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faking

  • 1 amañamiento

    SM (=manipulación) fiddling, trickery; (Pol) rigging, gerrymandering
    * * *
    = doctoring, fudging.
    Ex. The second section of the report describes the use of education as a weapon of cultural repression, and the doctoring of textbooks to promote intolerance.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of ' fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    * * *
    = doctoring, fudging.

    Ex: The second section of the report describes the use of education as a weapon of cultural repression, and the doctoring of textbooks to promote intolerance.

    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of ' fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.

    Spanish-English dictionary > amañamiento

  • 2 amañar

    v.
    1 to rig, to manipulate.
    2 to trick, to rig.
    * * *
    1 (falsear) to fiddle, fix; (documentos) to tamper with, doctor; (cuentas) to cook; (elecciones) to rig
    2 (componer) to fix, arrange
    1 (darse maña) to be skilful (US skillful)
    \
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) pey (=manipular) [+ resultado] to alter, tamper with; [+ elección] to rig; [+ foto] to fake; [+ partido, jurado] to fix; [+ cuentas] to cook *; [+ excusa] to cook up
    2) (=hacer bien) to do skilfully, do skillfully (EEUU), do cleverly
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo (fam) < elecciones> to rig; <partido/pelea> to fix; <carnet/documento> to tamper with; < informe> to alter, doctor (pej); <excusa/historia> to dream o cook up, concoct
    2.
    amañarse v pron
    1) tb

    amañárselas — ( ingeniarse) to manage

    2) (Col, Ven) ( acostumbrarse) to settle in
    * * *
    = sex up, fiddle, fiddle with, fudge, fake, cobble together, concoct.
    Ex. Kelly reportedly said that top aides of Prime Minister Tony Blair had ' sexed up' intelligence reports to help justify an invasion of Iraq.
    Ex. Thus, the wrong impression was gained, for instance, when the olive oil subsidies were being ' fiddled' in Italy.
    Ex. The writer bemoans record studios' tendency to chop up and fiddle with opera performances.
    Ex. The author explains how scientific literature is written, refereed, edited, and published, and contends that the data it contains have often been fudged or stolen from others.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex. By cobbling together these essays without any attempt to integrate them, Mills reveals a disregard for his audience.
    Ex. Their unquenchable thirst for revenge enabled them to concoct a diabolical scheme.
    ----
    * amañar el mercado = rig + the market.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo (fam) < elecciones> to rig; <partido/pelea> to fix; <carnet/documento> to tamper with; < informe> to alter, doctor (pej); <excusa/historia> to dream o cook up, concoct
    2.
    amañarse v pron
    1) tb

    amañárselas — ( ingeniarse) to manage

    2) (Col, Ven) ( acostumbrarse) to settle in
    * * *
    = sex up, fiddle, fiddle with, fudge, fake, cobble together, concoct.

    Ex: Kelly reportedly said that top aides of Prime Minister Tony Blair had ' sexed up' intelligence reports to help justify an invasion of Iraq.

    Ex: Thus, the wrong impression was gained, for instance, when the olive oil subsidies were being ' fiddled' in Italy.
    Ex: The writer bemoans record studios' tendency to chop up and fiddle with opera performances.
    Ex: The author explains how scientific literature is written, refereed, edited, and published, and contends that the data it contains have often been fudged or stolen from others.
    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex: By cobbling together these essays without any attempt to integrate them, Mills reveals a disregard for his audience.
    Ex: Their unquenchable thirst for revenge enabled them to concoct a diabolical scheme.
    * amañar el mercado = rig + the market.

