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beside that

  • 1 ad

       ad praep. with acc.    [cf. Eng. at].—Of approach (opp. to ab, as in to ex).    I. In space, to, toward: retorquet oculos ad urbem: una pars vergit ad septentriones, Cs.: tendens ad sidera palmas, V. —Fig.: ad alia vitia propensior, more inclined to. —Esp., ad dextram, sinistram, or laevam, to or on the right or left: ito ad dextram, T.: alqd ad dextram conspicere, Cs.: non rectā regione... sed ad laevam, L.—Designating the goal, to, toward: ad ripam convenire, Cs.: vocari ad cenam, H.: ad se adferre: reticulum ad narīs sibi admovebat (cf. accedit ad urbem, he approaches the city; and, accedit provinciae, it is added to the province).— Ad me, te, se, for domum meam, tuam, suam (in T. freq.): eamus ad me, T. — With gen., ellipt.: ad Dianae, to the temple of, T.: ad Castoris currere. — Used for dat: litteras dare ad aliquem, to write one a letter (cf. litteras dare alicui, to give a letter to one): domum ad te scribere: ad primam (epistulam) scribere, to answer.—Hence, librum ad aliquem mittere, scribere, to dedicate a book to one. —In titles, ad aliquem signifies to, addressed to.— With names of towns, ad answers to Whither? for the simple acc., i. e. to the vicinity of, to the neighborhood of: ad Aquinum accedere, approach: ut cum suis copiis iret ad Mutinam. — Of hostile movement or protection, against (cf. adversus): veniri ad se existimantes, Cs.: ipse ad hostem vehitur, N.: Romulus ad regem impetum facit (cf. in), L.: clipeos ad tela protecti obiciunt, V.: ad hos casūs provisa praesidia, Cs.—In war, of manner of fighting: ad pedes pugna venerat, was fought out on foot, L.: equitem ad pedes deducere, L.: pugna ad gladios venerat, L. — Emphatic of distance, to, even to, all the way to: a Salonis ad Oricum portūs... occupavit, Cs.: usque a Dianis ad Sinopum navigare. — Fig.: deverberasse usque ad necem, T.: virgis ad necem caedi.—Of nearness or proximity in gen. (cf. apud), near to, by, at, close by: ad forīs adsistere: Ianum ad infimum Argiletum fecit, L.: quod Romanis ad manum domi supplementum esset, at hand, L.: errantem ad flumina, V.; and ellipt.: pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret! — Of persons: qui primum pilum ad Caesarem duxerat, Cs.: ad me fuit, at my house: ad inferos poenas parricidi luent, among.—So, fig.: ad omnīs nationes sanctum, in the judgment of, Cs.: ut esset ad posteros monumentum, etc., L.: ad urbem esse (of a general outside of the walls): ad urbem cum imperio remanere, Cs.—With names of towns and verbs of rest: pons, qui erat ad Genavam, Cs.; and with an ordinal number and lapis: sepultus ad quintum lapidem, N.—    II. In time, about, toward: domum reductus ad vesperum, toward evening.—Till, until, to, even to, up to: usque ad hanc aetatem: ad multam noctem: amant ad quoddam tempus, until: quem ad finem? how long: ad quartam (sc. horam), H. — Hence, ad id (sc. tempus), till then: ad id dubios servare animos, L.— At, on, in, by: ad horam destinatam, at the appointed hour: frumentum ad diem dare. —    III. In number or amount, near, near to, almost, about, toward (cf. circiter): talenta ad quindecim coëgi, T.: annos ad quadraginta natus.—Adverb.: occisis ad hominum milibus quattuor, Cs.: ad duo milia et trecenti occisi, L.—Of a limit, to, unto, even to (rare): (viaticum) ad assem perdere, to the last farthing, H.: ad denarium solvere. —Esp., ad unum, to a single one, without exception: omnes ad unum idem sentiunt: exosus ad unum Troianos, V. —    IV. In other relations, with regard to, in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in: ad honorem antecellere: nihil ad rem pertinet.—Ellipt.: rectene an secus, nihil ad nos: Quid ad praetorem? quid ad rem? i. e. what difference does it make? H.: quibus (auxiliaribus) ad pugnam confidebat, Cs.: ad speciem ornatus, ad sensum acerbus: mentis ad omnia caecitas: ad cetera paene gemelli, H.: facultas ad dicendum.—With words denoting measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., according to, agreeably to, after: taleis ad certum pondus examinatis, Cs.: ad cursūs lunae describit annum, L.: canere ad tibiam: carmen castigare ad unguem, to perfection (see unguis), H.: ad istorum normam sapientes: ad specus angustiae vallium (i. e. ad specuum similitudinem angustae valles), Cs. — With the cause or reason, according to, at, on, in consequence of, for, in order to: ad horum proces in Boeotiam duxit, on their entreaty, L.: dictis ad fallendum instructis, L.: causae ad discordiam, to produce dissension, T.: ad facinora incendere, S.: ad speciem tabernaculis relictis, for appearance, Cs.: ad id, for this use, as a means to that end, L.: ad id ipsum, for that my purpose, L.: delecto milite ad navīs, marines, L.: puer ad cyathum statuetur, H.: biiugi ad frena leones, yoked in pairs with bits, V.: res quae sunt ad incendia, Cs.: ad communem salutem utilius.—In comparison, to, compared with, in comparison with: terra ad universi caeli complexum: nihil ad tuum equitatum, Caesar.—    V. In adverbial phrases, ad omnia, withal, to crown all: ad omnia tantum advehi auri, etc., L.—Ad hoc and ad haec, moreover, besides, in addition: ad hoc, quos... postremo omnes, quos, etc., S. — Ad id quod, beside that (rare): ad id quod... indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur, L. — Ad tempus, at a definite, fixed time, C., L.; at a fit, appropriate time, L.; for some time, for a short time, L.; according to circumstances. — Ad praesens, for the moment, for a short time.—Ad locum, on the spot: ut ad locum miles esset paratus, L.—Ad verbum, word for word, literally. — Ad summam, on the whole, generally, in general; in a word, in short, C., H.—Ad extremum, ad ultimum, ad postremum, at the end, finally, at last; of place, at the extremity, at the top, at the end: ad extremum (teli) unde ferrum exstabat, L.; of time, at last, finally: ad extremum incipit philosophari; of order, finally, lastly; to the last degree, quite, L. — Quem ad finem? to what limit? how far? how long? Note.—a. Ad rarely follows its acc: quam ad, T.: quos ad, C.: ripam ad Araxis, Ta.—b. In composition, ad- stands before vowels, b, d, f, h, i consonant, m, n, q, v, and mostly before l, r, s; acbefore c; but very often ad- before cl-, cr-, and cu-; ag- or ad- before g; ap- or ad- before p; atbefore t; but a- or ad- before gn, sp, sc, st.
    * * *
    I II
    to, up to, towards; near, at; until, on, by; almost; according to; about w/NUM

    Latin-English dictionary > ad

  • 2 ad

    ad, prep. with acc. (from the fourth century after Christ written also at; Etrusc. suf. -a; Osc. az; Umbr. and Old Lat. ar, as [p. 27] in Eug. Tab., in S. C. de Bacch., as arveho for adveho; arfuerunt, arfuisse, for adfuerunt, etc.; arbiter for adbiter; so, ar me advenias, Plant. Truc. 2, 2, 17; cf. Prisc. 559 P.; Vel. Long. 2232 P.; Fabretti, Glos. Ital. col. 5) [cf. Sanscr. adhi; Goth. and Eng. at; Celt. pref. ar, as armor, i.e. ad mare; Rom. a].
    I.
    As antith. to ab (as in to ex), in a progressive order of relation, ad denotes, first, the direction toward an object; then the reaching of or attaining to it; and finally, the being at or near it.
    A.
    In space.
    1.
    Direction toward, to, toward, and first,
    a.
    Horizontally:

    fugere ad puppim colles campique videntur,

    the hills and fields appear to fly toward the ship, Lucr. 4, 390: meridie umbrae cadunt ad septentrionem, ortu vero ad occasum, to or toward the north and west, Plin. 2, 13, and so often of the geog. position of a place in reference to the points of compass, with the verbs jacere, vergere, spectare, etc.:

    Asia jacet ad meridiem et austrum, Europa ad septentriones et aquiionem,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 31 Mull.;

    and in Plin. very freq.: Creta ad austrum... ad septentrionem versa, 4, 20: ad Atticam vergente, 4, 21 al.—Also trop.: animus alius ad alia vitia propensior,

    Cic. Tusc. 4, 37, 81.—
    b.
    In a direction upwards (esp. in the poets, very freq.): manusque sursum ad caelum sustulit, Naev. ap. Non. 116, 30 (B. Pun. p. 13, ed. Vahl.): manus ad caeli templa tendebam lacrimans, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 20, 40 (Ann. v. 50 ed. Vahl.); cf.:

    duplices tendens ad sidera palmas,

    Verg. A. 1, 93: molem ex profundo saxeam ad caelum vomit, Att. ap. Prisc. 1325 P.: clamor ad caelum volvendus, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 104 Mull. (Ann. v. 520 ed. Vahl.) (cf. with this: tollitur in caelum clamor, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1, or Ann. v. 422):

    ad caelumque ferat flammai fulgura rursum, of Aetna,

    Lucr. 1, 725; cf. id. 2, 191; 2, 325: sidera sola micant;

    ad quae sua bracchia tendens, etc.,

    Ov. M. 7, 188:

    altitudo pertingit ad caelum,

    Vulg. Dan. 4, 17.—
    c.
    Also in the direction downwards (for the usu. in):

    tardiore semper ad terras omnium quae geruntur in caelo effectu cadente quam visu,

    Plin. 2, 97, 99, § 216.
    2.
    The point or goal at which any thing arrives.
    a.
    Without reference to the space traversed in passing, to, toward (the most common use of this prep.): cum stupro redire ad suos popularis, Naev. ap. Fest. p. 317 Mull. (B. Pun. p. 14 ed. Vahl.):

    ut ex tam alto dignitatis gradu ad superos videatur potius quam ad inferos pervenisse,

    Cic. Lael. 3, 12: ad terras decidat aether, Lucan. 2, 58. —Hence,
    (α).
    With verbs which designate going, coming, moving, bearing, bringing near, adapting, taking, receiving, calling, exciting, admonishing, etc., when the verb is compounded with ad the prep. is not always repeated, but the constr. with the dat. or acc. employed; cf. Rudd. II. pp. 154, 175 n. (In the ante-class. per., and even in Cic., ad is generally repeated with most verbs, as, ad eos accedit, Cic. Sex. Rosc. 8:

    ad Sullam adire,

    id. ib. 25:

    ad se adferre,

    id. Verr. 4, 50:

    reticulum ad naris sibi admovebat,

    id. ib. 5, 27:

    ad laborem adhortantur,

    id. de Sen. 14:

    T. Vectium ad se arcessit,

    id. Verr. 5, 114; but the poets of the Aug. per., and the historians, esp. Tac., prefer the dative; also, when the compound verb contains merely the idea of approach, the constr. with ad and the acc. is employed; but when it designates increase, that with the dat. is more usual: accedit ad urbem, he approaches the city; but, accedit provinciae, it is added to the province.)—
    (β).
    Ad me, te, se, for domum meam, tuam, suam (in Plaut. and Ter. very freq.):

    oratus sum venire ad te huc,

    Plaut. Mil. 5, 1, 12: spectatores plaudite atque ite ad vos comissatum, id. Stich. fin.:

    eamus ad me,

    Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 64:

    ancillas traduce huc ad vos,

    id. Heaut. 4, 4, 22:

    transeundumst tibi ad Menedemum,

    id. 4, 4, 17: intro nos vocat ad sese, tenet intus apud se, Lucil. ap. Charis. p. 86 P.:

    te oro, ut ad me Vibonem statim venias,

    Cic. Att. 3, 3; 16, 10 al.—
    (γ).
    Ad, with the name of a deity in the gen., is elliptical for ad templum or aedem (cf.:

    Thespiadas, quae ad aedem Felicitatis sunt,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 4; id. Phil. 2, 35:

    in aedem Veneris,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 120;

    in aedem Concordiae,

    Cic. Cat. 3, 9, 21;

    2, 6, 12): ad Dianae,

    to the temple of, Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 43:

    ad Opis,

    Cic. Att. 8, 1, 14:

    ad Castoris,

    id. Quint. 17:

    ad Juturnae,

    id. Clu. 101:

    ad Vestae,

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 35 al.: cf. Rudd. II. p. 41, n. 4, and p. 334.—
    (δ).
    With verbs which denote a giving, sending, informing, submitting, etc., it is used for the simple dat. (Rudd. II. p. 175): litteras dare ad aliquem, to send or write one a letter; and: litteras dare alicui, to give a letter to one; hence Cic. never says, like Caesar and Sall., alicui scribere, which strictly means, to write for one (as a receipt, etc.), but always mittere, scribere, perscribere ad aliquem:

    postea ad pistores dabo,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 119:

    praecipe quae ad patrem vis nuntiari,

    id. Capt. 2, 2, 109:

    in servitutem pauperem ad divitem dare,

    Ter. Ph. 4, 3, 48:

    nam ad me Publ. Valerius scripsit,

    Cic. Fam. 14, 2 med.:

    de meis rebus ad Lollium perscripsi,

    id. ib. 5, 3:

    velim domum ad te scribas, ut mihi tui libri pateant,

    id. Att. 4, 14; cf. id. ib. 4, 16:

    ad primam (sc. epistulam) tibi hoc scribo,

    in answer to your first, id. ib. 3, 15, 2:

    ad Q. Fulvium Cons. Hirpini et Lucani dediderunt sese,

    Liv. 27, 15, 1; cf. id. 28, 22, 5.—Hence the phrase: mittere or scribere librum ad aliquem, to dedicate a book to one (Greek, prosphônein):

    has res ad te scriptas, Luci, misimus, Aeli,

    Lucil. Sat. 1, ap. Auct. Her. 4, 12:

    quae institueram, ad te mittam,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 5: ego interea admonitu tuo perfeci sane argutulos libros ad Varronem;

    and soon after: mihi explices velim, maneasne in sententia, ut mittam ad eum quae scripsi,

    Cic. Att. 13, 18; cf. ib. 16; Plin. 1, 19.—So in titles of books: M. Tullii Ciceronis ad Marcum Brutum Orator; M. T. Cic. ad Q. Fratrem Dialogi tres de Oratore, etc.—In the titles of odes and epigrams ad aliquem signifies to, addressed to.
    (ε).
    With names of towns after verbs of motion, ad is used in answer to the question Whither? instead of the simple acc.; but commonly with this difference, that ad denotes to the vicinity of, the neighborhood of:

    miles ad Capuam profectus sum, quintoque anno post ad Tarentum,

    Cic. de Sen. 4, 10; id. Fam. 3, 81:

    ad Veios,

    Liv. 5, 19; 14, 18; cf. Caes. B. G. 1, 7; id. B. C. 3, 40 al.—Ad is regularly used when the proper name has an appellative in apposition to it:

    ad Cirtam oppidum iter constituunt,

    Sall. J. 81, 2; so Curt. 3, 1, 22; 4, 9, 9;

    or when it is joined with usque,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 34, § 87; id. Deiot, 7, 19.— (When an adjective is added, the simple acc. is used poet., as well as with ad:

    magnum iter ad doctas proficisci cogor Athenas,

    Prop. 3, 21, 1; the simple acc., Ov. H. 2, 83: doctas jam nunc eat, inquit, Athenas).—
    (ζ).
    With verbs which imply a hostile movement toward, or protection in respect to any thing, against = adversus:

    nonne ad senem aliquam fabricam fingit?

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 2, 34:

    Lernaeas pugnet ad hydras,

    Prop. 3, 19, 9: neque quo pacto fallam, nec quem dolum ad eum aut machinam commoliar, old poet in Cic. N. D. 3, 29, 73:

    Belgarum copias ad se venire vidit,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 5; 7, 70:

    ipse ad hostem vehitur,

    Nep. Dat. 4, 5; id. Dion. 5, 4: Romulus ad regem impetus facit (a phrase in which in is commonly found), Liv. 1, 5, 7, and 44, 3, 10:

    aliquem ad hostem ducere,

    Tac. A. 2, 52:

    clipeos ad tela protecti obiciunt,

    Verg. A. 2, 443:

    munio me ad haec tempora,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 18:

    ad hos omnes casus provisa erant praesidia,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 65; 7, 41;

    so with nouns: medicamentum ad aquam intercutem,

    Cic. Off. 3, 24:

    remedium ad tertianam,

    Petr. Sat. 18:

    munimen ad imbris,

    Verg. G. 2, 352:

    farina cum melle ad tussim siccam efficasissima est,

    Plin. 20, 22, 89, § 243:

    ad muliebre ingenium efficaces preces,

    Liv. 1, 9; 1, 19 (in these two passages ad may have the force of apud, Hand).—
    (η).
    The repetition of ad to denote the direction to a place and to a person present in it is rare:

    nunc tu abi ad forum ad herum,

    Plaut. As. 2, 2, 100; cf.:

    vocatis classico ad concilium militibus ad tribunos,

    Liv. 5 47.—(The distinction between ad and in is given by Diom. 409 P., thus: in forum ire est in ipsum forum intrare; ad forum autem ire, in locum foro proximum; ut in tribunal et ad tribunal venire non unum est; quia ad tribunal venit litigator, in tribunal vero praetor aut judex; cf. also Sen. Ep. 73, 14, deus ad homines venit, immo, quod propius est, in homines venit.)—
    b.
    The terminus, with ref. to the space traversed, to, even to, with or without usque, Quint. 10, 7, 16: ingurgitavit usque ad imum gutturem, Naev. ap. Non. 207, 20 (Rib. Com. Rel. p. 30): dictator pervehitur usque ad oppidum, Naev. ap. Varr. L. L. 5, § 153 Mull. (B. Pun. p. 16 ed. Vahl.):

    via pejor ad usque Baii moenia,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 96; 1, 1, 97:

    rigidum permanat frigus ad ossa,

    Lucr. 1, 355; 1, 969:

    cum sudor ad imos Manaret talos,

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 10:

    ut quantum posset, agmen ad mare extenderet,

    Curt. 3, 9, 10:

    laeva pars ad pectus est nuda,

    id. 6, 5, 27 al. —Hence the Plinian expression, petere aliquid (usque) ad aliquem, to seek something everywhere, even with one:

    ut ad Aethiopas usque peteretur,

    Plin. 36, 6, 9, § 51 (where Jan now reads ab Aethiopia); so,

    vestis ad Seras peti,

    id. 12, 1, 1.— Trop.:

    si quid poscam, usque ad ravim poscam,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 5, 10:

    deverberasse usque ad necem,

    Ter. Phorm. 2, 2, 13;

    without usque: hic ad incitas redactus,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 136; 4, 2, 52; id. Poen. 4, 2, 85; illud ad incitas cum redit atque internecionem, Lucil. ap. Non. 123, 20:

    virgis ad necem caedi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 29, § 70; so Hor. S. 1, 2, 42; Liv. 24, 38, 9; Tac. A. 11, 37; Suet. Ner. 26; id. Dom. 8 al.
    3.
    Nearness or proximity in gen. = apud, near to, by, at, close by (in anteclass. per. very freq.; not rare later, esp. in the historians): pendent peniculamenta unum ad quemque pedum, trains are suspended at each foot, Enn. ap. Non. 149, 33 (Ann. v. 363 ed. Vahl.):

    ut in servitute hic ad suum maneat patrem,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 49; cf. id. ib. 2, 3, 98;

    3, 5, 41: sol quasi flagitator astat usque ad ostium,

    stands like a creditor continually at the door, id. Most. 3, 2, 81 (cf. with same force, Att. ap. Non. 522, 25;

    apud ipsum astas): ad foris adsistere,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 66; id. Arch. 24:

    astiterunt ad januam,

    Vulg. Act. 10, 17:

    non adest ad exercitum,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 6; cf. ib. prol. 133:

    aderant ad spectaculum istud,

    Vulg. Luc. 23, 48: has (testas) e fenestris in caput Deiciunt, qui prope ad ostium adspiraverunt, Lucil. ap. Non. 288, 31:

    et nec opinanti Mors ad caput adstitit,

    Lucr. 3, 959:

    quod Romanis ad manum domi supplementum esset,

    at hand, Liv. 9, 19, 6:

    haec arma habere ad manum,

    Quint. 12, 5, 1:

    dominum esse ad villam,

    Cic. Sull. 20; so id. Verr. 2, 21:

    errantem ad flumina,

    Verg. E. 6, 64; Tib. 1, 10, 38; Plin. 7, 2, § 12; Vitr. 7, 14; 7, 12; and ellipt. (cf. supra, 2. g):

    pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret!

    Cic. Phil. 1, 17.—Even of persons:

    qui primum pilum ad Caesarem duxerat (for apud),

    Caes. B. G. 6, 38; so id. ib. 1, 31; 3, 9; 5, 53; 7, 5; id. B. C. 3, 60:

    ad inferos poenas parricidii luent,

    among, Cic. Phil. 14, 13:

    neque segnius ad hostes bellum apparatur,

    Liv. 7, 7, 4: pugna ad Trebiam, ad Trasimenum, ad Cannas, etc., for which Liv. also uses the gen.:

    si Trasimeni quam Trebiae, si Cannarum quam Trasimeni pugna nobilior esset, 23, 43, 4.—Sometimes used to form the name of a place, although written separately, e. g. ad Murcim,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 154:

    villa ad Gallinas, a villa on the Flaminian Way,

    Plin. 15, 30, 40, § 37: ad urbem esse (of generals), to remain outside the city (Rome) until permission was given for a triumph:

    “Esse ad urbem dicebantur, qui cum potestate provinciali aut nuper e provincia revertissent, aut nondum in provinciam profecti essent... solebant autem, qui ob res in provincia gestas triumphum peterent, extra urbem exspectare, donec, lege lata, triumphantes urbem introire possent,”

    Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 3, 8.—So sometimes with names of towns and verbs of rest:

    pons, qui erat ad Genavam,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 7:

    ad Tibur mortem patri minatus est,

    Cic. Phil. 6, 4, 10:

    conchas ad Caietam legunt,

    id. Or. 2, 6:

    ad forum esse,

    to be at the market, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 136; id. Most. 3, 2, 158; cf. Ter. Ph. 4, 2, 8; id. And. 1, 5, 19.—Hence, adverb., ad dextram (sc. manum, partem), ad laevam, ad sinistram, to the right, to the left, or on the right, on the left:

    ad dextram,

    Att. Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 225; Plaut. Poen. 3, 4, 1; Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 44; Cic. Univ. 13; Caes. B. C. 1, 69:

    ad laevam,

    Enn. Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 51; Att. ib. p. 217: ad sinistram, Ter. [p. 28] Ad. 4, 2, 43 al.:

    ad dextram... ad laevam,

    Liv. 40, 6;

    and with an ordinal number: cum plebes ad tertium milliarium consedisset,

    at the third milestone, Cic. Brut. 14, 54, esp. freq. with lapis:

    sepultus ad quintum lapidem,

    Nep. Att. 22, 4; so Liv. 3, 69 al.; Tac. H. 3, 18; 4, 60 (with apud, Ann. 1, 45; 3, 45; 15, 60) al.; cf. Rudd. II. p. 287.
    B.
    In time, analogous to the relations given in A.
    1.
    Direction toward, i. e. approach to a definite point of time, about, toward:

    domum reductus ad vesperum,

    toward evening, Cic. Lael. 3, 12:

    cum ad hiemem me ex Cilicia recepissem,

    toward winter, id. Fam. 3, 7.—
    2.
    The limit or boundary to which a space of time extends, with and without usque, till, until, to, even to, up to:

    ego ad illud frugi usque et probus fui,

    Plaut. Most. 1, 2, 53:

    philosophia jacuit usque ad hanc aetatem,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 3, 5; id. de Sen. 14:

    quid si hic manebo potius ad meridiem,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 55; so id. Men. 5, 7, 33; id. Ps. 1, 5, 116; id. As. 2, 1, 5:

    ad multam noctem,

    Cic. de Sen. 14:

    Sophocles ad summam senectutem tragoedias fecit,

    id. ib. 2; cf. id. Rep. 1, 1:

    Alexandream se proficisci velle dixit (Aratus) remque integram ad reditum suum jussit esse,

    id. Off. 2, 23, 82:

    bestiae ex se natos amant ad quoddam tempus,

    id. Lael. 8; so id. de Sen. 6; id. Somn. Sc. 1 al. —And with ab or ab-usque, to desig. the whole period of time passed away:

    ab hora octava ad vesperum secreto collocuti sumus,

    Cic. Att. 7, 8:

    usque ab aurora ad hoc diei,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 8.—
    3.
    Coincidence with a point of time, at, on, in, by:

    praesto fuit ad horam destinatam,

    at the appointed hour, Cic. Tusc. 5, 22:

    admonuit ut pecuniam ad diem solverent,

    on the day of payment, id. Att. 16, 16 A:

    nostra ad diem dictam fient,

    id. Fam. 16, 10, 4; cf. id. Verr. 2, 2, 5: ad lucem denique arte et graviter dormitare coepisse, at (not toward) daybreak, id. Div. 1, 28, 59; so id. Att. 1, 3, 2; 1, 4, 3; id. Fin. 2, 31, 103; id. Brut. 97, 313:

    ad id tempus,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 24; Sall. J. 70, 5; Tac. A. 15, 60; Suet. Aug. 87; Domit. 17, 21 al.
    C.
    The relations of number.
    1.
    An approximation to a sum designated, near, near to, almost, about, toward (cf. Gr. epi, pros with acc. and the Fr. pres de, a peu pres, presque) = circiter (Hand, Turs. I. p. 102):

    ad quadraginta eam posse emi minas,

    Plaut. Ep. 2, 2, 111:

    nummorum Philippum ad tria milia,

    id. Trin. 1, 2, 115; sometimes with quasi added:

    quasi ad quadraginta minas,

    as it were about, id. Most. 3, 1, 95; so Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 93:

    sane frequentes fuimus omnino ad ducentos,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 1:

    cum annos ad quadraginta natus esset,

    id. Clu. 40, 110:

    ad hominum milia decem,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 4:

    oppida numero ad duodecim, vicos ad quadringentos,

    id. ib. 1, 5.—In the histt. and post-Aug. authors ad is added adverbially in this sense (contrary to Gr. usage, by which amphi, peri, and eis with numerals retain their power as prepositions): ad binum milium numero utrinque sauciis factis, Sisenn. ap. Non. 80, 4:

    occisis ad hominum milibus quattuor,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 33:

    ad duorum milium numero ceciderunt,

    id. B. C. 3, 53:

    ad duo milia et trecenti occisi,

    Liv. 10, 17, 8; so id. 27, 12, 16; Suet. Caes. 20; cf. Rudd. II. p. 334.—
    2.
    The terminus, the limit, to, unto, even to, a designated number (rare):

    ranam luridam conicere in aquam usque quo ad tertiam partem decoxeris,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 2, 26; cf. App. Herb. 41:

    aedem Junonis ad partem dimidiam detegit,

    even to the half, Liv. 42, 3, 2:

    miles (viaticum) ad assem perdiderat,

    to a farthing, to the last farthing, Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 27; Plin. Ep. 1, 15:

    quid ad denarium solveretur,

    Cic. Quint. 4.—The phrase omnes ad unum or ad unum omnes, or simply ad unum, means lit. all to one, i. e. all together, all without exception; Gr. hoi kath hena pantes (therefore the gender of unum is changed according to that of omnes): praetor omnes extra castra, ut stercus, foras ejecit ad unum, Lucil. ap. Non. 394, 22:

    de amicitia omnes ad unum idem sentiunt,

    Cic. Lael. 23:

    ad unum omnes cum ipso duce occisi sunt,

    Curt. 4, 1, 22 al.:

    naves Rhodias afflixit ita, ut ad unam omnes constratae eliderentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 27; onerariae omnes ad unam a nobis sunt exceptae, Cic. Fam. 12, 14 (cf. in Gr. hoi kath hena; in Hebr., Exod. 14, 28).— Ad unum without omnes:

    ego eam sententiam dixi, cui sunt assensi ad unum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 16:

    Juppiter omnipotens si nondum exosus ad unum Trojanos,

    Verg. A. 5, 687.
    D.
    In the manifold relations of one object to another.
    1.
    That in respect of or in regard to which a thing avails, happens, or is true or important, with regard to, in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in.
    a.
    With verbs:

    ad omnia alia aetate sapimus rectius,

    in respect to all other things we grow wiser by age, Ter. Ad. 5, 3, 45:

    numquam ita quisquam bene ad vitam fuat,

    id. ib. 5, 4, 1:

    nil ibi libatum de toto corpore (mortui) cernas ad speciem, nil ad pondus,

    that nothing is lost in form or weight, Lucr. 3, 214; cf. id. 5, 570; Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 21, § 58; id. Mur. 13, 29: illi regi Cyro subest, ad immutandi animi licentiam, crudelissimus ille Phalaris, in that Cyrus, in regard to the liberty of changing his disposition (i. e. not in reality, but inasmuch as he is at liberty to lay aside his good character, and assume that of a tyrant), there is concealed another cruel Phalaris, Cic. Rep. 1, 28:

    nil est ad nos,

    is nothing to us, concerns us not, Lucr. 3, 830; 3, 845:

    nil ad me attinet,

    Ter. Ad. 1, 2, 54:

    nihil ad rem pertinet,

    Cic. Caecin. 58;

    and in the same sense elliptically: nihil ad Epicurum,

    id. Fin. 1, 2, 5; id. Pis. 68:

