master number zero.
    Ex. The concept 'Senses' constitutes a false link in the chain.
    Ex. A sham catalog is a disservice to the user, and participating in the creation of a sham catalog is personally degrading to a professional.
    Ex. Examples would include giving a spurious impression of busyness at the reference desk.
    Ex. So, in the bicentennial spirit here's a three-point bill of particulars or grievances (in addition to what was mentioned previously with respect to offensive or unauthentic terms).
    Ex. Libri was accused of stealing manuscripts of unique importance and rarity from French provincial libraries in the 1840s and inserting faked notes of provenance, substituting Italian place names for French ones.
    Ex. Public library collections are of little use to scholars and have failed to provide the communications links that might prove this hypothesis untrue.
    Ex. The article 'A bogus and dismal science, or the eggplant that ate library schools' discusses the reasons for the perennial professional indentity crisis amongst librarians.
    Ex. Again, on the matter of the sources already consulted by the enquirer, the implication is not that he is unreliable or deceitful, but that in looking up the Encyclopedia Americana he may not be aware of the existence of the index.
    Ex. Sometimes authors write ' pseudo abstracts' to meet deadlines for articles or for talks to be delivered.
    Ex. This article deals with the detection of fake letters and documents.
    Ex. This course looks at this two-faced society with guided field trips to cemeteries and to the architecture of Edinburgh's underworld below the great banks and public buildings.
    Ex. Much of the culture of Western democracies has increasingly become inauthentic or phony.
    Ex. Much of the culture of Western democracies has increasingly become inauthentic or phony.
    Ex. The responsibility of the critic must be to maintain rigorous standards, and strive to alert the public to the implications for the future of a market flooded with meretricious productions.
    Ex. Criminal charges are to be brought against 3 people after the seizure of counterfeit copies of British Telecom's PhoneDisc, a CD-ROM database containing the company's 100 or so telephone directories.
    Ex. There is a point when participation may become mere meddling and insincere.
    Ex. The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex. This comparative frame of reference is specious and irrelevant on several counts.
    Ex. Mostly facsimiles are made without dishonest intent, although some have certainly been intended to deceive, and the ease with which they can be identified varies with the reproduction process used.
    Ex. I love movies like that -- where slowly, gradually, bit by bit, all the characters realize that the villain was really disastrously mendacious and criminal.
    Ex. Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    ----
    * abeto falso = spruce.
    * alegación falsa = ipse dixit.
    * charlatanería falsa = cant.
    * crear falsas ilusiones = create + false illusions.
    * dar una falsa impresión = keep up + facade, put on + an act.
    * dar un paso en falso = make + a false move.
    * democracia falsa = travesty democracy.
    * diamante falso = rhinestone.
    * erradicar falsas ideas = erase + misconceptions.
    * erradicar una falsa idea = dispel + idea.
    * falsa alabanza = lip service.
    * falsa ilusión = delusion.
    * falsa política de integración de minorías = tokenism.
    * falsa pretensión = false pretence.
    * falsa sensación de seguridad = false sense of security.
    * falso pretexto = false pretence.
    * falso testimonio = perjury.
    * hablar en falso = speak with + a split tongue, speak with + a forked tongue, speak with + a twisted tongue.
    * hacer un movimiento en falso = make + a false move.
    * idea falsa = misconception, bogus idea, illusion.
    * movimiento en falso = false move.
    * nivel jerárquico falso = false link.
    * paso en falso = false move.
    * pista falsa = red herring.
    * resultar falso = prove + false.
    * sonar falso = have + a hollow ring.
    * toma falsa = outtake.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    1)
    a) < billete> counterfeit, forged; < cuadro> forged; < documento> false, forged; <diamante/joya> fake; <cajón/techo> false
    b) ( insincero) < persona> insincere, false; <sonrisa/promesa> false
    2)
    a) ( no cierto) <dato/nombre/declaración> false

    eso es falso — that is not true, that is untrue

    b)

    en falso: jurar en falso to commit perjury; golpear en falso — to miss the mark

    * * *
    = dummy, false, sham, spurious, unauthentic, faked, untrue, bogus, deceitful, pseudo, fake, two-faced, inauthentic, phony [phoney], meretricious, counterfeit, insincere, hocus pocus, specious, dishonest, mendacious, delusional.

