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daily life

  • 1 agente furtivo

    (n.) = infiltrator
    Ex. We librarians are already infiltrators into the stale round of our readers' domestic daily life.
    * * *

    Ex: We librarians are already infiltrators into the stale round of our readers' domestic daily life.

    Spanish-English dictionary > agente furtivo

  • 2 anhelado

    adj.
    longed-for, strongly desired, yenned.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: anhelar.
    * * *
    = long-awaited [long awaited], hoped for [hoped-for], wishful, longed-for, desired, much desired.
    Ex. Dykstra, M., 'PRECIS: a primer', published in 1985, offers the long-awaited 'idiot's guide' to PRECIS indexing.
    Ex. The hoped for panaceas are either not materialising or proving illusory = Las panaceas tan esperadas no se materializaron o resultaron ser ficticias.
    Ex. To the extent that special librarians can recognise what burnout is and how, when, and where it occurs, they will be better prepared to resist the ineffectual, wishful remedies that are sometimes practised.
    Ex. They have literally faded now, at last, into the much longed-for invisibility background of daily life.
    Ex. Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    Ex. These concepts reflect the process of globalization and its relation to both the feared 'Clash of Civilizations' and the much desired and advocated 'Dialogue among Civilizations'.
    * * *
    = long-awaited [long awaited], hoped for [hoped-for], wishful, longed-for, desired, much desired.

    Ex: Dykstra, M., 'PRECIS: a primer', published in 1985, offers the long-awaited 'idiot's guide' to PRECIS indexing.

    Ex: The hoped for panaceas are either not materialising or proving illusory = Las panaceas tan esperadas no se materializaron o resultaron ser ficticias.
    Ex: To the extent that special librarians can recognise what burnout is and how, when, and where it occurs, they will be better prepared to resist the ineffectual, wishful remedies that are sometimes practised.
    Ex: They have literally faded now, at last, into the much longed-for invisibility background of daily life.
    Ex: Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    Ex: These concepts reflect the process of globalization and its relation to both the feared 'Clash of Civilizations' and the much desired and advocated 'Dialogue among Civilizations'.

    Spanish-English dictionary > anhelado

  • 3 antropofagia

    f.
    anthropophagy, cannibalism.
    * * *
    1 cannibalism
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino cannibalism
    * * *
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    * * *
    femenino cannibalism
    * * *

    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    * * *
    cannibalism, anthropophagy
    * * *
    cannibalism, anthropophagy
    * * *
    f cannibalism
    * * *
    canibalismo: cannibalism

    Spanish-English dictionary > antropofagia

  • 4 aspereza

    f.
    1 roughness.
    limar asperezas to smooth things over
    2 asperity, abrasiveness, roughness, coarseness.
    3 harsh remark, sour remark.
    * * *
    1 roughness, coarseness, asperity
    * * *
    SF [de terreno] roughness, ruggedness; (=acidez) sourness, tartness; [de carácter] surliness
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( al tacto) roughness; ( de terreno) roughness, unevenness
    b) ( de sabor) sharpness; (de voz, clima) harshness

    un terreno lleno de asperezasa very uneven o rough piece of ground

    limar asperezas: el tiempo limó las asperezas de su personalidad time knocked the rough edges off her; en un intento de limar asperezas — in an attempt to iron out their differences

    3) ( brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *
    = roughness, harshness.
    Ex. In practice, we find that antonyms often fall into the category of quasi-synonyms which represent points on the same continuum, eg roughness -- smoothness.
    Ex. Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    ----
    * limar asperezas = iron out + the bugs, knock + the rough edges off.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( al tacto) roughness; ( de terreno) roughness, unevenness
    b) ( de sabor) sharpness; (de voz, clima) harshness

    un terreno lleno de asperezasa very uneven o rough piece of ground

    limar asperezas: el tiempo limó las asperezas de su personalidad time knocked the rough edges off her; en un intento de limar asperezas — in an attempt to iron out their differences

    3) ( brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *
    = roughness, harshness.

    Ex: In practice, we find that antonyms often fall into the category of quasi-synonyms which represent points on the same continuum, eg roughness -- smoothness.

    Ex: Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    * limar asperezas = iron out + the bugs, knock + the rough edges off.

    * * *
    1 (al tacto) roughness
    2 (del terreno) roughness, unevenness
    3 (de un sabor) sharpness
    4 (de la voz) harshness
    5 (del clima) harshness
    B
    (parte áspera): usar papel de lija para quitar las asperezas use sandpaper to remove any roughness o rough patches ( o parts etc)
    quitar las asperezas con una lima file off the rough edges
    un terreno lleno de asperezas a very uneven o rough piece of ground
    limar asperezas: el tiempo ha limado las asperezas de su personalidad time has knocked the rough edges off her, she has mellowed with age
    en un intento de limar asperezas in an attempt to iron out their differences/problems
    C (brusquedad) abruptness, surliness
    * * *

    aspereza sustantivo femenino
    1
    a) (de superficie, piel) roughness


    (de voz, clima) harshness
    2 ( parte áspera):

    limar asperezas to smooth things over
    aspereza sustantivo femenino roughness
    ♦ Locuciones: figurado limar asperezas, to smooth things over
    ' aspereza' also found in these entries:
    English:
    abruptly
    - ruggedness
    * * *
    1. [al tacto] roughness
    2. [de terreno] ruggedness, roughness
    3. [de sabor] sharpness, sourness
    4. [de clima] harshness
    5. [de voz] harshness
    6. [rudeza] [de persona] abruptness;
    decir algo con aspereza to say something sharply o abruptly
    * * *
    f roughness, unevenness;
    limar asperezas knock the rough edges off
    * * *
    rudeza: roughness, coarseness

    Spanish-English dictionary > aspereza

  • 5 aterrador

    adj.
    terrifying, frightful, frightening, awesome.
    * * *
    1 terrifying, frightful
    * * *
    (f. - aterradora)
    adj.
    frightening, terrifying
    * * *
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo terrifying
    * * *
    = frightening, terrifying, terrorising [terrorizing, -USA], frightful, fear-inducing, hideous, hair-raising, groundshaking, creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.].
    Ex. No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex. To the general public 'the female librarian is still angular, elderly, acidulous and terrifying', to use Geoffrey Langley's words, 'and a male librarian is impossible under any hypothesis'.
    Ex. He perceived that his life threatened to be an interminable succession of these mortifying interviews unless he could discover a way or ways to deal with her surly and terrorizing ferocity.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. This ' hair-raising' experience will allow students to have a better understanding of what energy is and why it's so important.
    Ex. The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex. For me, it's like those really creepy films I used to like watching when I was a kid.
    * * *
    - dora adjetivo terrifying
    * * *
    = frightening, terrifying, terrorising [terrorizing, -USA], frightful, fear-inducing, hideous, hair-raising, groundshaking, creepy [creepier -comp., creepiest -sup.].

    Ex: No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.

    Ex: To the general public 'the female librarian is still angular, elderly, acidulous and terrifying', to use Geoffrey Langley's words, 'and a male librarian is impossible under any hypothesis'.
    Ex: He perceived that his life threatened to be an interminable succession of these mortifying interviews unless he could discover a way or ways to deal with her surly and terrorizing ferocity.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: This ' hair-raising' experience will allow students to have a better understanding of what energy is and why it's so important.
    Ex: The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex: For me, it's like those really creepy films I used to like watching when I was a kid.

