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complete failure

  • 1 de modo cómico

    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    * * *

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de modo cómico

  • 2 de modo divertido

    = comically, funnily
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. You should be a comedian, you look funny, you sound funny, you act funny, and your body even functions funnily.
    * * *
    = comically, funnily

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Ex: You should be a comedian, you look funny, you sound funny, you act funny, and your body even functions funnily.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de modo divertido

  • 3 de modo gracioso

    = comically, funnily
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. You should be a comedian, you look funny, you sound funny, you act funny, and your body even functions funnily.
    * * *
    = comically, funnily

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Ex: You should be a comedian, you look funny, you sound funny, you act funny, and your body even functions funnily.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de modo gracioso

  • 4 desacreditar

    v.
    to discredit.
    Ella desacredita a Ricardo She discredits Richard.
    Ella desacreditó a su amiga She discredited=debunked her friend.
    El político desacreditó al oponente The politician discredited his opponent
    * * *
    1 to discredit, bring discredit on, bring into discredit
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1.
    VT [+ político, gobierno] to discredit
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to discredit; <buen nombre/institución> to discredit, bring... into disrepute
    b) < teoría> to discredit
    2.
    desacreditarse v pron (refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *
    = discredit, denigrate, debunk, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, taint.
    Ex. Such circulation may contribute little to the creation of whole personalities but it may do much to discredit the circulators.
    Ex. This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex. Process reengineering is in the debunking phase of its life cycle - an evolutionary pattern in which management ideas and techniques are first presented as panaceas for business success and subsequently debunked as worthless.
    Ex. This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    ----
    * desacreditarse = come into + disrepute, fall into + disrepute.
    * desacreditar un mito = debunk + a myth.
    * estar desacreditado = hold in + disrepute.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) < persona> to discredit; <buen nombre/institución> to discredit, bring... into disrepute
    b) < teoría> to discredit
    2.
    desacreditarse v pron (refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *
    = discredit, denigrate, debunk, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, taint.

    Ex: Such circulation may contribute little to the creation of whole personalities but it may do much to discredit the circulators.

    Ex: This is not to denigrate such writing, much of which is extremely valuable.
    Ex: Process reengineering is in the debunking phase of its life cycle - an evolutionary pattern in which management ideas and techniques are first presented as panaceas for business success and subsequently debunked as worthless.
    Ex: This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    * desacreditarse = come into + disrepute, fall into + disrepute.
    * desacreditar un mito = debunk + a myth.
    * estar desacreditado = hold in + disrepute.

    * * *
    vt
    esos rumores lo han desacreditado mucho those rumors have done his reputation a great deal of harm o have seriously damaged his reputation
    la oposición intentó desacreditarlo the opposition tried to discredit him
    ( refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    * * *

    desacreditar ( conjugate desacreditar) verbo transitivo
    to discredit
    desacreditarse verbo pronominal ( refl) to discredit oneself, damage one's reputation
    desacreditar verbo transitivo (desprestigiar) to discredit, bring into discredit
    ' desacreditar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    descalificar
    English:
    discredit
    - disgrace
    - disparage
    - debunk
    - disrepute
    * * *
    vt
    to discredit;
    hubo una campaña para desacreditarla there was a campaign to discredit her;
    este nuevo fracaso lo desacredita como político this latest failure has destroyed his credibility as a politician;
    su actuación ha desacreditado al partido his behaviour has brought the party into disrepute
    * * *
    v/t discredit
    * * *
    desprestigiar: to discredit, to disgrace

    Spanish-English dictionary > desacreditar

  • 5 deshonrar

    v.
    1 to dishonor.
    con su conducta deshonra a toda la familia he is dishonoring the entire family with his conduct
    Elsa deshonró a su familia Elsa dishonored her family.
    2 to trample on, to tread on.
    Elsa deshonró su reputación Elsa trampled on her good name.
    3 to bring shame on, to shame.
    Elsa deshonró a sus padres Elsa brought shame on her parents.
    * * *
    1 (gen) to dishonour (US dishonor), disgrace
    2 (injuriar) to insult, defame
    3 (a una mujer) to dishonour (US dishonor)
    * * *
    verb
    to dishonor, disgrace
    * * *
    VT
    1) [+ familia, compañeros] to dishonour, dishonor (EEUU), disgrace
    2) (=afrentar) to insult
    3) euf [+ mujer] to dishonour, dishonor (EEUU)
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <familia/patria> to dishonor*, disgrace; < mujer> to dishonor*
    * * *
    = taint, vilify, stigmatise [stigmatize, -USA], besmirch, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, defile.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. Robert Kent's sole agenda is to attack Cuba and vilify the Cuban library community while supporting the US government's interventionist destabilization policies.
    Ex. Findings reaffirm that television stigmatises the occupation of business, independently of economic factors.
    Ex. the gulag was an atrocious system of incarceration and forced labor that had little to do with correction, that poisoned society, and that besmirched Soviet communism.
    Ex. This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    ----
    * deshonrar la reputación = besmirch + reputation.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <familia/patria> to dishonor*, disgrace; < mujer> to dishonor*
    * * *
    = taint, vilify, stigmatise [stigmatize, -USA], besmirch, bring + Nombre + into disrepute, disgrace, defile.

    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.

    Ex: Robert Kent's sole agenda is to attack Cuba and vilify the Cuban library community while supporting the US government's interventionist destabilization policies.
    Ex: Findings reaffirm that television stigmatises the occupation of business, independently of economic factors.
    Ex: the gulag was an atrocious system of incarceration and forced labor that had little to do with correction, that poisoned society, and that besmirched Soviet communism.
    Ex: This article considers the danger that inherent bias in such research might bring library and information science research into disrepute.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex: No person shall throw any waste, building debris or vehicle scrap into the public domain or defile the public domain.
    * deshonrar la reputación = besmirch + reputation.

