Перевод: с испанского на все языки

consumer+activist

  • 161 electrodomésticos

    = appliances, electrical appliances, kitchen appliances, domestic appliances.
    Ex. In addition, patrons use libraries to research consumer information to comparison-shop for major purchases, such as cars, boats, and appliances.
    Ex. Such things as the minimum room temperature within one hour of starting work, the adequacy of light and ventilation, and the safety of electrical appliances are all well covered in considerable detail.
    Ex. The author discusses the image of the US projected by the American Pavilion through its fashion shows, home furnishings and kitchen appliances exhibits and food.
    Ex. The usefulness of interlinking domestic appliances in this way is yet to be proved.
    * * *
    = appliances, electrical appliances, kitchen appliances, domestic appliances.

    Ex: In addition, patrons use libraries to research consumer information to comparison-shop for major purchases, such as cars, boats, and appliances.

    Ex: Such things as the minimum room temperature within one hour of starting work, the adequacy of light and ventilation, and the safety of electrical appliances are all well covered in considerable detail.
    Ex: The author discusses the image of the US projected by the American Pavilion through its fashion shows, home furnishings and kitchen appliances exhibits and food.
    Ex: The usefulness of interlinking domestic appliances in this way is yet to be proved.

    Spanish-English dictionary > electrodomésticos

  • 162 empañado

    adj.
    covered with breadcrumbs, in breadcrumbs.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: empanar.
    * * *
    1→ link=empanar empanar
    1 (rebozado) breaded, in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (Culin) cooked or rolled in breadcrumbs or pastry
    2) (=atontado)
    * * *
    = misty [mistier -comp., mistiest -sup.], tarnished.
    Ex. The article ' Misty, water-colored images' sounds the clarion for preservation activist librarians.
    Ex. Coca-Cola appears to be taking pains to buff up its tarnished image -- a controversy continues to brew over pesticides found in its soda products.
    ----
    * con los ojos empañados = misty-eyed.
    * * *
    = misty [mistier -comp., mistiest -sup.], tarnished.

    Ex: The article ' Misty, water-colored images' sounds the clarion for preservation activist librarians.

    Ex: Coca-Cola appears to be taking pains to buff up its tarnished image -- a controversy continues to brew over pesticides found in its soda products.
    * con los ojos empañados = misty-eyed.

    * * *

    Del verbo empanar: ( conjugate empanar)

    empanado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    empanado    
    empanar
    empanar ( conjugate empanar), (Méx)

    to coat … in breadcrumbs
    empanado,-a adjetivo breaded

    ' empanado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    empanada
    English:
    misty
    - steamy
    * * *
    empanado, -a adj
    breaded, covered in breadcrumbs
    * * *
    adj misty

    Spanish-English dictionary > empañado

  • 163 empresas americanas, las

    Ex. She is the author of 11 novels depicting the power of corporate America and the dark and insidious logic of the consumer society.

    Spanish-English dictionary > empresas americanas, las

  • 164 en condiciones de igualdad

    = on an equal footing, on equal terms, on an equal basis
    Ex. With a payment system the consumer controls production, and all goods compete on an equal footing.
    Ex. Rather than take a whole lot of time on this, let me utter a brief commercial on behalf of a book which addresses precisely this area of women-related headings, Joan Marshall's 'On Equal Terms'.
    Ex. All appropriate measures shall be taken to establish adequate legal protection of the rights of women on an equal basis with men.
    * * *
    = on an equal footing, on equal terms, on an equal basis

    Ex: With a payment system the consumer controls production, and all goods compete on an equal footing.

    Ex: Rather than take a whole lot of time on this, let me utter a brief commercial on behalf of a book which addresses precisely this area of women-related headings, Joan Marshall's 'On Equal Terms'.
    Ex: All appropriate measures shall be taken to establish adequate legal protection of the rights of women on an equal basis with men.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en condiciones de igualdad

  • 165 en gran medida

    = broadly, by and large, extensively, greatly, heavily, largely, to a considerable extent, to a high degree, to a large extent, tremendously, vastly, very much, keenly, in no small way, to any great degree, in many ways, in large part, in large measure, in no small measure, to a great extent, to a large degree, to a great degree
    Ex. These can be broadly categorised into the following two groups.
    Ex. This has been the case with newspapers which by and large have changed very little over the past century.
    Ex. Fiction classifications are used extensively in public libraries.
    Ex. The computer can greatly assist in thesaurus compilation and updating.
    Ex. Regular overhaul of guiding is important, especially for the new user who may rely heavily upon it.
    Ex. The reason for its popularity was largely that it was based upon a principle of conformity in essentials, and freedom in details.
    Ex. If the report is to a considerable extent in the words of the reporter then entry will be made under the heading for the reporter.
    Ex. UDC recognizes, to a high degree, the value of synthesis in classification.
    Ex. Variations in the extent of the description between a set of entries account to a large extent for the distinction between main, added and unit entries.
    Ex. The importance of the practicum in the curriculum has ebbed and flowed tremendously throughout the history of library education.
    Ex. And with the advent of computers, we have vastly accelerated the pace at which we are proceeding.
    Ex. She is still very much a children's book borrower with a smattering of titles taken from the applied sciences, which in Susan's case meant books on cookery and needlework.
    Ex. Those of us who deal with cooperatively produced catalogs and buy MARC tapes from a vendor will certainly feel the effects of all this keenly.
    Ex. His excellent rapport with Congress was in no small way responsible for the progress made by LC during his administration.
    Ex. Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex. In many ways, the order in DC is poor, separating language (400) from literature (800), and history (900) from the other social sciences (300) = En muchos sentidos, el orden de la CD es pobre al separar la lengua (400) de la literatura (800) y la historia (900) de las otras ciencias sociales (300).
    Ex. Only journals published in the USA and devoted exclusively or in large part to the literature of social gerontology are described here.
    Ex. Despite their weight of numbers, nurses have not been accorded a pre-eminent place in hospitals, and in large measure they continue to rely on medical libraries for their information needs.
    Ex. Although it may have taken a little while to find its feet, this collection is now a most significant resource in its own right, due in no small measure by the stimulation provided by Victorian historians.
    Ex. To a great extent, these are self-explanatory reasons.
    Ex. To a large degree, the image an institution creates is determined by the leader who is the directing force of that institution.
    Ex. To a great degree, it is the faculty that make the Stanford psychology program so reputable.
    * * *
    = broadly, by and large, extensively, greatly, heavily, largely, to a considerable extent, to a high degree, to a large extent, tremendously, vastly, very much, keenly, in no small way, to any great degree, in many ways, in large part, in large measure, in no small measure, to a great extent, to a large degree, to a great degree

    Ex: These can be broadly categorised into the following two groups.