    * * *
    terrifying
    * * *

    aterrador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    terrifying
    aterrador,-ora adjetivo terrifying

    ' aterrador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aterradora
    English:
    chilling
    - frightful
    - terrifying
    - terrifyingly
    - blood
    - fearful
    - fearsome
    - frightening
    * * *
    aterrador, -ora adj
    terrifying
    * * *
    adj frightening, terrifying
    * * *
    aterrador, - dora adj
    : terrifying
    * * *
    aterrador adj terrifying

    Spanish-English dictionary > aterrador

  • 6 atroz

    adj.
    1 terrible, awful.
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o awfully cold
    2 atrocious, horrible, inhumane, abominable.
    3 agonizing, excruciating.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl atroces)
    1 (bárbaro) atrocious, outrageous
    2 familiar (enorme) enormous, huge, awful
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=terrible) atrocious; (=cruel) cruel, inhuman; (=escandaloso) outrageous
    2) * (=enorme) huge, terrific; (=malísimo) dreadful, awful
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.
    Ex. The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.
    Ex. The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex. Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex. Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex. There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    * * *
    adjetivo (brutal, cruel) appalling; ( uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful
    * * *
    = dismal, atrocious, brutal, frightful, dire, abysmal, excruciating, hideous, gruesome, ferocious, god-awful, heinous.

    Ex: The persistence of a dismal image is a most worrying phenomenon and one which must change if progress is to be made by SLIS.

    Ex: The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex: Few, if any of us, want to be involved in murder, but the brutal act of one person killing another, the motives for doing so, the personal and social consequences, all hold our attention, as newspaper editors well know and exploit = Pocos, si existe alguien, desea verse implicado en un asesinato, pero el acto brutal de una persona asesinando a otra, los motivos para hacerlo, las consecuencias personales y sociales, todo capta nuestra atención, como bien saben y explotan los directores de periódicos.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex: The communications infrastructure in Africa varies from very good to abysmal = La infraestructura de comunicaciones en †frica oscila entre muy buena y pésima.
    Ex: Loneliness can involve excruciating physical pain as well as harrowing mental suffering.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: We hear horrendous tales of shootings in schools and colleges and gruesome murder of parents.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex: There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.

    * * *
    1 (brutal, cruel) appalling, terrible
    2 (uso hiperbólico) atrocious, awful, dreadful ( BrE)
    tengo un dolor de cabeza atroz I have an atrocious o an awful headache
    * * *

    atroz adjetivo
    atrocious
    atroz adjetivo
    1 (pésimo, insoportable) atrocious
    2 fam (enorme) enormous, tremendous
    ' atroz' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    insensibilidad
    - barbaridad
    - muerte
    English:
    agonizing
    - appalling
    - atrocious
    - dreadful
    - excruciating
    - heinous
    - hell
    - hideous
    - raging
    - unspeakable
    - vicious
    - crippling
    - dire
    - terrible
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. [cruel] [crimen, tortura] horrific, barbaric
    2. [enorme]
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly o bitterly cold;
    es de una fealdad atroz he's terribly o incredibly ugly
    3. [muy malo] atrocious, awful
    * * *
    adj
    1 appalling, atrocious
    2
    :
    un éxito atroz a smash hit
    * * *
    atroz adj, pl atroces : atrocious, appalling
    atrozamente adv
    * * *
    atroz adj
    1. (cruel) atrocious / appalling
    2. (enorme) terrible
    hace un frío atroz it's terribly cold / it's freezing