    * * *
    deshonrar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹familia/patria› to dishonor*, disgrace, bring dishonor* o disgrace o shame on
    trabajar no deshonra a nadie working is nothing to be ashamed of
    2 ‹mujer› to dishonor*
    * * *

    deshonrar ( conjugate deshonrar) verbo transitivofamilia/patria› to dishonor( conjugate dishonor), disgrace;
    mujer› to dishonor( conjugate dishonor)
    deshonrar verbo transitivo
    1 to dishonour, US dishonor
    2 (a la familia, etc) to bring disgrace on
    ' deshonrar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    disgrace
    - dishonor
    - dishonour
    - shame
    - blacken
    - taint
    * * *
    1. [injuriar] to dishonour;
    con su conducta deshonra a toda la familia his behaviour is bringing disgrace upon the entire family
    2. [mujer] to dishonour
    * * *
    v/t dishonor, Br
    dishonour
    * * *
    : to dishonor, to disgrace

    Spanish-English dictionary > deshonrar

  • 6 exceso en el presupuesto

    (n.) = budget overrun, overrun [over-run], cost overrun
    Ex. Problems like delay, budget overruns, sub-standard performance or even complete failure still occur frequently in IT projects.
    Ex. Findings show that both the Cobol and Natural projects experienced similar overruns.
    Ex. Following cost overruns of 330 million pounds on the British Library, the government's record of building procurement is being examined.
    * * *
    (n.) = budget overrun, overrun [over-run], cost overrun

    Ex: Problems like delay, budget overruns, sub-standard performance or even complete failure still occur frequently in IT projects.

    Ex: Findings show that both the Cobol and Natural projects experienced similar overruns.
    Ex: Following cost overruns of 330 million pounds on the British Library, the government's record of building procurement is being examined.

    Spanish-English dictionary > exceso en el presupuesto

  • 7 fracaso

    m.
    failure.
    un rotundo fracaso an outright failure
    todo fue un fracaso the whole thing was a disaster
    el fracaso escolar educational failure, poor performance at school
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: fracasar.
    * * *
    1 failure
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *

    la reforma está condenada al fracaso — the reform is doomed to failure, the reform is destined to fail

    ¡es un fracaso! — he's a disaster!

    * * *
    masculino failure

    un fracaso amoroso or sentimental — a disappointment in love

    * * *
    = flop, failure, underdog, bust, dog, defeat, fiasco, flake out, goof, write-off [writeoff], foundering, dud.
    Ex. And at worst, if the trip is a flop (it happens!), at least he is glad to get back to work.
    Ex. DBMS systems aim to cope with system failure and generate restart procedures.
    Ex. A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex. The article 'El Dorado or bust?' warns that the electronic market is changing.
    Ex. 'On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog -- the digital media has made possible the leveling of the playing field.
    Ex. Indeed, in larger libraries, there are those who regard a referral as tantamount to an admission of defeat.
    Ex. The history of the British Library is presented with particular reference to the political and administrative fiascos that have punctuated its development.
    Ex. The show was a real flake out.
    Ex. The film's supple structure, surprisingly light touch, and bravura performances make it perhaps the most fully formed, half-hearted goof ever.
    Ex. Gareth Jones's film makes a series of misjudgments so damaging that the whole thing is a virtual write-off.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Liberalism in a body bag: the foundering of the Middle East peace process'.
    Ex. It may be tempting the weather gods just to point this out, but this has been a dud of a hurricane season so far.
    ----
    * abocado al fracaso = failing, doomed.
    * abocado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed from + the beginning, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the start.
    * abocado al fracaso desde el principio = doomed from + the start, doomed from + the outset, doomed to + failure from its inception, doomed to + failure, doomed from + the beginning.
    * camino seguro al fracaso = blueprint for failure.
    * condenado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed from + the beginning, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the start.
    * condenado al fracaso desde el principio = doomed from + the start, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the beginning.
    * conseguir éxitos y fracasos = encounter + problems and successes.
    * éxitos o fracasos = successes or failures.
    * éxitos y fracasos = pitfalls and successes, successes and failures.
    * fórmula para el fracaso = blueprint for failure.
    * fracaso bochornoso = embarrassing failure.
    * fracaso desde el principio = doomed failure.
    * fracaso escolar = school failure.
    * fracaso lamentable = embarrassing failure.
    * fracaso miserable = miserable failure.
    * fracaso rotundo = resounding failure, complete failure.
    * fracaso total = complete failure.
    * fracaso vergonzoso = embarrassing failure.
    * índice de fracaso escolar = failure rate, dropout rate.
    * obtener éxitos y fracasos = experience + problems and successes.
    * predestinado al fracaso = doomed.
    * predestinado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed to + failure from its inception, doomed to + failure, doomed to + failure.
    * ser un fracaso = nothing + come of, prove + a failure.
    * significar fracaso = signify + failure, spell + failure.
    * suponer la diferencia entre el éxito o el fracaso = make or break.
    * tasa de fracaso escolar = dropout rate, failure rate.
    * traer consigo fracaso = spell + failure.
    * traer fracaso = spell + failure.
    * * *
    masculino failure

    un fracaso amoroso or sentimental — a disappointment in love

    * * *
    = flop, failure, underdog, bust, dog, defeat, fiasco, flake out, goof, write-off [writeoff], foundering, dud.

    Ex: And at worst, if the trip is a flop (it happens!), at least he is glad to get back to work.

    Ex: DBMS systems aim to cope with system failure and generate restart procedures.
    Ex: A chapter each is devoted to the comic hero, comedian, humorist, rogue, trickster, clown, fool, underdog, and simpleton.
    Ex: The article 'El Dorado or bust?' warns that the electronic market is changing.
    Ex: 'On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog -- the digital media has made possible the leveling of the playing field.
    Ex: Indeed, in larger libraries, there are those who regard a referral as tantamount to an admission of defeat.
    Ex: The history of the British Library is presented with particular reference to the political and administrative fiascos that have punctuated its development.
    Ex: The show was a real flake out.
    Ex: The film's supple structure, surprisingly light touch, and bravura performances make it perhaps the most fully formed, half-hearted goof ever.
    Ex: Gareth Jones's film makes a series of misjudgments so damaging that the whole thing is a virtual write-off.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Liberalism in a body bag: the foundering of the Middle East peace process'.
    Ex: It may be tempting the weather gods just to point this out, but this has been a dud of a hurricane season so far.
    * abocado al fracaso = failing, doomed.
    * abocado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed from + the beginning, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the start.
    * abocado al fracaso desde el principio = doomed from + the start, doomed from + the outset, doomed to + failure from its inception, doomed to + failure, doomed from + the beginning.
    * camino seguro al fracaso = blueprint for failure.
    * condenado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed from + the beginning, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the start.
    * condenado al fracaso desde el principio = doomed from + the start, doomed from + the outset, doomed from + the beginning.
    * conseguir éxitos y fracasos = encounter + problems and successes.
    * éxitos o fracasos = successes or failures.
    * éxitos y fracasos = pitfalls and successes, successes and failures.
    * fórmula para el fracaso = blueprint for failure.
    * fracaso bochornoso = embarrassing failure.
    * fracaso desde el principio = doomed failure.
    * fracaso escolar = school failure.
    * fracaso lamentable = embarrassing failure.
    * fracaso miserable = miserable failure.
    * fracaso rotundo = resounding failure, complete failure.
    * fracaso total = complete failure.
    * fracaso vergonzoso = embarrassing failure.
    * índice de fracaso escolar = failure rate, dropout rate.
    * obtener éxitos y fracasos = experience + problems and successes.
    * predestinado al fracaso = doomed.
    * predestinado al fracaso desde el comienzo = doomed to + failure from its inception, doomed to + failure, doomed to + failure.
    * ser un fracaso = nothing + come of, prove + a failure.
    * significar fracaso = signify + failure, spell + failure.
    * suponer la diferencia entre el éxito o el fracaso = make or break.
    * tasa de fracaso escolar = dropout rate, failure rate.
    * traer consigo fracaso = spell + failure.
    * traer fracaso = spell + failure.