    * * *
    amañar [A1 ]
    vt
    ( fam)
    1 ‹elecciones› to rig; ‹partido/pelea› to fix
    2 ‹carnet/documento› to tamper with, doctor
    amañó el informe oficial he doctored o altered the official report
    3 ‹excusa/historia› to dream o cook up, concoct
    A
    tb amañárselas (ingeniarse): se (las) amañó para llegar a fin de mes she somehow managed to get by until the end of the month
    B ( Col) (acostumbrarse) to settle in
    * * *

    amañar ( conjugate amañar) verbo transitivo (fam) ‹ elecciones to rig;
    partido/pelea to fix;
    carnet/documento to tamper with;
    informe to alter, doctor (pej);
    excusa/historia› to dream o cook up, concoct
    amañarse verbo pronominal
    1 tb

    2 (Col, Ven) ( acostumbrarse) to settle in
    amañar verbo transitivo
    1 to fix, fiddle
    2 (unas elecciones, un premio) to rig
    ' amañar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    book
    - cook
    - doctor
    - fiddle
    - fix
    - juggle
    - fudge
    - rig
    * * *
    vt
    1. [elecciones, resultado] to rig;
    [partido] to fix
    2. [documento] to doctor
    * * *
    v/t fam
    rig fam ; partido fix fam
    * * *
    : to rig, to fix, to tamper with

    Spanish-English dictionary > amañar

  • 3 cabrearse

    1 familiar to get angry, get worked up
    * * *
    VPR
    1) (=enfadarse) to get pissed off ***
    2) (=sospechar) to get suspicious
    3) Cono Sur (=aburrirse) to get bored
    * * *
    (v.) = throw + a hissy fit, throw + a fit, incense, wax + indignant, spit + feathers, get + (all) worked up (about), get + naffed off, get + hot under the collar
    Ex. Perhaps I should have thrown a hissy fit, but I just couldn't be bothered.
    Ex. The diva then threw a fit when told they couldn't serve her a milkshake.
    Ex. She was very incensed about what she believed was an ignorant remark he made during a sales call.
    Ex. To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.
    Ex. It makes me laugh to think of you poor losers spitting feathers about the government.
    Ex. Ordinary people can sit around and get morally worked up about the evil of drugs the way they once got worked up about the 'red menace'.
    Ex. This is the 3rd time he's been sidelined for 3 weeks due to injuries and he's starting to get naffed off.
    Ex. She is quick to get hot under the collar, but once the problem is ironed out she forgets it entirely.
    * * *
    (v.) = throw + a hissy fit, throw + a fit, incense, wax + indignant, spit + feathers, get + (all) worked up (about), get + naffed off, get + hot under the collar

    Ex: Perhaps I should have thrown a hissy fit, but I just couldn't be bothered.

    Ex: The diva then threw a fit when told they couldn't serve her a milkshake.
    Ex: She was very incensed about what she believed was an ignorant remark he made during a sales call.
    Ex: To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.
    Ex: It makes me laugh to think of you poor losers spitting feathers about the government.
    Ex: Ordinary people can sit around and get morally worked up about the evil of drugs the way they once got worked up about the 'red menace'.
    Ex: This is the 3rd time he's been sidelined for 3 weeks due to injuries and he's starting to get naffed off.
    Ex: She is quick to get hot under the collar, but once the problem is ironed out she forgets it entirely.

    * * *

    ■cabrearse vr fam to get worked up
    ' cabrearse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cabrear
    * * *
    vpr
    to get really pissed off o US pissed ( con with);
    no te cabrees, sólo era una broma keep your hair on, I was only joking;
    se ha cabreado con Ana he's really pissed off o US pissed with Ana
    * * *
    v/r pop
    get mad fam

    Spanish-English dictionary > cabrearse

  • 4 falsear

    v.
    1 to falsify, to distort (hechos, historia, datos).
    Elsa falseó la evidencia Elsa falsified the evidence.
    María falseó la verdad en la corte Mary distorted the truth in court.
    2 to adulterate, to vitiate, to make impure.
    Ricardo falseó los datos Richard adulterated the data.
    3 to rig.
    * * *
    1 (deformar un informe etc) to falsify; (unos hechos, la verdad) to distort
    2 (falsificar) to counterfeit, forge
    2 MÚSICA to be dissonant, be out of tune
    * * *
    1.
    VT [+ cifras, datos] to falsify, doctor; [+ verdad, hechos] to distort; [+ voto] to rig *, fiddle *; [+ firma, moneda, documento] to forge, fake; [+ cerrojo] to pick; (Téc) to bevel
    2. VI
    1) (=ceder) to buckle, sag; (fig) to flag, slacken
    2) (Mús) to be out of tune
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <hechos/datos> to falsify; <verdad/realidad> to distort
    * * *
    = falsify, fake, counterfeit.
    Ex. These multipliers are low in comparison with those applied by commercial publishers, though the comparison is substantially falsified by the high costs for the institutions of originating publications in a number of parallel language versions.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex. While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <hechos/datos> to falsify; <verdad/realidad> to distort
    * * *
    = falsify, fake, counterfeit.