    Spanish-English dictionary > atroz

  • 7 cambio1

    1 = adaptive response, alteration, change, editing, modulation, move, recasting, redesign, rotation, shift, transfer, transformation, changeover [change-over], disturbance, mutation, permeability, reformation, switchover, reverse, shift away from, shifting, changing of the guard, swing, bartering, switch, switching, change.
    Ex. It is too early to assess the success of the adaptive responses which have been instituted in most SLIS.
    Ex. A musical adaptation is a musical work that represents a distinct alteration of another work (e.g. a free transcription), a work that paraphrases parts of various works or the general style of another composer, or a work that is merely based on other music (e.g. variations on a them).
    Ex. These changes have meant modifications, some very time-consuming, to serials catalogues in libraries.
    Ex. To ensure further that all the index entries generated by chain procedure are indeed helpful, the initial analysis of the chain may require editing.
    Ex. There is little modulation, whole steps of division being short-circuited and an odd assembly of terms being frequently found: e.g.: LAW see also JURY, JUDGES.
    Ex. Better flexibility is achieved if the heating, ventilation and lighting can accommodate this move without the need for any alterations.
    Ex. This kind of large-scale recasting offers an opportunity for the scheme to go forward rather than stagnate until it is completely taken by events.
    Ex. This action was the redesign of the enquiry form in order to elicit more information from the enquirer.
    Ex. The entries that result from the rotation mechanism have standard layout, punctuation and typography, all of which have been pre-programmed.
    Ex. Transitory circumstances of daily life are what cause these shifts.
    Ex. When the record transfer is complete, the catalog summary screen is shown for the new record so that the user can review and update it.
    Ex. Hungary faces far-reaching socio-economic transformation which will inevitably affect libraries as well.
    Ex. The changeover has resulted in more rapid machine-editing of input and reduced costs for cataloguing.
    Ex. A centralised system was chosen to ensure speedy receipt and dissemination with minimal disturbances.
    Ex. The very meanings of words like 'library' and 'university' are about to undergo mutations too radical to conceive, much less predict = Los significados mismos de palabras como "biblioteca" y "universidad" están a punto de experimentar cambios demasiado radicales de concevir y cuanto mucho menos de predecir.
    Ex. There is greater permeability than before between different types of library at the start of a career but, once settled in a post, fewer librarians than before change from one type of library to another.
    Ex. The author presents suggestions for the reformation of medical library education.
    Ex. The transition date for the switchover is 1 Oct 2000.
    Ex. Moreover, we conclude that the process of placing a feminist stamp on working relations is both far from complete and subject to reverses.
    Ex. This article discusses the effects of changes in the economy on the distribution of work in libraries which indicate a shift away from its female origins.
    Ex. This article considers the use of a spreadsheet in the shifting of periodicals collections in order to save time.
    Ex. The recent reorganization has resulted in a merger of the academic and public divisions and a changing of the guard among the company's top officials.
    Ex. The addition of new feedback techniques produced a significant swing in favour of the application.
    Ex. Holdings will become increasingly important as a bartering tool to gain additional access benefits.
    Ex. Office automation have brought about a switch to a paperless office.
    Ex. These 'spuriously loyal' customers are not willing to churn just because of switching costs.
    Ex. Most libraries maintain a small cash float for the giving of change and, in addition, money/ is received in payment of fines.
    ----
    * a cambio = in return.
    * a cambio de = in exchange for, in return for.
    * a cambio de nada = for nothing.
    * aceptar el cambio = embrace + change.
    * aceptar un cambio = accommodate + change.
    * adaptarse al cambio = accommodate to + change, adapt to + change.
    * adaptarse a los cambios = flow with + the tides.
    * adoptar un cambio = adopt + change, accommodate + change.
    * agente de cambio = agent of(for) change, force for change, force of change.
    * agente del cambio = change agent.
    * aires de cambio = wind(s) of change, the, seas of change, the.
    * cambio a = flight to.
    * cambio brusco = revulsion, flip-flop.
    * cambio brusco de velocidad del viento = wind shear.
    * cambio climático = climate change, climatic change.
    * cambio cualitativo = step change, qualitative change.
    * cambio cuantitativo = quantitative change.
    * cambio cultural = cultural change.
    * cambio de actitud = change in attitude, change of heart.
    * cambio de aires = change of scenery, change of air and scene, change of air, change of scene, greener pastures, pastures new.
    * cambio de ambiente = change of scenery, change of air and scene, change of air, change of scene.
    * cambio de aspecto = lick of paint.
    * cambio de ciudadanía = change of citizenship.
    * cambio de dirección = change of hands.
    * cambio de dueño = change of hands.
    * cambio de énfasis = shift of emphasis, shift in emphasis.
    * cambio de entorno = change of scenery, change of air and scene, change of air, change of scene.
    * cambio de hora estacional = daylight saving time.
    * cambio de idea = change of heart, change of mind.
    * cambio de imagen = makeover [make-over], makeover [make-over].
    * cambio de instalación eléctrica = rewiring.
    * cambio de la guardia = changing of the guard.
    * cambio de look = lick of paint.
    * cambio de lugar = relocation.
    * cambio de manos = change of hands.
    * cambio de mirada = gaze-shift.
    * cambio demográfico = population trend.
    * cambio de nacionalidad = change of citizenship.
    * cambio de nombre = rebranding.
    * cambio de opinión = change of heart, change of mind.
    * cambio de orientación = paradigm change, paradigm shift.
    * cambio de paradigma = paradigm change, paradigm shift.
    * cambio de parecer = change of heart, change of mind.
    * cambio de procedimiento = procedural change.
    * cambio de propietario = change of hands.
    * cambio de proveedor = churn.
    * cambio de registro = code switching.
    * cambio de residencia = resettlement.
    * cambio de servicio = churn.
    * cambio de sexo = sex change.
    * cambio de título = title change.
    * cambio escénico = scene changing.
    * cambio estacional = seasonal change.
    * cambio hormonal = hormonal change.
    * cambio inesperado = twist.
    * cambio institucional = institutional change.
    * cambio metereológico = weather modification.
    * cambio + ocurrir = change + take place.
    * cambio + producirse = change + come about.
    * cambio profundo = profound change.
    * cambio radical = revulsion, sea change, radical change.
    * cambio radical de postura = about-face.
    * cambio revolucionario = revolutionary change.
    * cambios = second thoughts, ebb and flow.
    * cambio social = social change, societal change.
    * cambio + suceder = change + take place.
    * cambio + tener lugar = change + take place.
    * cambio total = turnabout [turn-about], turnaround.
    * cambio transformador = transformative change, transforming change.
    * cambio traumático = traumatic change.
    * cambio vertiginoso = spiral of change.
    * clima de cambio = climate of change.
    * efectuar cambios = wreak + changes.
    * efectuar un cambio = effect + change.
    * elemento de cambio = agent of(for) change.
    * en cambio = by contrast, in contrast, instead, shifting, by comparison.
    * en constante cambio = ever-changing [ever changing], ever-fluid, on the move, fast changing [fast-changing], ever-shifting.
    * en continuo cambio = constantly shifting, ever-changing [ever changing], ever-shifting.
    * en estado de cambio = in a state of flux.
    * enfrentarse a los cambios = cope with + change.
    * en proceso de cambio = changing.
    * estado de cambio = state of flux.
    * estar en estado de cambio = be in flux.
    * estar en proceso de cambio = be in flux.
    * estar sujeto a cambios = be written in sand, not stone, be subject to change.
    * experimentar un cambio = bring about + change, undergo + modification, undergo + change, undergo + transition.
    * experimentar un cambio + Adjetivo = take + a + Adjetivo + turn.
    * hacer cambios en la búsqueda = renegotiate + search.
    * hacer cambios indebidamente = tamper (with).
    * hacer el cambio = make + the change.
    * hacer frente al cambio = manage + change.
    * hacer frente a un cambio = meet + change.
    * hacer un cambio = make + change.
    * impulsor del cambio = driver of change.
    * introducir un cambio = bring + change.
    * libre cambio = laissez-faire.
    * línea internacional de cambio de fecha, la = International Date Line, the.
    * lograr un cambio = accomplish + change.
    * los constantes cambios de = the changing face of, the changing nature of.
    * momento clave del cambio = tipping point.
    * moneda de cambio = bargaining chip.
    * mostrar por medio de cambio de intensidad en el brillo = flash up.
    * motor del cambio = driver of change.
    * no hacer ningún cambio = stand + pat.
    * no sufrir cambios = remain + normal.
    * ocasionar un cambio = bring about + change, trigger + change.
    * operación de cambio de sexo = sex-change surgery, sex-change operation.
    * permanecer sin cambios = remain + unchanged.
    * proceso de cambio = process of change.
    * producir un cambio = effect + change, produce + change, trigger + change.
    * provocar cambios = wreak + changes.
    * provocar un cambio = bring about + change.
    * reacio al cambio = resistant to change.
    * realizar un cambio = make + alteration, implement + change.
    * repercusiones del cambio = impact of change.
    * resistente al cambio = resistant to change.
    * ritmo del cambio = rate of change, pace of change.
    * ser susceptible de cambios = be subject to change.
    * sin cambio = inviolate.
    * sin cambios = monotone, stable, undisturbed, unchanged, unmodified, unaltered, unedited.
    * subsidio para cambio de residencia = resettlement allowance.
    * suceder un cambio = occur + change.
    * sucesión de cambios bruscos = roller coaster ride, roller coaster.
    * sufrir un cambio = experience + change, undergo + change.
    * suponer un cambio = bring about + change.
    * trabajar a cambio de nada = work for + nothing.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cambio1

  • 8 canibalismo

    m.
    cannibalism.
    * * *
    1 cannibalism
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=antropofagia) cannibalism
    2) (=ferocidad) fierceness, savageness
    * * *
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    * * *

    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    * * *
    cannibalism
    * * *

    canibalismo sustantivo masculino cannibalism
    ' canibalismo' also found in these entries:
    English:
    canibalism
    * * *
    1. [de seres vivos] cannibalism
    2. Mktg cannibalization
    * * *
    m cannibalism
    * * *
    antropofagia: cannibalism

    Spanish-English dictionary > canibalismo

  • 9 caprichoso

    adj.
    capricious, cranky, erratic, fickle.
    * * *
    1 capricious, whimsical, fanciful
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 whimsical person
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [persona] capricious
    2) [idea, novela etc] whimsical, fanciful
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( inconstante) <carácter/persona> capricious; <tiempo/moda> changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino

    es un caprichoso — ( es inconstante) he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy

    * * *
    = capricious, whimsical, wayward, fickle, wanton, faddish, flighty [flightier -comp., flightiest -sup.], faddy [faddier -comp., faddies -sup.].
    Ex. Panizzi introduced what seemed to his critics unwarranted and capricious complications calculated to make the catalog much more difficult for the librarian to prepare and the reader to use.
    Ex. This slightly off-balance, whimsical remark was a Marsha James' trademark.
    Ex. The article 'The wayward scholar: resources and research in popular culture' defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource.
    Ex. The rise and dramatic fall of E-businesses is a testimony of the fickle electronic commerce (E-commerce) market.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. Whilst, presumably, a set of standards for the conduct of reference work, the document is in fact a hodgepodge shaped by faddish misconceptions.
    Ex. 'Anyway, to make a long story short, Huish said he knows Lisa has been a little flighty at times'.
    Ex. These emotions will have a knock-on effect on the child and may, in the case of the faddy eater, cause the situation to deteriorate.
    ----
    * de forma caprichosa = capriciously.
    * de modo caprichoso = capriciously.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo
    a) ( inconstante) <carácter/persona> capricious; <tiempo/moda> changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino

    es un caprichoso — ( es inconstante) he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy

    * * *
    = capricious, whimsical, wayward, fickle, wanton, faddish, flighty [flightier -comp., flightiest -sup.], faddy [faddier -comp., faddies -sup.].

    Ex: Panizzi introduced what seemed to his critics unwarranted and capricious complications calculated to make the catalog much more difficult for the librarian to prepare and the reader to use.

    Ex: This slightly off-balance, whimsical remark was a Marsha James' trademark.
    Ex: The article 'The wayward scholar: resources and research in popular culture' defends popular culture as a legitimate and important library resource.
    Ex: The rise and dramatic fall of E-businesses is a testimony of the fickle electronic commerce (E-commerce) market.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: Whilst, presumably, a set of standards for the conduct of reference work, the document is in fact a hodgepodge shaped by faddish misconceptions.
    Ex: 'Anyway, to make a long story short, Huish said he knows Lisa has been a little flighty at times'.
    Ex: These emotions will have a knock-on effect on the child and may, in the case of the faddy eater, cause the situation to deteriorate.
    * de forma caprichosa = capriciously.
    * de modo caprichoso = capriciously.

    * * *
    1 (inconstante) ‹carácter/persona› capricious; ‹tiempo/moda› changeable
    ¡qué niño más caprichoso! what a capricious child! o this child is always changing his mind
    las estalactitas presentaban formas caprichosas the stalactites formed fanciful shapes
    2 (difícil, exigente) fussy
    masculine, feminine
    es un caprichoso (es inconstante) he's so capricious o he's always changing his mind; (es difícil, exigente) he is so fussy
    * * *

     

    caprichoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a) ( inconstante) ‹carácter/persona capricious;

    tiempo/moda changeable
    b) (difícil, exigente) fussy

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino:


    (es difícil, exigente) he's so fussy
    caprichoso,-a
    I sustantivo masculino y femenino mi hermana es una caprichosa, my sister is very impulsive
    II adjetivo
    1 (antojadizo) whimsical, fanciful
    2 (maniático, exigente) fussy
    3 (creativo, sin norma) las nubes creaban figuras caprichosas, the clouds made strange shapes
    ' caprichoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    caprichosa
    - mañoso
    English:
    capricious
    - erratic
    - flighty
    - moody
    - whimsical
    * * *
    caprichoso, -a adj
    capricious, impulsive;
    actuar de forma caprichosa to act capriciously o impulsively
    * * *
    adj capricious
    * * *
    caprichoso, -sa adj
    antojadizo: capricious, fickle

    Spanish-English dictionary > caprichoso

  • 10 cotidiano

    adj.
    everyday, daily, day-to-day, quotidian.
    * * *
    1 daily, everyday
    * * *
    (f. - cotidiana)
    adj.
    everyday, daily
    * * *
    ADJ daily, everyday

    la vida cotidiana — daily life, everyday life

    * * *
    - na adjetivo < vida> everyday, daily
    * * *
    = day to day [day-to-day], everyday, habitualized, daily.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. The latter is the viewpoint of those who are perhaps concerned about day to day maintenance of the equipment.
    Ex. We have too much invested, and the new systems too intimately integrated into the everyday operation of the library, for us to assume any longer that we can temper their influence on emerging standards.
    Ex. Habitualized actions, they further suggest, become embedded in human behavior and provide the psychological gain of narrowing choices.
    Ex. Successful libraries will embrace the future by incorporating new technology into daily routines.
    ----
    * afrontar los problemas cotidianos = grapple with + life's problems.
    * dedicarse a + Posesivo + quehacer cotidiano = go about + Posesivo + everyday life.
    * dedicarse a + Posesivo + tareas cotidianas = go about + Posesivo + everyday life.
    * experiencia cotidiana = flux of experience.
    * expresión cotidiana = everyday locution.
    * formado por gente cotidiana de la calle = grassroots [grass-roots].
    * lenguaje cotidiano = everyday speech, everyday language.
    * locución cotidiana = everyday locution.
    * problema cotidiano = daily problem.
    * situación cotidiana = everyday situation, daily situation.
    * trabajo cotidiano = daily work.
    * vida cotidiana = daily life, everyday living.
    * vida cotidiana, la = day to day life, the, everyday life.
    * * *
    - na adjetivo < vida> everyday, daily
    * * *
    = day to day [day-to-day], everyday, habitualized, daily.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: The latter is the viewpoint of those who are perhaps concerned about day to day maintenance of the equipment.

    Ex: We have too much invested, and the new systems too intimately integrated into the everyday operation of the library, for us to assume any longer that we can temper their influence on emerging standards.
    Ex: Habitualized actions, they further suggest, become embedded in human behavior and provide the psychological gain of narrowing choices.
    Ex: Successful libraries will embrace the future by incorporating new technology into daily routines.
    * afrontar los problemas cotidianos = grapple with + life's problems.
    * dedicarse a + Posesivo + quehacer cotidiano = go about + Posesivo + everyday life.
    * dedicarse a + Posesivo + tareas cotidianas = go about + Posesivo + everyday life.
    * experiencia cotidiana = flux of experience.
    * expresión cotidiana = everyday locution.
    * formado por gente cotidiana de la calle = grassroots [grass-roots].
    * lenguaje cotidiano = everyday speech, everyday language.
    * locución cotidiana = everyday locution.
    * problema cotidiano = daily problem.
    * situación cotidiana = everyday situation, daily situation.
    * trabajo cotidiano = daily work.
    * vida cotidiana = daily life, everyday living.
    * vida cotidiana, la = day to day life, the, everyday life.