    * * *
    1 (acción) failure
    ha sufrido or tenido varios fracasos profesionales she has had several failures in her work
    el proyecto estaba condenado al fracaso the project was destined to fail o doomed to failure
    un fracaso amoroso or sentimental a disappointment in love
    un fracaso rotundo a complete failure
    2 (obra, persona) failure
    su última película fue un fracaso her last movie was a failure o ( colloq) flop, her last movie bombed ( AmE colloq)
    como profesor es un fracaso he's a disaster o failure as a teacher, he's a hopeless teacher
    * * *

     

    Del verbo fracasar: ( conjugate fracasar)

    fracaso es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    fracasó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    fracasar    
    fracaso
    fracasar ( conjugate fracasar) verbo intransitivo
    to fail
    fracaso sustantivo masculino
    failure
    fracasar verbo intransitivo to fail
    fracaso sustantivo masculino failure: el despegue del cohete fue un fracaso, the rocket lift-off was a failure
    ' fracaso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    derrota
    - estrepitosa
    - estrepitoso
    - responsabilizar
    - sed
    - sentenciar
    - servir
    - contundente
    - destinado
    - naufragio
    - rotundo
    English:
    bomb
    - defeat
    - dismal
    - failure
    - flop
    - mainly
    - no-win
    - resounding
    - unmitigated
    - unqualified
    - washout
    - break
    - fiasco
    - why
    * * *
    1. [falta de éxito] failure;
    ha sufrido varios fracasos amorosos he has had a number of failed relationships;
    todo fue un fracaso it was a complete failure;
    la película fue un fracaso comercial the movie o Br film was a commercial failure o flop
    fracaso escolar school failure;
    el entorno familiar contribuye al fracaso escolar the family environment is a contributory factor to educational failure
    2. [persona] failure;
    como profesor es un fracaso as a teacher he's a failure, he's useless as a teacher
    * * *
    m failure
    * * *
    fiasco: failure
    * * *
    fracaso n failure

    Spanish-English dictionary > fracaso

  • 8 fracaso rotundo

    (n.) = resounding failure, complete failure
    Ex. How well it is done ulitmately represents the difference between conspicuous success and resounding failure.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    * * *
    (n.) = resounding failure, complete failure

    Ex: How well it is done ulitmately represents the difference between conspicuous success and resounding failure.

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Spanish-English dictionary > fracaso rotundo

  • 9 fracaso total

    m.
    real failure.
    * * *
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    * * *

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Spanish-English dictionary > fracaso total

  • 10 manasas

    = ham-handed, ham-fisted.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. They must ponder how not only to prevent such tragedies in future, but also to avoid worsening them through ham-fisted intervention.
    * * *
    = ham-handed, ham-fisted.

    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.

    Ex: They must ponder how not only to prevent such tragedies in future, but also to avoid worsening them through ham-fisted intervention.

    Spanish-English dictionary > manasas

  • 11 patoso

    adj.
    1 clumsy.
    2 gauche.
    m.
    1 person who pretends to be funny.
    2 clumsy individual, clumsy person.
    * * *
    1 clumsy
    * * *
    (f. - patosa)
    adj.
    * * *
    patoso, -a *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=torpe) clumsy
    2) (=molesto) troublesome
    2. SM / F
    1) (=torpe) clumsy oaf
    2) (=sabihondo) clever Dick *, smart Aleck *
    3) (=agitador) troublemaker
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo (Esp fam) clumsy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino (Esp fam) clumsy idiot (colloq)
    * * *
    = bumbler, duffer, ham-handed.
    Ex. Henry Ellis is traditionally depicted as a reactionary bumbler who held back reform of the department of printed books.
    Ex. Plus, no matter what she did to stop people from picking on her she always ended up being called a duffer.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    ----
    * ser muy patoso = be all thumbs.
    * * *
    I
    - sa adjetivo (Esp fam) clumsy
    II
    - sa masculino, femenino (Esp fam) clumsy idiot (colloq)
    * * *
    = bumbler, duffer, ham-handed.

    Ex: Henry Ellis is traditionally depicted as a reactionary bumbler who held back reform of the department of printed books.

    Ex: Plus, no matter what she did to stop people from picking on her she always ended up being called a duffer.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    * ser muy patoso = be all thumbs.