    Ex: These multipliers are low in comparison with those applied by commercial publishers, though the comparison is substantially falsified by the high costs for the institutions of originating publications in a number of parallel language versions.

    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex: While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.

    * * *
    falsear [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹hechos/datos› to falsify; ‹verdad› to distort
    su versión falsea la realidad his version distorts the truth
    to work loose
    * * *

    falsear ( conjugate falsear) verbo transitivohechos/datos to falsify;
    verdad/realidad to distort
    falsear verbo transitivo
    1 (alterar los hechos) to distort
    2 (alterar un documento) to falsify
    ' falsear' also found in these entries:
    English:
    misrepresent
    - fake
    - falsify
    * * *
    [hechos, historia, datos] to falsify, to distort; [dinero, firma] to forge; [pruebas, facturas] to fake;
    falseó su testimonio he gave false evidence
    * * *
    v/t falsify
    * * *
    1) : to falsify, to fake
    2) : to distort
    1) ceder: to give way
    2) : to be out of tune

    Spanish-English dictionary > falsear

  • 5 falsificación

    f.
    1 falsification, forgery, faking, alteration.
    2 forgery, counterfeit, copy, forge.
    * * *
    1 (acto) falsification; (de firma, cuadro) forging, forgery; (de dinero) counterfeiting
    2 (objeto) forgery
    * * *
    noun f.
    fake, forgery, falsification
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=acto) (=creación) forging, faking; (=alteración) falsification
    2) (=objeto) forgery
    * * *
    femenino (firma, billete, cuadro) forgery; ( acción -de copiar) forging, forgery; (- de alterar) falsification
    * * *
    = forgery, counterfeiting, fake, falsification.
    Ex. Examples include: Border patrols, Forgeries, Birds, Spelunkers, Train robberies, etc.
    Ex. The problems of piracy, misappropriation and counterfeiting of intellectual property rights are a hot issue in international trade.
    Ex. This article presents a review of the problems for archivists in identifying fakes and facsimiles in manuscripts and other documents.
    Ex. This article touches upon issues concerning falsification and copyright, legal requirements regarding work with VDUs and controls placed upon the length of time working at VDUs and as ergonomic issues.
    * * *
    femenino (firma, billete, cuadro) forgery; ( acción -de copiar) forging, forgery; (- de alterar) falsification
    * * *
    = forgery, counterfeiting, fake, falsification.

    Ex: Examples include: Border patrols, Forgeries, Birds, Spelunkers, Train robberies, etc.

    Ex: The problems of piracy, misappropriation and counterfeiting of intellectual property rights are a hot issue in international trade.
    Ex: This article presents a review of the problems for archivists in identifying fakes and facsimiles in manuscripts and other documents.
    Ex: This article touches upon issues concerning falsification and copyright, legal requirements regarding work with VDUs and controls placed upon the length of time working at VDUs and as ergonomic issues.