    * * *
    ‹vida› everyday, daily
    mi trabajo cotidiano my daily work routine, the work I do every day
    * * *

     

    cotidiano
    ◊ -na adjetivo

    daily;

    vida everyday, daily
    cotidiano,-a adjetivo daily, everyday
    ' cotidiano' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cotidiana
    English:
    accustom
    - daily
    - day-to-day
    - everyday
    - day
    * * *
    cotidiano, -a adj
    daily;
    el trabajo cotidiano day-to-day tasks;
    ser algo cotidiano to be an everyday occurrence
    * * *
    adj daily;
    vida cotidiana daily life
    * * *
    cotidiano, -na adj
    : daily, everyday
    la vida cotidiana: daily life
    * * *
    cotidiano adj daily

    Spanish-English dictionary > cotidiano

  • 11 deseado

    1→ link=desear desear
    1 desired
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=anhelado) sought-after, coveted
    2) [embarazo] planned

    un embarazo no deseadoan unwanted o unplanned pregnancy

    * * *
    = desirable, intended, wishful, coveted, longed-for, desired.
    Ex. It is desirable that they be treated as parts of a single serials record, since this will provide a 'one-stop' file containing all the relevant data, and will produce a file with a number of funtions.
    Ex. In all 20 per cent of visitors went out of the bookshop with a book they had intended to buy, 15 per cent went out with a book they had not intended to buy and 67 went out with both intended and unintended purchases.
    Ex. To the extent that special librarians can recognise what burnout is and how, when, and where it occurs, they will be better prepared to resist the ineffectual, wishful remedies that are sometimes practised.
    Ex. Four factors enable such cooperation: common needs; possession of resources coveted by the other institution; a clear delineation of responsibilities; and demonstrated goodwill.
    Ex. They have literally faded now, at last, into the much longed-for invisibility background of daily life.
    Ex. Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    ----
    * no deseado = unwanted, uninvited.
    * * *
    = desirable, intended, wishful, coveted, longed-for, desired.

    Ex: It is desirable that they be treated as parts of a single serials record, since this will provide a 'one-stop' file containing all the relevant data, and will produce a file with a number of funtions.

    Ex: In all 20 per cent of visitors went out of the bookshop with a book they had intended to buy, 15 per cent went out with a book they had not intended to buy and 67 went out with both intended and unintended purchases.
    Ex: To the extent that special librarians can recognise what burnout is and how, when, and where it occurs, they will be better prepared to resist the ineffectual, wishful remedies that are sometimes practised.
    Ex: Four factors enable such cooperation: common needs; possession of resources coveted by the other institution; a clear delineation of responsibilities; and demonstrated goodwill.
    Ex: They have literally faded now, at last, into the much longed-for invisibility background of daily life.
    Ex: Arguably, before one tries to understand what current action would be optimal, one should decide on the desired eventual outcome.
    * no deseado = unwanted, uninvited.

    * * *
    deseado, -a adj
    1. [ansiado] desired;
    la tan deseada primera cita the longed-for first date
    2. [embarazo] planned;
    [hijo] wanted;
    un embarazo no deseado an unwanted pregnancy
    * * *
    adj desired;
    niño deseado wanted child;
    no deseado unwanted

    Spanish-English dictionary > deseado

  • 12 dureza

    f.
    1 hardness.
    2 harshness.
    3 callus, patch of hard skin.
    * * *
    1 hardness, toughness
    2 figurado (de carácter) toughness, harshness, severity
    \
    dureza de corazón hardheartedness, callousness
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=resistencia) [de mineral, roca, agua] hardness; [de carne] toughness
    2) (=agresividad) [de clima, régimen, crítica] harshness, severity; [de deporte, juego] roughness; [de ataque] fierceness; [de castigo, multa, sentencia] severity, harshness

    con dureza: los delitos serán castigados con dureza — any offence will be severely punished

    3) [de tarea, prueba, examen] hardness
    4) (=fortaleza) hardiness, strength

    la dureza de las mujeres campesinasthe hardiness o strength of country women

    5) (=callo) callus
    * * *
    1) (de mineral, del agua) hardness; ( de material) hardness, toughness; ( de la carne) toughness
    2)
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    b) ( en el deporte) roughness
    * * *
    = hardness, harshness, ruggedness.
    Ex. Hardness and the penetration of the ink layer into the paper were also measured = También se midió la solidez y la penetración de la tinta en el papel.
    Ex. Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    Ex. In the 10-year gap between the publication of her first book and her second, she stretched her imagination to match the diversity and ruggedness of America.
    ----
    * con dureza = harshly.
    * * *
    1) (de mineral, del agua) hardness; ( de material) hardness, toughness; ( de la carne) toughness
    2)
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    b) ( en el deporte) roughness
    * * *
    = hardness, harshness, ruggedness.

    Ex: Hardness and the penetration of the ink layer into the paper were also measured = También se midió la solidez y la penetración de la tinta en el papel.

    Ex: Ghobadi does not flinch from confronting the harshness of daily life in Iran in this portrayal of a small village high in the mountains.
    Ex: In the 10-year gap between the publication of her first book and her second, she stretched her imagination to match the diversity and ruggedness of America.
    * con dureza = harshly.

    * * *
    A
    1 (de un mineral) hardness; (de un material) hardness, toughness; (de la carne) toughness
    2 (de una luz) harshness
    3 (del agua) hardness
    B (callosidad) callus
    C
    1 (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness
    nos trataban con dureza they treated us harshly
    fue castigado con dureza he was severely punished
    me miró con dureza he gave me a stern look
    2 (en el deporte) roughness
    * * *

    dureza sustantivo femenino
    1 ( en general) hardness;
    ( de la carne) toughness
    2
    a) (severidad, inflexibilidad) harshness;


    fue castigado con dureza he was severely punished

    dureza sustantivo femenino
    1 hardness
    (de una persona) harshness, severity
    2 (en las manos, en los pies) callus
    ' dureza' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    rigor
    - tralla
    - vapulear
    - suavizar
    English:
    hardness
    - sharply
    * * *
    dureza nf
    1. [de objeto, material, superficie, colchón, cama, sofá] hardness;
    [de carne] toughness; [de pan] staleness
    2. Geol [de roca, mineral, metal] hardness
    3. [de agua] hardness
    4. [de clima, invierno] harshness, severity
    5. [severidad, aspereza] [de persona] harshness;
    [de críticas, acciones] harshness, severity; [de juego, partido] roughness;
    la criticó/reprendió con dureza he criticized/reprimanded her harshly;
    la dureza de la entrada le cortó la respiración the tackle was so hard it left him gasping for breath;
    la violencia racista debe ser castigada con dureza racist violence must be severely punished;
    el árbitro permitió demasiada dureza en el juego the referee allowed the game to get too rough
    6. [fortaleza, resistencia] strength
    7. [callosidad] callus, patch of hard skin;
    tener durezas en las manos/los pies to have calluses on the hands/feet
    * * *
    f
    1 de material hardness; de carne toughness
    2 de clima, fig
    harshness
    * * *
    dureza nf
    1) : hardness, toughness
    2) : severity, harshness

    Spanish-English dictionary > dureza

  • 13 espantoso

    adj.
    frightening, frightful, fearsome, dreadful.
    * * *
    1 (terrible) frightful, dreadful
    2 (asombroso) astonishing, amazing
    3 (desmesurado) dreadful, terrible
    hizo un frío espantoso the cold was awful, it was absolutely freezing
    * * *
    (f. - espantosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=aterrador) frightening
    2) [para exagerar]

    llevaba un traje espantososhe was wearing an awful o a hideous o a frightful o ghastly * hat

    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <escena/crimen> horrific, appalling
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) <comida/letra/tiempo> atrocious; <vestido/color> hideous; <ruido/voz> terrible, awful

    hace un calor espantosoit's boiling o roasting hot (colloq)

    * * *
    = frightening, harrowing, atrocious, awful, frightful, dire, ghastly, fear-inducing, hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, grisly [grislier -comp., grisliest -sup.], god-awful, groundshaking, nightmarish.
    Ex. No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex. See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.
    Ex. The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex. These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex. True, ghastly additions were made to XML.
    Ex. The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex. Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex. The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex. Much of what he sees and shows his readers is grim, if not grisly.
    Ex. The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex. The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex. It was the drugs that made me mad: Jane was anorexic, but the treatment prescribed pushed her over the edge for 22 nightmarish years.
    ----
    * dolor de cabeza espantoso = splitting headache.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo
    a) <escena/crimen> horrific, appalling
    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) <comida/letra/tiempo> atrocious; <vestido/color> hideous; <ruido/voz> terrible, awful

    hace un calor espantosoit's boiling o roasting hot (colloq)

    * * *
    = frightening, harrowing, atrocious, awful, frightful, dire, ghastly, fear-inducing, hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, grisly [grislier -comp., grisliest -sup.], god-awful, groundshaking, nightmarish.