    * * *
    patoso1 -sa
    ( Esp fam)
    1 (torpe) clumsy
    2 (difícil) difficult, tiresome
    patoso2 -sa
    masculine, feminine
    ( Esp fam)
    1 (persona torpe) clumsy idiot ( colloq), klutz ( AmE colloq)
    2 (persona difícil) pain in the neck ( colloq)
    * * *

    patoso
    ◊ -sa adjetivo (Esp fam) clumsy

    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino (Esp fam) clumsy idiot (colloq)
    patoso,-a adjetivo clumsy

    ' patoso' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    patosa
    English:
    clumsy
    - gauche
    - klutz
    * * *
    patoso, -a Esp Fam
    adj
    clumsy;
    no sabe bailar, es muy patoso he can't dance, he's got two left feet;
    hoy estoy muy patoso I'm being really clumsy today
    nm,f
    clumsy idiot o oaf
    * * *
    adj clumsy
    * * *
    patoso adj clumsy [comp. clumsier; superl. clumsiest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > patoso

  • 12 rotundamente

    adv.
    1 spherically.
    2 explicitly.
    3 flatly, categorically.
    * * *
    1 (negar) flatly, categorically
    2 (afirmar) emphatically
    * * *
    ADV [negar] flatly, roundly; [afirmar, expresar acuerdo] emphatically
    * * *

    contestó rotundamente que no — he answered with an emphatic `no'

    * * *
    = flatly, roundly, uncompromisingly, vigourously [vigorously, -USA], bluntly, point blank, hopelessly + Adjetivo.
    Ex. He flatly states that 'librarians could not have helped us' to organize and make available the most important research resources to others in the field.
    Ex. The constant demand for a return to the previous situation, so roundly criticised by the committee, may soon be granted.
    Ex. For the first time the stress was uncompromisingly vertical, while the italic was intended to be a mechanically sloped roman, quite unconnected with calligraphy.
    Ex. Far from being an innocuous social institution the public library is an arena where culture has been vigorously contested.
    Ex. In comparison with adult literature, South African children's literature presents issues more bluntly and also explores themes barely touched on in adult fiction.
    Ex. They refuses point blank to acknowledge the significance of gender differences.
    Ex. Rumor has it that she 'tolerates' Mathilda Panopoulos, having tried many times to engage her in meaningful dialogue only to find her ' hopelessly set in her opinions'.
    ----
    * negarse rotundamente = baulk at [balk at].
    * * *

    contestó rotundamente que no — he answered with an emphatic `no'

    * * *
    = flatly, roundly, uncompromisingly, vigourously [vigorously, -USA], bluntly, point blank, hopelessly + Adjetivo.

    Ex: He flatly states that 'librarians could not have helped us' to organize and make available the most important research resources to others in the field.

    Ex: The constant demand for a return to the previous situation, so roundly criticised by the committee, may soon be granted.
    Ex: For the first time the stress was uncompromisingly vertical, while the italic was intended to be a mechanically sloped roman, quite unconnected with calligraphy.
    Ex: Far from being an innocuous social institution the public library is an arena where culture has been vigorously contested.
    Ex: In comparison with adult literature, South African children's literature presents issues more bluntly and also explores themes barely touched on in adult fiction.
    Ex: They refuses point blank to acknowledge the significance of gender differences.
    Ex: Rumor has it that she 'tolerates' Mathilda Panopoulos, having tried many times to engage her in meaningful dialogue only to find her ' hopelessly set in her opinions'.
    * negarse rotundamente = baulk at [balk at].

    * * *
    contestó rotundamente que no he answered with a categorical o an emphatic `no', he denied it ( o refused etc) categorically
    se negó rotundamente a hacerlo she flatly o categorically refused to do it, she refused to do it point-blank
    fracasó rotundamente he failed utterly o totally
    * * *
    1. [categóricamente] categorically;
    rechazó rotundamente que tuviera nada que ver con el escándalo he categorically denied having anything to do with the scandal
    2. [completamente] completely;
    la nueva empresa fracasó rotundamente the new company was a total o complete failure
    * * *
    adv categorically, emphatically

    Spanish-English dictionary > rotundamente

  • 13 rotundo

    adj.
    categorical, final, absolute, emphatic.
    * * *
    1 (redondo) round
    2 figurado (frase) well-turned; (éxito) resounding
    3 (negativa) flat, categorical; (afirmación) categorical, emphatic
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=terminante) [negativa] flat; [victoria] clear, convincing

    me dio un "sí" rotundo — he gave me an emphatic "yes"

    2) (=redondo) round
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) < respuesta> categorical, emphatic; < negativa> categorical

    me contestó con un `no' rotundo — his answer was an emphatic `no'

    b) < éxito> resounding
    c) <párrafo/lenguaje> polished
    * * *
    = uncompromising, steadfast, forthright, blunt, uncompromised, resounding, unequivocal, unqualified, categoric, unmitigaged.
    Ex. What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.
    Ex. He does admit, however, that 'this power is unusual, it is a gift which must be cultivated, an accomplishment which can only be acquired by vigorous and steadfast concentration'.
    Ex. We have been told once, in clear and forthright terms, what it is that we need.
    Ex. The author discusses the range of enquiries he deals with, the sources of information he uses, and the blunt attitude with which he deals with many enquirers.
    Ex. The Gazette advocated uncompromised racial equality and viewed the migration as a weapon against oppression.
    Ex. The answer was a resounding yes.
    Ex. The exhaustive and unequivocal definition of the nature and types of material qualifying to be described as ephemera could probably form the basis of a learned dissertation.
    Ex. Wing has not had the almost unqualified praise from the reviewers that Pollard and Redgrave received.
    Ex. The question of the need for categoric assurances is not locked into a 12 month timeframe or any other timeframe.
    Ex. Only Bush could take a horrible situation and create an unmitigated disaster.
    ----
    * éxito rotundo = resounding success, award-winning success.
    * fracaso rotundo = resounding failure, complete failure.
    * no rotundo = flat "no".
    * tener un éxito roturno = take + Nombre + by storm.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    a) < respuesta> categorical, emphatic; < negativa> categorical

    me contestó con un `no' rotundo — his answer was an emphatic `no'

    b) < éxito> resounding
    c) <párrafo/lenguaje> polished
    * * *
    = uncompromising, steadfast, forthright, blunt, uncompromised, resounding, unequivocal, unqualified, categoric, unmitigaged.

    Ex: What precipitated that furor was that Panizzi's volume represented a uncompromising rejection of the comfortable ideology of the finding catalog.

    Ex: He does admit, however, that 'this power is unusual, it is a gift which must be cultivated, an accomplishment which can only be acquired by vigorous and steadfast concentration'.
    Ex: We have been told once, in clear and forthright terms, what it is that we need.
    Ex: The author discusses the range of enquiries he deals with, the sources of information he uses, and the blunt attitude with which he deals with many enquirers.
    Ex: The Gazette advocated uncompromised racial equality and viewed the migration as a weapon against oppression.
    Ex: The answer was a resounding yes.
    Ex: The exhaustive and unequivocal definition of the nature and types of material qualifying to be described as ephemera could probably form the basis of a learned dissertation.
    Ex: Wing has not had the almost unqualified praise from the reviewers that Pollard and Redgrave received.
    Ex: The question of the need for categoric assurances is not locked into a 12 month timeframe or any other timeframe.
    Ex: Only Bush could take a horrible situation and create an unmitigated disaster.
    * éxito rotundo = resounding success, award-winning success.
    * fracaso rotundo = resounding failure, complete failure.
    * no rotundo = flat "no".
    * tener un éxito roturno = take + Nombre + by storm.