    Ex: DOBIS/LIBIS, therefore, assigns them the dummy master number zero.

    Ex: The concept 'Senses' constitutes a false link in the chain.
    Ex: A sham catalog is a disservice to the user, and participating in the creation of a sham catalog is personally degrading to a professional.
    Ex: Examples would include giving a spurious impression of busyness at the reference desk.
    Ex: So, in the bicentennial spirit here's a three-point bill of particulars or grievances (in addition to what was mentioned previously with respect to offensive or unauthentic terms).
    Ex: Libri was accused of stealing manuscripts of unique importance and rarity from French provincial libraries in the 1840s and inserting faked notes of provenance, substituting Italian place names for French ones.
    Ex: Public library collections are of little use to scholars and have failed to provide the communications links that might prove this hypothesis untrue.
    Ex: The article 'A bogus and dismal science, or the eggplant that ate library schools' discusses the reasons for the perennial professional indentity crisis amongst librarians.
    Ex: Again, on the matter of the sources already consulted by the enquirer, the implication is not that he is unreliable or deceitful, but that in looking up the Encyclopedia Americana he may not be aware of the existence of the index.
    Ex: Sometimes authors write ' pseudo abstracts' to meet deadlines for articles or for talks to be delivered.
    Ex: This article deals with the detection of fake letters and documents.
    Ex: This course looks at this two-faced society with guided field trips to cemeteries and to the architecture of Edinburgh's underworld below the great banks and public buildings.
    Ex: Much of the culture of Western democracies has increasingly become inauthentic or phony.
    Ex: Much of the culture of Western democracies has increasingly become inauthentic or phony.
    Ex: The responsibility of the critic must be to maintain rigorous standards, and strive to alert the public to the implications for the future of a market flooded with meretricious productions.
    Ex: Criminal charges are to be brought against 3 people after the seizure of counterfeit copies of British Telecom's PhoneDisc, a CD-ROM database containing the company's 100 or so telephone directories.
    Ex: There is a point when participation may become mere meddling and insincere.
    Ex: The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex: This comparative frame of reference is specious and irrelevant on several counts.
    Ex: Mostly facsimiles are made without dishonest intent, although some have certainly been intended to deceive, and the ease with which they can be identified varies with the reproduction process used.
    Ex: I love movies like that -- where slowly, gradually, bit by bit, all the characters realize that the villain was really disastrously mendacious and criminal.
    Ex: Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    * abeto falso = spruce.
    * alegación falsa = ipse dixit.
    * charlatanería falsa = cant.
    * crear falsas ilusiones = create + false illusions.
    * dar una falsa impresión = keep up + facade, put on + an act.
    * dar un paso en falso = make + a false move.
    * democracia falsa = travesty democracy.
    * diamante falso = rhinestone.
    * erradicar falsas ideas = erase + misconceptions.
    * erradicar una falsa idea = dispel + idea.
    * falsa alabanza = lip service.
    * falsa ilusión = delusion.
    * falsa política de integración de minorías = tokenism.
    * falsa pretensión = false pretence.
    * falsa sensación de seguridad = false sense of security.
    * falso pretexto = false pretence.
    * falso testimonio = perjury.
    * hablar en falso = speak with + a split tongue, speak with + a forked tongue, speak with + a twisted tongue.
    * hacer un movimiento en falso = make + a false move.
    * idea falsa = misconception, bogus idea, illusion.
    * movimiento en falso = false move.
    * nivel jerárquico falso = false link.
    * paso en falso = false move.
    * pista falsa = red herring.
    * resultar falso = prove + false.
    * sonar falso = have + a hollow ring.
    * toma falsa = outtake.

