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chickening out of

  • 1 achicarse

    pron.v.
    1 to get smaller; to shrink.
    2 (fig.) To humble, to eat humble pie.
    3 to do oneself down, to belittle oneself (rebajarse). (Latin American)
    * * *
    1 (amenguarse) to get smaller
    2 (amilanarse) to lose heart
    * * *
    VPR
    1) (=empequeñecerse) to get smaller; [ropa] to shrink
    2) esp LAm (=rebajarse) to be intimidated, belittle o.s.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp, wimp out (on), chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp, wimp out (on), chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    * * *

    ■achicarse verbo reflexivo
    1 (apocarse) to lose heart
    2 (mermar) to get smaller
    ' achicarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    achicar
    English:
    chicken
    - shrink
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [empequeñecer] to grow smaller
    2. [acobardarse] to be intimidated
    * * *
    v/r get smaller; fig
    feel intimidated
    * * *
    vr
    : to become intimidated

    Spanish-English dictionary > achicarse

  • 2 acobardarse

    pron.v.
    to be frightened, to get frightened; to flinch, to shrink back.
    * * *
    1 to become frightened, lose one's nerve, shrink back ( ante, from)
    * * *
    VPR (=asustarse) to be intimidated, get frightened; (=echarse atrás) to flinch, shrink back ( ante from, at)
    * * *
    (v.) = wuss out, wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), get + cold feet
    Ex. What's great about this time of year is that people wuss out and stop training during the Winter (less crowded at the pool, gym, etc.).
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex. The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.
    * * *
    (v.) = wuss out, wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), get + cold feet

    Ex: What's great about this time of year is that people wuss out and stop training during the Winter (less crowded at the pool, gym, etc.).

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex: The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.

    * * *

    ■acobardarse verbo reflexivo
    1 (sentir temor) to become frightened
    2 (retraerse) to lose one's nerve o to shrink back [ante, from]
    ' acobardarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    rajarse
    - acobardar
    - encoger
    - rajar
    English:
    chicken out
    - quail
    - chicken
    * * *
    vpr
    to get frightened o scared;
    acobardarse ante un reto to shrink back from a challenge;
    no se acobarda ante nada nothing scares him
    * * *
    v/r get frightened, lose one’s nerve
    * * *
    vr
    : to be frightened, to cower
    * * *
    acobardarse vb to be frightened

    Spanish-English dictionary > acobardarse

  • 3 amedrentarse

    1 (asustarse) to be frightened, be scared; (acobardarse) to become intimidated
    * * *
    VPR to be scared, be intimidated
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), scare + Reflexivo
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex. A child with a vivid imagination can really scare herself with frightening images.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), scare + Reflexivo

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex: A child with a vivid imagination can really scare herself with frightening images.

    * * *

    ■amedrentarse verbo reflexivo to be intimidated, to be frightened
    * * *
    vpr
    to get scared o frightened
    * * *
    v/r be terrified, feel terrified
    * * *
    vr

    Spanish-English dictionary > amedrentarse

  • 4 echarse atrás

    v.
    1 to back off, to cry off, to back out, to flinch.
    María se echó atrás al verlo Mary backed off when she saw him.
    2 to move back, to back.
    El auto se echó atrás The car moved back.
    * * *
    (inclinarse) to lean back 2 (repensárselo) to have second thoughts, get cold feet
    * * *
    (v.) = draw back, draw back, chicken out (on/of), back out, get + cold feet, backpedal [back-pedal]
    Ex. When I saw what he was up to, I drew back for a punch and hit him so hard on the nose that he fell on his back and lay there for some time, so that his wife stood over him and cried out 'Mercy! You've done my husband in!'.
    Ex. The author looks at the reasons and purposes why some scholarly publishers have launched electronic projects (e-projects) while others have drawn back.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex. Dennis played her along until she decided to back out at which time he threatened to imprison her unless she paid up $2 million.
    Ex. The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.
    Ex. It will be interesting to see if he chooses to backpedal on their stance on this report, now that the administration has made its own stance clear.
    * * *
    (v.) = draw back, draw back, chicken out (on/of), back out, get + cold feet, backpedal [back-pedal]

    Ex: When I saw what he was up to, I drew back for a punch and hit him so hard on the nose that he fell on his back and lay there for some time, so that his wife stood over him and cried out 'Mercy! You've done my husband in!'.

    Ex: The author looks at the reasons and purposes why some scholarly publishers have launched electronic projects (e-projects) while others have drawn back.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex: Dennis played her along until she decided to back out at which time he threatened to imprison her unless she paid up $2 million.
    Ex: The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.
    Ex: It will be interesting to see if he chooses to backpedal on their stance on this report, now that the administration has made its own stance clear.

    Spanish-English dictionary > echarse atrás

  • 5 no hacer Algo por cobardía

    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    Spanish-English dictionary > no hacer Algo por cobardía

  • 6 no hacer Algo por miedo

    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    Spanish-English dictionary > no hacer Algo por miedo

  • 7 rajarse

    1 (partirse) to split, crack
    2 familiar (desistir) to back out, quit
    3 familiar (acobardarse) to chicken out
    * * *
    VPR
    1) [papel, tejido] to tear, rip; [vidrio, cerámica] to crack; [neumático] to get ripped
    2) * (=echarse atrás) to back out *

    ¡me rajé! — LAm that's enough for me!, I'm quitting!

    3) LAm (=huir) to run away
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    * * *

    ■rajarse verbo reflexivo
    1 (un objeto) to crack
    2 (una tela) to split
    3 fam (acobardarse) to back out, chicken out
    ' rajarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    quebrar
    - rajar
    - trizarse
    English:
    crack
    - rip
    - split
    - tear
    - chicken
    * * *
    vpr
    1. [partirse] [cerámica, puerta] to crack;
    [tela] to tear, to rip;
    se me rajó la camisa my shirt ripped
    2. Fam [echarse atrás] to back o pull out;
    ahora ya es muy tarde para que te rajes it's too late for you to back out now
    3. Andes, CAm, RP Fam [gastar] to blow;
    se rajó todo el sueldo en una semana she blew all her wages in one week
    4. Andes, Carib, RP Fam [escaparse] to rush o run off
    5. Bol, CAm, Chile, Perú Fam [obsequiar]
    se rajó con un anillo de brillantes he splashed out on a diamond ring
    6. Andes Fam [esforzarse] to slog one's guts out;
    se rajó para que él pudiese terminar los estudios she slogged her guts out so that he could finish his studies
    7. Chile, Col Fam [suspender] to fail, US to flunk;
    si no estudia para el examen, va a rajarse if she doesn't revise, she'll come a cropper in the exam
    * * *
    back out fam
    * * *
    vr
    1) : to crack, to split open
    2) fam : to back out
    * * *
    1. (partirse) to split [pt. & pp. split]
    al caer al suelo, el melón se rajó the melon split open when it fell on the floor
    2. (echarse atrás) to back out

    Spanish-English dictionary > rajarse

  • 8 retirarse por cobardía

    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    Spanish-English dictionary > retirarse por cobardía

  • 9 retirarse por miedo

    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    * * *
    (v.) = wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of)

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.

    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.

    Spanish-English dictionary > retirarse por miedo

  • 10 arredro

    adv.
    in the rear.
    m.
    intimidation, chickening out.
    pres.indicat.
    1st person singular (yo) present indicative of spanish verb: arredrar.

    Spanish-English dictionary > arredro

  • 11 rajamiento

    m.
    backing-out, chickening out.

    Spanish-English dictionary > rajamiento

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