    * * *
    rotundo -da
    1 ‹respuesta› categorical, emphatic; ‹negativa› categorical
    me contestó con un `no' rotundo his answer was a categorical o an emphatic `no'
    2 ‹éxito› resounding ( before n)
    3 ‹párrafo/lenguaje› polished
    * * *

    rotundo
    ◊ -da adjetivo


    negativa categorical, outright ( before n);
    me contestó con un `no' rotundo his answer was an emphatic `no'

    b)éxito/fracaso resounding

    rotundo,-a adjetivo
    1 emphatic, categorical
    éxito rotundo, resounding success
    2 (una voz, un lenguaje) expressive, well-rounded
    ' rotundo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    rotunda
    English:
    flat
    - no
    - outright
    - point-blank
    - resounding
    - rotund
    - straight
    - vigorous
    - blank
    - blunt
    - categorical
    - total
    - unqualified
    * * *
    rotundo, -a adj
    1. [negativa, persona] categorical
    2. [lenguaje, estilo] emphatic, forceful
    3. [completo] total;
    un rotundo fracaso a total o complete failure;
    tuvo un rotundo éxito it enjoyed a resounding success, it was hugely successful
    4. [cuerpo] rotund;
    una mujer de formas rotundas a curvaceous woman
    * * *
    adj fig
    categorical
    * * *
    rotundo, -da adj
    1) redondo: round
    2) : categorical, absolute
    un éxito rotundo: a resounding success
    rotundamente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > rotundo

  • 14 torpe

    adj.
    1 clumsy (sin destreza, sin tacto).
    sus movimientos son torpes her movements are clumsy
    es muy torpe conduciendo he's a terrible driver
    2 slow, dim-witted (sin inteligencia).
    3 importunate.
    f. & m.
    clumsy person, blunderer, butterfingers, blunderhead.
    * * *
    1 (poco hábil) clumsy
    2 (de movimiento) slow, awkward
    3 (poco inteligente) dim, thick
    * * *
    adj.
    1) awkward, clumsy
    2) dull
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=poco ágil) [persona] clumsy; [movimiento] ungainly

    ¡qué torpe eres, ya me has vuelto a pisar! — you're so clumsy, you've trodden on my foot again!

    2) (=necio) dim, slow

    soy muy torpe para la informáticaI'm very dim o slow when it comes to computers

    es bastante torpe y nunca entiende las leccioneshe's a bit dim o slow, he never understands the lessons

    3) (=sin tacto) clumsy

    ¡qué torpe soy! me temo que la he ofendido — how clumsy o stupid of me! I'm afraid I've offended her

    * * *
    a) ( en las acciones) clumsy; ( al andar) awkward

    un animal lerdo y torpe — a slow, ungainly animal

    b) ( de entendimiento) slow (colloq)
    c) ( sin tacto) <persona/comentario> clumsy
    * * *
    = clumsy [clumsier -comp., clumsiest -sup.], gauche, dull, heavy-handed, gawky, ham-handed, ham-fisted, clotted, awkward.
    Ex. Such solutions after repeated application cause the catalog to become a clumsy, inefficient tool, and serve only to compound future problems.
    Ex. But influence of the gauche Aldine greek of the 1490s, and then of the superb reinterpretations of Garamont (1540s) and Granjon (1560s), was irresistible.
    Ex. Then there are those children made to think themselves failures because of the hammer-blow terms like dull, backward, retarded, underprivileged, disadvantaged, handicapped, less able, slow, rejected, remedial, reluctant, disturbed.
    Ex. The often heavy-handed paternalism of Soviet children's literature is being challenged and children are being entrusted with real situations and real problems rather than the idealistic, rose-coloured version of reality previously thought suitable for them.
    Ex. His zany humor, gawky production, and sexual exhibitionism have grown in this new film into a confident, ironic account of a world in which it pays to be rich and beautiful.
    Ex. The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex. They must ponder how not only to prevent such tragedies in future, but also to avoid worsening them through ham-fisted intervention.
    Ex. Although he occasionally lapses into a sort of clotted prose, his book is a valuable study of McLuhan's cultural and geographical context.
    Ex. Access is impaired by archaic, awkward, or simply strange headings that most normal persons would never look for on their first try.
    ----
    * de una manera torpe = awkwardly, cumbrously.
    * ser torpe con las manos = be all thumbs.
    * ser torpe para + Infinitivo = be deficient in + Gerundio.
    * torpes, los = dull-witted, the.
    * * *
    a) ( en las acciones) clumsy; ( al andar) awkward

    un animal lerdo y torpe — a slow, ungainly animal

    b) ( de entendimiento) slow (colloq)
    c) ( sin tacto) <persona/comentario> clumsy
    * * *
    = clumsy [clumsier -comp., clumsiest -sup.], gauche, dull, heavy-handed, gawky, ham-handed, ham-fisted, clotted, awkward.

    Ex: Such solutions after repeated application cause the catalog to become a clumsy, inefficient tool, and serve only to compound future problems.

    Ex: But influence of the gauche Aldine greek of the 1490s, and then of the superb reinterpretations of Garamont (1540s) and Granjon (1560s), was irresistible.
    Ex: Then there are those children made to think themselves failures because of the hammer-blow terms like dull, backward, retarded, underprivileged, disadvantaged, handicapped, less able, slow, rejected, remedial, reluctant, disturbed.
    Ex: The often heavy-handed paternalism of Soviet children's literature is being challenged and children are being entrusted with real situations and real problems rather than the idealistic, rose-coloured version of reality previously thought suitable for them.
    Ex: His zany humor, gawky production, and sexual exhibitionism have grown in this new film into a confident, ironic account of a world in which it pays to be rich and beautiful.
    Ex: The League of Nations was a comically ham-handed debacle which collapsed in complete failure, disgracing all who were associated with it.
    Ex: They must ponder how not only to prevent such tragedies in future, but also to avoid worsening them through ham-fisted intervention.
    Ex: Although he occasionally lapses into a sort of clotted prose, his book is a valuable study of McLuhan's cultural and geographical context.
    Ex: Access is impaired by archaic, awkward, or simply strange headings that most normal persons would never look for on their first try.
    * de una manera torpe = awkwardly, cumbrously.
    * ser torpe con las manos = be all thumbs.
    * ser torpe para + Infinitivo = be deficient in + Gerundio.
    * torpes, los = dull-witted, the.