    Quid ad praetorem?

    id. Verr. 1, 116 (this usage is not to be confounded with that under 4.).—
    b.
    With adjectives:

    ad has res perspicax,

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 129:

    virum ad cetera egregium,

    Liv. 37, 7, 15:

    auxiliaribus ad pugnam non multum Crassus confidebat,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 25:

    ejus frater aliquantum ad rem est avidior,

    Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 51; cf. id. And. 1, 2, 21; id. Heaut. 2, 3, 129:

    ut sit potior, qui prior ad dandum est,

    id. Phorm. 3, 2, 48:

    difficilis (res) ad credendum,

    Lucr. 2, 1027:

    ad rationem sollertiamque praestantior,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 62; so id. Leg. 2, 13, 33; id. Fin. 2, 20, 63; id. Rosc. Am. 30, 85; id. Font. 15; id. Cat. 1, 5, 12; id. de Or. 1, 25, 113; 1, 32, 146; 2, 49, 200; id. Fam. 3, 1, 1; Liv. 9, 16, 13; Tac. A. 12, 54 al.—
    c.
    With nouns:

    prius quam tuum, ut sese habeat, animum ad nuptias perspexerit,

    before he knew your feeling in regard to the marriage, Ter. And. 2, 3, 4 (cf. Gr. hopôs echei tis pros ti):

    mentis ad omnia caecitas,

    Cic. Tusc. 3, 5, 11:

    magna vis est fortunae in utramque partem vel ad secundas res vel ad adversas,

    id. Off. 2, 6; so id. Par. 1:

    ad cetera paene gemelli,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 10, 3.—So with acc. of gerund instead of the gen. from the same vb.:

    facultas ad scribendum, instead of scribendi,

    Cic. Font. 6;

    facultas ad agendum,

    id. de Imp. Pomp. 1, 2: cf. Rudd. II. p. 245.—
    d.
    In gramm.: nomina ad aliquid dicta, nouns used in relation to something, i. e. which derive their significance from their relation to another object: quae non possunt intellegi sola, ut pater, mater;

    jungunt enim sibi et illa propter quae intelleguntur,

    Charis. 129 P.; cf. Prisc. 580 ib.—
    2.
    With words denoting measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., both prop. and fig., according to, agreeably to, after (Gr. kata, pros):

    columnas ad perpendiculum exigere,

    Cic. Mur. 77:

    taleis ferreis ad certum pondus examinatis,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 12: facta sunt ad certam formam. Lucr. 2, 379:

    ad amussim non est numerus,

    Varr. 2, 1, 26:

    ad imaginem facere,

    Vulg. Gen. 1, 26:

    ad cursus lunae describit annum,

    Liv. 1, 19:

    omnia ad diem facta sunt,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 5:

    Id ad similitudinem panis efficiebant,

    id. B. C. 3, 48; Vulg. Gen. 1, 26; id. Jac. 3, 9:

    ad aequos flexus,

    at equal angles, Lucr. 4, 323: quasi ad tornum levantur, to or by the lathe, id. 4, 361:

    turres ad altitudiem valli,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 42; Liv. 39, 6:

    ad eandem crassitudinem structi,

    id. 44, 11:

    ad speciem cancellorum scenicorum,

    with the appearance of, like, Varr. R. R. 3, 5, 8:

    stagnum maris instar, circumseptum aedificiis ad urbium speciem,

    Suet. Ner. 31:

    lascivum pecus ludens ad cantum,

    Liv. Andron. Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 1:

    canere ad tibiam,

    Cic. Tusc. 4, 2: canere ad tibicinem, id. ib. 1, 2 (cf.:

    in numerum ludere,

    Verg. E. 6, 28; id. G. 4, 175):

    quod ad Aristophanis lucernam lucubravi,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 9 Mull.: carmen castigare ad unguem, to perfection (v. unguis), Hor. A. P. 294:

    ad unguem factus homo,

    a perfect gentleman, id. S. 1, 5, 32 (cf. id. ib. 2, 7, 86):

    ad istorum normam sapientes,

    Cic. Lael. 5, 18; id. Mur. 3:

    Cyrus non ad historiae fidem scriptus, sed ad effigiem justi imperii,

    id. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 8:

    exercemur in venando ad similitudinem bellicae disciplinae,

    id. N. D. 2, 64, 161: so,

    ad simulacrum,

    Liv. 40, 6:

    ad Punica ingenia,

    id. 21, 22:

    ad L. Crassi eloquentiam,

    Cic. Var. Fragm. 8:

    omnia fient ad verum,

    Juv. 6, 324:

    quid aut ad naturam aut contra sit,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 9, 30:

    ad hunc modum institutus est,

    id. Tusc. 2, 3; Caes. B. G. 2, 31; 3, 13:

    ad eundem istunc modum,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 70:

    quem ad modum, q. v.: ad istam faciem est morbus, qui me macerat,

    of that kind, Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 73; id. Merc. 2, 3, 90; cf.

    91: cujus ad arbitrium copia materiai cogitur,

    Lucr. 2, 281:

    ad eorum arbitrium et nutum totos se fingunt,

    to their will and pleasure, Cic. Or. 8, 24; id. Quint. 71:

    ad P. Lentuli auctoritatem Roma contendit,

    id. Rab. Post. 21:

    aliae sunt legati partes, aliae imperatoris: alter omnia agere ad praescriptum, alter libere ad summam rerum consulere debet,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 51:

    rebus ad voluntatem nostram fluentibus,

    Cic. Off. 1, 26:

    rem ad illorum libidinem judicarunt,

    id. Font. 36:

    ad vulgi opinionem,

    id. Off. 3, 21.—So in later Lat. with instar:

    ad instar castrorum,

    Just. 36, 3, 2:

    scoparum,

    App. M. 9, p. 232:

    speculi,

    id. ib. 2, p. 118: ad hoc instar mundi, id. de Mundo, p. 72.—Sometimes, but very rarely, ad is used absol. in this sense (so also very rarely kata with acc., Xen. Hell. 2, 3; Luc. Dial. Deor. 8): convertier ad nos, as we (are turned), Lucr. 4, 317:

    ad navis feratur,

    like ships, id. 4, 897 Munro. —With noun:

    ad specus angustiac vallium,

    like caves, Caes. B. C. 3, 49.—Hence,
    3.
    With an object which is the cause or reason, in conformity to which, from which, or for which, any thing is or is done.
    a.
    The moving cause, according to, at, on, in consequence of:

    cetera pars animae paret et ad numen mentis momenque movetur,

    Lucr. 3, 144:

    ad horum preces in Boeotiam duxit,

    on their entreaty, Liv. 42, 67, 12: ad ea Caesar veniam ipsique et conjugi et fratribus tribuit, in consequence of or upon this, he, etc., Tac. Ann. 12, 37.—
    b.
    The final cause, or the object, end, or aim, for the attainment of which any thing,
    (α).
    is done,
    (β).
    is designed, or,
    (γ).
    is fitted or adapted (very freq.), to, for, in order to.
    (α).
    Seque ad ludos jam inde abhinc exerceant, Pac. ap. Charis. p. 175 P. (Rib. Trag. Rel. p. 80):

    venimus coctum ad nuptias,

    in order to cook for the wedding, Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 15:

    omnis ad perniciem instructa domus,

    id. Bacch. 3, 1, 6; cf. Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 41; Liv. 1, 54:

    cum fingis falsas causas ad discordiam,

    in order to produce dissension, Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 71:

    quantam fenestram ad nequitiam patefeceris,

    id. Heaut. 3, 1, 72:

    utrum ille, qui postulat legatum ad tantum bellum, quem velit, idoneus non est, qui impetret, cum ceteri ad expilandos socios diripiendasque provincias, quos voluerunt, legatos eduxerint,

    Cic. de Imp. Pomp. 19, 57:

    ego vitam quoad putabo tua interesse, aut ad spem servandam esse, retinebo,

    for hope, id. Q. Fr. 1, 4; id. Fam. 5, 17:

    haec juventutem, ubi familiares opes defecerant, ad facinora incendebant,

    Sall. C. 13, 4:

    ad speciem atque ad usurpationem vetustatis,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 12, 31; Suet. Caes. 67:

    paucis ad speciem tabernaculis relictis,

    for appearance, Caes. B. C. 2, 35; so id. ib. 2, 41; id. B. G. 1, 51.—
    (β).
    Aut equos alere aut canes ad venandum. Ter. And. 1, 1, 30:

    ingenio egregie ad miseriam natus sum,

    id. Heaut. 3, 1, 11;

    (in the same sense: in rem,

    Hor. C. 1, 27, 1, and the dat., Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 6):

    ad cursum equum, ad arandum bovem, ad indagandum canem,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 13, 40:

    ad frena leones,

    Verg. A. 10, 253:

    delecto ad naves milite,

    marines, Liv. 22, 19 Weissenb.:

    servos ad remum,

    rowers, id. 34, 6; and:

    servos ad militiam emendos,

    id. 22, 61, 2:

    comparasti ad lecticam homines,

    Cat. 10, 16:

    Lygdamus ad cyathos,

    Prop. 4, 8, 37; cf.:

    puer ad cyathum statuetur,

    Hor. C. 1, 29, 8.—
    (γ).
    Quae oportet Signa esse [p. 29] ad salutem, omnia huic osse video, everything indicative of prosperity I see in him, Ter. And. 3, 2, 2:

    haec sunt ad virtutem omnia,

    id. Heaut. 1, 2, 33:

    causa ad objurgandum,

    id. And. 1, 1, 123:

    argumentum ad scribendum,

    Cic. Att. 9, 7 (in both examples instead of the gen. of gerund., cf. Rudd. II. p. 245):

    vinum murteum est ad alvum crudam,

    Cato R. R. 125:

    nulla res tantum ad dicendum proficit, quantum scriptio,

    Cic. Brut. 24:

    reliquis rebus, quae sunt ad incendia,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 101 al. —So with the adjectives idoneus, utilis, aptus, instead of the dat.:

    homines ad hanc rem idoneos,

    Plaut. Poen. 3, 2, 6:

    calcei habiles et apti ad pedem,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 54, 231:

    orator aptus tamen ad dicendum,

    id. Tusc. 1, 3, 5:

    sus est ad vescendum hominibus apta,

    id. N. D. 2, 64, 160:

    homo ad nullam rem utilis,

    id. Off. 3, 6:

    ad segetes ingeniosus ager,

    Ov. F. 4, 684.—(Upon the connection of ad with the gerund. v. Zumpt, § 666; Rudd. II. p. 261.)—
    4.
    Comparison (since that with which a thing is compared is considered as an object to which the thing compared is brought near for the sake of comparison), to, compared to or with, in comparison with:

    ad sapientiam hujus ille (Thales) nimius nugator fuit,

    Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 25; id. Trin. 3, 2, 100:

    ne comparandus hic quidem ad illum'st,

    Ter. Eun. 4, 4, 14; 2, 3, 69:

    terra ad universi caeli complexum,

    compared with the whole extent of the heavens, Cic. Tusc. 1, 17, 40:

    homini non ad cetera Punica ingenia callido,

    Liv. 22, 22, 15:

    at nihil ad nostram hanc,

    nothing in comparison with, Ter. Eun. 2, 3, 70; so Cic. Deiot. 8, 24; and id. de Or. 2, 6, 25.
    E.
    Adverbial phrases with ad.
    1.
    Ad omnia, withal, to crown all:

    ingentem vim peditum equitumque venire: ex India elephantos: ad omnia tantum advehi auri, etc.,

    Liv. 35, 32, 4.—
    2.
    Ad hoc and ad haec (in the historians, esp. from the time of Livy, and in authors after the Aug. per.), = praeterea, insuper, moreover, besides, in addition, epi toutois:

    nam quicumque impudicus, adulter, ganeo, etc.: praeterea omnes undique parricidae, etc.: ad hoc, quos manus atque lingua perjurio aut sanguine civili alebat: postremo omnes, quos, etc.,

    Sall. C. 14, 2 and 3:

    his opinionibus inflato animo, ad hoc vitio quoque ingenii vehemens,

    Liv. 6, 11, 6; 42, 1, 1; Tac. H. 1, 6; Suet. Aug. 22 al.—
    3.
    Ad id quod, beside that (very rare):

    ad id quod sua sponte satis conlectum animorum erat, indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur,

    Liv. 3, 62, 1; so 44, 37, 12.—
    4.
    Ad tempus.
    a.
    At a definite, fixed time, Cic. Att. 13, 45; Liv. 38, 25, 3.—
    b.
    At a fit, appropriate time, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 54, § 141; Liv. 1, 7, 13.—
    c.
    For some time, for a short time, Cic. Off. 1, 8, 27; id. Lael. 15, 53; Liv. 21, 25, 14.—
    d.
    According to circumstances, Cic. Planc. 30, 74; id. Cael. 6, 13; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 9.—
    5.
    Ad praesens (for the most part only in post-Aug. writers).
    a.
    For the moment, for a short time, Cic. Fam. 12, 8; Plin. 8, 22, 34; Tac. A. 4, 21.—
    b.
    At present, now, Tac. A. 16, 5; id. H. 1, 44.—So, ad praesentiam, Tac. A. 11, 8.—
    6.
    Ad locum, on the spot:

    ut ad locum miles esset paratus,

    Liv. 27, 27, 2.—
    7.
    Ad verbum, word for word, literally, Cic. Fin. 1, 2, 4; id. de Or. 1, 34, 157; id. Ac. 2, 44, 135 al.—
    8.
    Ad summam.
    a.
    On the whole, generally, in general, Cic. Fam. 14, 14, 3; id. Att. 14, 1; Suet. Aug. 71.—
    b.
    In a word, in short, Cic. Off. 1, 41, 149; Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 106. —
    9.
    Ad extremum, ad ultimum, ad postremum.
    a.
    At the end, finally, at last.
    (α).
    Of place, at the extremity, extreme point, top, etc.:

    missile telum hastili abiegno et cetera tereti, praeterquam ad extremum, unde ferrum exstabat,

    Liv. 21, 8, 10.—
    (β).
    Of time = telos de, at last, finally:

    ibi ad postremum cedit miles,

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 5, 52; so id. Poen. 4, 2, 22; Cic. Off. 3, 23, 89; id. Phil. 13, 20, 45; Caes. B. G. 7, 53; Liv. 30, 15, 4 al.— Hence,
    (γ).
    of order, finally, lastly, = denique: inventa componere; tum ornare oratione; post memoria sepire;

    ad extremum agere cum dignitate,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 31, 142.—
    b.
    In Liv., to the last degree, quite: improbus homo, sed non ad extremum perditus, 23, 2, 3; cf.:

    consilii scelerati, sed non ad ultimum dementis,

    id. 28, 28, 8.—
    10.
    Quem ad finem? To what limit? How far? Cic. Cat. 1, 1; id. Verr. 5, 75.—
    11.
    Quem ad modum, v. sub h. v.
    a.
    Ad (v. ab, ex, in, etc.) is not repeated like some other prepositions with interrog. and relative pronouns, after nouns or demonstrative pronouns:

    traducis cogitationes meas ad voluptates. Quas? corporis credo,

    Cic. Tusc. 3, 17, 37 (ubi v. Kuhner).—
    b.
    Ad is sometimes placed after its substantive:

    quam ad,

    Ter. Phorm. 3, 2, 39:

    senatus, quos ad soleret, referendum censuit,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 4:

    ripam ad Araxis,

    Tac. Ann. 12, 51;

    or between subst. and adj.: augendam ad invidiam,

    id. ib. 12, 8.—
    c.
    The compound adque for et ad (like exque, eque, and, poet., aque) is denied by Moser, Cic. Rep. 2, 15, p. 248, and he reads instead of ad humanitatem adque mansuetudinem of the MSS., hum. atque mans. But adque, in acc. with later usage, is restored by Hand in App. M. 10, p. 247, adque haec omnia oboediebam for atque; and in Plaut. Capt. 2, 3, 9, utroque vorsum rectum'st ingenium meum, ad se adque illum, is now read, ad te atque ad illum (Fleck., Brix).
    II.
    In composition.
    A.
    Form. According to the usual orthography, the d of the ad remains unchanged before vowels, and before b, d, h, m, v: adbibo, adduco, adhibeo, admoveo, advenio; it is assimilated to c, f, g, l, n, p, r, s, t: accipio, affigo, aggero, allabor, annumero, appello, arripio, assumo, attineo; before g and s it sometimes disappears: agnosco, aspicio, asto: and before qu it passes into c: acquiro, acquiesco.—But later philologists, supported by old inscriptions and good MSS., have mostly adopted the following forms: ad before j, h, b, d, f, m, n, q, v; ac before c, sometimes, but less well, before q; ag and also ad before g; a before gn, sp, sc, st; ad and also al before l; ad rather than an before n; ap and sometimes ad before p; ad and also ar before r; ad and also as before s; at and sometimes ad before t. In this work the old orthography has commonly been retained for the sake of convenient reference, but the better form in any case is indicated.—
    B.
    Signif. In English up often denotes approach, and in many instances will give the force of ad as a prefix both in its local and in its figurative sense.
    1.
    Local.
    a.
    To, toward: affero, accurro, accipio ( to one's self).—
    b.
    At, by: astare, adesse.—
    c.
    On, upon, against: accumbo, attero.—
    d.
    Up (cf. de- = down, as in deicio, decido): attollo, ascendo, adsurgo.—
    2.
    Fig.
    a.
    To: adjudico, adsentior.—
    b.
    At or on: admiror, adludo.—
    c.
    Denoting conformity to, or comparison with: affiguro, adaequo.—
    d.
    Denoting addition, increase (cf. ab, de, and ex as prefixes to denote privation): addoceo, adposco.—
    e.
    Hence, denoting intensity: adamo, adimpleo, aduro, and perhaps agnosco.—
    f.
    Denoting the coming to an act or state, and hence commencement: addubito, addormio, adquiesco, adlubesco, advesperascit. See more upon this word in Hand, Turs. I. pp. 74-134.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ad

  • 3 advenio

    ad-vĕnĭo, vēni, ventum, 4, v. a., to come to a place, to reach, arrive at (syn.: accedere, adventare, adire, appellere, adesse); constr. absol., with ad, in, or acc.
    I.
    Lit.: verum praetor advenit, Naev. ap. Non. 468, 27 (Bell. Pun. v. 44 Vahl.): ad vos adveniens, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 38 (Trag. v. 14 Vahl.):

    ad forum,

    Plaut. Capt. 4, 2, 6; so id. Curc. 1, 2, 55; id. Am. prol. 32; cf. id. Men. 5, 2, 6:

    advenis modo? Admodum,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 8; Caecil. ap. Non. 247, 6:

    procul a patria domoque,

    Lucr. 6, 1103:

    ad auris,

    id. 6, 166; so id. 3, 783; 4, 874; 6, 234: in montem Oetam, Att. ap. Non. 223, 2:

    in provinciam,

    Cic. Phil. 11, 12 (so Ov. M. 7, 155:

    somnus in ignotos oculos): ex Hyperboreis Delphos,

    Cic. N. D. 3, 23:

    est quiddam, advenientem non esse peregrinum atque hospitem,

    id. Att. 6, 3; Verg. A. 10, 346; Ov. Tr. 1, 9, 41.—With simple acc.:

    Tyriam urbem,

    Verg. A. 1, 388:

    unde hos advenias labores,

    Stat. Th. 5, 47 (whether in Tac. A. 1, 18, properantibus Blaesus advenit, the first word is a dat., as Rudd. II. p. 135, supposes, or an abl. absol., may still be doubted).—Also with sup.:

    tentatum advenis,

    Ter. Phorm. 2, 3, 41; so id. ib. 2, 3, 13.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    Poet., in adding an entire thought as an amplification of what precedes (for accedo, q. v.): praeter enim quam quod morbis cum corporis aegret, Advenit id quod eam de rebus saepe futuris Macerat, etc., beside that it often suffers with the body itself, this often occurs, that it is itself tormented in regard to the future, etc., Lucr. 3, 825.—
    B.
    In the perf., the act of coming being considered as completed, to have come, i. e. to be somewhere, to be present (v. adventus, B.; cf. Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 2, 27);

    of time: mterea dies advenit, quo die, etc.,

    appeared, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 15; so,

    ubi dies advenit,

    Sall. J. 113, 5:

    advenit proficiscendi hora,

    Tac. H. 4, 62:

    tempus meum nondum advenit,

    Vulg. Joan. 7, 6.—
    C.
    To come into one's possession, to accrue, Sall. J. 111; cf. Liv. 45, 19 med.
    D.
    To come by conveyance, to be brought; of a letter:

    advenere litterae (for allatae sunt),

    Suet. Vesp. 7.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > advenio

  • 4 extrā

        extrā adv. and praep.    [exter].    I. Adv. (for comp. see exterius), on the outside, without: extra et intus hostem habere, Cs.: et in corpore et extra: illa, quae sunt extra, outward goods.—In the phrase, extra quam: extra quam fiat, etc., except in the case that, etc., C. (lex): extra quam qui eorum, etc., except those of them who, etc., L.: extra quam si nolint fame perire, unless. —    II. Praep., with acc, outside of, without, beyond: Iliacos intra muros peccatur et extra, H.: extra portam Collinam.— Apart from, aside from, out of the way of, beyond: esse extra noxiam, T.: extra famam noxae, L.: extra ruinam esse: extra cotidianam consuetudinem, contrary to, Cs.: extra iocum, jesting apart: extra gloriam, without, Ta. — Except, excepting, besides: optumam progeniem Priamo peperisti extra me (i. e. me exceptā), Enn. ap. C.: extra unam aniculam, T.: extra ea cave vocem mittas, L.
    * * *
    I II
    outside of, beyond, without, beside; except

    Latin-English dictionary > extrā

  • 5 accedo

    ac-cēdo, cessi, cessum, 3, v. n. ( perf. sync., accēstis, Verg. A. 1, 201), to go or come to or near, to approach (class.).
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen., constr. with ad, in, the local adverbs, the acc., dat., infin., or absol.
    (α).
    With ad:

    accedam ad hominem,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 6, 14; so,

    ad aedīs,

    id. Amph. 1, 1, 108:

    ad flammam,

    Ter. Andr. 1, 1, 103:

    omnīs ad aras,

    to beset every altar, Lucr. 5, 1199:

    ad oppidum,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 13:

    ad ludos,

    Cic. Pis. 27, 65:

    ad Caesarem supplex,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 3: ad manum, to come to their hands (of fishes), id. Att. 2, 1, 7:

    ad Aquinum,

    id. Phil. 2, 41, 106; so,

    ad Heracleam,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 129.— Impers.:

    ad eas (oleas) cum accederetur,

    Cic. Caecin. 8, 22.—
    (β).
    With in:

    ne in aedīs accederes,

    Cic. Caecin. 13, 36:

    in senatum,

    id. Att. 7, 4, 1:

    in Macedoniam,

    id. Phil. 10, 6:

    in funus aliorum,

    to join a funeral procession, id. Leg. 2, 26, 66 al. —
    (γ).
    With local adv.:

    eodem pacto, quo huc accessi, abscessero,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 84:

    illo,

    Cic. Caecin. 16, 46:

    quo,

    Sall. J. 14, 17.—
    (δ).
    With acc. (so, except the names of localities, only in poets and historians, but not in Caesar and Livy):

    juvat integros accedere fontīs atque haurire,

    Lucr. 1, 927, and 4, 2:

    Scyllaeam rabiem scopulosque,

    Verg. A. 1, 201:

    Sicanios portus,

    Sil. 14, 3; cf. id. 6, 604:

    Africam,

    Nep. Hann. 8:

    aliquem,

    Sall. J. 18, 9; 62, 1; Tac. H. 3, 24:

    classis Ostia cum magno commeatu accessit,

    Liv. 22, 37, 1:

    Carthaginem,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 3.—
    (ε).
    With dat. ( poet.):

    delubris,

    Ov. M. 15, 745:

    silvis,

    id. ib. 5, 674: caelo (i. e. to become a god), id. ib. 15, 818, and 870.—
    * (ζ).
    With inf.:

    dum constanter accedo decerpere (rosas),

    App. M. 4, p. 143 med.
    (η).
    Absol.:

    accedam atque hanc appellabo,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 17:

    deici nullo modo potuisse qui non accesserit,

    Cic. Caecin. 13, 36:

    accessit propius,

    ib. 8, 22:

    quoties voluit blandis accedere dictis,

    Ov. M. 3, 375 al. — Impers.: non potis accedi, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 38 (Trag. v. 17 ed. Vahl.):

    quod eā proxime accedi poterat,

    Cic. Caecin. 8, 21.
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    To approach a thing in a hostilemanner (like aggredior, adorior), to attack:

    acie instructa usque ad castra hostium accessit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 51:

    sese propediem cum magno exercitu ad urbem accessurum,

    Sall. C. 32 fin.:

    ad manum,

    to fight hand to hand, to engage in close combat, Nep. Eum. 5, 2; Liv. 2, 30, 12:

    ad corpus alicujus,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 2, 2: Atque accedit muros Romana juventus, Enn. ap. Gell. 10, 29 (Ann. v. 527 ed. Vahl.): hostīs accedere ventis navibus velivolis, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 5 (Ann. v. 380 ib.);

    and, in malam part.,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 22.—
    2.
    Mercant. t. t.:

    accedere ad hastam,

    to attend an auction, Nep. Att. 6, 3; Liv. 43, 16, 2.—
    3.
    In late Lat.: ad manus (different from ad manum, B. 1), to be admitted to kiss hands, Capit. Maxim. 5.
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    In gen., to come near to, to approach:

    haud invito ad aurīs sermo mi accessit,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 32; so,

    clemens quidam sonus aurīs ejus accedit,

    App. M. 5, p. 160:

    si somnus non accessit,

    Cels. 3, 18; cf.:

    febris accedit,

    id. 3, 3 sq.:

    ubi accedent anni,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 85; cf.:

    accedente senectā,

    id. Ep. 2, 2, 211.
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    To come to or upon one, to happen to, to befall (a meaning in which it approaches so near to accĭdo that in many passages it has been proposed to change it to the latter; cf. Ruhnk. Rut. Lup. 1, p. 3; 2, p. 96; Dictat. in Ter. p. 222 and 225); constr. with ad or (more usually) with dat.:

    voluntas vostra si ad poëtam accesserit,

    Ter. Phorm. prol. 29:

    num tibi stultitia accessit?

    have you become a fool? Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 77:

    paulum vobis accessit pecuniae,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 5, 56:

    dolor accessit bonis viris, virtus non est imminuta,

    Cic. Att. 1, 16, 9:

    quo plus sibi aetatis accederet,

    id. de Or. 1, 60, 254 al.
    2.
    With the accessory idea of increase, to be added = addi; constr. with ad or dat.: primum facie (i. e. faciei) quod honestas accedit, Lucil. ap. Gell. 1, 14; so ap. Non. 35, 20:

    ad virtutis summam accedere nihil potest,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 24:

    Cassio animus accessit,

    id. Att. 5, 20; 7, 3; id. Clu. 60 al.:

    pretium agris,

    the price increases, advances, Plin. Ep. 6, 19, 1.— Absol.:

    plura accedere debent,

    Lucr. 2, 1129:

    accedit mors,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 18, 60; id. de Or. 2, 17, 73:

    quae jacerent in tenebris omnia, nisi litterarum lumen accederet,

    id. Arch. 6, 14 (so, not accenderet, is to be read).—If a new thought is to be added, it is expressed by accedit with quod ( add to this, that, etc.) when it implies a logical reason, but with ut ( beside this, it happens that, or it occurs that) when it implies an historical fact (cf. Zumpt, §

    621 and 626): accedit enim, quod patrem amo,

    Cic. Att. 13, 21: so Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 2; Cic. Rosc. Am. 8, 22; id. Att. 1, 92 al.; Caes. B. G. 3, 2; 4, 16; Sall. C. 11, 5;

    on the other hand: huc accedit uti, etc.,

    Lucr. 1, 192, 215, 265 al.:

    ad App. Claudii senectutem accedebat etiam ut caecus esset,

    Cic. de Sen. 6, 16; so id. Tusc. 1, 19, 43; id. Rosc. Am. 31, 86; id. Deiot. 1, 2; Caes. B. G. 3, 13; 5, 16 al. When several new ideas are added, they are introduced by res in the plur.: cum ad has suspiciones certissimae res accederent: quod per fines Sequanorum Helvetios transduxisset; quod obsides inter eos dandos curāsset;

    quod ea omnia, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 19. Sometimes the historical idea follows accedit, without ut:

    ad haec mala hoc mihi accedit etiam: haec Andria... gravida e Pamphilo est,

    Ter. Andr. 1, 3, 11:

    accedit illud: si maneo... cadendum est in unius potestatem,

    Cic. Att. 8, 3, 1.
    3.
    To give assent to, accede to, assent to, to agree with, to approve of; constr. with ad or dat. (with persons only, with dat.):

    accessit animus ad meam sententiam,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 7, 13; so Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 28, § 69; Nep. Milt. 3, 5:

    Galba speciosiora suadentibus accessit,

    Tac. H. 1, 34; so Quint. 9, 4, 2 al.
    4.
    To come near to in resemblance, to resemble, be like; with ad or dat. (the latter most freq., esp. after Cic.):

    homines ad Deos nulla re propius accedunt quam salutem hominibus dando,

    Cic. Lig. 12:

    Antonio Philippus proximus accedebat,

    id. Brut. 147; cf. id. Verr. 2, 2, 3; id. de Or. 1, 62, 263; id. Ac. 2, 11, 36 al.
    5.
    To enter upon, to undertake; constr. with ad or in:

    in eandem infamiam,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 84:

    ad bellorum pericula,

    Cic. Balb. 10:

    ad poenam,

    to undertake the infliction of punishment, id. Off. 1, 25, 89:

    ad amicitiam Caesaris,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 48:

    ad vectiǵalia,

    to undertake their collection as contractor, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 42:

    ad causam,

    the direction of a lawsuit, id. ib. 2, 2, 38; id. de Or. 1, 38, 175 al. But esp.:

    ad rem publicam,

    to enter upon the service of the state, Cic. Off. 1, 9, 28; id. Rosc. Am. 1 al.,‡

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > accedo

  • 6 adeo

    1.
    ăd-ĕo, ĭī, and rarely īvi, ĭtum (arch. adirier for adiri, Enn. Rib. Trag. p. 59), 4, v. n. and a. (acc. to Paul. ex Fest. should be accented a/deo; v. Fest. s. v. adeo, p. 19 Müll.; cf. the foll. word), to go to or approach a person or thing (syn.: accedo, aggredior, advenio, appeto).
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen., constr.
    (α).
    With ad (very freq.): sed tibi cautim est adeundum ad virum, Att. ap. Non. 512, 10:

    neque eum ad me adire neque me magni pendere visu'st,

    Plaut. Cur. 2, 2, 12:

    adeamne ad eam?