    * * *
    falso -sa
    A
    1 ‹billete› counterfeit, forged; ‹cuadro› forged
    2 ‹documento› (copiado) false, forged, fake; (alterado) false, forged
    3 (simulado) ‹diamante/joya› fake; ‹bolsillo/cajón/techo› false
    4 (insincero) ‹persona› insincere, false; ‹sonrisa› false; ‹promesa› false
    B
    1 (no cierto) ‹dato/nombre/declaración› false
    eso es falso, nunca afirmé tal cosa that is not true o that is untrue, I never said such a thing
    2
    en falso: jurar en falso to commit perjury
    golpear en falso to miss the mark
    esta tabla está en falso this board isn't properly supported
    la maleta cerró en falso the suitcase didn't shut properly
    el tornillo giraba en falso the screw wouldn't grip
    paso1 m C 1. (↑ paso (1))
    Compuestos:
    feminine false alarm
    feminine false modesty
    masculine ( Der) false testimony, perjury
    no levantar falso testimonio ( Relig) thou shalt not bear false witness
    * * *

     

    falso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo


    cuadro forged;
    documento false, forged;
    diamante/joya fake;
    cajón/techo false

    sonrisa/promesa false
    c) ( no cierto) ‹dato/nombre/declaración false;

    eso es falso that is not true o is untrue;

    falsa alarma false alarm;
    falso testimonio sustantivo masculino (Der) false testimony, perjury
    falso,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 false: eso que dices es falso, what you're saying is wrong
    había un puerta falsa, there was a false door
    nombre falso, assumed name
    2 (persona) insincere: Juan me parece muy falso, I think Juan is insincere
    3 (falsificado) forged
    dinero falso, counterfeit o bogus money
    II m (persona) insincere person, hypocrit
    ♦ Locuciones: en falso, false: jurar en falso, to commit perjury
    ' falso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cierta
    - cierto
    - falaz
    - falsa
    - fantasma
    - incierta
    - incierto
    - jurar
    - perjurar
    - testimonio
    - colar
    - supuesto
    English:
    absolutely
    - affected
    - bogus
    - counterfeit
    - deceitful
    - disingenuous
    - dud
    - fake
    - false
    - false move
    - faux pas
    - hollow
    - insincere
    - phoney
    - sham
    - slimy
    - spurious
    - two-faced
    - untrue
    - untruthful
    - smooth
    - spruce
    - sycamore
    - trumped-up
    - two
    * * *
    falso, -a
    adj
    1. [afirmación, información, rumor] false, untrue;
    eso que dices es falso what you are saying is not true;
    en falso [falsamente] falsely;
    [sin firmeza] unsoundly;
    si haces un movimiento en falso, disparo one false move and I'll shoot;
    dio un paso en falso y se cayó he missed his footing and fell;
    jurar en falso to commit perjury
    falsa alarma false alarm;
    falso testimonio [en juicio] perjury, false evidence;
    dar falso testimonio to give false evidence
    2. [dinero, firma, cuadro] forged;
    [pasaporte] forged, false; [joyas] fake;
    un diamante falso an imitation diamond
    3. [hipócrita] deceitful;
    no soporto a los falsos amigos que te critican a la espalda I can't stand false friends who criticize you behind your back;
    basta ya de falsa simpatía that's enough of you pretending to be nice;
    Fam Hum
    es más falso que Judas he's a real snake in the grass
    Ling falso amigo false friend;
    falsa modestia false modesty
    4. [simulado] false
    falsa costilla false rib;
    falso estuco [en bricolaje] stick-on plasterwork;
    falso muro false wall;
    falso techo false ceiling
    nm,f
    [hipócrita] hypocrite
    * * *
    adj
    1 false
    2 joyas fake; documento, firma forged; monedas, billetes counterfeit
    3
    :
    declarar en falso commit perjury
    4 persona false
    * * *
    falso, -sa adj
    1) falaz: false, untrue
    2) : counterfeit, forged
    * * *
    falso adj
    1. (en general) false
    2. (billete, cuadro) forged
    3. (joya) fake
    4. (persona) false / insincere