    * * *
    1 (en las acciones) clumsy; (al andar) awkward
    la anciana andaba de manera torpe the old lady moved awkwardly
    un animal lerdo y torpe a slow, ungainly animal
    2 (de entendimiento) slow ( colloq), dim ( colloq)
    es torpe para las matemáticas he's very slow o dim at math(s)
    ¡qué torpe soy! I'm so stupid o slow o dim!
    3 (sin tacto) ‹persona/comentario› clumsy
    se disculpó de manera torpe she excused herself clumsily
    * * *

     

    torpe adjetivo

    b) ( de entendimiento) slow (colloq)

    c) ( sin tacto) ‹persona/comentario clumsy;


    torpe adjetivo
    1 (poco habilidoso) clumsy
    2 (comentario, gesto) clumsy
    3 (en el andar, etc) slow, awkward
    4 (de entendimiento) soy un poco torpe para la física, I'm not very good at physics
    pey (como insulto) dim, dense, thick
    ' torpe' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    calamidad
    - manta
    - ganso
    - inhábil
    - lerdo
    - sonado
    English:
    awkward
    - bumbling
    - clumsy
    - dense
    - gauche
    - heavy-handed
    - inept
    - laboured
    - oops!
    - slow
    - whoops
    - bungling
    - cumbersome
    - dull
    - heavy
    - klutz
    - labored
    - lumber
    * * *
    torpe adj
    1. [sin destreza] [persona] clumsy;
    [dedos, andares] clumsy, awkward;
    sus movimientos son torpes her movements are clumsy;
    escrito en torpes trazos infantiles written with clumsy childish handwriting;
    torpe con las manos [que rompe las cosas] esp Br ham-fisted, US ham-handed;
    [que deja caer las cosas] butter-fingered;
    con los años estoy torpe ya I'm getting clumsy as I get older;
    es muy torpe en dibujo he's not very good at drawing;
    es muy torpe Esp [m5] conduciendo o Am [m5] manejando he's a terrible driver
    2. [sin tacto] [gestos, palabras, comportamiento] clumsy
    3. [sin inteligencia] slow, dim-witted
    * * *
    adj clumsy; ( tonto) dense, dim
    * * *
    torpe adj
    1) desmañado: clumsy, awkward
    2) : stupid, dull
    torpemente adv
    * * *
    torpe adj
    1. (manazas) clumsy [comp. clumsier; superl. clumsiest]
    2. (lento) slow

    Spanish-English dictionary > torpe

  • 15 total2

    2 = complete, full [fuller -comp., fullest -sup.], thorough, total, end to end, supine, unrelieved, utter, gavel to gavel, systemic, overarching, ultimate, avowed, out-and-out, certified, unmitigaged, fully blown, unreserved.
    Ex. The main entry is the complete catalogue record of the document.
    Ex. Since recall goes up as precision goes down, it is clearly not possible to achieve in general a system which gives full recall at the same time as full precision.
    Ex. Timely and thorough planning is essential.
    Ex. This situation requires a very skilled information worker if total disaster is to be avoided.
    Ex. Next morning the heap, now damp right through, was set up on one end of the horse (later called the bank), a bench long enough to take two piles of paper end to end, and about as high as the coffin of the press.
    Ex. 'I was saying that we shouldn't have a supine acceptance for temporary limitations'.
    Ex. Although the slave narratives were usually intended to serve in the cause of abolition, not all of them were bitter, unrelieved tirades against the institution of slavery, but rather there were frequently moments of relieving laughter.
    Ex. There is little to be said for this grudging acceptance or utter rejection of pseudonyms.
    Ex. A survey of state legislators finds that lawmakers support expanding television coverage of legislative proceedings to include gavel to gavel programming.
    Ex. There is a need for an examination of the whole process of information dissemination from a 'systemic' framework.
    Ex. There appears to be an unhealthy tendency among information technology professionals to elevate any single, highly successful practical experience instantly into an overarching paradigm for managerial success.
    Ex. The whole project is undeniably full of sentimental, cinephiliac rapture, but it provided the ultimate opportunity for filmmakers to talk feverishly about the basic nature of their medium.
    Ex. Anne Bogart's novel combines avowed misogyny with postfeminist frolic.
    Ex. Such an appraoch is unlikely to improve the social sciences unless valid informaton can first be distinguished from out-and-out incorrect information.
    Ex. She is a certified TV-addict -- you simply cannot talk to her when she's glued to the box.
    Ex. Only Bush could take a horrible situation and create an unmitigated disaster.
    Ex. This time it's a hairline fracture rather than a fully blown break of a metatarsal, however the result is the same.
    Ex. It is also important that we all give them our unreserved support.
    ----
    * de movimiento total = full-motion.
    * en total = all told, altogether, in all, overall, in total, in toto.
    * fracaso total = complete failure.
    * integración total = seamlessness.
    * la suma total de = the total sum of, the sum total of.
    * limpieza total = clean sweep.
    * Número + en total = Número + in number.
    * oscuridad total = pitch blackness, pitch darkness.
    * rechazo total = bold statement against.
    * síndrome de alergia total = total allergy syndrome.
    * siniestro total = write-off [writeoff].
    * suma total = sum total, count.
    * total atención = undivided attention.