    Ter. And. 4, 1, 15; id. Eun. 3, 5, 30: aut ad consules aut ad te aut ad Brutum adissent, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 208, 5:

    ad M. Bibulum adierunt, id. Fragm. ap. Arus. p. 213 Lind.: ad aedis nostras nusquam adiit,

    Plaut. Aul. 1, 1, 24:

    adibam ad istum fundum,

    Cic. Caec. 29 —
    (β).
    With in: priusquam Romam atque in horum conventum adiretis, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 11, § 26 ed. Halm.—Esp.: adire in jus, to go to law:

    cum ad praetorem in jus adissemus,

    Cic. Verr. 4, § 147; id. Att. 11, 24; Caes. B. C. 1, 87, and in the Plebiscit. de Thermens. lin. 42: QVO DE EA RE IN IOVS ADITVM ERIT, cf. Dirks., Versuche S. p. 193.—
    (γ).
    Absol.:

    adeunt, consistunt, copulantur dexteras,

    Plaut. Aul. 1, 2, 38:

    eccum video: adibo,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 5.—
    (δ).
    With acc.:

    ne Stygeos adeam non libera manes,

    Ov. M. 13, 465:

    voces aetherias adiere domos,

    Sil. 6, 253:

    castrorum vias,

    Tac. A. 2, 13:

    municipia,

    id. ib. 39:

    provinciam,

    Suet. Aug. 47:

    non poterant adire eum,

    Vulg. Luc. 8, 19:

    Graios sales carmine patrio,

    to attain to, Verg. Cat. 11, 62; so with latter supine:

    planioribus aditu locis,

    places easier to approach, Liv. 1, 33.—With local adv.:

    quoquam,

    Sall. J. 14:

    huc,

    Plaut. Truc. 2, 7, 60.—
    B.
    Esp.,
    1.
    To approach one for the purpose of addressing, asking aid, consulting, and the like, to address, apply to, consult (diff. from aggredior, q. v.). —Constr. with ad or oftener with acc.; hence also pass.:

    quanto satius est, adire blandis verbis atque exquaerere, sintne illa, etc.,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 35:

    aliquot me adierunt,

    Ter. And. 3, 3, 2:

    adii te heri de filia,

    id. Hec. 2, 2, 9: cum pacem peto, cum placo, cum adeo, et cum appello meam, Lucil. ap. Non. 237, 28:

    ad me adire quosdam memini, qui dicerent,

    Cic. Fam. 3, 10:

    coram adire et alloqui,

    Tac. H. 4, 65.— Pass.:

    aditus consul idem illud responsum retulit,

    when applied to, Liv. 37, 6 fin.:

    neque praetores adiri possent,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 5.—Hence: adire aliquem per epistulam, to address one in writing, by a letter:

    per epistulam, aut per nuntium, quasi regem, adiri eum aiunt,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 6, 9 and 10; cf. Tac. A. 4, 39; id. H. 1, 9.—So also: adire deos, aras, deorum sedes, etc., to approach the gods, their altars, etc., as a suppliant (cf.:

    acced. ad aras,

    Lucr. 5, 1199): quoi me ostendam? quod templum adeam? Att. ap. Non. 281, 6:

    ut essent simulacra, quae venerantes deos ipsos se adire crederent,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 27:

    adii Dominum et deprecatus sum,

    Vulg. Sap. 8, 21:

    aras,

    Cic. Phil. 14, 1:

    sedes deorum,

    Tib. 1, 5, 39:

    libros Sibyllinos,

    to consult the Sibylline Books, Liv. 34, 55; cf. Tac. A. 1, 76:

    oracula,

    Verg. A. 7, 82.—
    2.
    To go to a thing in order to examine it, to visit:

    oppida castellaque munita,

    Sall. J. 94:

    hiberna,

    Tac. H. 1, 52.—
    3.
    To come up to one in a hostile manner, to assail, attack:

    aliquem: nunc prior adito tu, ego in insidiis hic ero,

    Ter. Ph. 1, 4, 52:

    nec quisquam ex agmine tanto audet adire virum,

    Verg. A. 5, 379:

    Servilius obvia adire arma jubetur,

    Sil. 9, 272.
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    To go to the performance of any act, to enter upon, to undertake, set about, undergo, submit to (cf.: accedo, aggredior, and adorior).—With ad or the acc. (class.):

    nunc eam rem vult, scio, mecum adire ad pactionem,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 25:

    tum primum nos ad causas et privatas et publicas adire coepimus,

    Cic. Brut. 90:

    adii causas oratorum, id. Fragm. Scaur. ap. Arus. p. 213 Lind.: adire ad rem publicam,

    id. de Imp. Pomp. 24, 70:

    ad extremum periculum,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 7.—With acc.:

    periculum capitis,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 38:

    laboribus susceptis periculisque aditis,

    id. Off. 1, 19:

    in adeundis periculis,

    id. ib. 24; cf.:

    adeundae inimicitiae, subeundae saepe pro re publica tempestates,

    id. Sest. 66, 139: ut vitae periculum aditurus videretur, Auct. B. G. 8, 48: maximos labores et summa pericula. Nep. Timol. 5:

    omnem fortunam,

    Liv. 25, 10:

    dedecus,

    Tac. A. 1, 39:

    servitutem voluntariam,

    id. G. 24:

    invidiam,

    id. A. 4, 70:

    gaudia,

    Tib. 1, 5, 39.—Hence of an inheritance, t. t., to enter on:

    cum ipse hereditatem patris non adisses,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 16; so id. Arch. 5; Suet. Aug. 8 and Dig.;

    hence also: adire nomen,

    to assume the name bequeathed by will, Vell. 2, 60.—
    B.
    Adire manum alicui, prov., to deceive one, to make sport of (the origin of this phrase is unc.; Acidalius conjectures that it arose from some artifice practised in wrestling, Wagner ad Plaut. Aul. 2, 8, 8):

    eo pacto avarae Veneri pulcre adii manum,

    Plaut. Poen. 2, 11; so id. Aul. 2, 8, 8; id. Cas. 5, 2, 54; id. Pers. 5, 2, 18.
    2.
    ăd-ĕō̆, adv. [cf. quoad and adhuc] (acc. to Festus, it should be accented adéo, v. the preced. word; but this distinction is merely a later invention of the grammarians; [p. 33] cf. Gell. 7, 7).
    I.
    In the ante-class. per.,
    A.
    To designate the limit of space or time, with reference to the distance passed through; hence often accompanied by usque (cf. ad), to this, thus far, so far, as far.
    1.
    Of space:

    surculum artito usque adeo, quo praeacueris,

    fit in the scion as far as you have sharpened it, Cato, R. R. 40, 3.— Hence: res adeo rediit, the affair has gone so far (viz., in deterioration, “cum aliquid pejus exspectatione contigit,” Don. ad Ter. Ph. 1, 2, 5):

    postremo adeo res rediit: adulescentulus saepe eadem et graviter audiendo victus est,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 61; cf. id. Ph. 1, 2, 5.—
    2.
    Of time, so long ( as), so long ( till), strengthened by usque, and with dum, donec, following, and in Cic. with quoad:

    merces vectatum undique adeo dum, quae tum haberet, peperisset bona,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 76; 3, 4, 72; id. Am. 1, 2, 10 al.:

    nusquam destitit instare, suadere, orare, usque adeo donec perpulit,

    Ter. And. 4, 1, 36; Cato, R. R. 67; id. ib. 76:

    atque hoc scitis omnes usque adeo hominem in periculo fuisse, quoad scitum sit Sestium vivere,

    Cic. Sest. 38, 82.—
    B.
    For the purpose of equalizing two things in comparison, followed by ut: in the same degree or measure or proportion... in which; or so very, so much, so, to such a degree... as (only in comic poets), Plaut. Ep. 4, 1, 38:

    adeon hominem esse invenustum aut infelicem quemquam, ut ego sum?

    Ter. And. 1, 5, 10.—Also followed by quasi, when the comparison relates to similarity:

    gaudere adeo coepit, quasi qui cupiunt nuptias,

    in the same manner as those rejoice who desire marriage, Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 12.—
    C.
    (Only in the comic poets) = ad haec, praeterea, moreover, besides, too: ibi tibi adeo lectus dabitur, ubi tu haud somnum capias ( beside the other annoyances), a bed, too, shall be given you there, etc., Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 80.—Hence also with etiam:

    adeo etiam argenti faenus creditum audio,

    besides too, id. Most. 3, 1, 101.—
    D.
    (Only in the comic poets.) Adeo ut, for this purpose that, to the end that:

    id ego continuo huic dabo, adeo me ut hic emittat manu,

    Plaut. Rud. 5, 3, 32:

    id adeo te oratum advenio, ut, etc.,

    id. Aul. 4, 10, 9:

    adeo ut tu meam sententiam jam jam poscere possis, faciam, etc.,

    id. ib. 3, 2, 26 (where Wagner now reads at ut):

    atque adeo ut scire possis, factum ego tecum hoc divido,

    id. Stich. 5, 4, 15. (These passages are so interpreted by Hand, I. p. 138; others regard adeo here = quin immo.)—
    E.
    In narration, in order to put one person in strong contrast with another. It may be denoted by a stronger emphasis upon the word to be made conspicuous, or by yet, on the contrary, etc.:

    jam ille illuc ad erum cum advenerit, narrabit, etc.: ille adeo illum mentiri sibi credet,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 4 sq.; so id. Merc. 2, 1, 8 al.
    II.
    To the Latin of every period belongs the use of this word,
    A.
    To give emphasis to an idea in comparison, so, so much, so very, with verbs, adjectives, and substantives:

    adeo ut spectare postea omnīs oderit,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 65:

    neminem quidem adeo infatuare potuit, ut ei nummum ullum crederet,

    Cic. Fl. 20, 47:

    adeoque inopia est coactus Hannibal, ut, etc.,

    Liv. 22, 32, 3 Weiss.:

    et voltu adeo modesto, adeo venusto, ut nil supra,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 92:

    nemo adeo ferus est, ut, etc.,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 39.—With usque:

    adeo ego illum cogam usque, ut mendicet meus pater,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 4, 10:

    usque adeo turbatur,

    even so much, so continually, Verg. E. 1, 12; Curt. 10, 1, 42; Luc. 1, 366.—In questions:

    adeone me fuisse fungum, ut qui illi crederem?

    Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3, 49:

    adeone hospes hujus urbis, adeone ignarus es disciplinae consuetudinisque nostrae, ut haec nescias?

    Cic. Rab. 10, 28; so id. Phil. 2, 7, 15; id. Fam. 9, 10; Liv. 2, 7, 10; 5, 6, 4.—With a negative in both clauses, also with quin in the last:

    non tamen adeo virtutum sterile saeculum, ut non et bona exempla prodiderit,

    Tac. H. 1, 3; so Suet. Oth. 9:

    verum ego numquam adeo astutus fui, quin, etc.,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 2, 13.—

    Sometimes the concluding clause is to be supplied from the first: quis genus Aeneadum, quis Trojae nesciat urbem?... non obtusa adeo gestamus pectora Poeni, viz.,

    that we know not the Trojans and their history, Verg. A. 1, 565:

    adeo senuerunt Juppiter et Mars?

    Juv. 6, 59.—Hence (post-Cic.): adeo non ut... adeo nihil ut... so little that, so far from that... (in reference to which, it should be noticed that in Latin the negative is blended with the verb in one idea, which is qualified by adeo) = tantum abest ut: haec dicta adeo nihil moverunt quemquam, ut legati prope violati sint, these words left them all so unmoved that, etc., or had so little effect, etc., Liv. 3, 2, 7: qui adeo non tenuit iram, ut gladio cinctum in senatum venturum se esse palam diceret, who restrained his anger so little that, etc. (for, qui non—tenuit iram adeo, ut), id. 8, 7, 5; so 5, 45, 4; Vell. 2, 66, 4: Curt. 3, 12, 22.—Also with contra in the concluding clause:

    apud hostes Afri et Carthaginienses adeo non sustinebant, ut contra etiam pedem referrent,

    Liv. 30, 34, 5. —
    B.
    Adeo is placed enclitically after its word, like quidem, certe, and the Gr. ge, even, indeed, just, precisely. So,
    1.
    Most freq. with pronouns, in order to render prominent something before said, or foll., or otherwise known (cf. in Gr. egôge, suge, autos ge, etc., Viger. ed. Herm. 489, vi. and Zeun.): argentariis male credi qui aiunt, nugas praedicant: nam et bene et male credi dico; id adeo hodie ego expertus sum, just this (touto ge), Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 1; so id. Aul. 2, 4, 10; 4, 2, 15; id. Am. 1, 1, 98; 1, 2, 6; id. Ep. 1, 1, 51; 2, 2, 31; 5, 2, 40; id. Poen. 1, 2, 57: plerique homines, quos, cum nihil refert, pudet;

    ubi pudendum'st ibi eos deserit pudor, is adeo tu es,

    you are just such a one, id. Ep. 2, 1, 2:

    cui tu obsecutus, facis huic adeo injuriam,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 68: tute adeo jam ejus verba audies, you yourself shall hear what he has to say (suge akousêi), Ter. And. 3, 3, 27: Dolabella tuo nihil scito mihi esse jucundius: hanc adeo habebo gratiam illi, i. e. hanc, quae maxima est, gratiam (tautên ge tên charin), Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 16:

    haec adeo ex illo mihi jam speranda fuerunt,

    even this, Verg. A. 11, 275.—It is often to be translated by the intensive and, and just, etc. (so esp. in Cic. and the histt.): id adeo, si placet, considerate, just that (touto ge skopeite), Cic. Caec. 30, 87:

    id adeo ex ipso senatus consulto cognoscite,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 64, 143; cf. id. Clu. 30, 80:

    ad hoc quicumque aliarum atque senatus partium erant, conturbari remp., quam minus valere ipsi malebant. Id adeo malum multos post annos in civitatem reverterat,

    And just this evil, Sall. C. 37, 11; so 37, 2; id. J. 68, 3; Liv. 2, 29, 9; 4, 2, 2: id adeo manifestum erit, si cognoverimus, etc., and this, precisely this, will be evident, if, etc., Quint. 2, 16, 18 Spald.—It is rarely used with ille:

    ille adeo illum mentiri sibi credet,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 2, 6.—Sometimes with the rel. pron.: quas adeo haud quisquam liber umquam tetigit, Plaut: Poen. 1, 2, 57; Cic. Fin. 2, 12, 37. —With interrog. pron.:

    Quis adeo tam Latinae linguae ignarus est, quin, etc.,

    Gell. 7, 17.—Adeo is joined with the pers. pron. when the discourse passes from one person to another, and attention is to be particularly directed to the latter: Juppiter, tuque adeo summe Sol, qui res omnes inspicis, and thou especially, and chiefly thou, Enn. ap. Prob.:

    teque adeo decus hoc aevi inibit,

    Verg. E. 4, 11; id. G. 1, 24: teque, Neptune, invoco, vosque adeo venti, Poët. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 34, 73;

    and without the copulative: vos adeo... item ego vos virgis circumvinciam,

    Plaut. Rud. 3, 4, 25.— Ego adeo often stands for ego quidem, equidem (egôge):

    tum libertatem Chrysalo largibere: ego adeo numquam accipiam,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 7, 30; so id. Mil. 4, 4, 55; id. Truc. 4, 3, 73:

    ego adeo hanc primus inveni viam,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 16:

    nec me adeo fallit,

    Verg. A. 4, 96.—Ipse adeo (autos ge), for the sake of emphasis:

    atque hercle ipsum adeo contuor,

    Plaut. As. 2, 3, 24:

    ipsum adeo praesto video cum Davo,

    Ter. And. 2, 5, 4:

    ipse adeo senis ductor Rhoeteus ibat pulsibus,

    Sil. 14, 487.—
    2.
    With the conditional conjj. si, nisi, etc. (Gr. ei ge), if indeed, if truly:

    nihili est autem suum qui officium facere immemor est, nisi adeo monitus,

    unless, indeed, he is reminded of it, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 2: Si. Num illi molestae quippiam hae sunt nuptiae? Da. Nihil Hercle: aut si adeo, bidui est aut tridui haec sollicitudo, and if, indeed, etc. (not if also, for also is implied in aut), Ter. And. 2, 6, 7.—
    3.
    With adverbs: nunc adeo (nun ge), Plaut. As. 3, 1, 29; id. Mil. 2, 2, 4; id. Merc. 2, 2, 57; id. Men. 1, 2, 11; id. Ps. 1, 2, 52; id. Rud. 3, 4, 23; Ter. And. 4, 5, 26; Verg. A. 9, 156: jam adeo (dê ge), id. ib. 5, 268; Sil. 1, 20; 12, 534; Val. Fl. 3, 70. umquam adeo, Plaut. Cas. 5, 4, 23:

    inde adeo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 1:

    hinc adeo,

    Verg. E. 9, 59: sic adeo (houtôs ge), id. A. 4, 533; Sil. 12, 646:

    vix adeo,

    Verg. A. 6, 498:

    non adeo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 57; Verg. A. 11, 436. —
    4.
    With adjectives = vel, indeed, even, very, fully:

    quot adeo cenae, quas deflevi, mortuae!

    how very many suppers, Plaut. Stich. 1, 3, 59: quotque adeo fuerint, qui temnere superbum... Lucil. ap. Non. 180, 2: nullumne malorum finem adeo poenaeque dabis (adeo separated from nullum by poet. license)? wilt thou make no end at all to calamity and punishment? Val. Fl. 4, 63:

    trīs adeo incertos caeca caligine soles erramus,

    three whole days we wander about, Verg. A. 3, 203; 7, 629.—And with comp. or the adv. magis, multo, etc.:

    quae futura et quae facta, eloquar: multo adeo melius quam illi, cum sim Juppiter,

    very much better, Plaut. Am. 5, 2, 3; so id. Truc. 2, 1, 5:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam aliā ullā culpā meā, contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15.—
    5.
    With the conjj. sive, aut, vel, in order to annex a more important thought, or to make a correction, or indeed, or rather, or even only:

    sive qui ipsi ambīssent, seu per internuntium, sive adeo aediles perfidiose quoi duint,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 71:

    si hercle scivissem, sive adeo joculo dixisset mihi, se illam amare,

    id. Merc. 5, 4, 33; so id. Truc. 4, 3, 1; id. Men. 5, 2, 74; Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 9: nam si te tegeret pudor, sive adeo cor sapientia imbutum foret, Pacuv. ap. Non. 521, 10:

    mihi adeunda est ratio, quā ad Apronii quaestum, sive adeo, quā ad istius ingentem immanemque praedam possim pervenire,

    or rather, Cic. Verr 2, 3, 46, 110; Verg. A. 11, 369; so, atque adeo:

    ego princeps in adjutoribus atque adeo secundus,

    Cic. Att. 1, 17, 9.—
    6.
    With the imperative, for emphasis, like tandem, modo, dum, the Germ. so, and the Gr. ge (cf. L. and S.), now, I pray:

    propera adeo puerum tollere hinc ab janua,

    Ter. And. 4, 4, 20 (cf. xullabete g auton, Soph. Phil. 1003).—
    C.
    Like admodum or nimis, to give emphasis to an idea (for the most part only in comic poets, and never except with the positive of the adj.; cf. Consent. 2023 P.), indeed, truly, so very, so entirely:

    nam me ejus spero fratrem propemodum jam repperisse adulescentem adeo nobilem,

    so very noble, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 123:

    nec sum adeo informis,

    nor am I so very ugly, Verg. E. 2, 25:

    nam Caii Luciique casu non adeo fractus,

    Suet. Aug. 65:

    et merito adeo,

    and with perfect right, Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 42:

    etiam num credis te ignorarier aut tua facta adeo,

    do you, then, think that they are ignorant of you or your conduct entirely? id. Ph. 5, 8, 38.—
    D.
    To denote what exceeds expectation, even: quam omnium Thebis vir unam esse optimam dijudicat, quamque adeo cives Thebani rumificant probam, and whom even the Thebans (who are always ready to speak evil of others) declare to be an honest woman, Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 44.— Hence also it denotes something added to the rest of the sentence, besides, too, over and above, usually in the connection: -que adeo (rare, and never in prose; cf.

    adhuc, I.): quin te Di omnes perdant qui me hodie oculis vidisti tuis, meque adeo scelestum,

    and me too, Plaut. Rud. 4, 4, 122; cf. id. 4, 2, 32:

    haec adeo tibi me, ipsa palam fari omnipotens Saturnia jussit,

    Verg. A. 7, 427.
    III.
    After Caesar and Cicero (the only instance of this use adduced from Cicero's works, Off. 1, 11, 36, being found in a passage rejected by the best critics, as B. and K.).
    A.
    For adding an important and satisfactory reason to an assertion, and then it always stands at the beginning of the clause, indeed, for:

    cum Hanno perorāsset, nemini omnium cum eo certare necesse fuit: adeo prope omnis senatus Hannibalis erat: the idea is,

    Hanno's speech, though so powerful, was ineffectual, and did not need a reply; for all the senators belonged to the party of Hannibal, Liv. 21, 11, 1; so id. 2, 27, 3; 2, 28, 2; 8, 37, 2; Tac. Ann. 1, 50, 81; Juv. 3, 274; 14, 233.—Also for introducing a parenthesis: sed ne illi quidem ipsi satis mitem gentem fore (adeo ferocia atque indomita [p. 34] ingenia esse) ni subinde auro... principum animi concilientur, Liv. 21, 20, 8; so id. 9, 26, 17; 3, 4, 2; Tac. A. 2, 28.—
    B.
    When to a specific fact a general consideration is added as a reason for it, so, thus (in Livy very often):

    haud dubius, facilem in aequo campi victoriam fore: adeo non fortuna modo, sed ratio etiam cum barbaris stabat,

    thus not only fortune, but sagacity, was on the side of the barbarians, Liv. 5, 38, 4:

    adeo ex parvis saepe magnarum momenta rerum pendent,

    id. 27, 9, 1; so id. 4, 31, 5; 21, 33, 6; 28, 19; Quint. 1, 12, 7; Curt. 10, 2, 11; Tac. Agr. 1:

    adeo in teneris consuescere multum est,

    Verg. G. 2, 272.—
    C.
    In advancing from one thought to another more important = immo, rather, indeed, nay: nulla umquam res publica ubi tantus paupertati ac parsimoniae honos fuerit: adeo, quanto rerum minus, tanto minus cupiditatis erat, Liv. praef. 11; so Gell. 11, 7; Symm. Ep. 1, 30, 37.—
    D.
    With a negative after ne—quidem or quoque, so much the more or less, much less than, still less (post-Aug.):

    hujus totius temporis fortunam ne deflere quidem satis quisquam digne potuit: adeo nemo exprimere verbis potest,

    still less can one describe: it by words, Vell. 2, 67, 1:

    ne tecta quidem urbis, adeo publicum consilium numquam adiit,

    still less, Tac. A. 6, 15; so id. H. 3, 64; Curt. 7, 5, 35:

    favore militum anxius et superbia viri aequalium quoque, adeo superiorum intolerantis,

    who could not endure his equals even, much less his superiors, Tac. H. 4, 80.—So in gen., after any negative: quaelibet enim ex iis artibus in paucos libros contrahi solet: adeo infinito spatio ac traditione opus non est, so much the less is there need, etc., Quint. 12, 11, 16; Plin. 17, 12, 35, § 179; Tac. H. 3, 39.—(The assumption of a causal signif. of adeo = ideo, propterea, rests upon false readings. For in Cael. Cic. Fam. 8, 15 we should read ideo, B. and K., and in Liv. 24, 32, 6, ad ea, Weiss.).—See more upon this word in Hand, Turs. I. pp. 135-155.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > adeo

  • 7 adhuc

    ăd-huc, adv.
    I.
    Prop., of place, to this place, hitherto, thus far (designating the limit, inclusive of the whole space traversed: hence often joined with usque; cf.

    ad, A. 1. B.): conveniunt adhuc utriusque verba,

    thus far, to this point, the statements of both agree, Plaut. Truc. 4, 3, 20:

    adhuc ea dixi, causa cur Zenoni non fuisset,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 44; cf. Auct. Her. 1, 9, 16:

    his oris, quas angulo Baeticae adhuc usque perstrinximus,

    Mel. 3, 6, 1.—Hence, in the desig. of measure or degree, so far, to such a degree:

    et ipse Caesar erat adhuc impudens, qui exercitum et provinciam invito senatu teneret,

    Cic. Fam. 16, 11, 4; so Liv. 21, 18, 4; Quint. 2, 19, 2; 8, 5, 20.—More frequently,
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    Of time, until now, hitherto, as yet (designating the limit, together with the period already passed; cf.

    ad, 1. B.): res adhuc quidem hercle in tuto est,

    Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 48:

    celabitur itidem ut celata adhuc est,

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 20:

    sicut adhuc fecerunt, speculabuntur,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 2, 6:

    ille vidit non modo, quot fuissent adhuc philosophorum de summo bono, sed quot omnino esse possent sententiae,

    id. Fin. 5, 6, 16:

    haec adhuc (sc. acta sunt): sed ad praeterita revertamur,

    id. Att. 5, 20; so ib. 3, 14 fin.; 5, 17, 46; id. Agr. 3, 1, 1:

    Britanni, qui adhuc pugnae expertes,

    Tac. Agr. 37; so Curt. 7, 7, 8 al.—With usque or semper:

    usque adhuc actum est probe,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 6, 107; so id. Ps. 4, 7, 14; Ter. And. 1, 5, 27; id. Ad. 4, 4, 23; 5, 4, 5; id. Hec. 4, 1, 29; Cic. Rep. 2, 20:

    quod adhuc semper tacui et tacendum putavi,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 26, 119.—With dum in subordinate propositions, for the purpose of more accurate desig. of time:

    quae adhuc te carens, dum hic fui, sustentabam,

    what I have endured during the whole time that I have been here, until now, Plaut. Capt. 5, 1, 4:

    adhuc dum mihi nullo loco deesse vis, numquam te confirmare potuisti,

    Cic. Fam. 16, 4; so ib. 18.—Hence the adverbial expression (occurring once in Plautus): adhuc locorum, until now, hitherto: ut adhuc locorum feci, faciam sedulo, Capt. 2, 3, 25.— Adhuc denotes not merely a limitation of time in the present, but also, though more rarely, like usque eo and ad id tempus, and the Engl. as yet, in the past:

    adhuc haec erant, ad reliqua alacri tendebamus animo,

    Cic. Div. 2, 2, 4:

    Abraham vero adhuc stabat,

    Vulg. Gen. 18, 22:

    unam adhuc a te epistulam acceperam,

    Cic. Att. 7, 2:

    cum adhuc sustinuisset multos dies,

    Vulg. Act. 18, 18:

    scripsi etiam illud quodam in libello... disertos me cognōsse nonnullos, eloquentem adhuc neminem,

    id. de Or. 1, 21:

    una adhuc victoria Carus Metius censebatur,

    Tac. Agr. 45.—
    B.
    Adhuc non, or neque adhuc, not as yet, not to this time: nihil adhuc, nothing as yet, or not at all as yet: numquam adhuc, never as yet, never yet:

    cupidissimi veniendi maximis injuriis affecti, adhuc non venerunt,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 27, 65:

    me adhuc non legisse turpe utrique nostrum est,

    id. Fam. 7, 24, 7; so id. 3, 8, 25; 6, 14; 14, 6, 2; Mart. 7, 89, 10:

    cui neque fulgor adhuc nec dum sua forma recessit,

    Verg. A. 11, 70:

    nihil adhuc peccavit etiam,

    Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 78:

    nihil adhuc est, quod vereare,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 1:

    sed quod quaeris, quando, qua, quo, nihil adhuc scimus,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 7, 4; so 9, 17, 7; Caes. B. C. 3, 57; Nep. Milt. 5:

    numquam etiam quicquam adhuc verborum est prolocutus perperam,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 92; cf. id. Capt. 5, 2, 7.—
    C.
    For etiam nunc, yet, still; to denote continuance (apparently not used by Cic.):

    stertis adhuc?

    are you still snoring? Pers. 3, 58;

    adhuc tranquilla res est,

    it is still quiet, Ter. Ph. 3, 1, 15; so id. Ad. 1, 2, 42:

    Ephesi regem est consecutus fluctuantem adhuc animo,

    Liv. 33, 49, 7; so 21, 43, 14; Tac. A. 1, 8, 17; id. H. 2, 44, 73; 4, 17; id. Germ. 28; Suet. Aug. 56, 69; Plin. Ep. 4, 13, 1; Curt. 8, 6, 18: quinque satis fuerant; nam sex septemve libelli est nimium: quid adhuc ludere, Musa, juvat? why play still, still more, or further? Mart. 8, 3; so id. 4, 91.—
    D.
    Hence also to denote that a thing is still remaining or existing:

    at in veterum comicorum adhuc libris invenio,

    I yet find in the old comic poets, Quint. 1, 7, 22:

    quippe tres adhuc legiones erant,

    were still left, Tac. H. 3, 9; so id. G. 34; id. Ann. 2, 26; Mart. 7, 44, 1.—With vb. omitted:

    si quis adhuc precibus locus, exue mentem,

    Verg. A. 4, 319.—
    E.
    To denote that a thing has only reached a certain point, now first, just now: cum adhuc ( now for the first time) naso odos obsecutus es meo, da vicissim meo gutturi gaudium, Plaut. Curc. 1, 2, 9:

    gangraenam vero, si nondum plane tenet, sed adhuc incipit, curare non difficillimum est,

    Cels. 5, 26, 34; so Mart. 13, 102.—Hence, with deinde or aliquando following:

    quam concedis adhuc artem omnino non esse, sed aliquando,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 58, 246:

    senatus priusquam edicto convocaretur ad curiam concurrit, obseratisque adhuc foribus, deinde apertis, tantas mortuo gratias agit, etc.,

    Suet. Tit. 11; so Tac. A. 11, 23.—
    F.
    To denote that a thing had reached a certain limit before another thing happened (in prose only after Livy), still, yet, while yet:

    inconditam multitudinem adhuc disjecit,

    he dispersed the multitude while yet unarranged, Tac. A. 3, 42.—
    G.
    For etiam, insuper, praeterea, to denote that a thing occurs beside or along with another (belonging perhaps only to popular language, hence once in Plaut., and to the post-Aug. per.), besides, further, moreover:

    addam minam adhuc istic postea,

    Plaut. Truc. 5, 18:

    unam rem adhuc adiciam,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, 8:

    sunt adhuc aliquae non omittendae in auro differentiae,

    Plin. 33, 2, 10, § 37; so Quint. 2, 21, 6; 9, 4, 34; Val. Fl. 8, 429; Tac. A. 1, 17; id. Agr. 29; ib. 33; Flor. 1, 13, 17; Vulg. Amos, 4, 7; ib. Joan. 16, 12; ib. Heb. 11, 32.—
    H.
    In later Lat. adhuc is used like etiam in the Cic. per., = eti, yet, still, for the sake of emphasis in comparisons; then, if it cnhances the comparative, it stands before it; but follows it, if that which the comp. expresses is added by way of augmentation; as, he has done a still greater thing, and he has still done a greater thing (this is the view of Hand, Turs. I. p. 166):

    tum Callicles adhuc concitatior,

    Quint. 2, 15, 28:

    adhuc difficilior observatio est per tenores,

    id. 1, 5, 22:

    si marmor illi (Phidiae), si adhuc viliorem materiem obtulisses, fecisset, etc.,

    Sen. Ep. 85, 34:

    adhuc diligentius,

    Plin. 18, 4: cui gloriae amplior [p. 36] adhuc ex opportunitate cumulus accessit, Suet. Tib. 17:

    Di faveant, majora adhuc restant,

    Curt. 9, 6, 23; so Quint. 10, 1, 99; Tac. G. 19; Suet. Ner. 10.
    I.
    Adhuc sometimes = adeo, even (in the connection, et adhuc, -que adhuc; v. adeo, II.).
    a.
    Ita res successit meliusque adhuc, Plaut. Bacch. 4, 9, 18:

    Tellurem Nymphasque et adhuc ignota precatur flumina,

    Verg. A. 7, 137:

    Nil parvum sapias et adhuc sublimia cures,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 12, 15; so ib. 2, 2, 114; Liv. 22, 49, 10; Sen. Ep. 49, 4.—
    b.
    Absol.:

    gens non astuta nec callida aperit adhuc secreta pectoris licentiā joci,

    Tac. G. 22:

    cetera similes Batavis, nisi quod ipso adhuc terrae suae solo et caelo acrius animantur,

    ib. 29, 3 (cf.: ipse adeo under adeo, II., and at the end); so Stat. S. 1, 2, 55.—See more upon this word, Hand, Turs. I. pp. 156-167.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > adhuc

  • 8 alioqui

    ălĭōquī (Corssen, Ausspr. II. p. 839, questions the MS. authority for the forms ălĭ-ōquin and cĕtĕrōquin, but if they are genuine, he believes they have the prep. in affixed, as in deoin), adv. (prop. abl. alioqui, i. e. alio quo modo, in some other way; used in the ante-Aug. per. only once in Lucr.; but freq. after that per., esp. by the histt., and by Pliny the younger).
    I.
    Lit., to indicate that something has its existence or right in all but the exception given, in other respects, for the rest, otherwise; Gr. allôs, often with adj. standing either before or after it:

    milites tantum, qui sequerentur currum, defuerunt: alioqui magnificus triumphus fuit,

    Liv. 37, 46 Madv.;

    8, 9: Hannibal tumulum tutum commodumque alioqui, nisi quod longinquae aquationis erat, cepit,

    id. 30, 29, 10:

    atqui si vitiis mediocribus ac mea paucis Mendosa est natura, alioquin recta,

    Hor. S. 1, 6, 66 K. and H.:

    solitus alioquin id temporis luxus principis intendere,

    Tac. A. 13, 20 Halm; so id. ib. 4, 37; Curt. 7, 4, 8; 8, 2, 2.—Sometimes concessive, hence also with quamquam, quamvis, cum, as for the rest, besides: triumphatum de Tiburtibus: alioqui mitis victoria fuit, i. e. although in other respects the victory was, etc., Liv. 7, 19: at si tantula pars oculi media illa peresa est, Incolumis quamvis alioqui splendidus orbis ( al though in other respects uninjured and clear) occidit extemplo lumen, Lucr. 3, 414 (Lachmann rejected this line; Munro receives it and reads alioquoi):

    ideo nondum eum legi, cum alioqui validissime cupiam,

    Plin. Ep. 9, 35 Keil; so Plin. 10, 69, 93, § 198.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    To indicate that something exists, avails, or has influence in other cases beside those mentioned, yet, besides, moreover (syn.:

    porro, praeterea): sed haec quidem alioquin memoria magni professoris, uti interponeremus, effecit,

    Cels. 8, 4:

    ne pugnemus igitur, cum praesertim plurimis alioqui Graecis sit utendum,

    very many other Greek words besides, Quint. 2, 14, 4 Halm:

    non tenuit iram Alexander, cujus alioqui potens non erat,

    of which he had not the control at other times, Curt. 4, 2, 6; Tac. H. 3, 32:

    quā occasione Caesar, validus alioquin spernendis honoribus hujuscemodi orationem coepit,

    id. A. 4, 37.—So in questions, Quint. 4, 5, 3.—Also et alioqui in Pliny: afficior curā; et alioqui meus pudor, mea dignitas in discrimen adducitur, Plin Ep. 2, 9, 1; so id. ib. 10, 42, 2; id. Pan. 45, 4; 68, 7; 7, 9.—And in copulative clauses with et... et, cum... tum, etc., both in general (or in other respects)... and:

    et alioqui opportune situm, et transitus eā est in Labeates,

    Liv. 43, 19:

    mors Marcelli cum alioqui miserabilis fuit, tum quod, etc.,

    id. 27, 27, 11; so Quint. 5, 6, 4; 12, 10, 63.—
    B.
    To indicate that something is in itself situated so and so, or avails in a certain manner, in itself, even in itself, himself, etc.: corpus, quod illa (Phryne) speciosissima alioqui ( in herself even most beautiful) diductā nudaverat tunicā, Quint. 2, 15, 9 Spald.; 10, 3, 13; 2, 1, 4.—
    C.
    Ellipt. like the Gr. allôs, and commonly placed at the beginning of a clause, to indicate that something must happen, if the previous assertion or assumption shall not be (which fact is not [p. 86] expressed), otherwise, else (cf. aliter, b. g):

    vidistine aliquando Clitumnum fontem? si nondum (et puto nondum: alioqui narrāsses mihi),

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8; 1, 20: Nec, si pugnent inter se, qui idem didicerunt, idcirco ars, quae utrique tradita est, non erit;

    alioqui nec armorum, etc.,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33; so id. 4, 2, 23:

    non inornata debet esse brevitas, alioqui sit indocta,

    id. 4, 2, 46:

    Da mihi liberos, alioquin moriar,

    Vulg. Gen. 30, 1; ib. Matt. 6, 1; ib. Heb. 9, 17:

    languescet alioqui industria, si nullus ex se metus aut spes,

    Tac. A. 2, 38.—
    D.
    (Eccl. Lat.) As an advers. conj., but (cf. ceterum and the Gr. alla):

    alioquin mitte manum tuam et tange os ejus et carnem,

    Vulg. Job, 2, 5. Cf. Hand, Turs. I. pp. 234-241.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > alioqui

  • 9 alioquin

    ălĭōquī (Corssen, Ausspr. II. p. 839, questions the MS. authority for the forms ălĭ-ōquin and cĕtĕrōquin, but if they are genuine, he believes they have the prep. in affixed, as in deoin), adv. (prop. abl. alioqui, i. e. alio quo modo, in some other way; used in the ante-Aug. per. only once in Lucr.; but freq. after that per., esp. by the histt., and by Pliny the younger).
    I.
    Lit., to indicate that something has its existence or right in all but the exception given, in other respects, for the rest, otherwise; Gr. allôs, often with adj. standing either before or after it:

    milites tantum, qui sequerentur currum, defuerunt: alioqui magnificus triumphus fuit,

    Liv. 37, 46 Madv.;

    8, 9: Hannibal tumulum tutum commodumque alioqui, nisi quod longinquae aquationis erat, cepit,

    id. 30, 29, 10:

    atqui si vitiis mediocribus ac mea paucis Mendosa est natura, alioquin recta,

    Hor. S. 1, 6, 66 K. and H.:

    solitus alioquin id temporis luxus principis intendere,

    Tac. A. 13, 20 Halm; so id. ib. 4, 37; Curt. 7, 4, 8; 8, 2, 2.—Sometimes concessive, hence also with quamquam, quamvis, cum, as for the rest, besides: triumphatum de Tiburtibus: alioqui mitis victoria fuit, i. e. although in other respects the victory was, etc., Liv. 7, 19: at si tantula pars oculi media illa peresa est, Incolumis quamvis alioqui splendidus orbis ( al though in other respects uninjured and clear) occidit extemplo lumen, Lucr. 3, 414 (Lachmann rejected this line; Munro receives it and reads alioquoi):

    ideo nondum eum legi, cum alioqui validissime cupiam,

    Plin. Ep. 9, 35 Keil; so Plin. 10, 69, 93, § 198.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    To indicate that something exists, avails, or has influence in other cases beside those mentioned, yet, besides, moreover (syn.:

    porro, praeterea): sed haec quidem alioquin memoria magni professoris, uti interponeremus, effecit,

    Cels. 8, 4:

    ne pugnemus igitur, cum praesertim plurimis alioqui Graecis sit utendum,

    very many other Greek words besides, Quint. 2, 14, 4 Halm:

    non tenuit iram Alexander, cujus alioqui potens non erat,

    of which he had not the control at other times, Curt. 4, 2, 6; Tac. H. 3, 32:

    quā occasione Caesar, validus alioquin spernendis honoribus hujuscemodi orationem coepit,

    id. A. 4, 37.—So in questions, Quint. 4, 5, 3.—Also et alioqui in Pliny: afficior curā; et alioqui meus pudor, mea dignitas in discrimen adducitur, Plin Ep. 2, 9, 1; so id. ib. 10, 42, 2; id. Pan. 45, 4; 68, 7; 7, 9.—And in copulative clauses with et... et, cum... tum, etc., both in general (or in other respects)... and:

    et alioqui opportune situm, et transitus eā est in Labeates,

    Liv. 43, 19:

    mors Marcelli cum alioqui miserabilis fuit, tum quod, etc.,

    id. 27, 27, 11; so Quint. 5, 6, 4; 12, 10, 63.—
    B.
    To indicate that something is in itself situated so and so, or avails in a certain manner, in itself, even in itself, himself, etc.: corpus, quod illa (Phryne) speciosissima alioqui ( in herself even most beautiful) diductā nudaverat tunicā, Quint. 2, 15, 9 Spald.; 10, 3, 13; 2, 1, 4.—
    C.
    Ellipt. like the Gr. allôs, and commonly placed at the beginning of a clause, to indicate that something must happen, if the previous assertion or assumption shall not be (which fact is not [p. 86] expressed), otherwise, else (cf. aliter, b. g):

    vidistine aliquando Clitumnum fontem? si nondum (et puto nondum: alioqui narrāsses mihi),

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8; 1, 20: Nec, si pugnent inter se, qui idem didicerunt, idcirco ars, quae utrique tradita est, non erit;

    alioqui nec armorum, etc.,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33; so id. 4, 2, 23:

    non inornata debet esse brevitas, alioqui sit indocta,

    id. 4, 2, 46:

    Da mihi liberos, alioquin moriar,

    Vulg. Gen. 30, 1; ib. Matt. 6, 1; ib. Heb. 9, 17:

    languescet alioqui industria, si nullus ex se metus aut spes,

    Tac. A. 2, 38.—
    D.
    (Eccl. Lat.) As an advers. conj., but (cf. ceterum and the Gr. alla):

    alioquin mitte manum tuam et tange os ejus et carnem,

    Vulg. Job, 2, 5. Cf. Hand, Turs. I. pp. 234-241.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > alioquin

  • 10 amens

    ā-mens, mentis, adj.
    I.
    Lit., out of one's senses, beside one's self, senseless, mad, insane, frantic, distracted (of every kind of passionate excitement; while insanus designates one diseased in mind; and excors or vecors, one that is without mind;

    among the poets a favorite word with Verg. and Ov.): inceptio est amentium, haud amantium,

    Ter. And. 1, 3, 13:

    homo amentissimus atque in omnibus consiliis praeceps,

    Cic. Phil. 5, 13:

    o vecors et amens,

    id. Pis. 9:

    arma amens capio,

    Verg. A. 2, 314:

    in dies amentior,

    Suet. Aug. 65:

    Ne trepides caeli divisis partibus amens,

    that thou tremble not senselessly at the divided heavens, Lucr. 6, 86:

    lugubris et amens,

    Ov. M. 2, 334:

    cursuque amens,

    Verg. A. 2, 321:

    adspectu amens,

    id. ib. 4, 279; so id. ib. 12, 776; and with gen.:

    amens animi,

    id. ib. 4, 203 (cf. Rudd. II. p. 73):

    dolore amens,

    Ov. Tr. 1, 3, 92:

    terrore amens,

    Liv. 32, 12:

    amens invidiā,

    id. 8, 31:

    amens metu,

    id. 23, 9; 1, 48:

    periculi magnitudine amens et attonitus,

    Curt. 6, 9.—
    II.
    Meton., foolish, stupid:

    homo audacissimus atque amentissimus,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 3, 7 (cf. a little before:

    quod cum incredibili ejus audaciā singularis stultitia conjuncta est).—Of things: amentissimum consilium,

    Cic. Att. 7, 10:

    cogor amenti caeca furore,

    Cat. 64, 197:

    impetus amens,

    Luc. 4, 279 al. — Adv. not used.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > amens

  • 11 amplissime

    amplus, a, um, adj. [some regard this as a shortened form of anapleôs, = filled up, full; others, as for ambulus from amb-, rounded out, as superus from super, etc.; v. Doed. Syn. II. p. 113; but perh. it is better to form it from am- and -plus, akin to -pleo, plenus, q. v. Pott], thus pr., full all round; hence, great, large. —In space, of large extent, great, large, wide, ample, spacious (the forms amplus and amplior are very rare in the ante-class. per., and rare in all periods. Amplius is com. in the ante-class., freq. in the class., and very freq. in the post-class. per., the Vulg. rarely using the other forms, but using this 121 times. Amplissimus belongs to prose, and is scarcely used before Cicero, with whom it was a very favorite word. It was also used by Plin. Maj. and Min., but never by Tac., Sall. (in his genuine works), nor the Vulg. Catullus used only the form amplius, and Prop. only amplus, while Tib. and Pers. never used this word in any form. Ampliter is found mostly in Plaut.; and ample and amplissime are used a few times by Cic. and by writers that followed him; syn.: magnus, ingens, latus, late patens, spatiosus, laxus).
    I.
    Lit.:

    amplus et spectu protervo ferox,

    Pac. Trag. Rel. p. 94 Rib.:

    qui (Pluto) ter amplum Geryonen compescit unda,

    Hor. C. 2, 14, 7:

    ampla domus dedecori domino fit, si est in ea solitudo,

    Cic. Off. 1, 39, 139; so Verg. A. 2, 310:

    admodum amplum et excelsum signum,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 74:

    collis castris parum amplus,

    Sall. J. 98, 3:

    porticibus in amplis,

    Verg. A. 3, 353:

    per amplum mittimur Elysium,

    id. ib. 6, 743:

    vocemque per ampla volutant Atria,

    id. ib. 1, 725:

    nil vulva pulchrius ampla,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 15, 41:

    amplae aures,

    Plin. 11, 52, 114, § 274:

    milium amplum grano,

    id. 18, 7, 10, § 55:

    cubiculum amplum,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 6:

    baptisterium amplum atque opacum,

    id. ib. 5, 6, 25.— Comp.:

    quanto est res amplior,

    Lucr. 2, 1133:

    Amplior Urgo et Capraria,

    Plin. 3, 6, 12, § 81:

    avis paulo amplior passere,

    id. 10, 32, 47, § 89:

    amplior specie mortali,

    Suet. Aug. 94; id. Caes. 76 (for the neutr. amplius, v. infra).— Sup.:

    amplissima curia... gymnasium amplissimum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 53:

    urbs amplissima atque ornatissima,

    id. Agr. 2, 76:

    amplissimum peristylum,

    id. Dom. 116:

    (candelabrum) ad amplissimi templi ornatum esse factum,

    id. Verr. 4, 65:

    mons Italiae amplissimus,

    Plin. 3, 5, 7, § 48:

    amplissimum flumen,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8, 3:

    amplissimus lacus,

    id. ib. 10, 41, 2:

    amplissima insula,

    Plin. 6, 20, 23, § 71:

    amplissimi horti,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 18, 11:

    amplissima arborum,

    Plin. 16, 39, 76, § 200:

    est (topazon) amplissima gemmarum,

    id. 37, 8, 32, § 109:

    amplissimum cubiculum,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 6, 23.—
    B.
    Transf., great, abundant, ample, much, long:

    bono atque amplo lucro,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 6 and Ep. 2, 2, 117:

    pabula miseris mortalibus ampla,

    Lucr. 5, 944:

    ampla civitas,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 81; 4, 96:

    civitas ampla atque florens,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 3:

    gens ampla,

    Plin. 5, 30, 33, § 125:

    amplae copiae,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 19:

    ampla manus militum,

    Liv. Epit. 1, 4, 9:

    pecuaria res ampla,

    Cic. Quinct. 12:

    res familiaris ampla,

    id. Phil. 13, 8:

    (res) ampla,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 3, 82, 20 Kritz:

    patrimonium amplum et copiosum,

    Cic. Sex. Rosc. 6; id. Dom. 146: id. Phil. 2, 67:

    amplae divitiae,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 101:

    esse patri ejus amplas facultates,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 14, 9:

    in amplis opibus heres,

    Plin. 9, 36, 59, § 122.— Comp.:

    amplior numerus,

    Cic. Mil. 57; Sall. J. 105, 3; Tac. A. 14, 53:

    ampliores aquae,

    Plin. 5, 9, 10, § 58:

    amplior exercitus,

    Sall. J. 54, 3; Suet. Vesp. 4:

    commeatus spe amplior,

    Sall. J. 75, 8:

    amplior pecunia, Auct. B. Alex. 56: pecunia amplior,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 11, 2:

    pretia ampliora,

    Plin. 10, 29, 43, § 84:

    omnia longe ampliora invenire quam etc.,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 14, 10:

    ampliores noctes,

    Plin. 18, 26, 63, § 232:

    ut ampliori tempore maneret,

    Vulg. Act. 18, 20.— Sup.:

    peditatus copiae amplissimae e Gallia,

    Cic. Font. 8:

    exercitus amplissimus,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 2; 9, 13, 11:

    amplissima pecunia,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 31:

    amplissimae fortunae,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 8; id. Quinct. 49; id. Phil. 10, 4:

    amplissimae patrimonii copiae,

    id. Fl. 89:

    amplissimas summas emptionibus occupare,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 2, 3:

    opes amplissimae,

    id. ib. 8, 18, 4:

    amplissima dies horarum quindecim etc.,

    the longest day, Plin. 6, 34, 39, § 218.—Also subst. in comp. neutr. (v. amplius, adv. infra), more:

    ut quirem exaudire amplius,

    Att. Trag. Rel. p. 173 Rib.:

    si vis amplius dari, Dabitur,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 18:

    jam amplius orat,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 19:

    daturus non sum amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 29:

    non complectar in his libris amplius quam quod etc.,

    id. de Or. 1, 6, 22:

    tantum adfero quantum ipse optat, atque etiam amplius,

    Plaut. Capt. 4, 1, 10:

    ni amplius etiam, quod ebibit,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 20: Ph. Etiamne amplius? Th. Nil, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 63: Tr. Dimidium Volo ut dicas. Gr. Immo hercle etiam amplius, Plaut. Rud. 4, 3, 21: Th. Nempe octoginta debentur huic minae? Tr. Haud nummo amplius, id. Most. 3, 3, 16:

    etiam amplius illam adparare condecet,

    Turp. Com. Rel. p. 100 Rib.:

    hoc onere suscepto amplexus animo sum aliquanto amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1:

    si sit opus liquidi non amplius urna,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 54:

    omnis numerus amplius octingentis milibus explebat,

    Vell. 2, 110, 3:

    Segestanis imponebat aliquanto amplius quam etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 76:

    illa corona contentus Thrasybulus neque amplius requisivit,

    Nep. Thras. 4, 3:

    amplius possidere,

    Plin. 18, 4, 3, § 17:

    Ille imperio ei reddito haud amplius, quam ut duo ex tribus filiis secum militarent, exegit,

    Curt. 8, 4, 21:

    dedit quantum maximum potuit, daturus amplius, si potuisset,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 21, 6:

    cum hoc amplius praestet, quod etc.,

    id. ib. 7, 25, 1.—Also with part. gen., more of, a greater quantity or number of:

    gaudeo tibi liberorum esse amplius,

    Plaut. Cist. 5, 4:

    te amplius bibisse praedicet loti,

    Cat. 39, 21:

    amplius frumenti auferre,

    Cic. Verr. 3, 49:

    expensum est auri viginti paulo amplius,

    id. Fl. 6, 8:

    amplius negotii contrahi,

    id. Cat. 4, 9:

    si amplius obsidum vellet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 9, ubi v. Herz.:

    quanto ejus amplius processerat temporis,

    id. B. C. 3, 25.—
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    Of internal power or force, great, strong, violent, impetuous:

    pro viribus amplis,

    Lucr. 5, 1174:

    amplae vires peditum,

    Plin. 6, 20, 23, § 75;

    ampla nepotum Spes,

    Prop. 4, 22, 41:

    poena sera, sed ampla,

    full, strict, id. 4, 5, 32. — Comp.:

    haec irae factae essent multo ampliores,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 1, 9:

    si forte morbus amplior factus siet, i. e. gravior,

    id. ib. 3, 1, 50:

    amplior metus,

    Cic. Clu. 128:

    amplior potentia feris,

    Plin. 28, 10, 42, § 153:

    ampliorem dicendi facultatem consequi,

    Quint. 2, 3, 4:

    amplior eoque acrior impetus,

    Flor. 4, 2, 66:

    spes amplior,

    Sall. J. 105, 4:

    amplius accipietis judicium,

    severer, Vulg. Matt. 23, 14:

    amplior auctoritas,

    Plin. 37, 3, 12, § 47:

    amplior virtus,

    higher merit, Quint. 8, 3, 83:

    idem aut amplior cultus (dei),

    Plin. 28, 2, 4, § 18:

    amplior est quaestio,

    Quint. 3, 5, 8:

    ampliora verba,

    of larger meaning, id. 8, 4, 2: scientia intellegentiaque ac sapientia ampliores inventae sunt in te, Vulg. Dan. 5, 14:

    quo legatis animus amplior esset,

    Sall. C. 40, 6; 59, 1:

    spiritus amplior,

    Vulg. Dan. 5, 12; 6, 3.— Sup.:

    (honos) pro amplissimis meritis redditur,

    Cic. Phil. 5, 41:

    cujus sideris (Caniculae) effectus amplissimi in terra sentiuntur,

    very violent, Plin. 2, 40, 40, § 107:

    amplissima spes,

    Suet. Caes. 7:

    his finis cognitionis amplissimae,

    most important trial, Plin. Ep. 2, 11, 23.—
    B.
    Of external splendor, great, handsome, magnificent, splendid, glorious:

    illis ampla satis forma, pudicitia,

    great enough, Prop. 1, 2, 24:

    haec ampla sunt, haec divina,

    Cic. Sest. 102; id. Arch. 23:

    res gestae satis amplae,

    Sall. C. 8, 2:

    cur parum amplis adfecerit praemiis,

    Cic. Mil. 57:

    ampla quidem, sed pro ingentibus meritis praemia acceperunt,

    Tac. A. 14, 53:

    amplum in modum praemia ostentare,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 26, 6:

    amplis honoribus usi,

    Sall. J. 25, 4:

    amplis honoribus auctos,

    Hor. S. 1, 6, 11.—Sometimes in mal. part. or ironically:

    amplam occasionem calumniae nactus,

    a fine opportunity, Cic. Verr. 2, 61:

    spolia ampla refertis Tuque puerque tuus,

    glorious spoils, Verg. A. 4, 93.— Comp.:

    ne ullum munus aedilitatis amplius aut gratius populo esse possit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 5; id. Mur. 37:

    praemiis ad perdiscendum amplioribus commoveri,

    id. de Or. 1, 4, 13:

    alicui ampliorem laudem tribuere,

    id. Sest. 27:

    in aliqua re esse laudem ampliorem,

    id. Marcell. 4:

    corporis membris plus dedit, id amplius atque augustius ratus (Zeuxis),

    Quint. 12, 10, 5:

    ut Augustus vocaretur ampliore cognomine,

    Suet. Aug. 7.— Subst.:

    in potestatibus eo modo agitabat, ut ampliore, quam gerebat, dignus haberetur,

    of something greater, Sall. J. 63, 5.— Sup.:

    ut consules monumentum quam amplissimum faciundum curent,

    Cic. Phil. 14, 38; 14, 31; id. Verr. 4, 82:

    hoc munus aedilitatis amplissimum,

    id. ib. 1, 12, 36; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 1, 74:

    alicui amplissimas potestates dare,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 31:

    insignibus amplissimis ornatus,

    id. ib. 2, 101:

    dona amplissima conferre,

    Plin. 18, 3, 3, § 9:

    praemia legatis dedistis amplissima,

    Cic. Cat. 4, 5; id. Phil. 2, 32:

    spe amplissimorum praemiorum adduci,

    id. Mil. 5; id. de Or. 1, 5, 16:

    velut praemium quoddam amplissimum longi laboris,

    Quint. 10, 7, 1:

    munera amplissima mittere,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    vestris beneficiis amplissimis adfectus,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 51; id. Dom. 98:

    laudi amplissimae lauream concedere,

    id. Pis. 74:

    laudibus amplissimis adficere,

    id. Phil. 7, 11:

    amplissimam gloriam consequi,

    id. Prov. Cons. 39:

    ut eum amplissimo regis honore et nomine adfeceris,

    id. Deiot. 14:

    amplissimis aliquem efferre honoribus,

    Aur. Vict. Epit. 17, 3:

    amplissimis uti honoribus,

    Cic. Fl. 45:

    amplissimos honores adipisci,

    id. Verr. 5, 181:

    honores adsequi amplissimos,

    id. Mil. 81:

    aliquem ad honores amplissimos perducere,

    id. Am. 20, 73:

    meus labor fructum est amplissimum consecutus,

    id. Imp. Pomp 2:

    mihi gratiae verbis amplissimis aguntur,

    in the handsomest termis, id. Cat. 3, 14; id. Phil. 2, 13; id. Quir. 15:

    ei amplissimis verbis gratias egimus,

    id. Phil. 1, 3:

    provincia Gallia merito ornatur verbis amplissimis ab senatu,

    id. ib. 4, 9:

    amplissimis verbis conlaudatus,

    Suet. Caes. 16:

    amplissimo populi senatusque judicio exercitus habuistis,

    Cic. Agr. 1, 12; id. Fl. 5; id. Dom. 86; id. Planc. 93:

    de meo consulatu amplissima atque ornatissima decreta fecerunt,

    id. Dom. 74:

    quam universi populi, illius gentis, amplissimum testimonium (said of Cic.),

    Plin. 7, 30, 31, § 116.—
    C.
    In respect of the opinion of others, esteemed, renowned, etc.:

    quicquid est, quamvis amplum sit, id est parum tum cum est aliquid amplius,

    Cic. Marcell. 26:

    quid hunc hominem magnum aut amplum de re publica cogitare (putare possumus), qui etc.,

    great or noble, id. Imp. Pomp. 37:

    omnia, quae vobis cara atque ampla sunt,

    id. Agr. 2, 9; id. Arch. 23:

    convenerunt corrogati et quidem ampli quidam homines,

    id. Phil. 3, 20:

    hoc studium parvi properemus et ampli,

    small and great, Hor. Ep. 1, 3, 28:

    amplis doctoribus instructus,

    Tac. A. 14, 52:

    sin autem sunt amplae et honestae familiae plebeiae,

    Cic. Mur. 7, 15.— Comp.:

    cum est aliquid amplius,

    Cic. Marcell. 26:

    ampliores ordines,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 77, where Dinter reads priores: quo (ingenio) neque melius neque amplius aliud in natura mortalium est, [p. 112] Sall. J. 2, 4:

    nihil amplius potes (tribuere) amicitia tua,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    quid amplius facitis?