    Spanish-English dictionary > falso

  • 11 ficticio

    adj.
    1 fictitious, counterfeit, dummy, made-up.
    2 fictitious, pseudonymous.
    3 fictitious, unauthentic, hypocritical, inauthentic.
    4 fictional, stage.
    * * *
    1 fictitious
    * * *
    (f. - ficticia)
    adj.
    fictitious, fictional
    * * *
    ADJ [nombre, carácter] fictitious; [historia, prueba] fabricated
    * * *
    - cia adjetivo <personaje/suceso> fictitious; < valor> fiduciary
    * * *
    = dummy, illusory, fictitious, fictionalised [fictionalized, -USA], fictional, fancied, make-believe, fictious, delusional.
    Ex. DOBIS/LIBIS, therefore, assigns them the dummy master number zero.
    Ex. We can permit ourselves to be hypnotized by the gadgetry for access and by illusory cost reductions, or we can use the computer effectively to transform the catalog into a truly responsive instrument.
    Ex. Certainly there are very serious novels which, by means of a fictitious story, have a great deal to say about human relationships and social structures.
    Ex. This is a humourous and cautionary fictionalised account of a disastrous author visit to a public library to do a reading for children.
    Ex. No one, in this purely hypothetical example, has thought that the reader might be happy with a factual account of an Atlantic convoy as well as, or in place of, a purely fictional account.
    Ex. It is suggested that differences between children's spoken words and the words in school texts may be more fancied than factual.
    Ex. This book illustrates and describes the features of a monster and reinsures the children not to be frightened of make-believe monsters.
    Ex. Many of them are fictious, but there are also real artists and scientists, who play parts in the book, in one way or another.
    Ex. Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    ----
    * amenaza ficticia = bogeyman [bogeymen], bogey [bogie].
    * elemento de búsqueda ficticio = rogue string.
    * entrada ficticia = rogue entry.
    * pasado ficticio = imaginary past.
    * resultar ser ficticio = prove + illusory.
    * * *
    - cia adjetivo <personaje/suceso> fictitious; < valor> fiduciary
    * * *
    = dummy, illusory, fictitious, fictionalised [fictionalized, -USA], fictional, fancied, make-believe, fictious, delusional.

    Ex: DOBIS/LIBIS, therefore, assigns them the dummy master number zero.

    Ex: We can permit ourselves to be hypnotized by the gadgetry for access and by illusory cost reductions, or we can use the computer effectively to transform the catalog into a truly responsive instrument.
    Ex: Certainly there are very serious novels which, by means of a fictitious story, have a great deal to say about human relationships and social structures.
    Ex: This is a humourous and cautionary fictionalised account of a disastrous author visit to a public library to do a reading for children.
    Ex: No one, in this purely hypothetical example, has thought that the reader might be happy with a factual account of an Atlantic convoy as well as, or in place of, a purely fictional account.
    Ex: It is suggested that differences between children's spoken words and the words in school texts may be more fancied than factual.
    Ex: This book illustrates and describes the features of a monster and reinsures the children not to be frightened of make-believe monsters.
    Ex: Many of them are fictious, but there are also real artists and scientists, who play parts in the book, in one way or another.
    Ex: Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    * amenaza ficticia = bogeyman [bogeymen], bogey [bogie].
    * elemento de búsqueda ficticio = rogue string.
    * entrada ficticia = rogue entry.
    * pasado ficticio = imaginary past.
    * resultar ser ficticio = prove + illusory.

    * * *
    1 ‹personaje/suceso› fictitious
    2 ‹valor› fiduciary
    * * *

    ficticio
    ◊ - cia adjetivo ‹personaje/suceso fictitious

    ficticio,-a adjetivo fictitious

    ' ficticio' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ficticia
    - real
    English:
    doe
    - fictional
    - fictitious
    - assume
    * * *
    ficticio, -a adj
    1. [imaginario] fictitious
    2. [convencional] imaginary
    * * *
    adj fictitious
    * * *
    ficticio, - cia adj
    : fictitious

    Spanish-English dictionary > ficticio

  • 12 iluso

    adj.
    1 naive, guileless, deluded, tender-minded.
    2 illusive.
    m.
    dreamer, self-deceiver, utopian, simpleton.
    * * *
    1 naive, gullible
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 naive person, gullible person
    * * *
    iluso, -a
    1.
    ADJ (=crédulo) gullible

    ¡pobre iluso! — poor deluded creature!

    ¡iluso de mí! — silly me!

    2.
    SM / F (=soñador) dreamer

    ¡iluso! — you're hopeful!

    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo naive
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino dreamer

    eres un iluso si crees que va a volveryou're being naive o (colloq) kidding yourself if you think she's going to come back

    * * *
    = starry-eyed, deluded, daydreamer, delusional.
    Ex. It would be starry-eyed to imagine that we the library ever reach into every home.
    Ex. On the one hand, Lynch gradually reveals a deluded, modestly talented, aspiring actress failing to achieve more than a stand-in role in her own life.
    Ex. The qualities inherent to the daydreamer's meandering mind are those that I wish to evoke within my photographs.
    Ex. Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    ----
    * persona ilusa = daydreamer.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo naive
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino dreamer

    eres un iluso si crees que va a volveryou're being naive o (colloq) kidding yourself if you think she's going to come back

    * * *
    = starry-eyed, deluded, daydreamer, delusional.