    Ex: This has been the case with newspapers which by and large have changed very little over the past century.
    Ex: Fiction classifications are used extensively in public libraries.
    Ex: The computer can greatly assist in thesaurus compilation and updating.
    Ex: Regular overhaul of guiding is important, especially for the new user who may rely heavily upon it.
    Ex: The reason for its popularity was largely that it was based upon a principle of conformity in essentials, and freedom in details.
    Ex: If the report is to a considerable extent in the words of the reporter then entry will be made under the heading for the reporter.
    Ex: UDC recognizes, to a high degree, the value of synthesis in classification.
    Ex: Variations in the extent of the description between a set of entries account to a large extent for the distinction between main, added and unit entries.
    Ex: The importance of the practicum in the curriculum has ebbed and flowed tremendously throughout the history of library education.
    Ex: And with the advent of computers, we have vastly accelerated the pace at which we are proceeding.
    Ex: She is still very much a children's book borrower with a smattering of titles taken from the applied sciences, which in Susan's case meant books on cookery and needlework.
    Ex: Those of us who deal with cooperatively produced catalogs and buy MARC tapes from a vendor will certainly feel the effects of all this keenly.
    Ex: His excellent rapport with Congress was in no small way responsible for the progress made by LC during his administration.
    Ex: Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex: In many ways, the order in DC is poor, separating language (400) from literature (800), and history (900) from the other social sciences (300) = En muchos sentidos, el orden de la CD es pobre al separar la lengua (400) de la literatura (800) y la historia (900) de las otras ciencias sociales (300).
    Ex: Only journals published in the USA and devoted exclusively or in large part to the literature of social gerontology are described here.
    Ex: Despite their weight of numbers, nurses have not been accorded a pre-eminent place in hospitals, and in large measure they continue to rely on medical libraries for their information needs.
    Ex: Although it may have taken a little while to find its feet, this collection is now a most significant resource in its own right, due in no small measure by the stimulation provided by Victorian historians.
    Ex: To a great extent, these are self-explanatory reasons.
    Ex: To a large degree, the image an institution creates is determined by the leader who is the directing force of that institution.
    Ex: To a great degree, it is the faculty that make the Stanford psychology program so reputable.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en gran medida

  • 166 en igualdad de condiciones

    = other things being equal, on equal terms, one of equals, ceteris paribus, in a tie, on an equal footing, on an equal basis, all (other) things being equal
    Ex. Other things being equal, the capability of a service will tend to increase as the resources devoted to it increase.
    Ex. Rather than take a whole lot of time on this, let me utter a brief commercial on behalf of a book which addresses precisely this area of women-related headings, Joan Marshall's 'On Equal Terms'.
    Ex. Above all, the relationship between Western experts and the Third World must be one of equal partners, not of donor and recipient.
    Ex. It is seen that open access to land can lead to overpopulation in a ceteris paribus sense.
    Ex. In a tie, the data suggests the nod would go to search engines = En igualdad de condiciones, los datos nos dan a entender que serían los buscadores los que ganarían el pulso, en última instancia.
    Ex. With a payment system the consumer controls production, and all goods compete on an equal footing.
    Ex. All appropriate measures shall be taken to establish adequate legal protection of the rights of women on an equal basis with men.
    Ex. Some of the modern evidence supporting the law of demand shows that, all other things being equal, when the price of a good rises, the amount of it demanded decreases.
    * * *
    = other things being equal, on equal terms, one of equals, ceteris paribus, in a tie, on an equal footing, on an equal basis, all (other) things being equal

    Ex: Other things being equal, the capability of a service will tend to increase as the resources devoted to it increase.

    Ex: Rather than take a whole lot of time on this, let me utter a brief commercial on behalf of a book which addresses precisely this area of women-related headings, Joan Marshall's 'On Equal Terms'.
    Ex: Above all, the relationship between Western experts and the Third World must be one of equal partners, not of donor and recipient.
    Ex: It is seen that open access to land can lead to overpopulation in a ceteris paribus sense.
    Ex: In a tie, the data suggests the nod would go to search engines = En igualdad de condiciones, los datos nos dan a entender que serían los buscadores los que ganarían el pulso, en última instancia.
    Ex: With a payment system the consumer controls production, and all goods compete on an equal footing.
    Ex: All appropriate measures shall be taken to establish adequate legal protection of the rights of women on an equal basis with men.
    Ex: Some of the modern evidence supporting the law of demand shows that, all other things being equal, when the price of a good rises, the amount of it demanded decreases.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en igualdad de condiciones

  • 167 en la tarea de

    Ex. The story of the postwar diner suggests some ways that purveyors of consumer commodities finessed and exploited emergent social dislocations in the drive to expand and diversify markets.
    * * *

    Ex: The story of the postwar diner suggests some ways that purveyors of consumer commodities finessed and exploited emergent social dislocations in the drive to expand and diversify markets.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en la tarea de

  • 168 en peligro

    = endangered, jeopardised [jeopardized, -USA], at stake, at risk, under threat, under challenge, on the line, on thin ice, on dangerous ground, threatened, in harm's way
    Ex. It asserts that young adult libraries and the services they provide are continously endangered and describes how to come to terms with this problem.
    Ex. And yet the thought of what he was being asked to do to salvage the jeopardized budget outraged his every fiber.
    Ex. But there was a principle at stake here, and she too felt obligated to express her honest thoughts.
    Ex. Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex. Products under threat include; greeting cards, circulars, information sheets, newspapers and magazines.
    Ex. During the previous 10 years the concept of free information services in Australian libraries has come increasingly under challenge.
    Ex. The article 'Assets on the line' discusses some of the disadvantages of manual methods of performing inventories of organization's hardware and software.
    Ex. As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex. On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    Ex. Kids and adults are encouraged to take a dip and raise funds to help protect sea turtles and other threatened marine wildlife.
    Ex. Santa Barbara area canyon's residents are among many Californians living in harm's way in fire-prone areas.
    * * *
    = endangered, jeopardised [jeopardized, -USA], at stake, at risk, under threat, under challenge, on the line, on thin ice, on dangerous ground, threatened, in harm's way

    Ex: It asserts that young adult libraries and the services they provide are continously endangered and describes how to come to terms with this problem.