    Spanish-English dictionary > total2

  • 16 total

    adj.
    1 total (completo) (cifra, coste).
    adv.
    basically, in a word.
    total que me marché so anyway, I left
    total, ¿qué más da? what difference does it make anyway?
    intj.
    in short.
    Total,nadie acudió a su trabajo! In short, nobody came to work!
    m.
    1 total (suma).
    2 whole (totalidad, conjunto).
    el total del grupo the whole group
    nos costó 200 dólares en total it cost us 200 dollars in total o all
    en total fuimos más de treinta personas in total there were more than thirty of us
    * * *
    1 total, complete, overall
    1 (totalidad) whole
    2 (suma) total, sum
    1 (en conclusión) in short, so
    total, fue un fracaso in short, it was a failure
    total, que se fueron porque quisieron they left because they wanted to
    2 (al fin y al cabo) after all
    total, para lo que me sirve... after all, for all the good it is to me...
    \
    en total in all
    * * *
    noun m. adj.
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=absoluto) [éxito, fracaso] total
    2) (=global) [importe, suma] total
    3) * (=excelente) smashing, brilliant
    2. ADV
    1) (=resumiendo) in short, all in all; (=así que) so

    total que — to cut a long story short, the upshot of it all was that...

    total, que no fuimos — so we didn't go after all

    total, que vas a hacer lo que quieras — basically then you're going to do as you please

    2) (=al fin y al cabo) at the end of the day

    total, ¿qué más te da? — at the end of the day, what do you care?

    total, usted manda — well, you're the boss after all

    3.
    SM (=suma total) total; (=totalidad) whole
    * * *
    I
    a) ( absoluto) <desastre/destrucción> total; < éxito> resounding, total
    b) ( global) <costo/importe> total
    II
    masculino total

    ¿cuánto es el total? — how much is it altogether?

    III
    adverbio (indep) (fam)
    a) ( al resumir una narración) so, in the end

    total, que me di por vencida — so in the end I gave up

    b) (expresando indiferencia, poca importancia)

    total, a mí qué — (fam) what do I care anyway

    total, mañana no tienes que trabajar — after all, you don't have to go to work tomorrow

    * * *
    I
    a) ( absoluto) <desastre/destrucción> total; < éxito> resounding, total
    b) ( global) <costo/importe> total
    II
    masculino total

    ¿cuánto es el total? — how much is it altogether?

    III
    adverbio (indep) (fam)
    a) ( al resumir una narración) so, in the end

    total, que me di por vencida — so in the end I gave up

    b) (expresando indiferencia, poca importancia)

    total, a mí qué — (fam) what do I care anyway

    total, mañana no tienes que trabajar — after all, you don't have to go to work tomorrow

    * * *
    total1
    1 = tally [tallies, pl.], total, count, grand total.

    Ex: As the various parts of the record are entered, the document summary indicates the additions by the tallies opposite the record parts.

    Ex: Someone must read a total on the card, so that the machine can add its computed item to it.
    Ex: Not much data beyond loan counts was available and re-keying and remanipulations were frequently needed to make the information useful.
    Ex: The grand total of 4,300 exhibitors was 4 per cent up on 1996.
    * de un total de + Cantidad = out of a total of + Cantidad.
    * el total de = the total sum of, the sum total of.
    * total comprometida = encumbrance.
    * total comprometido = accrual.
    * total de calorías = calorie count.
    * total de préstamos = circulation figures.
    * total devengado = encumbrance, accrual.
    * un total de = a universe of, a total of.

    total2
    2 = complete, full [fuller -comp., fullest -sup.], thorough, total, end to end, supine, unrelieved, utter, gavel to gavel, systemic, overarching, ultimate, avowed, out-and-out, certified, unmitigaged, fully blown, unreserved.

    Ex: The main entry is the complete catalogue record of the document.

    Ex: Since recall goes up as precision goes down, it is clearly not possible to achieve in general a system which gives full recall at the same time as full precision.
    Ex: Timely and thorough planning is essential.
    Ex: This situation requires a very skilled information worker if total disaster is to be avoided.
    Ex: Next morning the heap, now damp right through, was set up on one end of the horse (later called the bank), a bench long enough to take two piles of paper end to end, and about as high as the coffin of the press.
    Ex: 'I was saying that we shouldn't have a supine acceptance for temporary limitations'.
    Ex: Although the slave narratives were usually intended to serve in the cause of abolition, not all of them were bitter, unrelieved tirades against the institution of slavery, but rather there were frequently moments of relieving laughter.
    Ex: There is little to be said for this grudging acceptance or utter rejection of pseudonyms.
    Ex: A survey of state legislators finds that lawmakers support expanding television coverage of legislative proceedings to include gavel to gavel programming.
    Ex: There is a need for an examination of the whole process of information dissemination from a 'systemic' framework.
    Ex: There appears to be an unhealthy tendency among information technology professionals to elevate any single, highly successful practical experience instantly into an overarching paradigm for managerial success.
    Ex: The whole project is undeniably full of sentimental, cinephiliac rapture, but it provided the ultimate opportunity for filmmakers to talk feverishly about the basic nature of their medium.
    Ex: Anne Bogart's novel combines avowed misogyny with postfeminist frolic.
    Ex: Such an appraoch is unlikely to improve the social sciences unless valid informaton can first be distinguished from out-and-out incorrect information.
    Ex: She is a certified TV-addict -- you simply cannot talk to her when she's glued to the box.
    Ex: Only Bush could take a horrible situation and create an unmitigated disaster.
    Ex: This time it's a hairline fracture rather than a fully blown break of a metatarsal, however the result is the same.
    Ex: It is also important that we all give them our unreserved support.
    * de movimiento total = full-motion.
    * en total = all told, altogether, in all, overall, in total, in toto.
    * fracaso total = complete failure.
    * integración total = seamlessness.
    * la suma total de = the total sum of, the sum total of.
    * limpieza total = clean sweep.
    * Número + en total = Número + in number.
    * oscuridad total = pitch blackness, pitch darkness.
    * rechazo total = bold statement against.
    * síndrome de alergia total = total allergy syndrome.
    * siniestro total = write-off [writeoff].
    * suma total = sum total, count.
    * total atención = undivided attention.