    * * *
    1 (firma, billete, cuadro) forgery
    2 (acción) forging, forgery
    * * *

    falsificación sustantivo femenino
    1 (acción) forgery, counterfeit
    2 (lo falsificado) falsification, fake: no es un Picasso, es una falsificación, it's not a Picasso, it's a fake
    ' falsificación' also found in these entries:
    English:
    counterfeit
    - fake
    - falsification
    - forgery
    - phoney
    * * *
    1. [acción] forging, forgery
    2. [pasaporte] forgery, fake;
    [firma, billete] forgery
    * * *
    f de moneda counterfeiting; de documentos, firma forgery
    * * *
    1) : counterfeit, forgery
    2) : falsification
    * * *
    falsificación n forgery [pl. forgeries]

    Spanish-English dictionary > falsificación

  • 6 falsificador

    adj.
    forging, falsifying, counterfeiting, faking.
    m.
    forger, adulterator, counterfeiter, falsifier.
    * * *
    1 (de firma, cuadro) forging; (de dinero) counterfeiting
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (de firma, cuadro) forger; (de dinero) counterfeiter
    * * *
    falsificador, -a
    SM / F forger, counterfeiter
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino forger
    * * *
    = forger, counterfeiter.
    Ex. This article details the means available for uncovering forgery attempts by tracing the process a forger might use to introduce spurious correspondence into a presidential archive = Este artículo detalla los medios disponibles para descubrir los intentos de falsificación averiguando el proceso que un falsificador podría usar para introducir correspondencia falsa en un archivo presidencial.
    Ex. In the novel the murders have been committed by counterfeiters, not by Lizzie, and Lizzie herself is fictionalized in terms of prevailing Victorian stereotypes of womanhood.
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino forger
    * * *
    = forger, counterfeiter.

    Ex: This article details the means available for uncovering forgery attempts by tracing the process a forger might use to introduce spurious correspondence into a presidential archive = Este artículo detalla los medios disponibles para descubrir los intentos de falsificación averiguando el proceso que un falsificador podría usar para introducir correspondencia falsa en un archivo presidencial.

    Ex: In the novel the murders have been committed by counterfeiters, not by Lizzie, and Lizzie herself is fictionalized in terms of prevailing Victorian stereotypes of womanhood.

    * * *
    masculine, feminine
    forger
    * * *

    falsificador
    ◊ - dora sustantivo masculino, femenino

    forger

    ' falsificador' also found in these entries:
    English:
    forger
    * * *
    falsificador, -ora nm,f
    forger
    * * *
    m, falsificadora f de moneda counterfeiter; de documentos, firma forger
    * * *
    : counterfeiter, forger
    * * *
    falsificador n forger

    Spanish-English dictionary > falsificador

  • 7 falsificar

    v.
    1 to forge.
    Falsificamos dinero We forge money.
    2 to warp, to distort, to falsify.
    Falsificamos los comentarios de María We warped Ann's comments.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SACAR], like link=sacar sacar
    1 (gen) to falsify
    2 (firma, cuadro) to forge; (dinero) to counterfeit, forge
    * * *
    verb
    to fake, forge, falsify
    * * *
    VT [+ billete, firma, cuadro] to forge, fake, counterfeit; [+ resultado, elección] to rig *, fiddle *; [+ documento] (=crear) to forge, fake; (=cambiar) to falsify
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < firma> to forge, fake; < billete> to forge, counterfeit (frml); < cheque> to forge
    b) < documento> ( copiar) to forge, counterfeit; ( alterar) to falsify
    * * *
    = falsify, fake, counterfeit, trump up.
    Ex. These multipliers are low in comparison with those applied by commercial publishers, though the comparison is substantially falsified by the high costs for the institutions of originating publications in a number of parallel language versions.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex. While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.
    Ex. All summer long, the media have been trumping up stories that, while important, probably don't merit the attention they've been receiving.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    a) < firma> to forge, fake; < billete> to forge, counterfeit (frml); < cheque> to forge
    b) < documento> ( copiar) to forge, counterfeit; ( alterar) to falsify
    * * *
    = falsify, fake, counterfeit, trump up.

    Ex: These multipliers are low in comparison with those applied by commercial publishers, though the comparison is substantially falsified by the high costs for the institutions of originating publications in a number of parallel language versions.

    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex: While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.
    Ex: All summer long, the media have been trumping up stories that, while important, probably don't merit the attention they've been receiving.