    Ex: And yet the thought of what he was being asked to do to salvage the jeopardized budget outraged his every fiber.
    Ex: But there was a principle at stake here, and she too felt obligated to express her honest thoughts.
    Ex: Consumer advice centres were not used to any great degree by the working classes or those groups most at risk as consumers -- the elderly, divorced, widowed and separated.
    Ex: Products under threat include; greeting cards, circulars, information sheets, newspapers and magazines.
    Ex: During the previous 10 years the concept of free information services in Australian libraries has come increasingly under challenge.
    Ex: The article 'Assets on the line' discusses some of the disadvantages of manual methods of performing inventories of organization's hardware and software.
    Ex: As the title of my talk indicates, we are on thin ice, and in more ways than one.
    Ex: On dangerous ground: The threat of landslides is looming large with ad hoc building practices being the root cause.
    Ex: Kids and adults are encouraged to take a dip and raise funds to help protect sea turtles and other threatened marine wildlife.
    Ex: Santa Barbara area canyon's residents are among many Californians living in harm's way in fire-prone areas.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en peligro

  • 169 en secuencia

    (adj.) = sequential, sequentially, sequenced
    Ex. The sequential sorting of the pack and subpacks permits searching to proceed on combinations of terms.
    Ex. The three main stages of the indexing process need not necessarily be completed sequentially.
    Ex. This report is structured to provide readers with a sequenced view of how the information consumer finds, uses, evaluates and favors information sources.
    * * *
    (adj.) = sequential, sequentially, sequenced

    Ex: The sequential sorting of the pack and subpacks permits searching to proceed on combinations of terms.

    Ex: The three main stages of the indexing process need not necessarily be completed sequentially.
    Ex: This report is structured to provide readers with a sequenced view of how the information consumer finds, uses, evaluates and favors information sources.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en secuencia

  • 170 encarcelar

    v.
    1 to imprison.
    2 to put in prison, to jail, to prison, to send to prison.
    El policía encarceló al borracho The policeman put the drunk in prison.
    * * *
    1 to imprison, jail, incarcerate
    * * *
    verb
    to imprison, jail
    * * *
    VT to imprison, jail
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to imprison, jail
    * * *
    = jail [gaol, -UK], incarcerate, imprison, hold + prisoner, put + Nombre + behind bars.
    Ex. In 1892 Klas Linderfelt, the then ALA President, was jailed for 4 days on charges of embezzling more than $4,000 from library funds.
    Ex. A survey was conducted to identify the information needs of a 5% sample of men and women incarcerated in correctional institutions.
    Ex. Juan Carlos is a blind lawyer, activist and volunteer librarian who has been imprisoned without trial since March, when he was detained for peacefully protesting the arrest of a journalist.
    Ex. Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex. A 92-year-old woman has been put behind bars for sitting on her front porch shouting abuse at passers-by.
    ----
    * encarcelar de por vida = jail for + life.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to imprison, jail
    * * *
    = jail [gaol, -UK], incarcerate, imprison, hold + prisoner, put + Nombre + behind bars.

    Ex: In 1892 Klas Linderfelt, the then ALA President, was jailed for 4 days on charges of embezzling more than $4,000 from library funds.

    Ex: A survey was conducted to identify the information needs of a 5% sample of men and women incarcerated in correctional institutions.
    Ex: Juan Carlos is a blind lawyer, activist and volunteer librarian who has been imprisoned without trial since March, when he was detained for peacefully protesting the arrest of a journalist.
    Ex: Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex: A 92-year-old woman has been put behind bars for sitting on her front porch shouting abuse at passers-by.
    * encarcelar de por vida = jail for + life.

    * * *
    encarcelar [A1 ]
    vt
    to imprison, jail
    fue encarcelado he was imprisoned o jailed, he was put in prison o jail
    * * *

    encarcelar ( conjugate encarcelar) verbo transitivo
    to imprison, jail
    encarcelar verbo transitivo to imprison
    ' encarcelar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    enjaular
    - detener
    English:
    bang up
    - imprison
    - incarcerate
    - jail
    - send down
    * * *
    to imprison, to jail;
    fue encarcelado por homicidio he was jailed for murder
    * * *
    v/t put in prison, imprison
    * * *
    : to incarcerate, to imprison
    * * *
    encarcelar vb to imprison

    Spanish-English dictionary > encarcelar

  • 171 engaño

    m.
    1 deceit, deception, trickery, cheating.
    2 lie, hoax, trick, take-in.
    3 fraudulence, deceitfulness.
    4 delusion, false impression.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: engañar.
    * * *
    1 deceit, deception
    2 (estafa) fraud, trick, swindle
    3 (mentira) lie
    4 (error) mistake
    \
    estar en un engaño to be mistaken
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=acto) [gen] deception; (=ilusión) delusion

    aquí no hay engaño — there is no attempt to deceive anybody here, it's all on the level *

    2) (=trampa) trick, swindle
    3) (=malentendido) mistake, misunderstanding

    padecer engaño — to labour under a misunderstanding, labor under a misunderstanding (EEUU)

    4) pl engaños (=astucia) wiles, tricks
    5) [de pesca] lure
    6) Cono Sur (=regalo) small gift, token
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( mentira) deception
    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)
    c) ( ardid) ploy, trick
    2) (Taur) cape
    * * *
    = fraud, snare, sham, hoax, deceit, subterfuge, confidence trick, deception, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, hocus pocus, caper, dissimulation, fiddle, trickery, bluff, con trick, con, con job.
    Ex. At our library in Minnesota we have clearly identified material that deals with many types of business and consumer frauds, national liberation movements, bedtime, Kwanza, the Afro-American holiday.
    Ex. Whilst telematics for Africa is full of snares, it is the way towards the road to mastery in the future.
    Ex. The NCC argue that the three other rights established over the last three centuries -- civil, political and social -- are 'liable to be hollow shams' without the consequent right to information.
    Ex. This article examines several controversial cataloguing problems, including the classification of anti-Semitic works and books proven to be forgeries or hoaxes.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Policing fraud and deceit: the legal aspects of misconduct in scientific enquiry'.
    Ex. Citing authors' names in references can cause great difficulties, as ghosts, subterfuges, and collaborative teamwork may often obscure the true begetters of published works.
    Ex. Unless universal education is nothing more than a confidence trick, there must be more people today who can benefit by real library service than ever there were in the past.
    Ex. Furthermore, deception is common when subjects use e-mail and chat rooms.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex. The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex. The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex. The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex. Who was the mastermind of the Watergate caper & for what purpose has never been revealed.
    Ex. In fact, the terms of the contrast are highly ambivalent: order vs. anarchy, liberty vs. despotism, or industry vs. sloth, and also dissimulation vs. honesty.
    Ex. This paper reports a study based on an eight-week period of participant observation of a particular form of resistance, fiddles.
    Ex. It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.
    Ex. The most dramatic way to spot a bluff is to look your opponent in the eye and attempt to sense his fear.
    Ex. The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex. He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex. The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    ----
    * autoengaño = self-deception.
    * conducir a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * conseguir mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * entrar mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * llevar a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * someter a engaño = perpetrate + deception.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( mentira) deception
    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)
    c) ( ardid) ploy, trick
    2) (Taur) cape
    * * *
    = fraud, snare, sham, hoax, deceit, subterfuge, confidence trick, deception, swindle, rip-off, swindling, cheating, hocus pocus, caper, dissimulation, fiddle, trickery, bluff, con trick, con, con job.