    Vulg. Matt. 5, 47.— Sup.:

    ex amplissimo genere nubere,

    Cic. Cael. 34:

    amplissimo genere natus,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 12:

    genere copiisque amplissimus, id. ib 6, 15: quam (familiam) vidit amplissimam,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 12:

    amplissimos patruos habere,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 147:

    amplissima civitas,

    id. Verr. 5, 122:

    apud illos Fabiorum nomen est amplissimum,

    id. Font. 36; id. Caecin. 104; id. Verr. 3, 96; id. Deiot. 14:

    mihi hic locus ad agendum amplissimus est visus,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 1:

    non adgrediar ad illa maxima atque amplissima prius quam etc.,

    id. Sest. 5:

    licet tribuas ei quantum amplissimum potes, nihil tamen amplius potes amicitia tua,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    amplissimis operibus increscere,

    id. ib. 8, 4, 3:

    honores in amplissimo consilio collocare,

    Cic. Sen. 2:

    amplissimi orbis terrae consilii principes,

    id. Phil. 3, 34: honoris amplissimi puto esse accusare improbos, I esteem it to be the greatest honor, etc., id. Div. in Caecil. 70:

    promotus ad amplissimas procurationes,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 31, 3:

    praeter honores amplissimos cognomenque etc.,

    Plin. 7, 44, 45, § 142:

    spes amplissimae dignitatis,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 49; id. Sen. 19, 68; Suet. Vit. 2.—
    D.
    Hence, amplissimus (almost always thus in sup.) as a title for persons holding great and honored offices, as consul, senator, etc., or as an honorable epithet of the office itself or the body of officers, distinguished, very distinguished, honorable, right honorable, most honorable, etc.:

    is mihi videtur amplissimus, qui sua virtute in altiorem locum pervenit,

    Cic. Sex. Rosc. 83:

    homo et suis et populi Romani ornamentis amplissimus,

    id. Mur. 8:

    P. Africanus rebus gestis amplissimus,

    id. Caecin. 69:

    ut homines amplissimi testimonium de sua re non dicerent,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 102; id. Clu. 197:

    Q. Catuli atque ceterorum amplissimorum hominum auctoritas,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 63:

    vir amplissimus ejus civitatis,

    id. Verr. 4, 17; id. Fl. 32:

    exercitum Cn. Domitii, amplissimi viri, sustentavit,

    id. Deiot. 5, 14:

    cum habeas amplissimi viri religionem (of L. Lucullus),

    id. Arch. 4, 8; id. Lig. 22:

    in quo consilio amplissimi viri judicarent,

    id. Mil. 5; id. Balb. 1; id. Dom. 2:

    comitatus virorum amplissimorum,

    id. Sull. 9:

    viros primarios atque amplissimos civitatis in consilium advocare,

    id. Verr. 3, 18:

    ordinis amplissimi esse,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 13, 1; 37, 6:

    cives amplissimos legare,

    Cic. Balb. 42:

    hoc amplissimum nomen, i. e. senatorium,

    id. Verr. 3, 96:

    amplissimus honos, i. e. consulatus,

    id. Rep. 1, 6; so,

    amplissimo praeditus magistratu,

    Suet. Aug. 26:

    amplissimus ordo, i. e. senatorius,

    Plin. Ep. 10, 3; Suet. Calig. 49:

    amplissimi ordines, i. e. senatus et equites,

    id. Vesp. 9:

    amplissimum collegium decemvirale,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 49:

    an vero vir amplissimus, P. Scipio, pontifex maximus, etc.,

    id. Cat. 1, 3:

    amplissimum sacerdotium,

    id. Verr. 2, 126; id. Phil. 13, 8:

    sacerdotium amplissimum,

    id. Verr. 2, 127.—
    E.
    As rhet. epithet:

    amplus orator,

    one that speaks richly and with dignity, Cic. Or. 9; id. Brut. 68:

    herous (pes), qui est idem dactylus Aristoteli amplior, iambus humanior videatur,

    grander, more stately, Quint. 9, 4, 88:

    amplius compositionis genus,

    more copious style, id. 9, 4, 129.— Adv. (on the extent of the use of the different forms of the adverb, v. supra init.), largely, abundantly, copiously.
    I.
    Lit.
    a.
    Form amplĭter:

    benigne ei largi atque ampliter,

    Att. Trag. Rel. p. 173 Rib.:

    aptate munde atque ampliter convivium,

    Pomp. Com. Rel. p. 234 Rib.:

    extructam ampliter mensam,

    Lucil. 13, 7 Mull.:

    opsonato ampliter,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 65:

    adpositum est ampliter,

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 163:

    acceptus hilare atque ampliter,

    id. Merc. prol. 98:

    modeste melius facere sumptum quam ampliter,

    id. Stich. 5, 4, 10:

    parum (digitulos) immersisti ampliter,

    not deep enough, id. Bacch. 4, 4, 26.—
    b.
    Form amplē:

    exornat ample magnificeque triclinium,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 62: qui ample valetudinarios nutriunt, in great numbers (v. the context), Cels. praef. med.
    II.
    Trop., fully, handsomely.
    a.
    Form amplĭter:

    ampliter dicere,

    fully, particularly, Gell. 10, 3, 4:

    laudare ampliter,

    id. 2, 6, 11.—
    b.
    Form amplē: duo genera sunt: unum attenuate presseque, alterum sublate ampleque dicentium, with great fulness, richly (v. amplus, II. E.), Cic. Brut. 55, 201; so,

    elate ampleque loqui,

    id. Tusc. 5, 9, 24:

    satis ample sonabant in Pompeiani nominis locum Cato et Scipio,

    full grandly filled the place of, Flor. 4, 2, 65.— Comp.: amplĭus, more, longer, further, besides (syn.: ultra, praeterea); of time, number, and action (while plus denotes more in quantity, measure, etc.; magis, more, in the comparison of quality, and sometimes of action; and potius, rather, the choice between different objects or acts), constr. absol., with comp. abl., and, in the case of numerals, like minus, plus, propius, q. v., without quam with the nom., acc., or gen., or rarely with the abl. comp., or with quam, but chiefly in the post-Aug. per.; cf. Zumpt, § 485; Madv. § 305; Roby, § 1273; Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 4, 12; and Draeger, Hist. Synt. I. p. 521 sq.
    a.
    In gen.:

    deliberatum est non tacere [me] amplius,

    Afran. Com. Rel. p. 199 Rib.:

    otium ubi erit, de istis rebus tum amplius tecum loquar,

    Plaut. Truc. 4, 4, 18:

    cui amplius male faxim,

    id. Aul. 3, 2, 6: De. Etiam? Li. Amplius, id. As. 1, 1, 29: Ar. Vale. Ph. Aliquanto amplius valerem, si hic maneres, id. ib. 3, 3, 2:

    etiam faxo amabit (eam) amplius,

    id. Men. 5, 2, 40:

    multo tanto illum accusabo, quam te accusavi, amplius,

    id. ib. 5, 2, 49:

    quo populum servare potissit amplius,

    Lucil. 1, 15 Mull.:

    At ego amplius dico,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 26:

    amplius posse,

    Sall. J. 69, 2:

    armis amplius valere,

    id. ib. 111, 1:

    si lamentetur miser amplius aequo,

    Lucr. 3, 953:

    tribus vobis opsonatumst an opsono amplius Tibi et parasito et mulieri?

    besides, Plaut. Men. 2, 2, 45:

    Quam vellem invitatum, ut nobiscum esset amplius,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 11:

    in illo exercitu cuncta (probra) fuere et alia amplius,

    Sall. J. 44, 5:

    felices ter et amplius,

    Hor. C. 1, 13, 17:

    binas aut amplius domos continuare,

    Sall. C. 20, 11:

    ter nec amplius,

    Suet. Caes. 25:

    cum non solum de his scripserit, sed amplius praecepta (reliquerit),

    Quint. 12, 11, 24:

    multa promi amplius possunt,

    Plin. 2, 17, 15, § 77:

    si studere amplius possum,

    Quint. 6, prooem. 4:

    auram communem amplius haurire potui?

    id. 6, prooem. 12:

    sagum, quod amplius est,

    Vulg. Exod. 26, 12.—
    b.
    And so very often with the pron. quid, etc.; with the negatives nihil, non, neque, nec, ne; and sometimes with nemo and haud.
    (α).
    With quid, etc.:

    Quid faciam amplius?

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 14, and Cic. Har. Resp. 42:

    quid dicam amplius?

    Quint. 8, 4, 7:

    quid a me amplius dicendum putatis?

    Cic. Verr. 3, 60:

    quid quaeris amplius?

    id. Sex. Rosc. 145; id. Dom. 41; id. Verr. 2, 191:

    quid vultis amplius?

    id. Mil. 35:

    quid amplius vis?

    Hor. Epod. 17, 30:

    quid exspectatis amplius?

    Cic. Verr. 2, 174:

    quid amplius exspectabo,

    Vulg. 4 Reg. 6, 33:

    quid loquar amplius de hoc homine?

    Cic. Caecin. 25:

    quid amplius laboremus?

    Quint. 8, prooem. 31:

    quid habet amplius homo?

    Vulg. Eccl. 1, 3; 6, 8:

    quid ego aliud exoptem amplius, nisi etc.,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 134:

    quid amplius debeam optare?

    Quint. 4, 1, 51: Lo. Numquid amplius? Ly. Tantum est, Plaut. Merc. 2, 2, 11; Ter. And. 2, 1, 25: De. An quid est etiam amplius? He. Vero amplius, id. Ad. 3, 4, 22:

    quid est quod tibi mea ars efficere hoc possit amplius?

    more than this, id. And. 1, 1, 4:

    Etenim quid est, Catilina, quod jam amplius exspectes, si etc.,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 3, 6; id. Sull. 90:

    si quid amplius scit,

    Plaut. Rud. 2, 2, 23:

    si quid ego addidero amplius,

    id. Trin. 4, 2, 13:

    si amplius aliquid gloriatus fuero,

    Vulg. 2 Cor. 10, 8.—And often hoc amplius, where hoc is commonly an abl., but sometimes may be regarded as a nom. or an acc.:

    hoc amplius si quid poteris,

    any thing beyond this, Cic. de Or. 1, 10, 44: et hoc amplius (additur), quod etc., and this further, that etc., id. Sull. 44; so Quint. 5, 13, 36:

    de paedagogis hoc amplius, ut aut sint etc.,

    id. 1, 1, 8:

    Mario urbe Italiaque interdicendum, Marciano hoc amplius, Africa,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 11, 19; Quint. 1, 5, 50; 1, 5, 55; sometimes in plur., his amplius:

    his amplius apud eundem (est) etc.,

    Quint. 9, 3, 15;

    so rarely eo amplius: inferiasque his annua religione, publice instituit, et eo amplius matri Circenses,

    Suet. Calig. 15:

    quaeris quid potuerit amplius adsequi,

    Cic. Planc. 60: prius quam (hic) turbarum quid faciat amplius, Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 93:

    quare jam te cur amplius excrucies?

    Cat. 76, 10.—
    (β).
    With nihil, etc.:

    habet nihil amplius quam lutum,

    Lucil. 9, 46 Mull.:

    nihil habui amplius, quod praeciperem,

    Quint. 7, 1, 64:

    nihil enim dixit amplius,

    Cic. Deiot. 21:

    Nihil dico amplius: causa dicta est,

    I say no more; I have done with my case, id. ib. 8:

    nihil amplius dico, nisi me etc.,

    id. Planc. 96:

    nihil amplius dicam quam victoriam etc.,

    id. Marcell. 17.—Hence, nihil dico or dicam amplius, when one fears to wound by declaring his opinion, etc., I say no more, have nothing further to say or add:

    vetus est, Nihili cocio est. Scis cujus? non dico amplius,

    Plaut. As. 1, 3, 51:

    si, quod equitis Romani filius est, inferior esse debuit: omnes tecum equitum Romanorum filii petiverunt. Nihil dico amplius,

    Cic. Planc. 7 (tacite significat eos dignitate inferiores esse Plancio, Manut. ad h.l.):

    Alterius vero partis nihil amplius dicam quam id, quod etc.,

    id. Marcell. 6, 17:

    amplius nihil respondit,

    Vulg. Marc. 15, 5:

    nihil amplius addens,

    ib. Deut. 5, 22:

    nihil noverunt amplius,

    ib. Eccl. 9, 5:

    nihil amplius optet,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 46:

    nihil amplius potes,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    amplius quod desideres, nihil erit,

    this will leave nothing to be desired, Cic. Tusc. 1, 11, 24:

    nil amplius oro, nisi ut etc.,

    Hor. S. 2, 6, 4:

    ipse Augustus nihil amplius quam equestri familia ortum se scribit,

    Suet. Aug. 2:

    si non amplius, ad lustrum hoc protolleret unum,

    Lucil. 1, 33 Mull.:

    non luctabor tecum, Crasse, amplius,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 17, 74; id. Tusc. 5, 34, 98:

    verbum non amplius addam,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 121:

    non amplius me objurgabis,

    Quint. 5, 10, 47:

    non amplius posse,

    Sall. Fragm. Hist. 3, 82, 19 Kritz:

    non habent amplius quid faciant,

    Vulg. Luc. 12, 4: non videbitis amplius faciem meam. ib. Gen. 44, 23; ib. Heb. 10, 17:

    amplius illa jam non inveniet,

    ib. Apoc. 18, 14:

    studium, quo non aliud ad dignitatem amplius excogitari potest,

    Tac. Or. 5:

    extra me non est alia amplius,

    Vulg. Soph. 2, 15:

    neque hoc amplius quam quod vides nobis quicquamst,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 5, 21:

    neque va dari amplius neque etc.,

    Cic. Quinct. 23:

    nec jam amplius ullae Adparent terrae,

    Verg. A. 3, 192; 3, 260; 5, 8; 9, 426; 9, 519; 11, 807; 12, 680; id. G. 4, 503:

    nec irascar amplius,

    Vulg. Ezech. 16, 42; ib. Apoc. 7, 16:

    ne amplius dona petas,

    Cat. 68, 14:

    urere ne possit calor amplius aridus artus,

    Lucr. 4, 874;

    ne quos amplius Rhenum transire pateretur,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    ut ne quem amplius posthac discipulum reciperet,

    Suet. Gram. 17:

    ne amplius morando Scaurum incenderet,

    Sall. J. 25, 10; id. Fragm. Hist. 1, 2, 10 Kritz;

    3, 82, 17: ne amplius divulgetur,

    Vulg. Act. 4, 17:

    ut nequaquam amplius per eamdem viam revertamini,

    ib. Deut. 17, 16:

    nolite amplius accipere pecuniam,

    ib. 4 Reg. 12, 7.—
    (γ).
    With nemo:

    cur non restipulatur neminem amplius petiturum?

    Cic. Q. Rosc. 12, 36:

    cum amplius nemo occurreret,

    nobody further, no one more, Curt. 8, 10, 2; so,

    neminem amplius viderunt,

    Vulg. Marc. 9, 7:

    nemo emet amplius,

    no one will buy any longer, any more, ib. Apoc. 18, 11 (for cases of haud with amplius, v. c. a and g).—
    c.
    With numerals and numeral forms.
    (α).
    Without quam:

    amplius horam suffixum in cruce me memini esse,

    Cat. 69, 3:

    horam amplius jam in demoliendo signo homines moliebantur,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 95:

    amplius annos triginta tribunus fuerat,

    Sall. C. 59, 6:

    me non amplius novem annos nato,

    Nep. Hann. 2, 3:

    per annos amplius quadraginta,

    Suet. Aug. 72; 32:

    quid si tandem amplius triennium est?

    Cic. Q. Rosc. 8:

    Tu faciem illius noctem non amplius unam Falle dolo,

    Verg. A. 1, 683:

    inveniebat Sabim flumen non amplius milia passuum decem abesse,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 16; 4, 12:

    reliquum spatium, quod est non amplius pedum sexcentorum, mons continet,

    id. ib. 1, 28;

    2, 29: amplius sestertium ducentiens acceptum hereditatibus rettuli,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 40; id. Fl. 68; so Plin. Ep. 10, 39, 1:

    huic paulo amplius tertiam partem denegem?

    id. ib. 5, 7, 3:

    cum eum amplius centum cives Romani cognoscerent,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 14; 5, 155:

    victi amplius ducenti ceciderunt,

    Liv. 21, 29, 3: non amplius quattuordecim cohortes, Pompei. ap. Cic. Att. 8, 12, C:

    ex omni multitudine non amplius quadraginta locum cepere,

    Sall. J. 58, 3: torrentes amplius centum, [p. 113] Plin. 5, 28, 29, § 103; 9, 5, 4, § 10.—And very rarely placed after the numeral:

    qui septingentos jam annos amplius numquam mutatis legibus vivunt,

    Cic. Fl. 63:

    pugnatum duas amplius horas,

    Liv. 25, 19, 15 Weissenb.:

    duo haud amplius milia peditum effugerunt,

    id. 28, 2:

    decem amplius versus perdidimus,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 5, 12:

    tris pateat caeli spatium non amplius ulnas,

    Verg. E. 3, 105.—
    (β).
    With the comp. abl. (rare but class.):

    cum jam amplius horis sex continenter pugnaretur,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 5; 4, 37:

    pugnatum amplius duabus horis est,

    Liv. 27, 12:

    neque triennio amplius supervixit,

    Suet. Caes. 89:

    uti non amplius quinis aut senis milibus passuum interesset,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 15; 1, 23; 2, 7;

    6, 29: non amplius patet milibus quinque et triginta,

    Sall. Fragm. Hist. 4, 1, 34 Kritz:

    est ab capite paulo amplius mille passibus locus,

    Plin. Ep. 10, 90, 1:

    ab Capsa non amplius duum milium intervallo,

    Sall. J. 91, 3:

    (Catilina) cum initio non amplius duobus milibus (militum) habuisset,

    id. C. 56, 2; so,

    denas alii, alii plures (uxores) habent, set reges eo amplius,

    id. J. 80, 7.—

    And prob. the following ambiguous cases: cum mille non amplius equitibus,

    Sall. J. 105, 3:

    oppidum non amplius mille passuum abesse,

    id. ib. 68, 3.—
    (γ).
    With quam (postAug. and eccl.):

    non amplius, cum plurimum, quam septem horas dormiebat,

    Suet. Aug. 78:

    nec amplius quam septem et viginti dies Brundisii commoratus,

    id. ib. 17:

    Toto triennio semel omnino eam nec amplius quam uno die paucissimis vidit horis,

    id. Tib. 51:

    demoratus dies non amplius quam octo aut decem,

    Vulg. Act. 25, 6:

    ut non amplius apud te quam quarta (pars) remaneret,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 19:

    ut vexillum veteranorum, non amplius quam quingenti numero, copias fuderint,

    Tac. A. 3, 21:

    haud amplius quam ducentos misit,

    id. ib. 14, 32:

    insidiantur ei ex iis viri amplius quam quadraginta,

    Vulg. Act. 23, 21.—
    d. (α).
    Amplius, t. t. of judges when they deferred an important case for future examination:

    Amplius adeo prolixum temporis spatium significat, ut judices quotienscunque significarent, adhuc se audire velle, amplius dicebant. Itaque negotium differebant, unde hodieque ampliari judicium differri dicitur,

    Charis. 176 P.; so Don. ad Ter. Eun. 2, 3, 39; cf.

    also amplio and ampliatio: cum consules re audita amplius de consilii sententia pronuntiavissent,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 86:

    antea vel judicari primo poterat vel amplius pronuntiari,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 26:

    ut de Philodamo amplius pronuntiaretur,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 29.—

    And metaph.: ego amplius deliberandum censeo,

    Ter. Phorm. 2, 4, 17.—
    (β).
    Amplius non petere, judicial t. phr., to bring no further action, to make no further claim:

    quid ita satis non dedit, AMPLIVS [A SE] NEMINEM PETITVRVM?

    Cic. Rosc. Com. 12, 35:

    Tibi ego, Brute, non solvam, nisi prius a te cavero amplius eo nomine neminem, cujus petitio sit, petiturum,

    id. Brut. 5, 18:

    sunt duo, quae te rogo: primum, ut si quid satis dandum erit, AMPLIVS EO NOMINE NON PETI, cures etc.,

    id. Fam. 13, 28 A:

    quod ille recusarit satis dare amplius abs te non peti,

    id. Att. 1, 8, 1.—
    (γ).
    Hoc amplius, beside the general use given above (II. Comp. b. a), as t. phr. of senators when they approved a measure, but amended it by addition:

    Servilio adsentior et HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO, magnum Pompeium fecisse etc.,

    Cic. Phil. 12, 21, 50:

    cui cum essem adsensus, decrevi HOC AMPLIVS, ut etc.,

    id. ad Brut. 1, 5, 1;

    so Seneca: fortasse et post omnes citatus nihil improbabo ex iis, quae priores decreverint, et dicam HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO, Vit. Beat. 3, 2: Quaedam ex istis sunt, quibus adsentire possumus, sed HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO,

    id. Q. N. 3, 15, 1.—
    (δ).
    To this may be added the elliptical phrases, nihil amplius and si nihil amplius:

    nihil amplius, denoting that there is nothing further than has been declared: sese ipsum abs te repetit. Nihil amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 5, 49, 128;

    (res publica) ulta suas injurias est per vos interitu tyranni. Nihil amplius,

    id. Fam. 12, 1, 2; and, si nihil amplius, marking a limit, if nothing more, at least:

    excedam tectis? An, si nihil amplius, obstem?

    Ov. M. 9, 148.
    The form amplius has the ambiguity of the Engl.
    word more, which is sometimes an adj., sometimes a subst., and sometimes an adv., and some of the above examples would admit of different classifications; as, non amplius dicere, not to speak further (adv.) or not to say more (subst.), Plaut. As. 1, 3, 51; but some of them would admit of only one explanation;

    as, ne quos amplius Rhenum transire pateretur,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43. Sup.: amplissimē.
    I.
    Lit., very largely, most abundantly:

    ut quibus militibus amplissime (agri) dati adsignati essent,

    in the largest shares, Cic. Phil. 5, 53:

    duumviri (deos) tribus quam amplissume tum apparari poterat stratis lectis placavere,

    Liv. 5, 13, 6 Weissenb.—
    II.
    Fig., most generously, most handsomely:

    qui amplissime de salute mea decreverint,

    Cic. Dom. 44:

    amplissime laudare,

    in the handsomest style, Plin. 18, 3, 3, § 11; Suet. Calig. 15:

    honores amplissime gessit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 112:

    pater cum amplissime ex praetura triumphasset,

    with the greatest pomp, id. Mur. 15:

    placere eum quam amplissime supremo suo die efferri,

    should be carried forth with every possible solemnity, id. Phil. 9, 7, 16. V. on this word, Hand, Turs. I. pp. 287-296.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > amplissime

  • 12 amplus

    amplus, a, um, adj. [some regard this as a shortened form of anapleôs, = filled up, full; others, as for ambulus from amb-, rounded out, as superus from super, etc.; v. Doed. Syn. II. p. 113; but perh. it is better to form it from am- and -plus, akin to -pleo, plenus, q. v. Pott], thus pr., full all round; hence, great, large. —In space, of large extent, great, large, wide, ample, spacious (the forms amplus and amplior are very rare in the ante-class. per., and rare in all periods. Amplius is com. in the ante-class., freq. in the class., and very freq. in the post-class. per., the Vulg. rarely using the other forms, but using this 121 times. Amplissimus belongs to prose, and is scarcely used before Cicero, with whom it was a very favorite word. It was also used by Plin. Maj. and Min., but never by Tac., Sall. (in his genuine works), nor the Vulg. Catullus used only the form amplius, and Prop. only amplus, while Tib. and Pers. never used this word in any form. Ampliter is found mostly in Plaut.; and ample and amplissime are used a few times by Cic. and by writers that followed him; syn.: magnus, ingens, latus, late patens, spatiosus, laxus).
    I.
    Lit.:

    amplus et spectu protervo ferox,

    Pac. Trag. Rel. p. 94 Rib.:

    qui (Pluto) ter amplum Geryonen compescit unda,

    Hor. C. 2, 14, 7:

    ampla domus dedecori domino fit, si est in ea solitudo,

    Cic. Off. 1, 39, 139; so Verg. A. 2, 310:

    admodum amplum et excelsum signum,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 74:

    collis castris parum amplus,

    Sall. J. 98, 3:

    porticibus in amplis,

    Verg. A. 3, 353:

    per amplum mittimur Elysium,

    id. ib. 6, 743:

    vocemque per ampla volutant Atria,

    id. ib. 1, 725:

    nil vulva pulchrius ampla,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 15, 41:

    amplae aures,

    Plin. 11, 52, 114, § 274:

    milium amplum grano,

    id. 18, 7, 10, § 55:

    cubiculum amplum,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 6:

    baptisterium amplum atque opacum,

    id. ib. 5, 6, 25.— Comp.:

    quanto est res amplior,

    Lucr. 2, 1133:

    Amplior Urgo et Capraria,

    Plin. 3, 6, 12, § 81:

    avis paulo amplior passere,

    id. 10, 32, 47, § 89:

    amplior specie mortali,

    Suet. Aug. 94; id. Caes. 76 (for the neutr. amplius, v. infra).— Sup.:

    amplissima curia... gymnasium amplissimum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 53:

    urbs amplissima atque ornatissima,

    id. Agr. 2, 76:

    amplissimum peristylum,

    id. Dom. 116:

    (candelabrum) ad amplissimi templi ornatum esse factum,

    id. Verr. 4, 65:

    mons Italiae amplissimus,

    Plin. 3, 5, 7, § 48:

    amplissimum flumen,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8, 3:

    amplissimus lacus,

    id. ib. 10, 41, 2:

    amplissima insula,

    Plin. 6, 20, 23, § 71:

    amplissimi horti,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 18, 11:

    amplissima arborum,

    Plin. 16, 39, 76, § 200:

    est (topazon) amplissima gemmarum,

    id. 37, 8, 32, § 109:

    amplissimum cubiculum,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 6, 23.—
    B.
    Transf., great, abundant, ample, much, long:

    bono atque amplo lucro,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 6 and Ep. 2, 2, 117:

    pabula miseris mortalibus ampla,

    Lucr. 5, 944:

    ampla civitas,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 81; 4, 96:

    civitas ampla atque florens,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 3:

    gens ampla,

    Plin. 5, 30, 33, § 125:

    amplae copiae,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 19:

    ampla manus militum,

    Liv. Epit. 1, 4, 9:

    pecuaria res ampla,

    Cic. Quinct. 12:

    res familiaris ampla,

    id. Phil. 13, 8:

    (res) ampla,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 3, 82, 20 Kritz:

    patrimonium amplum et copiosum,

    Cic. Sex. Rosc. 6; id. Dom. 146: id. Phil. 2, 67:

    amplae divitiae,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 101:

    esse patri ejus amplas facultates,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 14, 9:

    in amplis opibus heres,

    Plin. 9, 36, 59, § 122.— Comp.:

    amplior numerus,

    Cic. Mil. 57; Sall. J. 105, 3; Tac. A. 14, 53:

    ampliores aquae,

    Plin. 5, 9, 10, § 58:

    amplior exercitus,

    Sall. J. 54, 3; Suet. Vesp. 4:

    commeatus spe amplior,

    Sall. J. 75, 8:

    amplior pecunia, Auct. B. Alex. 56: pecunia amplior,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 11, 2:

    pretia ampliora,

    Plin. 10, 29, 43, § 84:

    omnia longe ampliora invenire quam etc.,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 14, 10:

    ampliores noctes,

    Plin. 18, 26, 63, § 232:

    ut ampliori tempore maneret,

    Vulg. Act. 18, 20.— Sup.:

    peditatus copiae amplissimae e Gallia,

    Cic. Font. 8:

    exercitus amplissimus,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 2; 9, 13, 11:

    amplissima pecunia,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 31:

    amplissimae fortunae,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 8; id. Quinct. 49; id. Phil. 10, 4:

    amplissimae patrimonii copiae,

    id. Fl. 89:

    amplissimas summas emptionibus occupare,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 2, 3:

    opes amplissimae,

    id. ib. 8, 18, 4:

    amplissima dies horarum quindecim etc.,

    the longest day, Plin. 6, 34, 39, § 218.—Also subst. in comp. neutr. (v. amplius, adv. infra), more:

    ut quirem exaudire amplius,

    Att. Trag. Rel. p. 173 Rib.:

    si vis amplius dari, Dabitur,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 18:

    jam amplius orat,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 19:

    daturus non sum amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 29:

    non complectar in his libris amplius quam quod etc.,

    id. de Or. 1, 6, 22:

    tantum adfero quantum ipse optat, atque etiam amplius,

    Plaut. Capt. 4, 1, 10:

    ni amplius etiam, quod ebibit,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 20: Ph. Etiamne amplius? Th. Nil, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 63: Tr. Dimidium Volo ut dicas. Gr. Immo hercle etiam amplius, Plaut. Rud. 4, 3, 21: Th. Nempe octoginta debentur huic minae? Tr. Haud nummo amplius, id. Most. 3, 3, 16:

    etiam amplius illam adparare condecet,

    Turp. Com. Rel. p. 100 Rib.:

    hoc onere suscepto amplexus animo sum aliquanto amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1:

    si sit opus liquidi non amplius urna,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 54:

    omnis numerus amplius octingentis milibus explebat,

    Vell. 2, 110, 3:

    Segestanis imponebat aliquanto amplius quam etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 76:

    illa corona contentus Thrasybulus neque amplius requisivit,

    Nep. Thras. 4, 3:

    amplius possidere,

    Plin. 18, 4, 3, § 17:

    Ille imperio ei reddito haud amplius, quam ut duo ex tribus filiis secum militarent, exegit,

    Curt. 8, 4, 21:

    dedit quantum maximum potuit, daturus amplius, si potuisset,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 21, 6:

    cum hoc amplius praestet, quod etc.,

    id. ib. 7, 25, 1.—Also with part. gen., more of, a greater quantity or number of:

    gaudeo tibi liberorum esse amplius,

    Plaut. Cist. 5, 4:

    te amplius bibisse praedicet loti,

    Cat. 39, 21:

    amplius frumenti auferre,

    Cic. Verr. 3, 49:

    expensum est auri viginti paulo amplius,

    id. Fl. 6, 8:

    amplius negotii contrahi,

    id. Cat. 4, 9:

    si amplius obsidum vellet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 9, ubi v. Herz.:

    quanto ejus amplius processerat temporis,

    id. B. C. 3, 25.—
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    Of internal power or force, great, strong, violent, impetuous:

    pro viribus amplis,

    Lucr. 5, 1174:

    amplae vires peditum,

    Plin. 6, 20, 23, § 75;

    ampla nepotum Spes,

    Prop. 4, 22, 41:

    poena sera, sed ampla,

    full, strict, id. 4, 5, 32. — Comp.:

    haec irae factae essent multo ampliores,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 1, 9:

    si forte morbus amplior factus siet, i. e. gravior,

    id. ib. 3, 1, 50:

    amplior metus,

    Cic. Clu. 128:

    amplior potentia feris,

    Plin. 28, 10, 42, § 153:

    ampliorem dicendi facultatem consequi,

    Quint. 2, 3, 4:

    amplior eoque acrior impetus,

    Flor. 4, 2, 66:

    spes amplior,

    Sall. J. 105, 4:

    amplius accipietis judicium,

    severer, Vulg. Matt. 23, 14:

    amplior auctoritas,

    Plin. 37, 3, 12, § 47:

    amplior virtus,

    higher merit, Quint. 8, 3, 83:

    idem aut amplior cultus (dei),

    Plin. 28, 2, 4, § 18:

    amplior est quaestio,

    Quint. 3, 5, 8:

    ampliora verba,

    of larger meaning, id. 8, 4, 2: scientia intellegentiaque ac sapientia ampliores inventae sunt in te, Vulg. Dan. 5, 14:

    quo legatis animus amplior esset,

    Sall. C. 40, 6; 59, 1:

    spiritus amplior,

    Vulg. Dan. 5, 12; 6, 3.— Sup.:

    (honos) pro amplissimis meritis redditur,

    Cic. Phil. 5, 41:

    cujus sideris (Caniculae) effectus amplissimi in terra sentiuntur,

    very violent, Plin. 2, 40, 40, § 107:

    amplissima spes,

    Suet. Caes. 7:

    his finis cognitionis amplissimae,

    most important trial, Plin. Ep. 2, 11, 23.—
    B.
    Of external splendor, great, handsome, magnificent, splendid, glorious:

    illis ampla satis forma, pudicitia,

    great enough, Prop. 1, 2, 24:

    haec ampla sunt, haec divina,

    Cic. Sest. 102; id. Arch. 23:

    res gestae satis amplae,

    Sall. C. 8, 2:

    cur parum amplis adfecerit praemiis,

    Cic. Mil. 57:

    ampla quidem, sed pro ingentibus meritis praemia acceperunt,

    Tac. A. 14, 53:

    amplum in modum praemia ostentare,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 26, 6:

    amplis honoribus usi,

    Sall. J. 25, 4:

    amplis honoribus auctos,

    Hor. S. 1, 6, 11.—Sometimes in mal. part. or ironically:

    amplam occasionem calumniae nactus,

    a fine opportunity, Cic. Verr. 2, 61:

    spolia ampla refertis Tuque puerque tuus,

    glorious spoils, Verg. A. 4, 93.— Comp.:

    ne ullum munus aedilitatis amplius aut gratius populo esse possit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 5; id. Mur. 37:

    praemiis ad perdiscendum amplioribus commoveri,

    id. de Or. 1, 4, 13:

    alicui ampliorem laudem tribuere,

    id. Sest. 27:

    in aliqua re esse laudem ampliorem,

    id. Marcell. 4:

    corporis membris plus dedit, id amplius atque augustius ratus (Zeuxis),

    Quint. 12, 10, 5:

    ut Augustus vocaretur ampliore cognomine,

    Suet. Aug. 7.— Subst.:

    in potestatibus eo modo agitabat, ut ampliore, quam gerebat, dignus haberetur,

    of something greater, Sall. J. 63, 5.— Sup.:

    ut consules monumentum quam amplissimum faciundum curent,

    Cic. Phil. 14, 38; 14, 31; id. Verr. 4, 82:

    hoc munus aedilitatis amplissimum,

    id. ib. 1, 12, 36; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 1, 74:

    alicui amplissimas potestates dare,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 31:

    insignibus amplissimis ornatus,

    id. ib. 2, 101:

    dona amplissima conferre,

    Plin. 18, 3, 3, § 9:

    praemia legatis dedistis amplissima,

    Cic. Cat. 4, 5; id. Phil. 2, 32:

    spe amplissimorum praemiorum adduci,

    id. Mil. 5; id. de Or. 1, 5, 16:

    velut praemium quoddam amplissimum longi laboris,

    Quint. 10, 7, 1:

    munera amplissima mittere,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    vestris beneficiis amplissimis adfectus,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 51; id. Dom. 98:

    laudi amplissimae lauream concedere,

    id. Pis. 74:

    laudibus amplissimis adficere,

    id. Phil. 7, 11:

    amplissimam gloriam consequi,

    id. Prov. Cons. 39:

    ut eum amplissimo regis honore et nomine adfeceris,

    id. Deiot. 14:

    amplissimis aliquem efferre honoribus,

    Aur. Vict. Epit. 17, 3:

    amplissimis uti honoribus,

    Cic. Fl. 45:

    amplissimos honores adipisci,

    id. Verr. 5, 181:

    honores adsequi amplissimos,

    id. Mil. 81:

    aliquem ad honores amplissimos perducere,

    id. Am. 20, 73:

    meus labor fructum est amplissimum consecutus,

    id. Imp. Pomp 2:

    mihi gratiae verbis amplissimis aguntur,

    in the handsomest termis, id. Cat. 3, 14; id. Phil. 2, 13; id. Quir. 15:

    ei amplissimis verbis gratias egimus,

    id. Phil. 1, 3:

    provincia Gallia merito ornatur verbis amplissimis ab senatu,

    id. ib. 4, 9:

    amplissimis verbis conlaudatus,

    Suet. Caes. 16:

    amplissimo populi senatusque judicio exercitus habuistis,

    Cic. Agr. 1, 12; id. Fl. 5; id. Dom. 86; id. Planc. 93:

    de meo consulatu amplissima atque ornatissima decreta fecerunt,

    id. Dom. 74:

    quam universi populi, illius gentis, amplissimum testimonium (said of Cic.),

    Plin. 7, 30, 31, § 116.—
    C.
    In respect of the opinion of others, esteemed, renowned, etc.:

    quicquid est, quamvis amplum sit, id est parum tum cum est aliquid amplius,

    Cic. Marcell. 26:

    quid hunc hominem magnum aut amplum de re publica cogitare (putare possumus), qui etc.,

    great or noble, id. Imp. Pomp. 37:

    omnia, quae vobis cara atque ampla sunt,

    id. Agr. 2, 9; id. Arch. 23:

    convenerunt corrogati et quidem ampli quidam homines,

    id. Phil. 3, 20:

    hoc studium parvi properemus et ampli,

    small and great, Hor. Ep. 1, 3, 28:

    amplis doctoribus instructus,

    Tac. A. 14, 52:

    sin autem sunt amplae et honestae familiae plebeiae,

    Cic. Mur. 7, 15.— Comp.:

    cum est aliquid amplius,

    Cic. Marcell. 26:

    ampliores ordines,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 77, where Dinter reads priores: quo (ingenio) neque melius neque amplius aliud in natura mortalium est, [p. 112] Sall. J. 2, 4:

    nihil amplius potes (tribuere) amicitia tua,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    quid amplius facitis?

    Vulg. Matt. 5, 47.— Sup.:

    ex amplissimo genere nubere,

    Cic. Cael. 34:

    amplissimo genere natus,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 12:

    genere copiisque amplissimus, id. ib 6, 15: quam (familiam) vidit amplissimam,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 12:

    amplissimos patruos habere,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 147:

    amplissima civitas,

    id. Verr. 5, 122:

    apud illos Fabiorum nomen est amplissimum,

    id. Font. 36; id. Caecin. 104; id. Verr. 3, 96; id. Deiot. 14:

    mihi hic locus ad agendum amplissimus est visus,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 1:

    non adgrediar ad illa maxima atque amplissima prius quam etc.,

    id. Sest. 5:

    licet tribuas ei quantum amplissimum potes, nihil tamen amplius potes amicitia tua,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    amplissimis operibus increscere,

    id. ib. 8, 4, 3:

    honores in amplissimo consilio collocare,

    Cic. Sen. 2:

    amplissimi orbis terrae consilii principes,

    id. Phil. 3, 34: honoris amplissimi puto esse accusare improbos, I esteem it to be the greatest honor, etc., id. Div. in Caecil. 70:

    promotus ad amplissimas procurationes,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 31, 3:

    praeter honores amplissimos cognomenque etc.,

    Plin. 7, 44, 45, § 142:

    spes amplissimae dignitatis,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 49; id. Sen. 19, 68; Suet. Vit. 2.—
    D.
    Hence, amplissimus (almost always thus in sup.) as a title for persons holding great and honored offices, as consul, senator, etc., or as an honorable epithet of the office itself or the body of officers, distinguished, very distinguished, honorable, right honorable, most honorable, etc.:

    is mihi videtur amplissimus, qui sua virtute in altiorem locum pervenit,

    Cic. Sex. Rosc. 83:

    homo et suis et populi Romani ornamentis amplissimus,

    id. Mur. 8:

    P. Africanus rebus gestis amplissimus,

    id. Caecin. 69:

    ut homines amplissimi testimonium de sua re non dicerent,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 102; id. Clu. 197:

    Q. Catuli atque ceterorum amplissimorum hominum auctoritas,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 63:

    vir amplissimus ejus civitatis,

    id. Verr. 4, 17; id. Fl. 32:

    exercitum Cn. Domitii, amplissimi viri, sustentavit,

    id. Deiot. 5, 14:

    cum habeas amplissimi viri religionem (of L. Lucullus),

    id. Arch. 4, 8; id. Lig. 22:

    in quo consilio amplissimi viri judicarent,

    id. Mil. 5; id. Balb. 1; id. Dom. 2:

    comitatus virorum amplissimorum,

    id. Sull. 9:

    viros primarios atque amplissimos civitatis in consilium advocare,

    id. Verr. 3, 18:

    ordinis amplissimi esse,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 13, 1; 37, 6:

    cives amplissimos legare,

    Cic. Balb. 42:

    hoc amplissimum nomen, i. e. senatorium,

    id. Verr. 3, 96:

    amplissimus honos, i. e. consulatus,

    id. Rep. 1, 6; so,

    amplissimo praeditus magistratu,

    Suet. Aug. 26:

    amplissimus ordo, i. e. senatorius,

    Plin. Ep. 10, 3; Suet. Calig. 49:

    amplissimi ordines, i. e. senatus et equites,

    id. Vesp. 9:

    amplissimum collegium decemvirale,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 49:

    an vero vir amplissimus, P. Scipio, pontifex maximus, etc.,

    id. Cat. 1, 3:

    amplissimum sacerdotium,

    id. Verr. 2, 126; id. Phil. 13, 8:

    sacerdotium amplissimum,

    id. Verr. 2, 127.—
    E.
    As rhet. epithet:

    amplus orator,

    one that speaks richly and with dignity, Cic. Or. 9; id. Brut. 68:

    herous (pes), qui est idem dactylus Aristoteli amplior, iambus humanior videatur,

    grander, more stately, Quint. 9, 4, 88:

    amplius compositionis genus,

    more copious style, id. 9, 4, 129.— Adv. (on the extent of the use of the different forms of the adverb, v. supra init.), largely, abundantly, copiously.
    I.
    Lit.
    a.
    Form amplĭter:

    benigne ei largi atque ampliter,

    Att. Trag. Rel. p. 173 Rib.:

    aptate munde atque ampliter convivium,

    Pomp. Com. Rel. p. 234 Rib.:

    extructam ampliter mensam,

    Lucil. 13, 7 Mull.:

    opsonato ampliter,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 65:

    adpositum est ampliter,

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 163:

    acceptus hilare atque ampliter,

    id. Merc. prol. 98:

    modeste melius facere sumptum quam ampliter,

    id. Stich. 5, 4, 10:

    parum (digitulos) immersisti ampliter,

    not deep enough, id. Bacch. 4, 4, 26.—
    b.
    Form amplē:

    exornat ample magnificeque triclinium,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 62: qui ample valetudinarios nutriunt, in great numbers (v. the context), Cels. praef. med.
    II.
    Trop., fully, handsomely.
    a.
    Form amplĭter:

    ampliter dicere,

    fully, particularly, Gell. 10, 3, 4:

    laudare ampliter,

    id. 2, 6, 11.—
    b.
    Form amplē: duo genera sunt: unum attenuate presseque, alterum sublate ampleque dicentium, with great fulness, richly (v. amplus, II. E.), Cic. Brut. 55, 201; so,

    elate ampleque loqui,

    id. Tusc. 5, 9, 24:

    satis ample sonabant in Pompeiani nominis locum Cato et Scipio,

    full grandly filled the place of, Flor. 4, 2, 65.— Comp.: amplĭus, more, longer, further, besides (syn.: ultra, praeterea); of time, number, and action (while plus denotes more in quantity, measure, etc.; magis, more, in the comparison of quality, and sometimes of action; and potius, rather, the choice between different objects or acts), constr. absol., with comp. abl., and, in the case of numerals, like minus, plus, propius, q. v., without quam with the nom., acc., or gen., or rarely with the abl. comp., or with quam, but chiefly in the post-Aug. per.; cf. Zumpt, § 485; Madv. § 305; Roby, § 1273; Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 4, 12; and Draeger, Hist. Synt. I. p. 521 sq.
    a.
    In gen.:

    deliberatum est non tacere [me] amplius,

    Afran. Com. Rel. p. 199 Rib.:

    otium ubi erit, de istis rebus tum amplius tecum loquar,

    Plaut. Truc. 4, 4, 18:

    cui amplius male faxim,

    id. Aul. 3, 2, 6: De. Etiam? Li. Amplius, id. As. 1, 1, 29: Ar. Vale. Ph. Aliquanto amplius valerem, si hic maneres, id. ib. 3, 3, 2:

    etiam faxo amabit (eam) amplius,

    id. Men. 5, 2, 40:

    multo tanto illum accusabo, quam te accusavi, amplius,

    id. ib. 5, 2, 49:

    quo populum servare potissit amplius,

    Lucil. 1, 15 Mull.:

    At ego amplius dico,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 26:

    amplius posse,

    Sall. J. 69, 2:

    armis amplius valere,

    id. ib. 111, 1:

    si lamentetur miser amplius aequo,

    Lucr. 3, 953:

    tribus vobis opsonatumst an opsono amplius Tibi et parasito et mulieri?

    besides, Plaut. Men. 2, 2, 45:

    Quam vellem invitatum, ut nobiscum esset amplius,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 11:

    in illo exercitu cuncta (probra) fuere et alia amplius,

    Sall. J. 44, 5:

    felices ter et amplius,

    Hor. C. 1, 13, 17:

    binas aut amplius domos continuare,

    Sall. C. 20, 11:

    ter nec amplius,

    Suet. Caes. 25:

    cum non solum de his scripserit, sed amplius praecepta (reliquerit),

    Quint. 12, 11, 24:

    multa promi amplius possunt,

    Plin. 2, 17, 15, § 77:

    si studere amplius possum,

    Quint. 6, prooem. 4:

    auram communem amplius haurire potui?

    id. 6, prooem. 12:

    sagum, quod amplius est,

    Vulg. Exod. 26, 12.—
    b.
    And so very often with the pron. quid, etc.; with the negatives nihil, non, neque, nec, ne; and sometimes with nemo and haud.
    (α).
    With quid, etc.:

    Quid faciam amplius?

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 14, and Cic. Har. Resp. 42:

    quid dicam amplius?

    Quint. 8, 4, 7:

    quid a me amplius dicendum putatis?

    Cic. Verr. 3, 60:

    quid quaeris amplius?

    id. Sex. Rosc. 145; id. Dom. 41; id. Verr. 2, 191:

    quid vultis amplius?

    id. Mil. 35:

    quid amplius vis?

    Hor. Epod. 17, 30:

    quid exspectatis amplius?

    Cic. Verr. 2, 174:

    quid amplius exspectabo,

    Vulg. 4 Reg. 6, 33:

    quid loquar amplius de hoc homine?

    Cic. Caecin. 25:

    quid amplius laboremus?

    Quint. 8, prooem. 31:

    quid habet amplius homo?

    Vulg. Eccl. 1, 3; 6, 8:

    quid ego aliud exoptem amplius, nisi etc.,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 134:

    quid amplius debeam optare?

    Quint. 4, 1, 51: Lo. Numquid amplius? Ly. Tantum est, Plaut. Merc. 2, 2, 11; Ter. And. 2, 1, 25: De. An quid est etiam amplius? He. Vero amplius, id. Ad. 3, 4, 22:

    quid est quod tibi mea ars efficere hoc possit amplius?

    more than this, id. And. 1, 1, 4:

    Etenim quid est, Catilina, quod jam amplius exspectes, si etc.,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 3, 6; id. Sull. 90:

    si quid amplius scit,

    Plaut. Rud. 2, 2, 23:

    si quid ego addidero amplius,

    id. Trin. 4, 2, 13:

    si amplius aliquid gloriatus fuero,

    Vulg. 2 Cor. 10, 8.—And often hoc amplius, where hoc is commonly an abl., but sometimes may be regarded as a nom. or an acc.:

    hoc amplius si quid poteris,

    any thing beyond this, Cic. de Or. 1, 10, 44: et hoc amplius (additur), quod etc., and this further, that etc., id. Sull. 44; so Quint. 5, 13, 36:

    de paedagogis hoc amplius, ut aut sint etc.,

    id. 1, 1, 8:

    Mario urbe Italiaque interdicendum, Marciano hoc amplius, Africa,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 11, 19; Quint. 1, 5, 50; 1, 5, 55; sometimes in plur., his amplius:

    his amplius apud eundem (est) etc.,

    Quint. 9, 3, 15;

    so rarely eo amplius: inferiasque his annua religione, publice instituit, et eo amplius matri Circenses,

    Suet. Calig. 15:

    quaeris quid potuerit amplius adsequi,

    Cic. Planc. 60: prius quam (hic) turbarum quid faciat amplius, Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 93:

    quare jam te cur amplius excrucies?

    Cat. 76, 10.—
    (β).
    With nihil, etc.:

    habet nihil amplius quam lutum,

    Lucil. 9, 46 Mull.:

    nihil habui amplius, quod praeciperem,

    Quint. 7, 1, 64:

    nihil enim dixit amplius,

    Cic. Deiot. 21:

    Nihil dico amplius: causa dicta est,

    I say no more; I have done with my case, id. ib. 8:

    nihil amplius dico, nisi me etc.,

    id. Planc. 96:

    nihil amplius dicam quam victoriam etc.,

    id. Marcell. 17.—Hence, nihil dico or dicam amplius, when one fears to wound by declaring his opinion, etc., I say no more, have nothing further to say or add:

    vetus est, Nihili cocio est. Scis cujus? non dico amplius,

    Plaut. As. 1, 3, 51:

    si, quod equitis Romani filius est, inferior esse debuit: omnes tecum equitum Romanorum filii petiverunt. Nihil dico amplius,

    Cic. Planc. 7 (tacite significat eos dignitate inferiores esse Plancio, Manut. ad h.l.):

    Alterius vero partis nihil amplius dicam quam id, quod etc.,

    id. Marcell. 6, 17:

    amplius nihil respondit,

    Vulg. Marc. 15, 5:

    nihil amplius addens,

    ib. Deut. 5, 22:

    nihil noverunt amplius,

    ib. Eccl. 9, 5:

    nihil amplius optet,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 2, 46:

    nihil amplius potes,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 13, 10:

    amplius quod desideres, nihil erit,

    this will leave nothing to be desired, Cic. Tusc. 1, 11, 24:

    nil amplius oro, nisi ut etc.,

    Hor. S. 2, 6, 4:

    ipse Augustus nihil amplius quam equestri familia ortum se scribit,

    Suet. Aug. 2:

    si non amplius, ad lustrum hoc protolleret unum,

    Lucil. 1, 33 Mull.:

    non luctabor tecum, Crasse, amplius,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 17, 74; id. Tusc. 5, 34, 98:

    verbum non amplius addam,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 121:

    non amplius me objurgabis,

    Quint. 5, 10, 47:

    non amplius posse,

    Sall. Fragm. Hist. 3, 82, 19 Kritz:

    non habent amplius quid faciant,

    Vulg. Luc. 12, 4: non videbitis amplius faciem meam. ib. Gen. 44, 23; ib. Heb. 10, 17:

    amplius illa jam non inveniet,

    ib. Apoc. 18, 14:

    studium, quo non aliud ad dignitatem amplius excogitari potest,

    Tac. Or. 5:

    extra me non est alia amplius,

    Vulg. Soph. 2, 15:

    neque hoc amplius quam quod vides nobis quicquamst,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 5, 21:

    neque va dari amplius neque etc.,

    Cic. Quinct. 23:

    nec jam amplius ullae Adparent terrae,

    Verg. A. 3, 192; 3, 260; 5, 8; 9, 426; 9, 519; 11, 807; 12, 680; id. G. 4, 503:

    nec irascar amplius,

    Vulg. Ezech. 16, 42; ib. Apoc. 7, 16:

    ne amplius dona petas,

    Cat. 68, 14:

    urere ne possit calor amplius aridus artus,

    Lucr. 4, 874;

    ne quos amplius Rhenum transire pateretur,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    ut ne quem amplius posthac discipulum reciperet,

    Suet. Gram. 17:

    ne amplius morando Scaurum incenderet,

    Sall. J. 25, 10; id. Fragm. Hist. 1, 2, 10 Kritz;

    3, 82, 17: ne amplius divulgetur,

    Vulg. Act. 4, 17:

    ut nequaquam amplius per eamdem viam revertamini,

    ib. Deut. 17, 16:

    nolite amplius accipere pecuniam,

    ib. 4 Reg. 12, 7.—
    (γ).
    With nemo:

    cur non restipulatur neminem amplius petiturum?

    Cic. Q. Rosc. 12, 36:

    cum amplius nemo occurreret,

    nobody further, no one more, Curt. 8, 10, 2; so,

    neminem amplius viderunt,

    Vulg. Marc. 9, 7:

    nemo emet amplius,

    no one will buy any longer, any more, ib. Apoc. 18, 11 (for cases of haud with amplius, v. c. a and g).—
    c.
    With numerals and numeral forms.
    (α).
    Without quam:

    amplius horam suffixum in cruce me memini esse,

    Cat. 69, 3:

    horam amplius jam in demoliendo signo homines moliebantur,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 95:

    amplius annos triginta tribunus fuerat,

    Sall. C. 59, 6:

    me non amplius novem annos nato,

    Nep. Hann. 2, 3:

    per annos amplius quadraginta,

    Suet. Aug. 72; 32:

    quid si tandem amplius triennium est?

    Cic. Q. Rosc. 8:

    Tu faciem illius noctem non amplius unam Falle dolo,

    Verg. A. 1, 683:

    inveniebat Sabim flumen non amplius milia passuum decem abesse,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 16; 4, 12:

    reliquum spatium, quod est non amplius pedum sexcentorum, mons continet,

    id. ib. 1, 28;

    2, 29: amplius sestertium ducentiens acceptum hereditatibus rettuli,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 40; id. Fl. 68; so Plin. Ep. 10, 39, 1:

    huic paulo amplius tertiam partem denegem?

    id. ib. 5, 7, 3:

    cum eum amplius centum cives Romani cognoscerent,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 14; 5, 155:

    victi amplius ducenti ceciderunt,

    Liv. 21, 29, 3: non amplius quattuordecim cohortes, Pompei. ap. Cic. Att. 8, 12, C:

    ex omni multitudine non amplius quadraginta locum cepere,

    Sall. J. 58, 3: torrentes amplius centum, [p. 113] Plin. 5, 28, 29, § 103; 9, 5, 4, § 10.—And very rarely placed after the numeral:

    qui septingentos jam annos amplius numquam mutatis legibus vivunt,

    Cic. Fl. 63:

    pugnatum duas amplius horas,

    Liv. 25, 19, 15 Weissenb.:

    duo haud amplius milia peditum effugerunt,

    id. 28, 2:

    decem amplius versus perdidimus,

    Plin. Ep. 3, 5, 12:

    tris pateat caeli spatium non amplius ulnas,

    Verg. E. 3, 105.—
    (β).
    With the comp. abl. (rare but class.):

    cum jam amplius horis sex continenter pugnaretur,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 5; 4, 37:

    pugnatum amplius duabus horis est,

    Liv. 27, 12:

    neque triennio amplius supervixit,

    Suet. Caes. 89:

    uti non amplius quinis aut senis milibus passuum interesset,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 15; 1, 23; 2, 7;

    6, 29: non amplius patet milibus quinque et triginta,

    Sall. Fragm. Hist. 4, 1, 34 Kritz:

    est ab capite paulo amplius mille passibus locus,

    Plin. Ep. 10, 90, 1:

    ab Capsa non amplius duum milium intervallo,

    Sall. J. 91, 3:

    (Catilina) cum initio non amplius duobus milibus (militum) habuisset,

    id. C. 56, 2; so,

    denas alii, alii plures (uxores) habent, set reges eo amplius,

    id. J. 80, 7.—

    And prob. the following ambiguous cases: cum mille non amplius equitibus,

    Sall. J. 105, 3:

    oppidum non amplius mille passuum abesse,

    id. ib. 68, 3.—
    (γ).
    With quam (postAug. and eccl.):

    non amplius, cum plurimum, quam septem horas dormiebat,

    Suet. Aug. 78:

    nec amplius quam septem et viginti dies Brundisii commoratus,

    id. ib. 17:

    Toto triennio semel omnino eam nec amplius quam uno die paucissimis vidit horis,

    id. Tib. 51:

    demoratus dies non amplius quam octo aut decem,

    Vulg. Act. 25, 6:

    ut non amplius apud te quam quarta (pars) remaneret,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 19:

    ut vexillum veteranorum, non amplius quam quingenti numero, copias fuderint,

    Tac. A. 3, 21:

    haud amplius quam ducentos misit,

    id. ib. 14, 32:

    insidiantur ei ex iis viri amplius quam quadraginta,

    Vulg. Act. 23, 21.—
    d. (α).
    Amplius, t. t. of judges when they deferred an important case for future examination:

    Amplius adeo prolixum temporis spatium significat, ut judices quotienscunque significarent, adhuc se audire velle, amplius dicebant. Itaque negotium differebant, unde hodieque ampliari judicium differri dicitur,

    Charis. 176 P.; so Don. ad Ter. Eun. 2, 3, 39; cf.

    also amplio and ampliatio: cum consules re audita amplius de consilii sententia pronuntiavissent,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 86:

    antea vel judicari primo poterat vel amplius pronuntiari,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 26:

    ut de Philodamo amplius pronuntiaretur,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 29.—

    And metaph.: ego amplius deliberandum censeo,

    Ter. Phorm. 2, 4, 17.—
    (β).
    Amplius non petere, judicial t. phr., to bring no further action, to make no further claim:

    quid ita satis non dedit, AMPLIVS [A SE] NEMINEM PETITVRVM?