    * * *
    falsificar [A2 ]
    vt
    1 ‹firma/billete› to forge, falsify, counterfeit ( frml)
    2 ‹cheque/documento› (copiar) to forge, counterfeit; (alterar) to forge, falsify
    * * *

    falsificar ( conjugate falsificar) verbo transitivo
    a)firma/billete/cheque to forge


    ( alterar) to falsify
    falsificar vtr (distorsionar) to falsify
    (crear una copia falsa) to forge, counterfeit: falsificó la firma de su padre, she forged her father's signature
    ' falsificar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    counterfeit
    - fake
    - falsify
    - forge
    - rig
    - tamper
    - trump up
    - doctor
    * * *
    [firma, pasaporte] to forge; [billete] to forge, to counterfeit
    * * *
    v/t moneda counterfeit; documento, firma forge, falsify
    * * *
    falsificar {72} vt
    1) : to counterfeit, to forge
    2) : to falsify
    * * *
    falsificar vb to forge

    Spanish-English dictionary > falsificar

  • 8 fingir

    v.
    1 to feign.
    fingió no saber nada he pretended not to know anything
    Ella fingió un desmayo She feigned a fainting spell.
    Su hijo fingió Her son feigned.
    2 to pretend.
    3 to pretend to, to feign to.
    Ella fingió comer She pretended to eat.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ DIRIGIR], like link=dirigir dirigir
    1 to feign, pretend
    1 to pretend to be
    * * *
    verb
    to feign, pretend
    * * *
    1.

    finge dormir o que duerme — he's pretending to be asleep

    2.

    ¡no finjas más! — stop pretending!

    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <alegría/desinterés> to feign, fake

    fingir + inf — to pretend to + inf

    b) < voz> to imitate
    2.
    fingir vi to pretend
    3.
    fingirse v pron
    * * *
    = feign, dissimulate, fake, counterfeit, sandbag, keep up + facade, put on + an act, keep up + appearances, pretend, dissemble, hoax, bullshit.
    Ex. 'You're sure you know what to do?' 'I'm sure,' she replied, with a confidence still slightly feigned = "¿Estás segura de que sabes qué hacer?" "Estoy segura", respondió con una seguridad todavía ligeramente fingida.
    Ex. He highlights the fact that the amount of time spent lying, dissimulating, and conforming in matters of religious faith was a huge issue in the 16th century.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex. While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.
    Ex. First, if you're one of those players who think that sandbagging is unsportsmanlike, then you don't fully understand the nature of poker.
    Ex. Tom Hernandez tried not to show how sad he felt about his friends' leaving, and managed to keep up a cheerful facade until the party broke up.
    Ex. Singers, dancers, and actors must now all know how to sing, dance and put on an act.
    Ex. As many as 15 million Britons are using credit cards in the struggle to keep up appearances as they mistakenly consider themselves to be middle class.
    Ex. We do not pretend to have equipped you with an instant expertise in the subject analysis and classification of documents.
    Ex. On Sunday it was Vice President Cheney who dissembled about the impact of the tax cuts on the federal budget deficit and the relative size of the deficit.
    Ex. He hoaxed the popular media into thinking that he had burnt a million quid for the publicity it would, and has continued to, generate.
    Ex. Being able to bullshit effectively requires at least a modicum of knowledge about the subject at hand.
    ----
    * fingir debilidad = sandbagging.
    * fingir estar enfermo = malinger.
    * fingir estar muerto = feign + death.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <alegría/desinterés> to feign, fake

    fingir + inf — to pretend to + inf

    b) < voz> to imitate
    2.
    fingir vi to pretend
    3.
    fingirse v pron
    * * *
    = feign, dissimulate, fake, counterfeit, sandbag, keep up + facade, put on + an act, keep up + appearances, pretend, dissemble, hoax, bullshit.

    Ex: 'You're sure you know what to do?' 'I'm sure,' she replied, with a confidence still slightly feigned = "¿Estás segura de que sabes qué hacer?" "Estoy segura", respondió con una seguridad todavía ligeramente fingida.