    Ex: At our library in Minnesota we have clearly identified material that deals with many types of business and consumer frauds, national liberation movements, bedtime, Kwanza, the Afro-American holiday.

    Ex: Whilst telematics for Africa is full of snares, it is the way towards the road to mastery in the future.
    Ex: The NCC argue that the three other rights established over the last three centuries -- civil, political and social -- are 'liable to be hollow shams' without the consequent right to information.
    Ex: This article examines several controversial cataloguing problems, including the classification of anti-Semitic works and books proven to be forgeries or hoaxes.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Policing fraud and deceit: the legal aspects of misconduct in scientific enquiry'.
    Ex: Citing authors' names in references can cause great difficulties, as ghosts, subterfuges, and collaborative teamwork may often obscure the true begetters of published works.
    Ex: Unless universal education is nothing more than a confidence trick, there must be more people today who can benefit by real library service than ever there were in the past.
    Ex: Furthermore, deception is common when subjects use e-mail and chat rooms.
    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The article 'Online scams, swindles, frauds and rip-offs' lists some of the most better known Internet frauds of recent times.
    Ex: The swindling & deception the immigrants encountered often preyed on their Zionist ideology & indeed, some of the crooks were Jewish themselves.
    Ex: The author discerns 3 levels of cheating and deceit and examines why scientists stoop to bias and fraud, particularly in trials for new treatments.
    Ex: The final section of her paper calls attention to the ' hocus pocus' research conducted on many campuses.
    Ex: Who was the mastermind of the Watergate caper & for what purpose has never been revealed.
    Ex: In fact, the terms of the contrast are highly ambivalent: order vs. anarchy, liberty vs. despotism, or industry vs. sloth, and also dissimulation vs. honesty.
    Ex: This paper reports a study based on an eight-week period of participant observation of a particular form of resistance, fiddles.
    Ex: It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.
    Ex: The most dramatic way to spot a bluff is to look your opponent in the eye and attempt to sense his fear.
    Ex: The social contract has been the con trick by which the bosses have squeezed more and more out of the workers for themselves.
    Ex: He has long argued that populist conservatism is nothing more than a con.
    Ex: The global warming hoax had all the classic marks of a con job from the very beginning.
    * autoengaño = self-deception.
    * conducir a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * conseguir mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * entrar mediante engaño = bluff + Posesivo + way into.
    * llevar a engaño = be misleading, be deceiving.
    * someter a engaño = perpetrate + deception.

    * * *
    A
    1 (mentira) deception
    lo que más me duele es el engaño it was the deceit o deception that upset me most
    fue víctima de un cruel engaño she was the victim of a cruel deception o swindle, she was cruelly deceived o taken in
    vivió en el engaño durante años for years she lived in complete ignorance of his deceit
    es un engaño, no es de oro it's a con, this isn't (made of) gold ( colloq)
    2 (ardid) ploy, trick
    se vale de todo tipo de engaños para salirse con la suya he uses all kinds of tricks o every trick in the book to get his own way
    llamarse a engaño to claim one has been cheated o deceived
    para que luego nadie pueda llamarse a engaño so that no one can claim o say that they were deceived/cheated
    C ( Dep) fake
    * * *

     

    Del verbo engañar: ( conjugate engañar)

    engaño es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    engañó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    engañar    
    engaño    
    engañó
    engañar ( conjugate engañar) verbo transitivo


    tú a mí no me engañas you can't fool me;
    lo engañó haciéndole creer que … she deceived him into thinking that …;
    engaño a algn para que haga algo to trick sb into doing sth
    b) (estafar, timar) to cheat, con (colloq)


    engañarse verbo pronominal ( refl) ( mentirse) to deceive oneself, kid oneself (colloq)
    engaño sustantivo masculino

    b) (timo, estafa) swindle, con (colloq)


    engañar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 to deceive, mislead
    2 (mentir) to lie: no me engañes, ese no es tu coche, you can't fool me, this isn't your car
    3 (la sed, el hambre, el sueño) comeremos un poco para engañar el hambre, we'll eat a bit to keep the wolf from the door
    4 (timar) to cheat, trick
    5 (ser infiel) to be unfaithful to
    II verbo intransitivo to be deceptive: parece pequeña, pero engaña, it looks small, but it's deceptive
    engaño sustantivo masculino
    1 (mentira, trampa) deception, swindle
    (estafa) fraud
    (infidelidad) unfaithfulness
    2 (ilusión, equivocación) delusion: deberías sacarle del engaño, you should tell him the truth
    ♦ Locuciones: llamarse a engaño, to claim that one has been duped
    ' engaño' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    engañarse
    - farsa
    - maña
    - montaje
    - tramar
    - trampear
    - coba
    - descubrir
    - desengañar
    - engañar
    - tapadera
    - tranza
    English:
    deceit
    - deception
    - delusion
    - double-cross
    - game
    - guile
    - impersonation
    - put over
    - ride
    - sham
    - unfaithful
    - hoax
    * * *
    1. [mentira] deception, deceit;
    se ganó su confianza con algún engaño she gained his trust through a deception;
    lo obtuvo mediante engaño she obtained it by deception;
    todo fue un engaño it was all a deception;
    llamarse a engaño [engañarse] to delude oneself;
    [lamentarse] to claim to have been misled;
    que nadie se llame a engaño, la economía no va bien let no one have any illusions about it, the economy isn't doing well;
    no nos llamemos a engaño, el programa se puede mejorar let's not delude ourselves, the program could be improved;
    para que luego no te llames a engaño so you can't claim to have been misled afterwards
    2. [estafa] swindle;
    ha sido víctima de un engaño en la compra del terreno he was swindled over the sale of the land
    3. [ardid] ploy, trick;
    de nada van a servirte tus engaños your ploys will get you nowhere;
    las rebajas son un engaño para que la gente compre lo que no necesita sales are a ploy to make people buy things they don't need
    4. Taurom bullfighter's cape
    5. [para pescar] lure
    * * *
    m
    1 ( mentira) deception, deceit
    2 ( ardid) trick;
    llamarse a engaño claim to have been cheated
    * * *
    1) : deception, trick
    2) : fake, feint (in sports)
    * * *
    1. (mentira) lie
    2. (trampa) trick
    3. (timo) swindle