    Ex: It would be starry-eyed to imagine that we the library ever reach into every home.

    Ex: On the one hand, Lynch gradually reveals a deluded, modestly talented, aspiring actress failing to achieve more than a stand-in role in her own life.
    Ex: The qualities inherent to the daydreamer's meandering mind are those that I wish to evoke within my photographs.
    Ex: Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    * persona ilusa = daydreamer.

    * * *
    iluso1 -sa
    naive
    ¡no seas tan iluso! don't be so naive!, don't kid yourself! ( colloq), you've got a hope! ( iro)
    iluso2 -sa
    masculine, feminine
    dreamer
    eres un iluso si crees que va a volver you're being naive o living in a dreamworld o ( colloq) kidding yourself if you think she's going to come back
    * * *

    iluso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    naive
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    dreamer
    iluso,-a adjetivo easily deceived, gullible

    ' iluso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ilusa
    English:
    starry
    * * *
    iluso, -a
    adj
    naive;
    ¡no seas iluso! don't be so naive!
    nm,f
    naive person, dreamer;
    piensa que le van a subir el sueldo, ¡iluso! he's so naive, he thinks he's going to get a pay Br rise o US raise!;
    eres un iluso si crees que vas a conseguir algo así you're dreaming o kidding yourself if you think you can achieve anything like that
    * * *
    I adj gullible
    II m, ilusa f dreamer
    * * *
    iluso, -sa adj
    : naive, gullible
    iluso, -sa n
    soñador: dreamer, visionary

    Spanish-English dictionary > iluso

  • 13 ilusorio

    adj.
    illusory, chimerical, imaginary, illusive.
    * * *
    1 illusory
    * * *
    ADJ (=irreal) illusory; (=sin valor) empty; (=sin efecto) ineffective
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo
    a) ( engañoso) < promesa> false; < esperanza> false, illusory
    b) ( imaginario) imaginary
    * * *
    = illusory, starry-eyed, hallucinatory, deceptive, delusional, airy-fairy, fantastical, fantastic.
    Ex. We can permit ourselves to be hypnotized by the gadgetry for access and by illusory cost reductions, or we can use the computer effectively to transform the catalog into a truly responsive instrument.
    Ex. It would be starry-eyed to imagine that we the library ever reach into every home.
    Ex. Subject-matter, portrayed with hallucinatory realism, is largely autobiographical -- mainly people connected with the artist and places associated with them.
    Ex. Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.
    Ex. Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    Ex. Home Secretary David Blunkett says an ' airy fairy, libertarian' view of the world is no good for fighting terrorism.
    Ex. Filled with allegory and allusion, his paintings portray a fantastical universe inhabited by mysterious and fanciful creatures.
    Ex. He builds up a picture of human anguish in the face of the mysteries of existence that is both dreamlike and concrete, fantastic and real at the same time.
    * * *
    - ria adjetivo
    a) ( engañoso) < promesa> false; < esperanza> false, illusory
    b) ( imaginario) imaginary
    * * *
    = illusory, starry-eyed, hallucinatory, deceptive, delusional, airy-fairy, fantastical, fantastic.

    Ex: We can permit ourselves to be hypnotized by the gadgetry for access and by illusory cost reductions, or we can use the computer effectively to transform the catalog into a truly responsive instrument.

    Ex: It would be starry-eyed to imagine that we the library ever reach into every home.
    Ex: Subject-matter, portrayed with hallucinatory realism, is largely autobiographical -- mainly people connected with the artist and places associated with them.
    Ex: Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.
    Ex: Despite what false patriots tell us, we now have a delusional democracy, not one that citizens can trust to serve their interests.
    Ex: Home Secretary David Blunkett says an ' airy fairy, libertarian' view of the world is no good for fighting terrorism.
    Ex: Filled with allegory and allusion, his paintings portray a fantastical universe inhabited by mysterious and fanciful creatures.
    Ex: He builds up a picture of human anguish in the face of the mysteries of existence that is both dreamlike and concrete, fantastic and real at the same time.