    Ex: No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.

    Ex: See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.
    Ex: The public library's selection of books for small boys is atrocious.
    Ex: These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: Throughout the process of development, debate and enactment of the Digital Millennium Act in the USA, many dire forebodings were envisaged for the library profession.
    Ex: True, ghastly additions were made to XML.
    Ex: The author suggests that the ability to enjoy fear-inducing media increases with age.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex: Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex: The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex: Much of what he sees and shows his readers is grim, if not grisly.
    Ex: The director and deputies deserve the most recognition because they actually had to give up time with their families for the god-awful places we sent them.
    Ex: The author gives an insider's perspective on what it feels like to be an Arab since the groundshaking events of 1967 when Arab hopes were unexpectedly shattered by the outcome of the Arab Israeli war.
    Ex: It was the drugs that made me mad: Jane was anorexic, but the treatment prescribed pushed her over the edge for 22 nightmarish years.
    * dolor de cabeza espantoso = splitting headache.

    * * *
    1 ‹escena/crimen› horrific, appalling
    fue una experiencia espantosa it was a horrific o horrifying experience
    2 ( fam)
    (uso hiperbólico): hace un calor espantoso it's boiling o roasting, it's incredibly o unbearably hot ( colloq)
    pasamos un frío espantoso we were absolutely freezing ( colloq)
    tengo un hambre espantosa I'm ravenous o starving ( colloq)
    la comida era espantosa the food was atrocious o ghastly
    ¡qué sombrero tan espantoso! what a hideous o an awful hat
    esta máquina hace un ruido espantoso this machine makes a terrible o dreadful noise ( colloq)
    llueve que es una cosa espantosa it's absolutely pouring ( colloq), it's bucketing down ( colloq)
    * * *

    espantoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo

    a)escena/crimen horrific, appalling

    b) (fam) ( uso hiperbólico) ‹comida/letra/tiempo atrocious;

    vestido/color hideous;
    ruido/voz terrible, awful;

    espantoso,-a adjetivo
    1 (horripilante) horrifying, appalling: es un asunto espantoso, it's a horrifying situation
    2 fam (uso hiperbólico) tengo unas ganas espantosas de que llegue el fin de semana, I'm dying for the weekend to come!
    3 fam (muy feo) awful, hideous: ¡quítate ese espantoso sombrero!, take off that awful hat!
    ' espantoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    berrido
    - espantosa
    - ridícula
    - ridículo
    - sueño
    - tener
    - hacer
    English:
    diabolic
    - diabolical
    - dreadful
    - frightening
    - frightful
    - ghastly
    - gruesome
    - hairy
    - hideous
    - horrendous
    - interminable
    - shocking
    - stinking
    - wretched
    - abominable
    - atrocious
    - boiling
    - dire
    - excruciating
    - horrific
    - split
    - terrible
    - terrific
    * * *
    espantoso, -a adj
    1. [pavoroso] horrific
    2. [enorme] terrible;
    allí dentro hacía un calor espantoso it was roasting o boiling o terribly hot in there;
    tengo un frío espantoso I'm freezing to death;
    teníamos un hambre espantosa we were famished o starving
    3. [feísimo] hideous, frightful;
    llevaba un vestido espantoso she was wearing a hideous o frightful dress
    4. [pasmoso] appalling, shocking;
    el servicio postal era espantoso the postal service was appalling;
    * * *
    adj
    1 horrific, appalling
    2 para enfatizar terrible, dreadful;
    hace un calor espantoso it’s terribly o incredibly hot
    * * *
    espantoso, -sa adj
    1) : frightening, terrifying
    2) : frightful, dreadful
    * * *
    espantoso adj awful / dreadful

    Spanish-English dictionary > espantoso

  • 14 espía

    f. & m.
    spy, double agent, secret agent, infiltrator.
    pres.indicat.
    3rd person singular (él/ella/ello) present indicative of spanish verb: espiar.
    imperat.
    2nd person singular (tú) Imperative of Spanish verb: espiar.
    * * *
    1 spy
    * * *
    noun mf.
    * * *
    1.
    SMF spy
    2.
    ADJ
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo invariable <avión/satélite> spy (before n); < cámara> hidden (before n), secret (before n)
    II
    masculino y femenino ( persona) spy
    * * *
    = foreign agent, infiltrator, spy, undercover agent, mole, spook, secret agent, stool pigeon, snoop.
    Ex. I am sure I am being spied upon by foreign agents.
    Ex. We librarians are already infiltrators into the stale round of our readers' domestic daily life.
    Ex. During these campaigns, black soldiers served as militiamen, guides, teamsters, and spies.
    Ex. During the one-day trials of the arrested dissidents four independent librarians testified for the prosecution, revealing themselves to be undercover agents.
    Ex. On the one hand it is a tale of espionage and mole hunting, and on the other it is an elegiac drama of remembrance and departure.
    Ex. Wherever there are diplomats, spooks are not far away.
    Ex. He used the University as his recruiting ground to enlist bright, patriotic young men to serve as secret agents.
    Ex. There is only one proper method of exposing the stool pigeons -- and that is mass exposure, creating mass hatred against these rats.
    Ex. Every single email she wrote in secret has been read by snoops.
    ----
    * hacerse espía = go undercover.
    * jefe de espías = spymaster.
    * página espía = spy page.
    * programas espía = spyware.
    * programas espía de anuncios = adware.
    * propio de espías = cloak-and-dagger.
    * virus espía = snoop.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo invariable <avión/satélite> spy (before n); < cámara> hidden (before n), secret (before n)
    II
    masculino y femenino ( persona) spy
    * * *
    = foreign agent, infiltrator, spy, undercover agent, mole, spook, secret agent, stool pigeon, snoop.

    Ex: I am sure I am being spied upon by foreign agents.

    Ex: We librarians are already infiltrators into the stale round of our readers' domestic daily life.
    Ex: During these campaigns, black soldiers served as militiamen, guides, teamsters, and spies.
    Ex: During the one-day trials of the arrested dissidents four independent librarians testified for the prosecution, revealing themselves to be undercover agents.
    Ex: On the one hand it is a tale of espionage and mole hunting, and on the other it is an elegiac drama of remembrance and departure.
    Ex: Wherever there are diplomats, spooks are not far away.
    Ex: He used the University as his recruiting ground to enlist bright, patriotic young men to serve as secret agents.
    Ex: There is only one proper method of exposing the stool pigeons -- and that is mass exposure, creating mass hatred against these rats.
    Ex: Every single email she wrote in secret has been read by snoops.
    * hacerse espía = go undercover.
    * jefe de espías = spymaster.
    * página espía = spy page.
    * programas espía = spyware.
    * programas espía de anuncios = adware.
    * propio de espías = cloak-and-dagger.
    * virus espía = snoop.