    Spanish-English dictionary > engaño

  • 172 engañoso

    adj.
    1 deceitful, deceiving, deceptive, liar.
    2 delusive, misleading, illusive, delusional.
    * * *
    1 (gen) deceptive
    2 (palabras) deceitful; (consejo) misleading
    * * *
    (f. - engañosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ (=persona) deceitful, dishonest; (=apariencia) deceptive; (=consejo) misleading
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < palabras> deceitful; < apariencias> deceptive
    * * *
    = deceptive, fallacious, deceitful, devious, sneaky [sneakier -comp., sneakiest -sup.], specious, duplicitous, distortive.
    Ex. Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.
    Ex. On the basis of current knowledge it seems fallacious to describe people's consumer behavior as having clear-cut objectives.
    Ex. Again, on the matter of the sources already consulted by the enquirer, the implication is not that he is unreliable or deceitful, but that in looking up the Encyclopedia Americana he may not be aware of the existence of the index.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex. The article carries the title 'Holdouts and other sneaky vendor tactics: no one profits when providers keep searchers from finding information'.
    Ex. This comparative frame of reference is specious and irrelevant on several counts.
    Ex. This remake of William Castle's action adventure adds a genuinely supernatural plot to the old story of the duplicitous wife scheming to kill her husband but being one-upped by his even more ingenious counterplots.
    Ex. Its distortive influence on feminist research has so far remained undiscussed.
    ----
    * de apariencia engañosa = misleading.
    * naturaleza engañosa = deceptiveness.
    * palabra engañosa = weasel word.
    * * *
    - sa adjetivo < palabras> deceitful; < apariencias> deceptive
    * * *
    = deceptive, fallacious, deceitful, devious, sneaky [sneakier -comp., sneakiest -sup.], specious, duplicitous, distortive.

    Ex: Rehyping old stuff as if it were new is not only annoyingly deceptive but doesn't sell any books to suspicious customers.

    Ex: On the basis of current knowledge it seems fallacious to describe people's consumer behavior as having clear-cut objectives.
    Ex: Again, on the matter of the sources already consulted by the enquirer, the implication is not that he is unreliable or deceitful, but that in looking up the Encyclopedia Americana he may not be aware of the existence of the index.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'The devious, the distraught and the deranged: designing and applying personal safety into library protection'.
    Ex: The article carries the title 'Holdouts and other sneaky vendor tactics: no one profits when providers keep searchers from finding information'.
    Ex: This comparative frame of reference is specious and irrelevant on several counts.
    Ex: This remake of William Castle's action adventure adds a genuinely supernatural plot to the old story of the duplicitous wife scheming to kill her husband but being one-upped by his even more ingenious counterplots.
    Ex: Its distortive influence on feminist research has so far remained undiscussed.
    * de apariencia engañosa = misleading.
    * naturaleza engañosa = deceptiveness.
    * palabra engañosa = weasel word.

    * * *
    ‹palabras› deceitful; ‹apariencias› deceptive
    * * *

    engañoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo ‹ palabras deceitful;


    apariencias deceptive
    engañoso,-a adj (mentiroso, falaz) deceitful
    (apariencia) deceptive
    ' engañoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    amagar
    - engañosa
    - falaz
    English:
    deceptive
    - misleading
    - deceitful
    * * *
    engañoso, -a adj
    1. [aspecto, apariencia, impresión] deceptive
    2. [persona, palabras] deceitful
    * * *
    adj persona, palabras deceitful; apariencias deceptive
    * * *
    engañoso, -sa adj
    1) : deceitful
    2) : misleading, deceptive
    * * *
    engañoso adj deceptive

    Spanish-English dictionary > engañoso

  • 173 enlazar

    v.
    1 to connect (trenes).
    2 to lace, to engage, to lace together, to hitch.
    María enlaza las cortinas Mary laces the curtains.
    3 to link, to string together, to connect.
    Ella enlaza los programas She links the programs.
    4 to marry.
    Pedro enlazó a María Peter married Mary.
    * * *
    1 (unir) to link, connect, tie (together)
    2 (ideas etc) to link, connect, relate
    3 (carreteras etc) to connect
    1 (trenes etc) to connect ( con, with)
    1 (unirse) to be linked, be connected
    2 (casarse) to get married, marry
    3 (familias) to become linked by marriage
    * * *
    verb
    to join, link, connect
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=unir con lazos) to bind together; (=atar) to tie
    2) [+ ideas] to link, connect
    3) LAm to lasso
    2.
    VI [tren, vuelo] to connect; [carretera] to link (up); [idea, movimiento] to meet, link (up) ( con with)
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < ciudades> to link, link up; <ideas/temas> to link, connect

    caminaban con las manos enlazadas — (liter) they walked along hand in hand

    b) < cintas> to tie... together
    2) (Col, RPl) <res/caballo> to lasso, rope (AmE)
    3) (Méx frml) ( casar) to marry
    2.

    enlazar con algotren/vuelo to connect with something; carretera to link up with something

    * * *
    = link, linking, link up.
    Ex. These references operate in a similar fashion whether they are used to link authors' names or subject headings.
    Ex. The process of allocating a sign or symbol to join the descriptors assigned to a document or to a request for retrieval is known as linking.
    Ex. The first word, 'communication,' should be familiar to librarians since we are in the business of getting across, linking up, in this age of enlightenment.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) < ciudades> to link, link up; <ideas/temas> to link, connect

    caminaban con las manos enlazadas — (liter) they walked along hand in hand

    b) < cintas> to tie... together
    2) (Col, RPl) <res/caballo> to lasso, rope (AmE)
    3) (Méx frml) ( casar) to marry
    2.

    enlazar con algotren/vuelo to connect with something; carretera to link up with something

    * * *
    = link, linking, link up.

    Ex: These references operate in a similar fashion whether they are used to link authors' names or subject headings.

    Ex: The process of allocating a sign or symbol to join the descriptors assigned to a document or to a request for retrieval is known as linking.
    Ex: The first word, 'communication,' should be familiar to librarians since we are in the business of getting across, linking up, in this age of enlightenment.

    * * *
    enlazar [A4 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹ciudades› to link, link up; ‹ideas/temas› to link, connect
    caminaban con las manos enlazadas ( liter); they walked along hand in hand
    enlazar algo CON algo to link sth WITH o TO sth
    2 ‹cintas› to tie … together
    B (Col, RPI) ‹res/caballo› to lasso, rope ( AmE)
    C ( Méx frml) (casar) to marry
    ■ enlazar
    vi
    enlazar CON algo «tren/vuelo» to connect WITH sth; «carretera» to link up WITH sth
    * * *

    enlazar ( conjugate enlazar) verbo transitivo
    1

    ideas/temas to link, connect
    b) cintasto tie … together

    2 (Col, RPl) ‹res/caballo to lasso, rope (AmE)
    3 (Méx frml) ( casar) to marry
    verbo intransitivo enlazar con algo [tren/vuelo] to connect with sth;
    [ carretera] to link up with sth
    enlazar verbo transitivo & verbo intransitivo to link [con, with/to], connect [con, with]
    ' enlazar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    connect
    - rope
    * * *
    vt
    1. [relacionar] [lugares, ideas] to link, to connect;
    enlazar algo con to link o connect sth with;
    enlazó el tema con una crítica a la sociedad de consumo he linked the issue with a criticism of consumer society;
    la autopista que enlaza una ciudad con otra the motorway that links the two cities
    2. [atar]
    enlazar algo a to tie sth up to
    3. [con lazos] to lace
    4. Am [animal] to lasso
    vi
    [trenes] to connect (en at); [carreteras] to join (up) ( con with);
    esta carretera enlaza con la autopista this road joins up with the motorway;
    en la terminal C enlaza usted con su vuelo a Lima your connecting flight to Lima leaves from Terminal C
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 link (up), connect
    2 L.Am.
    con cuerda rope, lasso
    II v/i de carretera link up ( con with); AVIA, FERR connect ( con with)
    * * *
    enlazar {21} v
    : to join, to link, to fit together
    * * *
    enlazar vb to connect