    * * *
    1 (engañoso) ‹promesa› false, deceptive; ‹esperanza› false, illusory
    2 (imaginario) imaginary
    * * *
    ilusorio, -a adj
    [imaginario] illusory; [promesa] empty
    * * *
    adj illusory
    * * *
    ilusorio, - ria adj
    engañoso: illusory, misleading

    Spanish-English dictionary > ilusorio

  • 14 incremento presupuestario

    Ex. It is in their interests to promote budget increases and institutional cooperation necessary to expand the public library's value to them.
    * * *

    Ex: It is in their interests to promote budget increases and institutional cooperation necessary to expand the public library's value to them.

    Spanish-English dictionary > incremento presupuestario

  • 15 intereses

    Ex. Increasing competition and the 'global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.
    * * *

    Ex: Increasing competition and the 'global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.

    Spanish-English dictionary > intereses

  • 16 minucias

    f.pl.
    minutia, trivia, minutiae.
    * * *
    = minutiae, bits and pieces, odds and ends, bits and bobs, petty details.
    Ex. Flaws are emphasized and frequent comparisons made with similar tools, but these are often buried in a mass of minutiae.
    Ex. At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    Ex. Ephemeral jobs are likely to have been printed on such odds and ends of paper -- remnants and the like -- as were available in the warehouse.
    Ex. There she found a plastic sleeve with all sorts of invoices in it and other bits and bobs.
    Ex. We all share the same wants and needs, only the petty details differ.
    * * *
    = minutiae, bits and pieces, odds and ends, bits and bobs, petty details.

    Ex: Flaws are emphasized and frequent comparisons made with similar tools, but these are often buried in a mass of minutiae.

    Ex: At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    Ex: Ephemeral jobs are likely to have been printed on such odds and ends of paper -- remnants and the like -- as were available in the warehouse.
    Ex: There she found a plastic sleeve with all sorts of invoices in it and other bits and bobs.
    Ex: We all share the same wants and needs, only the petty details differ.

    Spanish-English dictionary > minucias

  • 17 mundial

    adj.
    1 world.
    2 worldwide, world, world-ranging, world-wide.
    f. & m.
    World Cup.
    m.
    World Championships.
    * * *
    1 worldwide, world
    1 world championship
    \
    de fama mundial world-famous
    mundial de fútbol World Cup
    * * *
    adj.
    world, worldwide
    * * *
    1.
    ADJ [acontecimiento, esfuerzo, organismo] worldwide; [economía, figura, población] world antes de s

    una crisis a escala mundial — a crisis on a worldwide scale, a global crisis

    la primera guerra mundial — the First World War, World War I

    la segunda guerra mundial — the Second World War, World War II

    2.

    el Mundial o los Mundiales (de Fútbol) — the World Cup

    el Mundial o los Mundiales de Atletismo — the Athletics World Cup o Championship

    * * *
    I
    adjetivo <historia/mercado> world (before n)

    es un problema mundialit's a global o worldwide problem

    II
    masculino, mundiales masculino plural World Championship(s)
    * * *
    = world, global.
    Ex. The business community entered the field at a time when the world economy was shaken by the oil price rises of the seventies.
    Ex. Increasing competition and the ' global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.
    ----
    * aldea mundial de la información, la = global information village, the.
    * aldea mundial, la = global village, the.
    * alfabetización a nivel mundial = world literacy.
    * alfabetización mundial = world literacy.
    * a nivel mundial = worldwide [world-wide], globally.
    * autoridad mundial = world authority.
    * Banco Mundial, el = World Bank, the.
    * campeón mundial = world champion.
    * comunidad mundial, la = world community, the.
    * crisis económica mundial = global economic slump.
    * Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información = World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).
    * de fama mundial = world-renowned, internationally renowned, world-renown.
    * de prestigio mundial = world-class.
    * de renombre mundial = world-renown, world-renowned.
    * economía mundial, la = world economy, the.
    * en el escenario mundial = on the world stage.
    * escena mundial, la = global scene, the.
    * Infraestructura Mundial para la Información = Global Information Infrastructure (GII).
    * marca mundial = world record.
    * mercado mundial = global market, world market.
    * Organización Mundial para el Comercio = World Trade Organization (WTO).
    * potencia mundial = world power.
    * Primera Guerra Mundial = World War I [First World War].
    * Programa Mundial de Alimentos, el = World Food Programme, the.
    * recesión mundial = world recession.
    * récord mundial = world record.
    * Segunda Guerra Mundial = World War II [Second World War].
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo <historia/mercado> world (before n)

    es un problema mundialit's a global o worldwide problem

    II
    masculino, mundiales masculino plural World Championship(s)
    * * *
    = world, global.