    Ex: He highlights the fact that the amount of time spent lying, dissimulating, and conforming in matters of religious faith was a huge issue in the 16th century.
    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex: While the U.S. Treasury has taken steps to make it harder to counterfeit American currency, it's still apparently easy to make up fake money orders.
    Ex: First, if you're one of those players who think that sandbagging is unsportsmanlike, then you don't fully understand the nature of poker.
    Ex: Tom Hernandez tried not to show how sad he felt about his friends' leaving, and managed to keep up a cheerful facade until the party broke up.
    Ex: Singers, dancers, and actors must now all know how to sing, dance and put on an act.
    Ex: As many as 15 million Britons are using credit cards in the struggle to keep up appearances as they mistakenly consider themselves to be middle class.
    Ex: We do not pretend to have equipped you with an instant expertise in the subject analysis and classification of documents.
    Ex: On Sunday it was Vice President Cheney who dissembled about the impact of the tax cuts on the federal budget deficit and the relative size of the deficit.
    Ex: He hoaxed the popular media into thinking that he had burnt a million quid for the publicity it would, and has continued to, generate.
    Ex: Being able to bullshit effectively requires at least a modicum of knowledge about the subject at hand.
    * fingir debilidad = sandbagging.
    * fingir estar enfermo = malinger.
    * fingir estar muerto = feign + death.

    * * *
    fingir [I7 ]
    vt
    1 ‹alegría/desinterés› to feign, fake
    fingió sorpresa he feigned o faked surprise, he pretended to be surprised
    fingir + INF to pretend to + INF
    fingía saberlo she pretended o she made out that she knew, she pretended to know
    2 ‹voz› to imitate, put on
    intentó fingir la voz de su hermano he tried to put on o imitate his brother's voice
    ■ fingir
    vi
    to pretend
    se fingió apenado he pretended o made out that he was sorry, he pretended to be sorry
    * * *

     

    fingir ( conjugate fingir) verbo transitivo
    a)alegría/desinterés to feign, fake;


    b) voz to imitate

    verbo intransitivo
    to pretend
    fingirse verbo pronominal:

    fingir verbo transitivo to pretend

    ' fingir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aparentar
    - simular
    - afectar
    - hacer
    English:
    act
    - affect
    - fake
    - feign
    - make out
    - make-believe
    - pretend
    - sham
    - pretense
    * * *
    vt
    to feign;
    fingió alegría para no desilusionarme he pretended to be happy so as not to disappoint me;
    fingió no saber nada he pretended not to know anything
    vi
    to pretend
    * * *
    v/t feign fml ;
    fingió no haberlo oído he pretended he hadn’t heard;
    fingió dormir he pretended to be asleep
    * * *
    fingir {35} v
    : to feign, to pretend
    * * *
    fingir vb to pretend

    Spanish-English dictionary > fingir

  • 9 indignarse

    1 to become indignant ( por, at/about)
    * * *

    ¡es para indignarse! — it's infuriating!

    indignarse por algo — to get indignant about sth, get angry about sth

    * * *
    (v.) = incense, wax + indignant
    Ex. She was very incensed about what she believed was an ignorant remark he made during a sales call.
    Ex. To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.
    * * *
    (v.) = incense, wax + indignant

    Ex: She was very incensed about what she believed was an ignorant remark he made during a sales call.

    Ex: To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.

    * * *

    ■indignarse verbo reflexivo to get indignant [por, at, about]
    ' indignarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    indignar
    English:
    indignant
    - steam up
    * * *
    vpr
    [enfadarse] to get angry o indignant ( por about); [encolerizarse] to be outraged ( por about);
    se indignó conmigo she got angry with me
    * * *
    v/r become indignant
    * * *
    vr
    * * *
    indignarse vb to get angry