    Spanish-English dictionary > enlazar

  • 174 enojado al máximo

    Ex. The article 'The acquisitions librarian as informed consumer: mad as hell, and not going to take it any more!' considers some of the underlying practices used by publishers which keep prices increasing faster than inflation.
    * * *

    Ex: The article 'The acquisitions librarian as informed consumer: mad as hell, and not going to take it any more!' considers some of the underlying practices used by publishers which keep prices increasing faster than inflation.

    Spanish-English dictionary > enojado al máximo

  • 175 enérgico

    adj.
    1 energetic, strong, active, powerful.
    2 forceful, high-pressure, aggressive, drastic.
    * * *
    1 energetic, vigorous
    \
    en tono enérgico emphatically
    * * *
    (f. - enérgica)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] energetic, vigorous; [gesto, habla, tono] emphatic; [esfuerzo] determined; [ejercicio] strenuous; [campaña] vigorous, high-pressure; [medida, golpe] bold, drastic; [ataque] vigorous, strong; [protesta] forceful
    * * *
    - ca adjetivo
    a) ( físicamente) <ejercicio/movimiento> energetic, strenuous; < persona> energetic, vigorous
    b) (firme, resuelto) < carácter> forceful; <protesta/ataque> vigorous; < medidas> firm, strong; <desmentido/rechazo> flat, firm
    * * *
    = emphatic, energetic, forceful, assertive, aggressive, brisk [brisker -comp., briskest -sup.], spirited, vociferous, vocal, spry [spryer comp., spryest -sup.], sprightly [sprightlier -comp., sprightliest -sup.], power-packed.
    Ex. Her first hint that all was not well was with the sudden appearance of Consuelo Feng, whose no-nonsensen approach to her job was emphasized by the emphactic clicks of her heels along the highly polished terrazzo floors.
    Ex. She has been a vital and energetic voice in the movement to increase the sensitivity and responsibility of libraries to social issues, as well as a first-rate cataloger.
    Ex. The implications are that as resources are become scarcer, librarians will need to adopt more forceful attitudes.
    Ex. I tried to say at the very outset of my remarks that there probably has not been sufficient consumer-like and assertive leverage exerted upon our chief suppliers.
    Ex. Problem patrons include, but are not limited to, illiterates simply seeking shelter, alcoholics, the homeless, the mentally disturbed, aggressive young people, and those with offensive odours.
    Ex. The classic example quoted by Jourard is the brisk, super-efficient nurse, whose manner appears to be something that she puts on when she dons her uniform.
    Ex. Their aim was to mount a spirited attack on a consumer driven and marketeers' approach to reading and books, and on relativism and populism.
    Ex. The reaction came in 1978 -- a vociferous social demand for reading and learning, including a new interest in librarianship.
    Ex. Koelling has been a vocal advocate for successful digitization projects in the museum community.
    Ex. A spry 80 years young, Virginia has been painting murals for the last 50 years and a lot can be said for the advantages of experience.
    Ex. He was described as a ' sprightly nonagenarian' who was born in 1905.
    Ex. Eating these power-packed vegetables in their natural state especially garlic increases their health benefits.
    ----
    * enérgico, poderoso, contundente, potente, potentísimo, impetuoso, formidable = power-packed.
    * * *
    - ca adjetivo
    a) ( físicamente) <ejercicio/movimiento> energetic, strenuous; < persona> energetic, vigorous
    b) (firme, resuelto) < carácter> forceful; <protesta/ataque> vigorous; < medidas> firm, strong; <desmentido/rechazo> flat, firm
    * * *
    = emphatic, energetic, forceful, assertive, aggressive, brisk [brisker -comp., briskest -sup.], spirited, vociferous, vocal, spry [spryer comp., spryest -sup.], sprightly [sprightlier -comp., sprightliest -sup.], power-packed.

    Ex: Her first hint that all was not well was with the sudden appearance of Consuelo Feng, whose no-nonsensen approach to her job was emphasized by the emphactic clicks of her heels along the highly polished terrazzo floors.

    Ex: She has been a vital and energetic voice in the movement to increase the sensitivity and responsibility of libraries to social issues, as well as a first-rate cataloger.
    Ex: The implications are that as resources are become scarcer, librarians will need to adopt more forceful attitudes.
    Ex: I tried to say at the very outset of my remarks that there probably has not been sufficient consumer-like and assertive leverage exerted upon our chief suppliers.
    Ex: Problem patrons include, but are not limited to, illiterates simply seeking shelter, alcoholics, the homeless, the mentally disturbed, aggressive young people, and those with offensive odours.
    Ex: The classic example quoted by Jourard is the brisk, super-efficient nurse, whose manner appears to be something that she puts on when she dons her uniform.
    Ex: Their aim was to mount a spirited attack on a consumer driven and marketeers' approach to reading and books, and on relativism and populism.
    Ex: The reaction came in 1978 -- a vociferous social demand for reading and learning, including a new interest in librarianship.
    Ex: Koelling has been a vocal advocate for successful digitization projects in the museum community.
    Ex: A spry 80 years young, Virginia has been painting murals for the last 50 years and a lot can be said for the advantages of experience.
    Ex: He was described as a ' sprightly nonagenarian' who was born in 1905.
    Ex: Eating these power-packed vegetables in their natural state especially garlic increases their health benefits.
    * enérgico, poderoso, contundente, potente, potentísimo, impetuoso, formidable = power-packed.