    Ex: The business community entered the field at a time when the world economy was shaken by the oil price rises of the seventies.

    Ex: Increasing competition and the ' global economy' is greatly affecting the geographic dispersement of these people and the breadth of their interests.
    * aldea mundial de la información, la = global information village, the.
    * aldea mundial, la = global village, the.
    * alfabetización a nivel mundial = world literacy.
    * alfabetización mundial = world literacy.
    * a nivel mundial = worldwide [world-wide], globally.
    * autoridad mundial = world authority.
    * Banco Mundial, el = World Bank, the.
    * campeón mundial = world champion.
    * comunidad mundial, la = world community, the.
    * crisis económica mundial = global economic slump.
    * Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información = World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).
    * de fama mundial = world-renowned, internationally renowned, world-renown.
    * de prestigio mundial = world-class.
    * de renombre mundial = world-renown, world-renowned.
    * economía mundial, la = world economy, the.
    * en el escenario mundial = on the world stage.
    * escena mundial, la = global scene, the.
    * Infraestructura Mundial para la Información = Global Information Infrastructure (GII).
    * marca mundial = world record.
    * mercado mundial = global market, world market.
    * Organización Mundial para el Comercio = World Trade Organization (WTO).
    * potencia mundial = world power.
    * Primera Guerra Mundial = World War I [First World War].
    * Programa Mundial de Alimentos, el = World Food Programme, the.
    * recesión mundial = world recession.
    * récord mundial = world record.
    * Segunda Guerra Mundial = World War II [Second World War].

    * * *
    un artista de fama mundial a world-famous artist, an artist of worldwide renown
    el 65% del mercado mundial 65% of the world market
    batió la marca mundial she broke the world record
    ha tenido influencia a escala mundial she has been influential worldwide
    la historia mundial world history
    es un problema mundial it's a global o worldwide problem
    la producción mundial de café world coffee production
    la población mundial the population of the world, the world's population
    World Championship(s)
    el mundial de fútbol the World Cup
    el mundial de natación the World Swimming Championships
    * * *

     

    mundial adjetivo ‹historia/mercado world ( before n);

    de fama mundial world-famous;
    es un problema mundial it's a global o worldwide problem
    ■ sustantivo masculino: tb mundiales sustantivo masculino plural
    World Championship(s);
    el mundial de fútbol the World Cup
    mundial
    I adjetivo worldwide
    comercio mundial, world trade
    Día Mundial de la Infancia, World Childhood Day
    II m Dep world championship

    ' mundial' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    clasificación
    - entrenarse
    - fama
    - global
    - guerra
    - récord
    - telaraña
    English:
    aim
    - global
    - hold
    - lead
    - renown
    - seminar
    - ultimately
    - world
    - world-class
    - world-famous
    - worldwide
    - do
    - VE-Day
    - web
    - World Wide Web
    * * *
    adj
    [política, economía, guerra] world; [tratado, organización] worldwide;
    los líderes del sector a nivel mundial the world leaders in the sector;
    un escritor de fama mundial a world-famous writer
    nm
    World Championships;
    [de fútbol, rugby] World Cup; [de Fórmula 1, motociclismo] world championship Mundial de Clubes [de fútbol] World Club Championship;
    mundial de rallies world rally championship
    * * *
    I adj world atr
    II m
    :
    * * *
    mundial adj
    : world, worldwide
    * * *
    mundial1 adj
    1. (en general) world
    2. (universal) worldwide
    mundial2 n world championship

    Spanish-English dictionary > mundial

  • 18 partes

    f.pl.
    parties, parties to a dispute.
    pres.indicat.
    2nd person singular (tú) present indicative of spanish verb: partir.
    * * *
    1 familiar privates, private parts
    * * *
    Ex. At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    * * *

    Ex: At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.