    Spanish-English dictionary > indignarse

  • 10 inventar

    v.
    to invent.
    María inventó un nuevo secador Mary invented a new dryer.
    Ricardo inventó esa patraña Richard invented that tall story.
    * * *
    1 (crear) to invent
    2 (imaginar) to imagine
    3 (mentir) to make up, fabricate
    \
    inventar excusas to make up excuses
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    VT [gen] to invent; [+ plan] to devise; [+ historia, excusa] to invent, make up, concoct
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <aparato/sistema> to invent
    b) <juego/palabra> to make up, invent; <cuento/excusa/mentira> to make up
    2.
    inventarse v pron (enf) inventar
    * * *
    = invent, confabulate, fabricate, cook up, trump up.
    Ex. Frequently, but not always, this same process will have been attempted by the author when inventing the title, and this explains why the title is often a useful aid to indexing.
    Ex. His cognitive abilities were severely compromised, and he confabulated continuously and bizarrely.
    Ex. Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex. He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.
    Ex. All summer long, the media have been trumping up stories that, while important, probably don't merit the attention they've been receiving.
    ----
    * inventarse = devise.
    * reinventar = reinvent [re-invent].
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <aparato/sistema> to invent
    b) <juego/palabra> to make up, invent; <cuento/excusa/mentira> to make up
    2.
    inventarse v pron (enf) inventar
    * * *
    = invent, confabulate, fabricate, cook up, trump up.

    Ex: Frequently, but not always, this same process will have been attempted by the author when inventing the title, and this explains why the title is often a useful aid to indexing.

    Ex: His cognitive abilities were severely compromised, and he confabulated continuously and bizarrely.
    Ex: Both the researcher and the student practice of 'fudging' involves faking, fabricating, or stealing data.
    Ex: He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.
    Ex: All summer long, the media have been trumping up stories that, while important, probably don't merit the attention they've been receiving.
    * inventarse = devise.
    * reinventar = reinvent [re-invent].

    * * *
    inventar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹aparato/sistema› to invent pólvora
    2 ‹juego/palabra› to make up, invent; ‹cuento› to make up
    3 ‹excusa/mentira› to make up, invent, come up with
    ( enf) ‹pretexto/mentira› to invent, come up with, make up
    * * *

     

    inventar ( conjugate inventar) verbo transitivo
    a)aparato/sistema to invent

    b)juego/palabra to make up, invent;

    cuento/excusa/mentira to make up
    inventar verbo transitivo
    1 (un objeto, una técnica) to invent
    2 (excusa, mentira) to make up, concoct
    ' inventar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    concoct
    - contrive
    - fabricate
    - invent
    - justification
    - make up
    - devise
    - make
    - think
    * * *
    vt
    1. [máquina, sistema] to invent
    2. [narración, falsedades] to make up
    * * *
    v/t invent
    * * *
    1) : to invent
    2) : to fabricate, to make up
    * * *
    1. (descubrir) to invent
    2. (idear) to make up
    ¡te lo estás inventando! you're making it up!

    Spanish-English dictionary > inventar

  • 11 ponerse como un energúmeno

    to go up the wall, blow one's top
    * * *
    (v.) = get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, blow + Posesivo + top, blow + a fuse, wax + indignant, throw + a wobbly, throw + a wobbler, tear + Posesivo + hair out, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + stack
    Ex. The trouble began when some journalists got their knickers in a twist over Reich's unusual theories -- one of these being the notion that every individual should have a healthy satisfying sex life.
    Ex. Now before anyone gets their knickers in a bundle over that statement let me clarify.
    Ex. I cannot for the life of me understand what you see in the Serb's cause that gets your panties in a bundle.
    Ex. Yoga is better for people who are always blowing their top and who are therefore prone to high blood pressure.
    Ex. He simply blew a fuse and decided to go out on the road, spitefully apologizing again and again, until he got it right.
    Ex. To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.
    Ex. The good thing about having it in writing is that you`re then well within your rights to throw a wobbly and demand you get what you paid for.
    Ex. Of course there are things they don't like, and sometimes one of them throws a wobbler -- which sets the other one off!.
    Ex. People are clearly extremely upset, apparently tearing their hair out at having to deal with spam.
    Ex. Of course her initial reaction was to blow her lid, but she didn't -- instead she took the high road and simply just left.
    Ex. She really blew her stack as she stomped out of the sales manager's office talking to herself.
    * * *
    (v.) = get + Posesivo + knickers in a twist, get + Posesivo + knickers in a bundle, get + Posesivo + panties in a bundle, blow + Posesivo + top, blow + a fuse, wax + indignant, throw + a wobbly, throw + a wobbler, tear + Posesivo + hair out, blow + Posesivo + lid, blow + Posesivo + stack

    Ex: The trouble began when some journalists got their knickers in a twist over Reich's unusual theories -- one of these being the notion that every individual should have a healthy satisfying sex life.