    * * *
    ‹avión/satélite› spy ( before n); ‹cámara› hidden ( before n), secret ( before n)
    A (persona) spy
    B
    * * *

    Del verbo espiar: ( conjugate espiar)

    espía es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) presente indicativo

    2ª persona singular (tú) imperativo

    Multiple Entries:
    espiar    
    espía
    espiar ( conjugate espiar) verbo transitivoenemigo/movimientos to spy on, keep watch on
    verbo intransitivo
    to spy
    espía adjetivo invariable ‹avión/satélite spy ( before n);
    cámara hidden ( before n), secret ( before n)
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino ( persona) spy
    espiar
    I verbo intransitivo to spy
    II verbo transitivo to spy on: ¿me estabas espiando?, were you spying on me?
    espía mf spy
    espía doble, double agent
    ' espía' also found in these entries:
    English:
    bump off
    - double agent
    - midst
    - mole
    - operative
    - plant
    - spy
    * * *
    adj
    avión/satélite espía spy plane/satellite
    nmf
    [persona] spy espía doble double agent
    espía2 nf
    Náut [cabo] warp
    * * *
    m/f spy
    * * *
    espía nmf
    : spy
    * * *
    espía n spy [pl. spies]

    Spanish-English dictionary > espía

  • 15 gente común

    f.
    common people, ordinary people, ruck.
    * * *
    (n.) = pleb [plebe]
    Ex. Mysterious Latin ciphers, such as s.l. and s.n. (in brackets, of course), that could well make ordinary plebes feel like dummies.
    * * *
    la gente común
    = ordinary people, common people, the

    Ex: For the majority of ordinary people the European Community remains a remote bureaucratic organization.

    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    (n.) = pleb [plebe]

    Ex: Mysterious Latin ciphers, such as s.l. and s.n. (in brackets, of course), that could well make ordinary plebes feel like dummies.

    Spanish-English dictionary > gente común

  • 16 gente común y corriente, la

    = common people, the
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    Spanish-English dictionary > gente común y corriente, la

  • 17 gente común, la

    = ordinary people, common people, the
    Ex. For the majority of ordinary people the European Community remains a remote bureaucratic organization.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.

    Spanish-English dictionary > gente común, la

  • 18 gratuito2

    2 = wanton, gratuitous.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. However, most librarians do not have the training for counseling and should avoid gratuitous tampering with the lives of library patrons.
    ----
    * a título gratuito = gratuitous.

    Spanish-English dictionary > gratuito2

  • 19 horrendo

    adj.
    horrible, terrible, dreadful, horrifying.
    * * *
    1 horrible, horrifying, awful, frightful
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=aterrador) [crimen] horrific, ghastly *
    2) (=horrible) [ropa, zapatos] hideous, ghastly *; [película, libro] dreadful; [frío, calor] terrible, dreadful, awful
    * * *
    - da adjetivo horroroso
    * * *
    = harrowing, frightful, horrendous, horrifying, hideous, horrible, grotesquely ugly.
    Ex. See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.
    Ex. The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex. If we were confronted with the alternatives that Mr. Gorman described this morning, it would have been a horrendous undertaking.
    Ex. The article 'A horrifying problem' examines the controversial issue about whether to remove books about satanism from the library shelves.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex. In all three novels, a lovestricken swain believes that he is disporting himself with the handsome object of his affections, when actually he lies abed with the grotesquely ugly maidservant of his mistress.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo horroroso
    * * *
    = harrowing, frightful, horrendous, horrifying, hideous, horrible, grotesquely ugly.

    Ex: See Michael R. Booth, 'English Melodrama', for further details of this harrowing tale.

    Ex: The book, written by a man who is not a military historian as such, is concerned above all with showing the war's hideousness, its frightful human cost, its pathos and loss, and its essential failure to achieve its objectives.
    Ex: If we were confronted with the alternatives that Mr. Gorman described this morning, it would have been a horrendous undertaking.
    Ex: The article 'A horrifying problem' examines the controversial issue about whether to remove books about satanism from the library shelves.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex: In all three novels, a lovestricken swain believes that he is disporting himself with the handsome object of his affections, when actually he lies abed with the grotesquely ugly maidservant of his mistress.

    * * *
    * * *

    horrendo
    ◊ -da adjetivo See Also→ horroroso


    ' horrendo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    horrendo-a
    - infierno
    English:
    eyewitness
    - harrowing
    - horrendous
    - horrific
    - ghastly
    - hideous
    - horrifying
    * * *
    * * *
    adj horrendous
    * * *
    horrendo, -da adj
    : horrendous, horrible

    Spanish-English dictionary > horrendo

  • 20 horrible

    adj.
    1 horrifying, terrifying.
    2 terrible, awful (muy malo).
    3 horrible, hideous (muy feo).
    * * *
    1 horrible, dreadful, awful
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=espantoso) [accidente, crimen, matanza] horrific
    2) (=feo) [persona, objeto, ropa, cuadro] hideous
    3) (=malo, perverso) horrible

    ¡qué hombre tan horrible! — what a horrible man!

    4) (=insoportable) terrible

    hizo un calor horrible — it was terribly hot, the heat was terrible

    la conferencia fue un rollo horrible* the lecture was a real drag *

    * * *
    a) <accidente/muerte> horrible, horrific
    b) ( feo) < persona> hideous, ugly; <camisa/adorno> horrible, hideous
    c) < tiempo> terrible, awful
    d) ( inaguantable) unbearable
    * * *
    = horrid, lousy [lousier -comp., lousiest -sup.], unsightly, revolting, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unpleasant, awful, terrible, crummy [crummier -comp., crummiest -sup.], hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, heinous, frightening, yucky [yuckier -comp., yuckiest -sup.], pathetic.
    Ex. The horrid thing broke out with a screeching laugh, and pointed his brown finger at me.
    Ex. I want to react, though, to your description of lousy catalogers.
    Ex. He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex. This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex. Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex. And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex. These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex. She had a distant fleeting vision of a workplace in which people acted like free and sensible human beings, instead of like the martyrized and victimized puppets of a terrible system called 'one-upmanship'.
    Ex. One librarian bluntly wondered about the ethics of sending ' crummy looking books with information that is incorrect or obsolete to the needy (because) everyone should have access to good material'.
    Ex. The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex. The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex. Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex. The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex. There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    Ex. No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex. I saw Gina's post the other day where she said she feels 'fat and frumpish and yucky'.
    Ex. Unfortunately, the quality of the debate on the other side is pathetic.
    ----
    * horrible, espantoso, de puta pena = awful.
    * morir una muerte horrible = suffer + a horrible death, die + a horrible death.
    * tener una muerte horrible = die + a horrible death, suffer + a horrible death.
    * tener un aspecto horrible = look + shit.
    * * *
    a) <accidente/muerte> horrible, horrific
    b) ( feo) < persona> hideous, ugly; <camisa/adorno> horrible, hideous
    c) < tiempo> terrible, awful
    d) ( inaguantable) unbearable
    * * *
    = horrid, lousy [lousier -comp., lousiest -sup.], unsightly, revolting, nasty [natier -comp., nastiest -sup.], unpleasant, awful, terrible, crummy [crummier -comp., crummiest -sup.], hideous, shocking, horrible, dreadful, heinous, frightening, yucky [yuckier -comp., yuckiest -sup.], pathetic.