    Spanish-English dictionary > partes

  • 19 punto de referencia

    point of reference
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = benchmark, frame of reference, signpost, signposting, point of reference, anchor, anchor point, referral point, switching point, reference point, reference point
    Ex. Benchmarks are the times taken to carry out a set of standard operations and they are comparable to the government fuel consumption figures for cars.
    Ex. However well a network may function, if the people communicating are not in the same frame of reference, the resulting problems will inpinge upon the benefits of office automation.
    Ex. The cooperative approach in evidence in the Moorlands Information scheme is one signpost for the future.
    Ex. The sequence in the book is chosen for us by the author and we cannot alter it, though we may to a large extent minimize the effect by adequate signposting in the form of indexes and guiding.
    Ex. This article uses the example of the needs of library service of Pretoria University as a point of reference.
    Ex. This format can provide an anchor for instructional designers attempting to come to terms with the vast potential of hypertext and hypermedia.
    Ex. This article stresses the importance of the library as a permanent anchor point for the local community.
    Ex. There is a wider objective of establishing referral points as 'a place to go when you don't know where to go'.
    Ex. With the help of a central 'switching point' the board hopes to use this information to provide a sophisticated resource sharing scheme.
    Ex. Behaviour of patrons who could choose between a person sitting at a computer and one sitting at a desk at each of 2 reference points was observed.
    Ex. The list was prepared to be used as a reference point by professionals wishing to further their knowledge about the Turkish library and information scene.
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = benchmark, frame of reference, signpost, signposting, point of reference, anchor, anchor point, referral point, switching point, reference point, reference point

    Ex: Benchmarks are the times taken to carry out a set of standard operations and they are comparable to the government fuel consumption figures for cars.

    Ex: However well a network may function, if the people communicating are not in the same frame of reference, the resulting problems will inpinge upon the benefits of office automation.
    Ex: The cooperative approach in evidence in the Moorlands Information scheme is one signpost for the future.
    Ex: The sequence in the book is chosen for us by the author and we cannot alter it, though we may to a large extent minimize the effect by adequate signposting in the form of indexes and guiding.
    Ex: This article uses the example of the needs of library service of Pretoria University as a point of reference.
    Ex: This format can provide an anchor for instructional designers attempting to come to terms with the vast potential of hypertext and hypermedia.
    Ex: This article stresses the importance of the library as a permanent anchor point for the local community.
    Ex: There is a wider objective of establishing referral points as 'a place to go when you don't know where to go'.
    Ex: With the help of a central 'switching point' the board hopes to use this information to provide a sophisticated resource sharing scheme.
    Ex: Behaviour of patrons who could choose between a person sitting at a computer and one sitting at a desk at each of 2 reference points was observed.
    Ex: The list was prepared to be used as a reference point by professionals wishing to further their knowledge about the Turkish library and information scene.

    * * *
    reference point

    Spanish-English dictionary > punto de referencia

  • 20 retazos

    m.pl.
    remnants, bits and pieces of fabric, rags, cuttings.
    * * *
    = odds and ends, shavings, bits and pieces, bits and bobs
    Ex. Ephemeral jobs are likely to have been printed on such odds and ends of paper -- remnants and the like -- as were available in the warehouse.
    Ex. The sheets of paper were dipped by handfuls into hot size, a solution of animal gelatine made from vellum or leather shavings boiled in water, to make them relatively impermeable.
    Ex. At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    Ex. There she found a plastic sleeve with all sorts of invoices in it and other bits and bobs.
    * * *
    = odds and ends, shavings, bits and pieces, bits and bobs

    Ex: Ephemeral jobs are likely to have been printed on such odds and ends of paper -- remnants and the like -- as were available in the warehouse.

    Ex: The sheets of paper were dipped by handfuls into hot size, a solution of animal gelatine made from vellum or leather shavings boiled in water, to make them relatively impermeable.
    Ex: At the same time, indigenous knowledge has become more fragmented and specialised as scientists and humanitarians pick at the bits and pieces that fit with their interests and disciplines.
    Ex: There she found a plastic sleeve with all sorts of invoices in it and other bits and bobs.

    Spanish-English dictionary > retazos

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