    * * *
    1 (absoluto) ‹desastre/destrucción› total; ‹éxito› resounding ( before n), total
    la película fue un fracaso total the film was a total o an utter failure
    un cambio total a complete change
    2 (global) ‹coste/importe› total
    total
    ¿cuánto es el total? what's the total?, what does it all come to?, how much is it altogether?
    el total de las pérdidas/ganancias the total losses/profits
    el total asciende a $40.000 the total amounts to o comes to o is $40,000
    afecta a un total de 600 personas it affects a total of 600 people
    en total altogether
    son 5 euros en total that's 5 euros altogether
    ( indep) ( fam)
    total, que me di por vencida so in the end I gave up
    2
    (expresando indiferencia, poca importancia): ¿por qué no te quedas? total, mañana no tienes que trabajar why not stay? I mean o after all, you don't have to go to work tomorrow
    * * *

     

    total adjetivo
    a) ( absoluto) ‹desastre/destrucción total;

    éxito resounding ( before n), total;
    cambio complete
    b) ( global) ‹costo/importe total

    ■ sustantivo masculino
    total;

    ■ adverbio ( indep) (fam) ( al resumir una narración) so, in the end;
    total, que me di por vencida so in the end I gave up
    total
    I adjetivo total
    un desastre total, a complete o total disaster
    eclipse total, total eclipse
    II sustantivo masculino
    1 total
    el total de la población, the whole population
    el total de los trabajadores, all the workers
    en total costó unas dos mil pesetas, altogether it cost over two thousand pesetas
    2 Mat total
    III adv (en resumen) so: total, que al final María vino con nosotros, so, in the end Maria came with us
    fam (con indiferencia) anyway: total, a mí no me gustaba, I didn't like it anyway

    ' total' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    absoluta
    - absoluto
    - aforo
    - completa
    - completo
    - desconocimiento
    - esclarecimiento
    - importe
    - montante
    - monto
    - parque
    - radical
    - suma
    - sumar
    - toda
    - todo
    - totalizar
    - global
    - integral
    - liquidación
    - miramiento
    - monta
    - perdido
    - pleno
    - ser
    - silencio
    English:
    absolute
    - all
    - altogether
    - bedlam
    - capacity
    - come to
    - complete
    - dead
    - dedication
    - dismal
    - disregard
    - full
    - grand total
    - ignorance
    - in
    - overall
    - perfect
    - rank
    - raving
    - reversal
    - sell-out
    - serve out
    - sheer
    - subtotal
    - sum
    - tell
    - total
    - unqualified
    - utter
    - write off
    - write-off
    - account
    - add
    - come
    - count
    - disarray
    - downright
    - flat
    - grand
    - grid
    - gross
    - implicit
    - matter
    - number
    - out
    - recall
    - run
    - swell
    - virtual
    - write
    * * *
    adj
    1. [cifra, coste, gasto] total;
    el importe total de las inversiones the total amount of the investments
    2. [confianza, rechazo, ruptura] total, complete;
    actúa con total libertad she acts completely freely, she has complete freedom of action;
    su influencia en ellos es total he has overwhelming influence over them
    3. Fam [fantástico] fab, Br brill
    nm
    1. [suma] total;
    el total de visitantes del museo alcanzó los tres millones the total number of visitors to the museum reached three million;
    me da un total de 580 I make it 580
    Cont total actualizado running total;
    total de ventas total sales
    2. [totalidad, conjunto] whole;
    el total del grupo the whole group;
    en total in total, in all;
    nos costó 200 dólares en total it cost us 200 dollars in total o all;
    en total fuimos más de treinta personas in total there were more than thirty of us
    adv
    1. [en resumen] basically, in a word;
    total, que me marché so anyway, I left;
    total, que te has quedado sin trabajo, ¿no? basically, you're out of a job, then?
    2. [en realidad] anyway;
    total, ¿qué más da? what difference does it make anyway?;
    llévatelo, total ¿para qué lo quiero yo? take it, what good is it to me, after all?
    * * *
    I adj total, complete;
    en total altogether, in total
    II m total;
    un total de 50 personas a total of 50 people
    III adv
    :
    total, que no conseguí estudiar the upshot was that I didn’t manage to get any studying done
    * * *
    total adv
    : in the end, so
    total, que no fui: in short, I didn't go
    total adj & nm
    : total
    totalmente adv
    * * *
    total1 adj total / complete
    total2 adv so
    total, que no piensas venir so, you're not coming then
    total3 n total
    eso hace un total de 2.000 pesetas that makes a total of 2,000 pesetas

    Spanish-English dictionary > total

  • 17 cartucho complete

    Испанско-русский универсальный словарь > cartucho complete

  • 18 relleno complete

    Испанско-русский универсальный словарь > relleno complete

  • 19 temple complete

    сущ.

    Испанско-русский универсальный словарь > temple complete

  • 20 cartucho complete

    Diccionario Politécnica español-ruso > cartucho complete

См. также в других словарях:

  • Complete Failure (band) — Complete Failure, also known as ComFail , is a hardcore punk band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Contents 1 History 2 Influences 3 Members 4 Discography …   Wikipedia

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  • failure — [[t]fe͟ɪljə(r)[/t]] ♦♦ failures 1) N UNCOUNT Failure is a lack of success in doing or achieving something, especially in relation to a particular activity. This policy is doomed to failure... Three attempts on the British 200 metre record also… …   English dictionary

  • failure — fail|ure W2S2 [ˈfeıljə US ər] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(lack of success)¦ 2¦(unsuccessful person/thing)¦ 3 failure to do something 4¦(business)¦ 5¦(machine/body part)¦ 6¦(crops)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1.) ¦(LACK OF SUCCESS)¦ [U and C] a lack of success in achieving or… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • failure — noun 1 LACK OF SUCCESS (C, U) a lack of success in achieving or doing something: How can we account for the failure of the League of Nations to achieve peace in Europe? | end/result in failure: Harry s ambitious plans ended in failure. 2… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • complete epispadias — epispadias in which the urethra is entirely open to the bladder neck in males, and there may be complete failure of fusion of the anterior urethral wall in females; it is frequently associated with exstrophy of bladder …   Medical dictionary

  • Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome — Classification and external resources AIS results when the function of the androgen receptor (AR) is impaired. The AR protein (pictured) mediates the effects of androgens in the human body. ICD 10 …   Wikipedia

  • Failure causes — are defects in design, process, quality, or part application, which are the underlying cause of a failure or which initiate a process which leads to failure. Where failure depends on the user of the product or process, then human error must be… …   Wikipedia

  • Failure mode and effects analysis — A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a procedure for analysis of potential failure modes within a system for classification by severity or determination of the effect of failures on the system. It is widely used in manufacturing… …   Wikipedia

  • failure — n. 1) to experience failure 2) an abject, complete, dismal, hopeless, miserable, outright failure 3) a box office; crop failure 4) heart failure 5) a power failure 6) a failure to + int. (the patient s failure to respond to treatment was… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • Failure (band) — Infobox musical artist Name = Failure Background = group or band Origin = Los Angeles, California, U.S. Genre = Alternative rock Space rock Stoner rock Years active = 1990 1997 Label = Slash Warner Bros. Associated acts = Replicants On Year of… …   Wikipedia

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