    * * *
    1 (físicamente) ‹ejercicio/movimiento› energetic, strenuous; ‹persona› energetic, vigorous
    le asestó un enérgico golpe en la cabeza she dealt him a fierce o heavy blow to the head
    2 (firme, resuelto) ‹carácter› forceful; ‹protesta› vigorous; ‹medidas› firm, strong
    lanzó un enérgico ataque contra ellos she launched a vigorous o fierce o strong attack on them
    un enérgico desmentido a flat o firm denial
    * * *

    enérgico
    ◊ -ca adjetivo


    b) (firme, resuelto) ‹ carácter forceful;

    protesta/ataque vigorous;
    medidas firm, strong;
    negativa/rechazo flat, firm
    enérgico,-a adjetivo
    1 energetic
    con un golpe enérgico, with a vigorous blow
    2 (con decisión) firm
    ' enérgico' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    enérgica
    - plumazo
    - decidido
    English:
    active
    - assertive
    - brisk
    - energetic
    - forceful
    - spirited
    - sprightly
    - strenuous
    - strident
    - vigorous
    - vital
    - vociferous
    - emphatic
    - high
    - loud
    - strength
    - strong
    * * *
    enérgico, -a adj
    1. [físicamente] [persona, salto] energetic;
    [golpe] vigorous, powerful; [gesto, movimiento] vigorous, energetic
    2. [decidido, firme] [persona, carácter] forceful;
    [medida] firm; [defensa, protesta] vigorous, energetic; [respuesta] emphatic
    * * *
    adj energetic; fig
    forceful, strong
    * * *
    enérgico, -ca adj
    1) : energetic, vigorous
    2) : forceful, emphatic
    * * *
    1. (persona) energetic / vigorous
    2. (respuesta, medida) strong

    Spanish-English dictionary > enérgico

  • 176 erróneo

    adj.
    erroneous, equivocal, wrong, mistaken.
    * * *
    1 erroneous, wrong, mistaken, unsound
    * * *
    (f. - errónea)
    adj.
    erroneous, wrong
    * * *
    ADJ (=equivocado) mistaken, erroneous; (=falso) untrue, false
    * * *
    - nea adjetivo (frml) <decisión/afirmación> wrong, erroneous (frml)
    * * *
    = erroneous, false, misguided, misleading, wrong, wrong-headed, misapplied, fallacious, misplaced, misinformed, in error.
    Ex. Mistakes in check-in will occasionally lead to erroneous entries in the receipt history.
    Ex. The concept 'Senses' constitutes a false link in the chain.
    Ex. We have long recognized the necessity for medical schools and law schools to lead the way in exploring new methods and new ideas -- even ones that prove to be wrong or misguided.
    Ex. Some titles are deliberately misleading or eye-catching, rather than informative.
    Ex. In a conventional system, the omission of a punctuation mark or an abbreviation will not necessarily cause an entry to be filed in the wrong place, because humans can compensate for variations in spelling and punctuation.
    Ex. His largest group of intentional alterations consisted of 27 relatively minor emendations, mostly wrong-headed.
    Ex. The word 'archival' has been rejected so as to avoid some misapplied promotional efforts by vendors.
    Ex. On the basis of current knowledge it seems fallacious to describe people's consumer behavior as having clear-cut objectives.
    Ex. Because of the nature of AIDS, much misinformation, prejudice, and misplaced fear exist both within the general public and in professional communities worldwide.
    Ex. In the 1990s damaging stereotypes and misguided caricatures persist in dominating the American public's generally misinformed view of what it means to be a librarian.
    Ex. Errors are indicated by a flashing light and the repositioning of the cursor at the item in error.
    ----
    * aplicar un tratamiento erróneo = mistreat.
    * colocado en lugar erróneo = misplaced.
    * correo con dirección errónea = misdirected mail.
    * interpretación errónea = misinterpretation, misrepresentation.
    * llevar a conclusiones erróneas = mislead.
    * representación errónea = misrepresentation.
    * ser erróneo = be wide of the mark, be wrong, be in error.
    * * *
    - nea adjetivo (frml) <decisión/afirmación> wrong, erroneous (frml)
    * * *
    = erroneous, false, misguided, misleading, wrong, wrong-headed, misapplied, fallacious, misplaced, misinformed, in error.

    Ex: Mistakes in check-in will occasionally lead to erroneous entries in the receipt history.

    Ex: The concept 'Senses' constitutes a false link in the chain.
    Ex: We have long recognized the necessity for medical schools and law schools to lead the way in exploring new methods and new ideas -- even ones that prove to be wrong or misguided.
    Ex: Some titles are deliberately misleading or eye-catching, rather than informative.
    Ex: In a conventional system, the omission of a punctuation mark or an abbreviation will not necessarily cause an entry to be filed in the wrong place, because humans can compensate for variations in spelling and punctuation.
    Ex: His largest group of intentional alterations consisted of 27 relatively minor emendations, mostly wrong-headed.
    Ex: The word 'archival' has been rejected so as to avoid some misapplied promotional efforts by vendors.
    Ex: On the basis of current knowledge it seems fallacious to describe people's consumer behavior as having clear-cut objectives.
    Ex: Because of the nature of AIDS, much misinformation, prejudice, and misplaced fear exist both within the general public and in professional communities worldwide.
    Ex: In the 1990s damaging stereotypes and misguided caricatures persist in dominating the American public's generally misinformed view of what it means to be a librarian.
    Ex: Errors are indicated by a flashing light and the repositioning of the cursor at the item in error.
    * aplicar un tratamiento erróneo = mistreat.
    * colocado en lugar erróneo = misplaced.
    * correo con dirección errónea = misdirected mail.
    * interpretación errónea = misinterpretation, misrepresentation.
    * llevar a conclusiones erróneas = mislead.
    * representación errónea = misrepresentation.
    * ser erróneo = be wide of the mark, be wrong, be in error.

    * * *
    ( frml); ‹decisión/afirmación› wrong, erroneous ( frml)
    sería erróneo afirmar que … it would be wrong o erroneous to say that …
    debido a un cálculo erróneo owing to a mistake in the calculations, owing to a miscalculation
    * * *

    erróneo
    ◊ - nea adjetivo (frml) ‹decisión/afirmación wrong, erroneous (frml)

    erróneo,-a adjetivo erroneous, wrong

    ' erróneo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    errónea
    - incorrecta
    - incorrecto
    English:
    erroneous
    - false
    - improper
    - misconceived
    - misleading
    - mistaken
    * * *
    erróneo, -a adj
    [juicio, afirmación, decisión] mistaken, erroneous; [cálculo, datos] incorrect, wrong;
    sería erróneo claudicar ahora it would be a mistake to give in now
    * * *
    adj wrong, erroneous fml
    * * *
    erróneo, - nea adj
    equivocado: erroneous, wrong
    * * *
    erróneo adj wrong / incorrect

    Spanish-English dictionary > erróneo

  • 177 escribir mucho sobre Algo

    = a lot + be written about, much + be written about
    Ex. A lot has been written about the plunge in consumer confidence since that day.
    Ex. Much has been written about why females don't play the same games or as many digital games as males do.
    * * *
    = a lot + be written about, much + be written about

    Ex: A lot has been written about the plunge in consumer confidence since that day.