    Ex: Now before anyone gets their knickers in a bundle over that statement let me clarify.
    Ex: I cannot for the life of me understand what you see in the Serb's cause that gets your panties in a bundle.
    Ex: Yoga is better for people who are always blowing their top and who are therefore prone to high blood pressure.
    Ex: He simply blew a fuse and decided to go out on the road, spitefully apologizing again and again, until he got it right.
    Ex: To wax indignant about a President's telling lies makes no more sense than to do so about a wrestler's faking falls.
    Ex: The good thing about having it in writing is that you`re then well within your rights to throw a wobbly and demand you get what you paid for.
    Ex: Of course there are things they don't like, and sometimes one of them throws a wobbler -- which sets the other one off!.
    Ex: People are clearly extremely upset, apparently tearing their hair out at having to deal with spam
    .
    Ex: Of course her initial reaction was to blow her lid, but she didn't -- instead she took the high road and simply just left.
    Ex: She really blew her stack as she stomped out of the sales manager's office talking to herself.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ponerse como un energúmeno

  • 12 falsificación

    • alteration
    • counterfeit
    • counterfeiting
    • embezzlement
    • fake
    • faking
    • falsification
    • forge
    • forgery
    • forging

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > falsificación

См. также в других словарях:

  • Faking It — was a television programme originating on UK Channel 4 which has spawned various international remakes, including a US version which began in 2003 on the TLC network. Devised by Stephen Lambert of RDF Media, the programme s original concept was a …   Wikipedia

  • faking — index disguise Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • faking — n. fabricating, feigning, counterfeiting feɪk n. counterfeit, imitation, copy; deception; cheat, pretender, deceiver v. counterfeit, copy; impersonate, pretend; alter in order to deceive adj. counterfeit, false …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Faking the Books — Infobox Album | Name = Faking the Books Type = Album Artist = Lali Puna Released = April 20, 2004 (U.S.) Recorded = June November 2003 Genre = electronic, indie pop Length = 38:30 Label = Morr Music Producer = Mario Thaler Reviews = *Allmusic… …   Wikipedia

  • Faking It (NCIS) — Infobox Television episode | Title = Faking It Colour = Series = NCIS Season = 4 Episode = 4 Airdate = October 10, 2006 Production = 4x04 Writer = Shane Brennan Director = Thomas J. Wright Guests = Muse Watson as former NIS Agent Mike Franks… …   Wikipedia

  • Faking box — Fake Fake, v. t. (Naut.) To coil (a rope, line, or hawser), by winding alternately in opposite directions, in layers usually of zigzag or figure of eight form,, to prevent twisting when running out. [1913 Webster] {Faking box}, a box in which a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • faking an orgasm — feigning sexual excitement or pleasure …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Tilt-shift miniature faking — is a process in which a photograph of a life size location or object is manipulated so that it looks like a photograph of a miniature scale model. By distorting the focus of the photo, the artist simulates the shallow depth of field normally… …   Wikipedia

  • Miniature faking — Digitally blurred miniature fake of Jodhpur Original p …   Wikipedia

  • List of Faking It episodes — This is an episode list of the documentary television series Faking It . Dates shown are original air date. =Season 1: 2000= =Season 4: 2002= =Season 7: 2004 …   Wikipedia

  • space faking — /speɪs ˈfeækɪŋ/ (say spays fayking) noun the practice of masquerading as someone else on the internet. {(cyber)space + faking} –space faker, noun …   Australian English dictionary

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