    Ex: The horrid thing broke out with a screeching laugh, and pointed his brown finger at me.

    Ex: I want to react, though, to your description of lousy catalogers.
    Ex: He went on to explain that while there were no unsightly slums, there was a fairly large district of rather nondescript homes intermingled with plain two- and three-family brick and frame dwellings, principally in the eastern reaches of the city.
    Ex: This was so that the stuffing could be teased out and cleared of lumps, and so that the pelts could be softened by currying and soaking them in urine; the smell is said to have been revolting.
    Ex: Anthony Datto thanked them for having permitted him to unburden himself and after a few desultory remarks about the nasty weather and nothing in particular, they parted.
    Ex: And, as if by way of indicating that he had thrown down the gauntlet, he added, 'I can be unpleasant. I warn you'.
    Ex: These articles were written by those who have had first hand experience of the awful consequences of not devoting enough time to testing their security systems.
    Ex: She had a distant fleeting vision of a workplace in which people acted like free and sensible human beings, instead of like the martyrized and victimized puppets of a terrible system called 'one-upmanship'.
    Ex: One librarian bluntly wondered about the ethics of sending ' crummy looking books with information that is incorrect or obsolete to the needy (because) everyone should have access to good material'.
    Ex: The book focuses on images where hideous atrocities -- e.g., murder, blasphemy, wanton destruction and even cannibalism -- are shown to be part of the daily life of the common people of Paris during the revolution.
    Ex: The author mentions several recent shocking revelations concerning the activities of the Japanese government and its officials.
    Ex: Not saving the wildlife is too horrible to contemplate, but saving it will require us to accept harsh realities and abandon romantic notions.
    Ex: The same author also wrote the book 'Serials deselection: a dreadful dilemma'.
    Ex: There are several different ways to make a stink bomb, all of which involving the use of chemicals which react in a way to create a particularly heinous odor.
    Ex: No echo of so frightening a concept, 'class', ever lingers within the hushed precincts of our libraries.
    Ex: I saw Gina's post the other day where she said she feels 'fat and frumpish and yucky'.
    Ex: Unfortunately, the quality of the debate on the other side is pathetic.
    * horrible, espantoso, de puta pena = awful.
    * morir una muerte horrible = suffer + a horrible death, die + a horrible death.
    * tener una muerte horrible = die + a horrible death, suffer + a horrible death.
    * tener un aspecto horrible = look + shit.

    * * *
    1 (trágico, espantoso) ‹accidente/muerte› horrible, horrific
    2 (feo) ‹persona› hideous, ugly; ‹camisa/adorno› horrible, hideous
    3 (malo) ‹tiempo› terrible, awful, dreadful
    4
    (inaguantable): ¡qué calor más horrible! it's terribly o unbearably hot!
    * * *

     

    horrible adjetivo
    a)accidente/muerte horrible, horrific

    b) ( feo) ‹ persona hideous, ugly;

    camisa/adorno horrible, hideous
    c) tiempo terrible, awful


    horrible adjetivo horrible, dreadful, awful
    ' horrible' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    amanecer
    - horrendo-a
    - infame
    - pestazo
    - antipático
    - calor
    - cargante
    - mal
    - malo
    - odioso
    - pereza
    - perro
    - pinche
    - tocar
    - tufo
    English:
    awful
    - cat
    - dreadful
    - hideous
    - hole
    - horrible
    - horrid
    - it
    - manage
    - mind
    - nasty
    - shocking
    - thought
    - wretched
    - abominable
    - crummy
    - foul
    - ghastly
    - revolting
    - rotten
    - sickly
    - vile
    * * *
    1. [terrorífico] horrific, terrifying;
    un accidente horrible a horrific accident
    2. Fam [muy malo] appalling, awful;
    nos hizo un tiempo horrible we had terrible o awful weather
    3. Fam [muy feo] horrible, hideous;
    tiene un novio horrible she's got a horrible-looking o hideous boyfriend;
    ese vestido le queda horrible that dress looks horrible o hideous on her
    4. Fam [muy grande]
    tengo un frío horrible I'm absolutely freezing;
    ¡qué frío más horrible! it's absolutely freezing!;
    tengo un hambre horrible I'm ravenous o starving
    * * *
    adj horrible, dreadful
    * * *
    : horrible, dreadful
    * * *
    1. (en general) awful / terrible
    2. (accidente) horrific

    Spanish-English dictionary > horrible

См. также в других словарях:

  • daily life — UK US noun [countable/uncountable] [singular daily life plural daily lives] all the things that happen or that you do regularly I don’t think that I should have to face discrimination as part of my daily life. Thesaurus: habi …   Useful english dictionary

  • daily life — noun count or uncount all the things that happen or that you do regularly: I don t think that I should have to face discrimination as part of my daily life …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • daily life — UK / US noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms daily life : singular daily life plural daily lives all the things that happen or that you do regularly I don t think that I should have to face discrimination as part of my daily life …   English dictionary

  • daily life — everyday life, everyday events …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ˌdaily ˈlife — noun [C/U] all the things that happen or that you do regularly …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • Daily Life in the Mongol Empire — Food in the Mongolian EmpireDuring the Mongolian Empire there were two different groups of food, “white foods” and “red foods”. “White foods” were usually dairy products and were the main food source during the summer. The main dairy product that …   Wikipedia

  • Life — (l[imac]f), n.; pl. {Lives} (l[imac]vz). [AS. l[imac]f; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. l[imac]p life, body, OHG. l[imac]b life, Icel. l[imac]f, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. [root]119. See {Live}, and cf. {Alive}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Life annuity — Life Life (l[imac]f), n.; pl. {Lives} (l[imac]vz). [AS. l[imac]f; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. l[imac]p life, body, OHG. l[imac]b life, Icel. l[imac]f, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. [root]119. See {Live}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Life arrow — Life Life (l[imac]f), n.; pl. {Lives} (l[imac]vz). [AS. l[imac]f; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. l[imac]p life, body, OHG. l[imac]b life, Icel. l[imac]f, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. [root]119. See {Live}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Life assurance — Life Life (l[imac]f), n.; pl. {Lives} (l[imac]vz). [AS. l[imac]f; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. l[imac]p life, body, OHG. l[imac]b life, Icel. l[imac]f, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. [root]119. See {Live}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Life buoy — Life Life (l[imac]f), n.; pl. {Lives} (l[imac]vz). [AS. l[imac]f; akin to D. lijf body, G. leib body, MHG. l[imac]p life, body, OHG. l[imac]b life, Icel. l[imac]f, life, body, Sw. lif, Dan. liv, and E. live, v. [root]119. See {Live}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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