    Ex: Much has been written about why females don't play the same games or as many digital games as males do.

    Spanish-English dictionary > escribir mucho sobre Algo

  • 178 estar saturado de trabajo

    (v.) = work to + capacity
    Ex. The Consumer Protection Department's inspectors were already working to capacity and did not want actively to encourage more casework = Los inspectores del Departamento de Protección al Consumidor ya estaban saturados de trabajo y no querían propiciar nuevos casos.
    * * *
    (v.) = work to + capacity

    Ex: The Consumer Protection Department's inspectors were already working to capacity and did not want actively to encourage more casework = Los inspectores del Departamento de Protección al Consumidor ya estaban saturados de trabajo y no querían propiciar nuevos casos.

    Spanish-English dictionary > estar saturado de trabajo

  • 179 esterilidad

    f.
    sterility.
    * * *
    1 (de terreno) sterility, barrenness
    2 (de hombre) sterility; (de mujer) sterility, infertility
    3 figurado futility, uselessness
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=infertilidad) [de mujer] sterility, infertility; [de hombre] sterility; [de terreno] sterility, barrenness
    2) [de esfuerzo] futility, uselessness
    * * *
    a) (de persona, animal) sterility; ( de terreno) barrenness, infertility
    b) (de esfuerzo, discusión) futility
    c) ( asepsia) sterility
    * * *
    Ex. The author describes the scope of consumer health information relating to fertility and infertility on the Internet.
    * * *
    a) (de persona, animal) sterility; ( de terreno) barrenness, infertility
    b) (de esfuerzo, discusión) futility
    c) ( asepsia) sterility
    * * *

    Ex: The author describes the scope of consumer health information relating to fertility and infertility on the Internet.

    * * *
    1 (de una mujer, un animal) infertility, sterility; (de un hombre) sterility; (de un terreno) barrenness, infertility
    2 (de un esfuerzo, una discusión) futility, fruitlessness
    3 (asepsia) sterility
    * * *

    esterilidad sustantivo femenino
    infertility;
    ( de un hombre) sterility
    esterilidad sustantivo femenino
    1 (infecundidad) sterility
    (inutilidad) futility
    2 (ausencia de gérmenes) sterility
    ' esterilidad' also found in these entries:
    English:
    infertility
    - sterility
    * * *
    1. [de mujer, hombre, animal] infertility, sterility;
    [de terreno] barrenness, infertility; [de pensamiento, imaginación] sterility
    2. [de gasa, instrumental] sterility
    3. [inutilidad] futility
    * * *
    f sterility
    * * *
    1) : sterility
    2) : infertility

    Spanish-English dictionary > esterilidad

  • 180 estudio de mercado

    market research
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = market survey, market research, marketing audit, consumer research
    Ex. The planning stage included a market survey of library furniture manufacturers.
    Ex. New market research in developing countries requires deep knowledge of the society.
    Ex. Kotler defines the marketing audit as a 'comprehensive, systematic, independent, and periodic examination of the library's total environment, objectives, strategies, activities, and resources in order to determine problem areas and opportunities and to recommend a plan of action'.
    Ex. Self-reports are a key source of information in consumer research.
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = market survey, market research, marketing audit, consumer research

    Ex: The planning stage included a market survey of library furniture manufacturers.

    Ex: New market research in developing countries requires deep knowledge of the society.
    Ex: Kotler defines the marketing audit as a 'comprehensive, systematic, independent, and periodic examination of the library's total environment, objectives, strategies, activities, and resources in order to determine problem areas and opportunities and to recommend a plan of action'.
    Ex: Self-reports are a key source of information in consumer research.

    * * *
    market research; resultado market survey

    Spanish-English dictionary > estudio de mercado

См. также в других словарях:

  • Consumer activism — is activism undertaken on behalf of consumers, to assert consumer rights. Contents 1 Objectives and tactics 2 Periods of Consumer Movements 3 Conceptions of Consumer movement …   Wikipedia

  • Center for Consumer Freedom — Founder(s) Richard Berman Type 501(c)(3) Founded 1995 Location Washington, D.C …   Wikipedia

  • The Consumer Goods — Infobox musical artist Name = The Consumer Goods Img capt = Img size = Landscape = Background = group or band Alias = Origin = flagicon|Canada Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Genre = Indie rock Pop Years active = Label = Grumpy Cloud Records… …   Wikipedia

  • John Oswald (activist) — This article is about John Oswald an 18th century political revolutionary. Information related to the Canadian composer may be found at John Oswald (composer) John Oswald, (c. 1760 September 14, 1793) was a Scottish philosopher, writer, poet,… …   Wikipedia

  • Michael Vernon — For other people named Michael Vernon, see Michael Vernon (disambiguation). Michael J Vernon AM c1980 Michael Mike Vernon A.M. (2 April 1932 – 6 November 1993) was a prominent Australian consumer activist. Vernon was born in Portsmouth, United… …   Wikipedia

  • Eileen Hoats — Eileen M. Hoats (born 1949) is a American consumer activist. She was elected president of the Consumer Federation of America in 1975.Staff report (February 15, 1975). Eileen Hoats Heads Consumer Groups. Washington Post ] She also served as… …   Wikipedia

  • Mangalore Ranga Pai — M. R. Pai Mangalore Ranga Pai (7 May 1931 – 3 July 2003), or M. R. Pai, was born in Manjeshwar, Kerala, a small village on the Karnataka Kerala Border. He studied at Canara High School, Mangalore and later at Presidency College, Madras where he… …   Wikipedia

  • H. D. Shourie — Infobox Celebrity name =Padma Vibhushan Hari Dev Shourie caption = birth date = 1911 birth place = Lahore, India. death date = 2005 death place = New Delhi, India occupation = Bureaucrat, Consumer Activist spouse = salary = networth = website =… …   Wikipedia

  • Democracy Now! — For other uses, see Democracy Now (disambiguation). Democracy Now! Genre News program, current affairs Running time 60 minutes daily (M F) …   Wikipedia

  • 1932 — This article is about the year 1932. Millennium: 2nd millennium Centuries: 19th century – 20th century – 21st century Decades: 1900s  1910s  1920s  – 1930s –  1940s   …   Wikipedia

  • Clara Lemlich — Shavelson (March 28, 1886 – July 25, 1982) was a leader of the Uprising of 20,000, the massive strike of shirtwaist workers in New York s garment industry in 1909. Later blacklisted from the industry for her labor union work, she became a member… …   Wikipedia

Книги



Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное

Прямая ссылка:
Нажмите правой клавишей мыши и выберите «Копировать ссылку»

Мы используем куки для наилучшего представления нашего сайта. Продолжая использовать данный сайт, вы соглашаетесь с этим.