    Cic. Rosc. Com. 12, 35:

    Tibi ego, Brute, non solvam, nisi prius a te cavero amplius eo nomine neminem, cujus petitio sit, petiturum,

    id. Brut. 5, 18:

    sunt duo, quae te rogo: primum, ut si quid satis dandum erit, AMPLIVS EO NOMINE NON PETI, cures etc.,

    id. Fam. 13, 28 A:

    quod ille recusarit satis dare amplius abs te non peti,

    id. Att. 1, 8, 1.—
    (γ).
    Hoc amplius, beside the general use given above (II. Comp. b. a), as t. phr. of senators when they approved a measure, but amended it by addition:

    Servilio adsentior et HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO, magnum Pompeium fecisse etc.,

    Cic. Phil. 12, 21, 50:

    cui cum essem adsensus, decrevi HOC AMPLIVS, ut etc.,

    id. ad Brut. 1, 5, 1;

    so Seneca: fortasse et post omnes citatus nihil improbabo ex iis, quae priores decreverint, et dicam HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO, Vit. Beat. 3, 2: Quaedam ex istis sunt, quibus adsentire possumus, sed HOC AMPLIVS CENSEO,

    id. Q. N. 3, 15, 1.—
    (δ).
    To this may be added the elliptical phrases, nihil amplius and si nihil amplius:

    nihil amplius, denoting that there is nothing further than has been declared: sese ipsum abs te repetit. Nihil amplius,

    Cic. Verr. 5, 49, 128;

    (res publica) ulta suas injurias est per vos interitu tyranni. Nihil amplius,

    id. Fam. 12, 1, 2; and, si nihil amplius, marking a limit, if nothing more, at least:

    excedam tectis? An, si nihil amplius, obstem?

    Ov. M. 9, 148.
    The form amplius has the ambiguity of the Engl.
    word more, which is sometimes an adj., sometimes a subst., and sometimes an adv., and some of the above examples would admit of different classifications; as, non amplius dicere, not to speak further (adv.) or not to say more (subst.), Plaut. As. 1, 3, 51; but some of them would admit of only one explanation;

    as, ne quos amplius Rhenum transire pateretur,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43. Sup.: amplissimē.
    I.
    Lit., very largely, most abundantly:

    ut quibus militibus amplissime (agri) dati adsignati essent,

    in the largest shares, Cic. Phil. 5, 53:

    duumviri (deos) tribus quam amplissume tum apparari poterat stratis lectis placavere,

    Liv. 5, 13, 6 Weissenb.—
    II.
    Fig., most generously, most handsomely:

    qui amplissime de salute mea decreverint,

    Cic. Dom. 44:

    amplissime laudare,

    in the handsomest style, Plin. 18, 3, 3, § 11; Suet. Calig. 15:

    honores amplissime gessit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 112:

    pater cum amplissime ex praetura triumphasset,

    with the greatest pomp, id. Mur. 15:

    placere eum quam amplissime supremo suo die efferri,

    should be carried forth with every possible solemnity, id. Phil. 9, 7, 16. V. on this word, Hand, Turs. I. pp. 287-296.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > amplus

  • 13 animadverto

    ănĭmadverto (archaic - vorto), ti, sum, 3, v. a. [contr. from animum adverto, which orthography is very freq. in the anteclass. period; cf. adverto, II. B.] (scarcely found in any poet beside Ter. and Verg.), to direct the mind or attention to a thing, to attend to, give heed to, to take heed, consider, regard, observe.
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen.:

    alios tuam rem credidisti magis quam tete animum advorsuros,

    Ter. Phorm. 3, 1, 3:

    atque haec in bello plura et majora videntur timentibus, eadem non tam animadvertuntur in pace,

    Cic. Div. 2, 27:

    sed animadvertendum est diligenter, quae natura rerum sit,

    id. Off. 2, 20, 69:

    dignitas tua facit, ut animadvertatur quicquid facias,

    id. Fam. 11, 27, 7; Nep. Epam. 6, 2.—With ut, to think of:

    illud me non animadvertisse moleste ferrem, ut ascriberem, etc.,

    Cic. Fam. 5, 20, 5 (cf.:

    animos advertere, ne,

    Liv. 4, 45).—
    B.
    Esp., as t. t.
    1.
    Of the lictor, whose duty it was to give attention, to see, that the consul, when he appeared, should receive due homage (cf. Sen. Ep. 64; Schwarz ad Plin. Pan. 23, and Smith, Dict. Antiq., s. v. lictor):

    consul animadvertere proximum lictorem jussit,

    Liv. 24, 44 fin.
    2.
    Of the people, to whom the lictor gave orders to pay attention, to pay regard to:

    consule theatrum introeunte, cum lictor animadverti ex more jussisset,

    Suet. Caes. 80 Ruhnk.—
    II.
    Transf., as a consequence of attention.
    A.
    To remark, notice, observe, perceive, see (in a more general sense than above; the most usu. signif. of this word).
    a.
    With acc.:

    Ecquid attendis? ecquid animadvertis horum silentium?

    Cic. Cat. 1, 8, 20: utcumque animadversa aut existimata erunt, Liv. praef. med.:

    his animadversis,

    Verg. G. 2, 259; 3, 123 et saep.:

    Equidem etiam illud animadverto, etc.,

    Cic. Off. 1, 12, 37 Beier.:

    nutrix animadvertit puerum dormientem circumplicatum serpentis amplexu,

    id. Div. 1, 36, 79.—
    b.
    With acc. and inf.:

    postquam id vos velle animum advorteram,

    Ter. Phorm. 5, 8, 16:

    qui non animadverterit innocentes illos natos, etc.,

    Nep. Epam. 6, 3:

    turrim conlucere animadvertit,

    Tac. H. 3, 38.—
    c.
    With ind. quest.: quod quale sit, etiam in bestiis quibusdam animadverti potest, Cic.Am. 8, 27.—
    B.
    In a pregn. sense, to discern something, or, in gen., to apprehend, understand, comprehend, know (less freq. than the synn. cognoscere, intellegere, etc.):

    boni seminis sues animadvertuntur a facie et progenie,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 4, 4:

    nonne animadvertis, quam multi effugerint?

    Cic. N. D. 3, 37, 89:

    ut adsint, cognoscant, animadvertant, quid de religione... existimandum sit,

    id. ib. 1, 6, 14:

    animadverti enim et didici ex tuis litteris te, etc.,

    id. Fam. 3, 5.—
    C.
    To notice a wrong, to censure, blame, chastise, punish (cf. the Engl. phrase to attend to one, for to punish):

    Ea primum ab illo animadvortenda injuriast,

    deserves to be punished, Ter. And. 1, 1, 129 (animadvortenda = castiganda, vindicanda, Don.):

    O facinus animadvortendum,

    O crime worthy of punishment, id. ib. 4, 4, 28:

    animadvertenda peccata,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 40:

    res a magistratibus animadvertenda,

    id. Caecin. 12:

    neque animadvertere neque vincire nisi sacerdotibus permissum = morte multare,

    to punish with death, Tac. G. 7.—Esp. freq. in judicial proceedings as t. t., constr. with in aliquem: qui institueras [p. 122] animadvertere in eos, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 23:

    imperiti, si in hunc animadvertissem, crudeliter et regie factum esse dicerent,

    id. Cat. 1, 12, 30:

    qui in alios animadvertisset indictā causā,

    id. Fam. 5, 2; so Sall. C. 51, 21; Liv. 1, 26:

    in Marcianum Icelum, ut in libertum, palam animadversum,

    Tac. H. 1, 46; 1, 68; 1, 85; 4, 49; Suet. Aug. 15; id. Tib. 61; id. Calig. 30; id. Galb. 20; Dig. 48, 19, 8 al.;

    hence, effect for cause, animadverti,

    to offend, be censurable, Cic. Or. 3, 12.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > animadverto

  • 14 animadvorto

    ănĭmadverto (archaic - vorto), ti, sum, 3, v. a. [contr. from animum adverto, which orthography is very freq. in the anteclass. period; cf. adverto, II. B.] (scarcely found in any poet beside Ter. and Verg.), to direct the mind or attention to a thing, to attend to, give heed to, to take heed, consider, regard, observe.
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen.:

    alios tuam rem credidisti magis quam tete animum advorsuros,

    Ter. Phorm. 3, 1, 3:

    atque haec in bello plura et majora videntur timentibus, eadem non tam animadvertuntur in pace,

    Cic. Div. 2, 27:

    sed animadvertendum est diligenter, quae natura rerum sit,

    id. Off. 2, 20, 69:

    dignitas tua facit, ut animadvertatur quicquid facias,

    id. Fam. 11, 27, 7; Nep. Epam. 6, 2.—With ut, to think of:

    illud me non animadvertisse moleste ferrem, ut ascriberem, etc.,

    Cic. Fam. 5, 20, 5 (cf.:

    animos advertere, ne,

    Liv. 4, 45).—
    B.
    Esp., as t. t.
    1.
    Of the lictor, whose duty it was to give attention, to see, that the consul, when he appeared, should receive due homage (cf. Sen. Ep. 64; Schwarz ad Plin. Pan. 23, and Smith, Dict. Antiq., s. v. lictor):

    consul animadvertere proximum lictorem jussit,

    Liv. 24, 44 fin.
    2.
    Of the people, to whom the lictor gave orders to pay attention, to pay regard to:

    consule theatrum introeunte, cum lictor animadverti ex more jussisset,

    Suet. Caes. 80 Ruhnk.—
    II.
    Transf., as a consequence of attention.
    A.
    To remark, notice, observe, perceive, see (in a more general sense than above; the most usu. signif. of this word).
    a.
    With acc.:

    Ecquid attendis? ecquid animadvertis horum silentium?

    Cic. Cat. 1, 8, 20: utcumque animadversa aut existimata erunt, Liv. praef. med.:

    his animadversis,

    Verg. G. 2, 259; 3, 123 et saep.:

    Equidem etiam illud animadverto, etc.,

    Cic. Off. 1, 12, 37 Beier.:

    nutrix animadvertit puerum dormientem circumplicatum serpentis amplexu,

    id. Div. 1, 36, 79.—
    b.
    With acc. and inf.:

    postquam id vos velle animum advorteram,

    Ter. Phorm. 5, 8, 16:

    qui non animadverterit innocentes illos natos, etc.,

    Nep. Epam. 6, 3:

    turrim conlucere animadvertit,

    Tac. H. 3, 38.—
    c.
    With ind. quest.: quod quale sit, etiam in bestiis quibusdam animadverti potest, Cic.Am. 8, 27.—
    B.
    In a pregn. sense, to discern something, or, in gen., to apprehend, understand, comprehend, know (less freq. than the synn. cognoscere, intellegere, etc.):

    boni seminis sues animadvertuntur a facie et progenie,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 4, 4:

    nonne animadvertis, quam multi effugerint?

    Cic. N. D. 3, 37, 89:

    ut adsint, cognoscant, animadvertant, quid de religione... existimandum sit,

    id. ib. 1, 6, 14:

    animadverti enim et didici ex tuis litteris te, etc.,

    id. Fam. 3, 5.—
    C.
    To notice a wrong, to censure, blame, chastise, punish (cf. the Engl. phrase to attend to one, for to punish):

    Ea primum ab illo animadvortenda injuriast,

    deserves to be punished, Ter. And. 1, 1, 129 (animadvortenda = castiganda, vindicanda, Don.):

    O facinus animadvortendum,

    O crime worthy of punishment, id. ib. 4, 4, 28:

    animadvertenda peccata,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 40:

    res a magistratibus animadvertenda,

    id. Caecin. 12:

    neque animadvertere neque vincire nisi sacerdotibus permissum = morte multare,

    to punish with death, Tac. G. 7.—Esp. freq. in judicial proceedings as t. t., constr. with in aliquem: qui institueras [p. 122] animadvertere in eos, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 23:

    imperiti, si in hunc animadvertissem, crudeliter et regie factum esse dicerent,

    id. Cat. 1, 12, 30:

    qui in alios animadvertisset indictā causā,

    id. Fam. 5, 2; so Sall. C. 51, 21; Liv. 1, 26:

    in Marcianum Icelum, ut in libertum, palam animadversum,

    Tac. H. 1, 46; 1, 68; 1, 85; 4, 49; Suet. Aug. 15; id. Tib. 61; id. Calig. 30; id. Galb. 20; Dig. 48, 19, 8 al.;

    hence, effect for cause, animadverti,

    to offend, be censurable, Cic. Or. 3, 12.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > animadvorto

  • 15 apud

    ăpŭd ( apud down to the time of Caesar, Corp. Inscr. I. 30; I. 196; and after 45 B. C. both apud, Inscr. Orell. 206; 818, and aput, ib. 206; 15; 34; another form of apud was apor, Paul. ex Fest. p. 26 Mull. apud, Ritschl, Rib. in Trag. et Com. Rel., Mull. in Lucil., and Dietsch in Sall.; aput, Lachm., Fleck. in Plaut.; both apud and aput, Mull. in Cat. and Rib. in Verg.) [Corssen once regarded apud as connected with apisci, as juxta with jungo, Ausspr. I. p. 335, 1st ed., but afterwards, ib. 2d ed. I. p. 197, he adopted Pott's view, that it was comp. of Sanscr. api, = to, toward, near (Gr. epi), and ad, old form ar, which view the form apor favors, and thus its strict meaning would be on to, unto; v. infra, IV.]; prep. gov. acc., with, at, by, near (regularly with words denoting rest, and primarily of persons, while ad properly designates only direction, motion, extension, etc., and is chiefly used of places; the diff. between apud and penes is given in Paul. ex Fest. p. 22 Mull.: apud et penes in hoc differunt, quod alterum personam cum loco significat, alterum personam et dominium ac potestatem; v. penes, and cf. Nep. Them. 7, 2: ad ephoros Lacedaemoniorum accessit, penes quos summum imperium erat, atque apud eos (v. infra, I. B. 2. a.) contendit, etc.; and for the difference between ad and apud, cf. Lucil. 9, 58 sq. Mull.: apud se longe alid est, neque idem valet ad se: Intro nos vocat ad sese, tenet intus apud se; syn.: ad, prope, coram, inter, in with abl.; rare in early Lat.; very freq. in Plaut., less freq. in Ter., seven times in Verg., five times in Juv., three times in Catull., twice in Ov, and once in Hor. and Prop.; never in Tib. or Pers.; very freq. in Cic., the historians, and the Vulg.).
    I.
    A.. In designating nearness in respect of persons, with, near: apud ipsum adstas, Att. ap. Non. p. 522, 25:

    adsum apud te, genitor,

    id. ib. p. 522, 32:

    alteram (partem) apud me adponito,

    Plaut. Trin. 4, 3, 60:

    nunc hic apud te servio,

    id. Capt. 2, 2, 62:

    scriptorum non magnast copia apud me,

    Cat. 68, 33 Mull.:

    mane apud me,

    Vulg. Gen. 29, 19:

    Advocatum habemus apud Patrem,

    ib. 1 Joan. 2, 1:

    cum in lecto Crassus esset et apud eum Sulpicius sederet,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 3, 12; so id. Pis. 26, and id. Rep. 3, 28.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    a.. With a pron. or subst., apud me, te, se, aliquem, etc., with me, in my house, etc., in one's house, at the house of a person; Fr. chez moi, chez vous, chez soi, etc.:

    Quis heri apud te? Naev., Com. Rel. p. 9 Rib.: dico eum esse apud me,

    Plaut. Capt. 3, 2, 15; 4, 2, 73:

    hic apud me hortum confodere jussi,

    id. Aul. 2, 2, 66:

    si commodumst, apud me, sis, volo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 110:

    condixerant cenam apud me, Turp., Com. Rel. p. 108 Rib.: quid nunc virgo? Nempe apud test?

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 159:

    Quid sibi volunt homines isti apud te?

    Vulg. Num. 22, 9; ib. Matt. 26, 18:

    cenabis bene apud me,

    Cat. 13, 1:

    apud me habitavit,

    Cic. Clu. 33; id. Verr. 4, 111; 5, 77:

    apud te cenavit,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 58; id. Verr. 4, 49; id. Cael. 26; id. Deiot. 32:

    in curia posita potius quam rure apud te, Titin., Com. Rel. p. 142 Rib.: mane apud me etiam hodie,

    Vulg. Jud. 19, 9:

    tenet intus apud se,

    Lucil. 9, 59 Mull.:

    Pompeius petiit, ut secum et apud se essem cotidie,

    Cic. Att. 5, 6:

    apud se fecit manere,

    Vulg. Jud. 19, 7; ib. Luc. 11, 37:

    de gladiis, quae apud ipsum erant deprehensa,

    Cic. Cat. 3, 10:

    Cum postridie apud eundem ventum exspectans manerem,

    id. Phil. 1, 8:

    mansit apud eum quattuor mensibus,

    Vulg. Jud. 19, 2; ib. Act. 28, 14:

    apud quem deversatus es,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 37: apud nympham Calypsonem, Liv. And. ap. Prisc. p. 685 (cf. Hom. Od. 4, 557: Numphês en megaroisi Kalupsous):

    habitasti apud Heium Messanae,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 18; id. Cael. 51:

    Fuisti apud Laecam illa nocte,

    id. Cat. 1, 4, 9; id. de Or. 1, 22, 104; id. Att. 1, 8:

    apud Ostorium Scapulam epulatur,

    Tac. A. 14, 48:

    apud Cornelium Primum juxta Velabrum delituit,

    id. H. 3, 74; 1, 14:

    Factum est, ut moraretur apud Simonem quendam,

    Vulg. Act. 9, 43:

    invenient hominem apud sororem tuam occultantem se,

    Cic. Dom. 83:

    qui apud te esset eductus,

    id. Quinct. 69:

    apud quem erat educatus,

    id. Lael. 20, 75:

    cum alter ejus filius apud matrem educaretur,

    id. Clu. 27:

    disciplina C. Cassii, apud quem educatus erat,

    Tac. A. 15, 52:

    se apud Q. Mucium jus civile didicisse,

    id. Or. 30:

    apud eosdem magistratus institutus,

    Suet. Calig. 24:

    servorum manus tamquam apud senem festinantes,

    Tac. H. 1, 7:

    in convivio apud regem,

    id. A. 2, 57: Bene vale;

    apud Orcum te videbo,

    in the abode of Orcus, Plaut. As. 3, 3, 16:

    sacrificasse apud deos, i. e. in templis deorum,

    Tac. A. 11, 27:

    frater apud Othonem militans,

    in the army of Otho, id. H. 2, 26; so,

    nec solum apud Caecinam (cognoscebatur id damnum composuisse),

    id. ib. 2, 27:

    quorum sint legati apud se,

    in his camp, Caes. B. G. 4, 8; cf.:

    Quos cum apud se in castris Ariovistus conspexisset,

    id. ib. 1, 47:

    dici hoc potest, Apud portitores eas (litteras) resignatas sibi,

    at the custom-house, Plaut. Trin. 3, 3, 64; 3, 3, 80:

    Quantillum argenti mihi apud trapezitam siet,

    at the banker's, id. Capt. 1, 2, 90:

    duo genera materiarum apud rhetoras tractantur, i. e. in scholis rhetorum, as he says just before,

    Tac. Or. 35.—Apud me etc. is sometimes added to domi or in aedibus, or interchanges with domi: Me. Ubi namst, quaeso? Ch. Apud me domi, Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 21:

    a me insidias apud me domi positas esse dixerunt,

    Cic. Sest. 41:

    domi esse apud sese archipiratas dixit duos,

    id. Verr. 5, 73; so Vulg. Gen. 27, 15:

    quae (signa) cognovi apud istum in aedibus,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 50:

    esse illa signa domi suae, non esse apud Verrem,

    id. ib. 4, 16:

    nihil apud hanc lautum, pistor domi nullus,

    id. Pis. 67; id. Clu. 165.—Hence,
    b.
    Trop.: apud se esse, to be at home, i. e. to be in one's senses, be one's self, be sane (only in conversational lang.; most freq. in Ter.; cf. Gr. en heautôi einai, Ar. Vesp. 642; opp. vecors, amens esse, to be out of one's wits, beside one's self; so Gr. phrenôn exestanai, Eur. Or. 1021):

    Sumne ego apud me?

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 36:

    Non sum apud me,

    Ter. Phorm. 1, 4, 26, and Afran., Com. Rel, p. 170 Rib.:

    Prae iracundia, Menedeme, non sum apud me,

    Ter. Heaut. 5, 1, 48:

    Vix sum apud me: ita animus commotust metu, spe, gaudio,

    id. And. 5, 4, 34:

    Num tibi videtur esse apud sese?

    id. Hec. 4, 4, 85 (quasi ob amorem meretricis insanus, Don.):

    proin tu fac, apud te ut sies,

    id. And. 2, 4, 5 (= ut praeparatus sis, Don.); Petr. 129.—
    2.
    In respect of persons, in whose presence or before whom any thing is done or takes place, esp. of discussions or debates in which the persons have the right of decision (Web. Uebungsch. p. 33), before, in the presence of, = coram, ad.
    a.
    Of civil or military affairs, before:

    cum res agatur apud praetorem populi Romani et apud severissimos judices,

    Cic. Arch. 3:

    apud eosdem judices reus est factus,

    id. Clu. 22, 59:

    vis de his judicari apud me?

    Vulg. Act. 25, 9:

    accusavit fratres suos apud patrem,

    ib. Gen. 37, 2; ib. 1 Macc. 7, 6; ib. Joan. 5, 45:

    hoc, quod nunc apud pontifices agis,

    Cic. Dom. 51; 117:

    istud ne apud eum quidem dictatorem quisquam egit isto modo,

    id. Lig. 12:

    qui hanc causam aliquotiens apud te egit,

    id. Quinct. 30; so id. Verr. 2, 100; 3, 114; id. Caecin. 69; id. Sest. 120:

    (populus Romanus) mihi potestatem apud se agendi dedit,

    id. Verr. 5, 173: Repulsior secunda collatione dixit Cato in ea, quae est contra Cornelium apud populum, Paul. ex Fest. p. 286 Mull.:

    tutoresne defendent apud istius modi praetorem?

    Cic. Verr. 1, 153; id. Clu. 126: apud te cum sim defensurus me, Vulg. Act. [p. 146] 26, 2:

    omnia apud praetores gererentur,

    Tac. Or. 38:

    causam nescio quam apud judicem defendebat,

    Cic. Clu. 74; so Tac. A. 3, 12; id. Or. 19:

    apud te defendit alium in ea voluntate non fuisse, in qua te,

    Cic. Lig. 6:

    apud judicem causam dicere,

    id. Quinct. 43; id. Verr. 1, 26; id. Sex. Rosc. 85:

    apud aliquem dicere,

    id. Lig. 6; id. Deiot. 4:

    verba apud senatum fecit,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 20:

    habita apud senatum oratione,

    Tac. A. 12, 25; 6, 8:

    haec apud patres disseruit,

    id. ib. 2, 43; 4, 2;

    4, 6: modeste apud vos socius populi Romani questus est,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 18:

    Quae est ergo apud Caesarem querella?

    id. Lig. 25:

    isne apud vos obtinebit causam, qui etc.,

    id. Caecin. 38:

    petita multa est apud eum praetorem,

    id. Verr. 1, 155:

    causam contra aliquem apud centumviros dicere,

    id. de Or. 2, 23, 98; Tac. Or. 38:

    numerus oratorum quot annis apud magistratus publice subscribitur,

    Cic. Verr. 3, 120:

    apud eorum quem qui manumitteretur,

    Liv. 41, 9: apud proconsules aliquem manumittere, Marcian. ap. Dig. 1, 162.—
    b.
    In extra judicial cases, before:

    apud hunc confessus es et genus etc.,

    Plaut. Capt. 2, 3, 52:

    nullam causam dico, quin mihi Et parentum et libertatis apud te deliquio siet,

    id. ib. 3, 4, 93:

    apud erum qui (servos) vera loquitur,

    id. Am. 2, 1, 43:

    apud novercam querere,

    id. Ps. 1, 3, 80:

    ego apud parentem loquor,

    Cic. Lig. 30:

    plura fateri apud amicos,

    Tac. A. 14, 62:

    aliquid apud aliquem laudare,

    Cic. Att. 2, 25; Tac. A. 13, 46; so Vulg. Gen. 12, 15:

    aliquem apud aliquos vituperare,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 11:

    apud quem tu etiam nos criminari soles,

    id. Vatin. 29.—
    c.
    Of one's feelings, views, judgment, with, in the view or sight of, before.
    (α).
    With verbs:

    apud Tenedios sanctissimus deus habetur,

    Cic. Fl. 61; id. Verr. 1, 49:

    quod apud illos amplissimum sacerdotium putatur,

    id. ib. 2, 126;

    1, 69: si tutoris auctoritas apud te ponderis nihil habebat,

    id. ib. 2, 55; id. Planc. 4:

    apud judicem grave et sanctum esse ducetur,

    id. Q. Rosc. 6:

    Quae omnia apud nos partim infamia... ponuntur, Nep. praef. 5: justificatur apud Deum,

    Vulg. Gal. 3, 11:

    haec apud illos barbatos ridicula videbantur,

    Cic. Mur. 26; id. Dom. 101:

    unus dies apud Dominum (est) sicut mille anni, et mille anni sicut dies unus,

    Vulg. 2 Pet. 3, 8.—
    (β).
    With adjj.:

    fuisti apud pontifices superior,

    Cic. Dom. 4:

    qui honos est apud Syracusanos amplissimus,

    id. Verr. 4, 137; id. Font. 36:

    quam clara (expugnatio) apud omnes,

    id. Verr. 1, 50; 2, 50:

    Satis clarus est apud timentem quisquis timetur,

    Tac. H. 2, 76; id. Or. 7:

    hoc est apud Graecos prope gloriosius quam Romae triumphasse,

    Cic. Fl. 31; Tac. H. 5, 17:

    quod aeque apud bonos miserum est,

    id. ib. 1, 29:

    quae justa sunt apud nos,

    Vulg. 1 Macc. 11, 33; ib. Rom. 2, 13:

    tunc eritis inculpabiles apud Dominum,

    ib. Num. 32, 22:

    si is pretio apud istum idoneus esset,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 121.—
    (γ).
    With substt.:

    est tanta apud eos ejus fani religio atque antiquitas, ut etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 46:

    tanta nominis Romani dignitas est apud omnes nationes, ut etc.,

    id. ib. 5, 150:

    qua (hic) apud omnes Siculos dignitate atque existimatione sit,

    id. ib. 2, 111:

    Dymnus modicae apud regem auctoritatis et gratiae,

    Curt. 6, 72:

    abominatio est uterque apud Deum,

    Vulg. Prov. 17, 15.—Apud animum, apud animum meum, etc. sometimes stand for mihi, mecum, etc., or simply animo: Ea tute tibi subice et apud animum propone, before your mind, before you, Sulp. ap. Cic. Fam. 4, 5:

    ipsi primum statuerint apud animos, quid vellent,

    Liv. 6, 39, 11:

    Sic apud animum meum statuo,

    Sall. de Ord. Rep. 2:

    sic statuere apud animum meum possum,

    Liv. 34, 2, 4.—So with pers. pron. in Vulg. after the Greek: haec apud se (pros heauton) oravit, within himself, to himself, Luc. 18, 11: Sciens apud semet ipsum (en heautôi), in himself, Joan. 6, 62: statui hoc ipsum apud me (emautôi), ne etc., with myself, 2 Cor. 2, 1; so, hoc cogitet apud se (eph heautou), ib. 10, 7.—
    d.
    And simply before, in the presence of:

    id apud vos proloquar,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 6:

    nemo est meorum amicorum, apud quem expromere omnia mea occulta audeam,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 14:

    se jactant apud eos, quos inviti vident,

    Cic. Fl. 61:

    licet mihi, Marce fili, apud te gloriari, ad quem etc.,

    id. Off. 1, 22, 78: de vobis glorior apud Macedones, Vulg. 2 Cor. 9, 2:

    plus quam apud vos commemorari velitis,

    Cic. Caecin. 77:

    non apud indoctos loquor,

    id. Pis. 68:

    ostendit, quae quisque de eo apud se dixerit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 19:

    quid apud magnum loquerentur Achillem,

    Ov. M. 12, 163:

    neque raro neque apud paucos talia jaciebat,

    Tac. A. 4, 7:

    loqui de se apud aliquem,

    Cic. Att. 1, 3:

    mentiri apud aliquem,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 1, 24:

    apud aliquem profiteri,

    Curt. 7, 7, 24:

    Non est nobis haec oratio habenda apud imperitam multitudinem,

    Cic. Mur. 61:

    Caesar apud milites contionatur,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 7:

    gratias agere alicui apud aliquem,

    Cic. Sest. 4; so Tac. A. 15, 22:

    si quid (in me) auctoritatis est, apud eos utar, qui etc.,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 2; so id. Lig. 16, and id. Red. in Sen. 24:

    Quae fundebat apud Samson lacrimas,

    Vulg. Jud. 14, 16.—
    3.
    Of a person with whom, in whose case something is, exists, is done, with, in the case of, often = in with abl.:

    quom apud te parum stet fides,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 62:

    Et bene apud memores veteris stat gratia facti,

    Verg. A. 4, 539:

    At fides mihi apud hunc est,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 3, 10: De. Quid est? Ch. Itan parvam mihi fidem esse apud te? id. Phorm. 5, 3, 27:

    ut apud me praemium esse positum pietati scias,

    id. Hec. 4, 2, 8:

    alioqui mercedem non habebitis apud Patrem vestrum,

    Vulg. Matt. 6, 1:

    illa res quantam declarat ejusdem hominis apud hostes populi Romani auctoritatem,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 46:

    (eum) Aeduorum auctoritatem apud omnes Belgas amplificaturum,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 14:

    si M. Petrei non summa auctoritas apud milites exstitisset,

    Cic. Sest. 12:

    Pompei auctoritas apud omnes tanta est. quanta etc.,

    id. Fl. 14; id. Phil. 13, 7:

    ecquid auctoritatis apud vos socii populi Romani habere debeant,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 17; so id. Verr. 2, 14; id. Mur 38:

    (servi) apud eum sunt in honore et pretio,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 77; id. Verr. 5, 157; id. Cat. 3, 2:

    videmus quanta sit in invidia quantoque in odio apud quosdam virtus et industria,

    id. Verr. 5, 181:

    quo majore apud vos odio esse debet quam etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 42:

    domi splendor, apud exteras nationes nomen et gratia,

    id. Clu. 154; id. Mur. 38:

    Dumnorigem, magna apud plebem gratia,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 18:

    tanti ejus apud se gratiam esse ostendit, uti etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 20:

    certe apud te et hos, qui tibi adsunt, veritas valebit,

    Cic. Quinct. 5; id. Div. in Caecil. 17; id. Lig. 30; id. Marcell. 14; id. Mil. 34:

    utrum apud eos pudor atque officium aut timor valeret,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 40:

    apud quem ut multum gratia valeret,

    Nep. Con. 2, 1:

    video apud te causas valere plus quam preces,

    Cic. Lig. 31; so id. Lael. 4, 13, and Tac. H. 3, 36:

    quod apud vos plurimum debebit valere,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 11; so Caes. B. G. 1, 17, and Tac. H. 4, 73:

    qui tantum auctoritate apud suos cives potuit, ut etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 113:

    speravit sese apud tales viros aliquid posse ad etc.,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 141:

    (eum) apud finitimas civitates largiter posse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 18:

    quae (pecunia) apud me contra fidem meam nihil potuisset,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 19:

    quae (memoria) plus apud eum possit quam salus civitatis,

    id. Phil. 5, 51; id. Verr. 3, 131:

    qui apud eum plurimum poterat,

    id. ib. 3, 130:

    qui apud me et amicitia et beneficiis et dignitate plurimum possunt,

    id. Sex. Rosc. 4; so Caes. B. G. 1, 9.—So very rarely with adjj.:

    faciles sunt preces apud eos, qui etc.,

    Cic. Har. Resp. 63:

    nihil me turpius apud homines fuisset,

    id. Att. 2, 19:

    apud quos miserum auxilium tolerabile miserius malum fecit,

    Cels. 3, 23.—
    4.
    Of persons, of inhabitants of cities or countries, among whom one is, or something is, is done or happens, among = inter:

    CONSOL. QVEI. FVIT. APVD. VOS., Epit. Scip. ap. Grotef. Gr. II. p. 296: homines apud nos noti, inter suos nobiles,

    Cic. Fl. 52:

    Ut vos hic, itidem ille apud vos meus servatur filius,

    Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 11; 2, 2, 62:

    qui (colonus) perigrinatur apud vos,

    Vulg. Exod. 12, 49:

    qui regnabat apud vos,

    ib. 1 Macc. 12, 7; ib. Matt. 13, 56; ib. Luc. 9, 41:

    si iste apud eos quaestor non fuisset,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 4; 65:

    Apud eos fuisse regem Divitiacum,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4; 2, 2:

    qui (praetores) apud illos a populo creantur,

    Cic. Fl. 44:

    apud quos consul fuerat,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 66; id. Verr. 2, 5; 4, 108:

    apud inferos illi antiqui supplicia impiis constituta esse voluerunt,

    id. Cat. 4, 8; id. Tusc. 1, 5, 10; so Vulg. Eccli. 14, 17: Sunt apud infernos tot milia formosarum, Prop. 3, 2, 63:

    fateri quae quis apud superos distulit in seram commissa piacula mortem,

    Verg. A. 6, 568;

    Vel. 2, 48, 2: studiis militaribus apud juventutem obsoletis,

    Cic. Font. 42:

    qui apud socios nominis Latini censi essent,

    Liv. 41, 9:

    qui apud gentes solus praestat, Naev., Com. Rel. p. 25 Rib.: quae sacra apud omnes gentes nationesque fiunt,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 109:

    id (simulacrum) apud Segestanos positum fuisse,

    id. ib. 4, 80:

    si apud Athenienses non deerant qui rem publicam defenderent,

    id. Sest. 141, and Nep. Milt. 6, 2:

    ille est magistratus apud Siculos, qui etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 131:

    si tu apud Persas deprehensus etc.,

    id. ib. 5, 166:

    Apud Helvetios longe nobilissimus fuit Orgetorix,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 2:

    apud omnes Graecos hic mos est, ut etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 158, and id. Fragm. B. 7, 18 B. and K.:

    quod apud Germanos ea consuetudo esset, ut etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 50:

    aliis Germanorum populis usurpatum raro apud Chattos in consensum vertit,

    Tac. G. 31:

    Cui (mihi) neque apud Danaos usquam locus (est),

    Verg. A. 2, 71:

    apud Nahanarvalos antiquae religionis lucus ostenditur,

    Tac. G. 43; 32; 38; 44; id. H. 4, 56; 4, 61; id. A. 2, 1; 2, 45: apud Graecos magis quam in ceteris nationibus exculta est medicina, Cels. praef. 3, 9.—So of an army, in, with, where in with abl. is commonly used:

    qui apud exercitum cum Lucio Lucullo est,

    in the army under L. Lucullus, Cic. Verr. 4, 49; so id. Arch. 11:

    apud exercitum mihi fueris tot annos,

    id. Mur. 45:

    quod Hannibalem etiam nunc cum imperio apud exercitum haberent,

    in the army with a command, Nep. Hann. 7, 3:

    simul manere apud exercitus Titum utile videbatur,

    Tac. H. 5, 10:

    quod XII. pondo argenti habuisset apud exercitum,

    with his troops, Plin. 33, 4, 50, § 143.—
    5.
    In designating the author of a work or of an assertion, apud aliquem, in, by, in the writings of, any one (the work itself being designated by in with abl.; as, de qua in Catone majore satis multa diximus, Cic. Off. 1, 42, 151:

    Socraiem illum, qui est in Phaedro Platonis,

    id. de Or. 1, 7, 28:

    quo in libro,

    id. ib. 1, 11, 47):

    ut scriptum apud eundem Caelium est,

    Cic. Div. 1, 26, 55:

    apud Xenophontem autem moriens Cyrus major haec dicit,

    id. Sen. 22, 79:

    quod apud Platonem est in philosophos dictum, quod etc.,

    id. Off. 1, 9, 28:

    apud Agathoclem scriptum in historia est,

    id. Div. 1, 24, 50:

    ut est apud poetam nescio quem,

    id. Phil. 2, 65:

    Quod enim est apud Ennium, etc.,

    id. Off. 1, 8, 26:

    de qua (ambitione) praeclare apud eundem est Platonem, simile etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 25, 87:

    Apud Varronem ita est, etc.,

    Plin. 18, 35, 79, § 348:

    ut video scriptum apud Graecos,

    Cic. Scaur. 4:

    invenio apud quosdam auctores,

    Tac. H. 2, 37; so id. A. 1, 81; 3, 3:

    reperio apud scriptores,

    id. ib. 2, 88:

    apud Solonem,

    i. e. in his laws, Cic. Leg. 2, 26, 64:

    cui bono est, si apud te Agamemnon diserte loquitur, i. e. in tragoediis tuis,

    Tac. Or. 9. —Also of speakers:

    apud quosdam acerbior in conviciis narrabatur,

    Tac. Agr. 22.—
    6.
    a.. Est aliquid apud aliquem = est alicui aliquid, apud aliquem being equivalent to dat. of possessor:

    quae (scientia auguralis) mihi videtur apud majores fuisse dupliciter, ut etc.,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 33:

    juris civilis magnum usum apud multos fuisse,

    id. Brut. 41, 152:

    cum apud eum summum esset imperium populi,

    Nep. Phoc. 2, 4:

    omnis gratia, potentia, honos, divitiae apud illos sunt,

    Sall. C. 20, 8:

    par gloria apud Hannibalem hostesque Poenos erat,

    Liv. 22, 30, 8:

    apud quos nulla loricarum galearumve tegmina (erant),

    Tac. A. 12, 35:

    pecuniam ac dona majora apud Romanos (esse),

    id. H. 4, 76:

    minorem esse apud victos animum,

    id. ib. 3, 1;

    2, 75: quando quidem est apud te virtuti honos,

    Liv. 2, 1, 15: Phoebo sua semper apud me Munera sunt, Phoebus has his gifts with me, i. e. I have his gifts for Phoebus, Verg. E. 3, 62; so Hor. C. 3, 29, 5:

    apud te est fons vitae,

    Vulg. Psa. 35, 10:

    apud Dominum (est) misericordia,

    ib. ib. 129, 7.—
    b.
    Est aliquid apud aliquem also simply denotes that something is in one's hands, in his power, at his disposal:

    erat ei apud me pauxillulum Nummorum,

    Ter. Phorm. 1, 1, 3:

    negasse habere se (phaleras): apud alium quoque eas habuisse depositas,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 29:

    multa (signa) deposita apud amicos,

    id. ib. 4, 36:

    apud quem inventus est scyphus,

    Vulg. Gen. 44, 16; ib. [p. 147] Exod. 22, 4; ib. Deut. 24, 12.—So also of persons:

    te pix atra agitet apud carnuficem,

    in the hands of, Plaut. Capt. 3, 4, 65:

    qui (obsides) apud eum sint,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 31; 1, 33.—
    c.
    Apud aliquem = alicui, the dat. of indir. obj.:

    remanet gloria apud me, Att., Trag. Rel. p. 194 Rib.: nihil apud Siculum, nihil apud civem Romanum tota in Sicilia reliquisse,

    Cic. Verr. 4, 2:

    si (cura rei publicae) apud Othonem relinqueretur,

    Tac. H. 1, 13; 1, 20:

    qui judicia manere apud ordinem Senatorium volunt,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 8:

    neque praemia caedis apud interfectorem mansura,

    Tac. H. 2, 70; id. A. 15, 7:

    fidens apud aliquem obligare,

    Dig. 16, 1, 27.—So rarely with adjj.:

    Essetne apud te is servos acceptissimus?

    Plaut. Capt. 3, 5, 56:

    non dicam amicum tuum, quod apud homines carissimum est,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 110:

    apud publicanos gratiosus fuisti,

    id. ib. 2, 169; 4, 38; id. Fl. 76; id. Lig. 31: Apud homines hoc impossibile est;

    apud Deum autem omnia possibilia sunt,

    Vulg. Matt. 19, 26; ib. Marc. 10, 27.
    II.
    Transf. In designations of place,
    A.
    At, near, about, around, before (esp. freq. in the post-Aug. histt.) = ad, prope, circum, ante: tibi servi multi apud mensam adstant, Naev. ap. Prisc. p. 893 P. (Com. Rel. p. 10 Rib.):

    verecundari neminem apud mensam decet,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 77:

    Quid apud hasce aedis negotii est tibi?

    id. Am. 1, 1, 194:

    Quid illisce homines quaerunt apud aedis meas?

    id. Most. 4, 2, 26; id. Trin. 4, 2, 25: apud ignem adsidere, Turp. ap. Non. p. 522, 26 (Com. Rel. p. 100 Rib.); Sisenn. ap. Non. p. 86, 16:

    navem is fregit apud Andrum insulam,

    Ter. And. 1, 3, 17:

    apud Tenedum pugna illa navalis,

    Cic. Arch. 21:

    ut apud Salamina classem suam constituerent,

    Nep. Them. 3, 4:

    apud oppidum morati,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 7:

    agri in Hispania apud Karthaginem Novam,

    Cic. Agr. 1, 5:

    bellatum apud Actium,

    Tac. H. 1, 1; 1, 72; 3, 76:

    Pugnabant alii tardis apud Ilion armis,

    Ov. R. Am. 163:

    morabatur in castris apud Galgalam,

    Vulg. Jos. 10, 6:

    quidquid apud durae cessatum est moenia Trojae,

    Verg. A. 11, 288:

    apud vetustam turrem, Att., Trag. Rel. p. 189 Rib.: apud castellum consedisse,

    Tac. A. 4, 25:

    Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. H. 3, 35:

    apud vexillum tendentes,

    id. A. 1, 17:

    trepidatur apud naves,

    id. H. 2, 15:

    hostis est non apud Anienem, sed in urbe,

    Cic. Mur. 84; id. Fam. 2, 10, 5:

    quam detraxerat apud rapidum Simoenta sub Ilio alto,

    Verg. A. 5, 261:

    apud abunaantem amnem et rapidas undas Inachi, Att., Trag. Rel. p. 175 Rib.: apud gelidi flumina Hebri,

    Verg. A. 12, 331:

    octo apud Rhenum legiones,

    Tac. A. 1, 3:

    apud ripam Rheni,

    id. ib. 2, 83:

    probavi te apud Aquam Contradictionis,

    Vulg. Psa. 80, 8:

    repertus apud fretum Siciliae,

    Tac. A. 6, 14:

    propitiata Juno apud proximum mare,

    id. ib. 15, 44:

    apud promunturium Miseni consedit in villa,

    id. ib. 6, 50:

    Ut aput nivem et ferarum gelida stabula forem, for in nive etc.,

    Cat. 63, 53 Mull.:

    apud altaria deum pepigere,

    before, Tac. A. 11, 9:

    decernuntur supplicationes apud omnia pulvinaria,

    id. ib. 14, 12 (cf.:

    unum diem circa omnia pulvinaria supplicatio fuit,

    Liv. 41, 9):

    apud Caesaris effigiem procubuit,

    Tac. A. 12, 17; 13, 23:

    quartum apud lapidem substiterat,

    id. ib. 15, 60:

    laudavit ipse apud rostra (for pro rostris),

    Tac. A. 16, 6; so, apud forum (cf.: ad forum under ad, I. A. 3., and in Gr. Sophocl. Trach. 371, pros mesêi agorai;

    on the other hand,

    id. ib. 423, en mesêi agorai; id. ib. 524, têlaugei par ochthôi): Quidam apud forum mihi vendidit, Pomp., Com. Rel. p. 250 Rib.: Ch. Qui scis? By. Apud forum modo e Davo audivi, Ter. And. 2, 1, 2; 1, 5, 18:

    Capuae multa apud forum aedificia de caelo tacta,

    Liv. 41, 9 (Weissenb., in foro):

    quod (templum) apud forum holitorium C. Duilius struxerat,

    Tac. A. 2, 49.—
    B.
    At, in = in with abl. or gen. or abl. of place: CONSVLES SENATVM CONSOLVERVNT N. OCTOB. APVD AEDEM DVELONAI, S. C. de Bacch. I.; so,

    ejus statuam majores apud aedem matris deum consecravisse,

    Tac. A. 4, 64:

    apud villam est,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 1, 1; so Cic. Verr. 4, 22, 48:

    Eum argentum sumpsisse apud Thebas ab danista fenore,

    Plaut. Ep. 2, 2, 67:

    deponere apud Solos in delubro pecuniam,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 16, 40:

    ut rationes apud duas civitates possim relinquere,

    id. Att. 6, 7, 2: qui mense Aprili apud Baias essent, id. Fragm. B. 13, 4, 1 B. and K.;

    13, 4, 4 iid.: seditio militum coepta apud Sucronem,

    Liv. 28, 29:

    donum apud Antium statuitur,

    Tac. A. 3, 71:

    bellis civilibus Maecenatem equestris ordinis cunctis apud Romam atque Italiam praeposuit,

    id. ib. 6, 11:

    Titus in consecrando apud Memphim bove Apide diadema gestavit,

    Suet. Tit. 5:

    quod Judaeam praeterveniens apud Hierosolymam non supplicasset,

    id. Aug. 93:

    apud Mediolanum,

    Lact. Mort. Persec. 48:

    eum pugionem apud Capitolium consecravit,

    Tac. A. 15, 74:

    Equitum Romanorum locos sedilibus plebis anteposuit apud Circum,

    id. ib. 15, 32:

    quae (effigies) apud theatrum Pompei locaretur,

    id. ib. 3, 72:

    qui (rei) apud aerarium pependissent,

    Suet. Dom. 9 Roth:

    cujus (scientiae) apiscendae otium apud Rhodum magistrum Thrasullum habuit,

    Tac. A. 6, 20; 4, 14; so Suet. Aug. 92; Eutr. 7, 13:

    ut civitati Cibyraticae apud Asiam subveniretur,

    Tac. A. 4, 13; 4, 18; 16, 15:

    apud Pharsaliam,

    Liv. Epit. 111:

    apud Palaestinam,

    Eutr. 7, 13:

    qui erant apud Helladam,

    Vulg. 1 Macc. 8, 9. —
    III.
    Of time.
    A.
    With words denoting time or occasion, in, at (rare):

    apud saeclum prius,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 15:

    aliquem apud judicium persequi,

    at the trial, Cic. Verr. 4, 104.—
    B.
    With words designating persons, with, among, in the time of:

    hostis apud majores nostros is dicebatur, quem nunc etc.,

    Cic. Off. 1, 12, 36:

    fecerunt hoc multi apud majores nostros,

    id. Verr. 2, 118; 5, 148:

    Fuit eodem ex studio vir eruditus apud patres nostros,

    id. Mur. 36; id. Off. 2, 24, 85; id. Lael. 2, 6:

    Apud antiquos fuit Petron quidam, Cels. praef. 3, 9: aliam apud Fabricios, aliam apud Scipiones pecuniam (fuisse),

    Tac. A. 2, 33.—
    IV.
    For ad with words implying motion (very rare):

    APVT EVM PERVENIRE,

    Inscr. Grut. 786, 5:

    atque apud hunc eo vicinum,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 5, 70:

    Bito apud aurificem,

    Lucil. 30, 66 Mull.: apud legiones venit, Sall. Fragm. ap. Pomp. Commod. Don. p. 395 Lind.:

    (naves) apud insulas longius sitas ejectae,

    Tac. A. 2, 24:

    qui apud Romanos de societate functus est legatione,

    Vulg. 2 Macc. 4, 11.
    Apud has some peculiarities of position, chiefly in Tac.
    (cf. ad, I. fin. b.)
    a.
    It is sometimes placed after its subst.:

    quae fiunt apud fabros, fictores, item alios apud,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 78, p. 104 Mull.:

    Is locus est Cumas aput,

    Lucr. 6, 747 Lachm.:

    montem apud Erycum,

    Tac. A. 4, 43:

    ripam apud Euphratis,

    id. ib. 6, 31:

    Misenum apud et Ravennam,

    id. ib. 4, 5 (in Suet. Dom. 9 the editt. vary between aerarium apud and apud aerarium; the latter seems preferable, and is adopted by Oudend., Bremi, Baumg.-Crus., and Roth).—
    b.
    It is sometimes placed between the subst. and adj.:

    barbaras apud gentes,

    Tac. A. 2, 88, 3, 26; 15, 60:

    non modo Graecis in urbibus, sed Romana apud templa,

    id. ib. 14, 14.—
    c.
    Twice in Verg. it stands before the secondary adjunct of its subst.:

    apud durae moenia Trojae, A. 11, 288: apud gelidi flumina Hebri,

    ib. 12, 331. Apud is never found in compound words. V. more on this word in Hand, Turs. I. pp. 405-416.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > apud

  • 16 ceteroquin

    ălĭōquī (Corssen, Ausspr. II. p. 839, questions the MS. authority for the forms ălĭ-ōquin and cĕtĕrōquin, but if they are genuine, he believes they have the prep. in affixed, as in deoin), adv. (prop. abl. alioqui, i. e. alio quo modo, in some other way; used in the ante-Aug. per. only once in Lucr.; but freq. after that per., esp. by the histt., and by Pliny the younger).
    I.
    Lit., to indicate that something has its existence or right in all but the exception given, in other respects, for the rest, otherwise; Gr. allôs, often with adj. standing either before or after it:

    milites tantum, qui sequerentur currum, defuerunt: alioqui magnificus triumphus fuit,

    Liv. 37, 46 Madv.;

    8, 9: Hannibal tumulum tutum commodumque alioqui, nisi quod longinquae aquationis erat, cepit,

    id. 30, 29, 10:

    atqui si vitiis mediocribus ac mea paucis Mendosa est natura, alioquin recta,

    Hor. S. 1, 6, 66 K. and H.:

    solitus alioquin id temporis luxus principis intendere,

    Tac. A. 13, 20 Halm; so id. ib. 4, 37; Curt. 7, 4, 8; 8, 2, 2.—Sometimes concessive, hence also with quamquam, quamvis, cum, as for the rest, besides: triumphatum de Tiburtibus: alioqui mitis victoria fuit, i. e. although in other respects the victory was, etc., Liv. 7, 19: at si tantula pars oculi media illa peresa est, Incolumis quamvis alioqui splendidus orbis ( al though in other respects uninjured and clear) occidit extemplo lumen, Lucr. 3, 414 (Lachmann rejected this line; Munro receives it and reads alioquoi):

    ideo nondum eum legi, cum alioqui validissime cupiam,

    Plin. Ep. 9, 35 Keil; so Plin. 10, 69, 93, § 198.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    To indicate that something exists, avails, or has influence in other cases beside those mentioned, yet, besides, moreover (syn.:

    porro, praeterea): sed haec quidem alioquin memoria magni professoris, uti interponeremus, effecit,

    Cels. 8, 4:

    ne pugnemus igitur, cum praesertim plurimis alioqui Graecis sit utendum,

    very many other Greek words besides, Quint. 2, 14, 4 Halm:

    non tenuit iram Alexander, cujus alioqui potens non erat,

    of which he had not the control at other times, Curt. 4, 2, 6; Tac. H. 3, 32:

    quā occasione Caesar, validus alioquin spernendis honoribus hujuscemodi orationem coepit,

    id. A. 4, 37.—So in questions, Quint. 4, 5, 3.—Also et alioqui in Pliny: afficior curā; et alioqui meus pudor, mea dignitas in discrimen adducitur, Plin Ep. 2, 9, 1; so id. ib. 10, 42, 2; id. Pan. 45, 4; 68, 7; 7, 9.—And in copulative clauses with et... et, cum... tum, etc., both in general (or in other respects)... and:

    et alioqui opportune situm, et transitus eā est in Labeates,

    Liv. 43, 19:

    mors Marcelli cum alioqui miserabilis fuit, tum quod, etc.,

    id. 27, 27, 11; so Quint. 5, 6, 4; 12, 10, 63.—
    B.
    To indicate that something is in itself situated so and so, or avails in a certain manner, in itself, even in itself, himself, etc.: corpus, quod illa (Phryne) speciosissima alioqui ( in herself even most beautiful) diductā nudaverat tunicā, Quint. 2, 15, 9 Spald.; 10, 3, 13; 2, 1, 4.—
    C.
    Ellipt. like the Gr. allôs, and commonly placed at the beginning of a clause, to indicate that something must happen, if the previous assertion or assumption shall not be (which fact is not [p. 86] expressed), otherwise, else (cf. aliter, b. g):

    vidistine aliquando Clitumnum fontem? si nondum (et puto nondum: alioqui narrāsses mihi),

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8; 1, 20: Nec, si pugnent inter se, qui idem didicerunt, idcirco ars, quae utrique tradita est, non erit;

    alioqui nec armorum, etc.,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33; so id. 4, 2, 23:

    non inornata debet esse brevitas, alioqui sit indocta,

    id. 4, 2, 46:

    Da mihi liberos, alioquin moriar,

    Vulg. Gen. 30, 1; ib. Matt. 6, 1; ib. Heb. 9, 17:

    languescet alioqui industria, si nullus ex se metus aut spes,

    Tac. A. 2, 38.—
    D.
    (Eccl. Lat.) As an advers. conj., but (cf. ceterum and the Gr. alla):

    alioquin mitte manum tuam et tange os ejus et carnem,

    Vulg. Job, 2, 5. Cf. Hand, Turs. I. pp. 234-241.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ceteroquin

  • 17 praeter

    praeter, adv. and prep. [prae, with the demonstrative suffix ter, as in inter, subter, propter], signifies motion by or past, and hence, also, beyond, or rest outside a thing.
    I.
    Adv., past, by, beyond (cf. praeterquam), in the trop. sense; i. e.
    A.
    Comparatively, before, beyond, above, more than (only ante-class.):

    quae praeter sapiet quam placet parentibus,

    Plaut. Pers. 3, 1, 38:

    quod mihi videre Facere, et praeter quam res te adhortatur tua,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 8.—
    B.
    Exceptionally, except, excepting, unless, save (class. but rare):

    etiam e Graecis ipsis diligenter cavendae sunt quaedam familiaritates, praeter hominum perpaucorum,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 5, § 16:

    ne quis praeter armatus violaretur,

    Liv. 4, 59, 7 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    diem statuit, ante quam liceret sine fraude ab armis discedere, praeter rerum capitalium damnatis,

    Sall. C. 36, 2:

    religionum usquequaque contemptor, praeter unius deae Syriae,

    Suet. Ner. 56; id. Claud. 4 fin.: exsules, praeter caedis damnati, restituebantur, [p. 1434] Just. 13, 5, 2:

    praeter hodie,

    Vulg. Gen. 21, 26:

    nil praeter salices cassaque canna fuit,

    Ov. F. 6, 406:

    uti pueri in curiam ne introeant, praeter ille unus Papirius,

    Gell. 1, 23, 13.—In connection with the particles si, quod, que:

    praeter si aliter nequeas,

    unless, Varr. R. R. 1, 41 fin.:

    praeter quod epulis alienis voluptates meas anteferrem, etc.,

    besides that, App. M. 2, p. 122:

    montes in Arcadiā Cyllene, Lycaeus... praeterque ignobiles octo,

    and besides, and also, Plin. 4, 6, 10, § 21:

    praeterque,

    id. 5, 1, 1, § 16; 8, 42, 67, § 166; 9, 39, 64, § 138; 11, 4, 3, § 10. —For praeter quam and praeter propter, v. praeterquam and praeterpropter.—
    II.
    Prep. with acc., past, by, before, in front of, along.
    A.
    Lit., of place (rare but class.):

    mustela murem mihi abstulit praeter pedes,

    Plaut. Stich. 3, 2, 7:

    magni montes solem succedere praeter,

    Lucr. 4, 139:

    praeter castra Caesaris suas copias transduxit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 48:

    servi ejus praeter oculos Lollii haec omnia ferebant,

    before the eyes of, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 25, § 62:

    Ligures praeter oram Etrusci maris Neapolim transmisit,

    Liv. 40, 41:

    praeter radices montis lapsus amnis,

    Plin. 6, 3, 4, § 10:

    praeter ora suorum,

    Tac. H. 4, 30:

    tela volant... Praeter utrumque latus praeterque et lumen et aures,

    Ov. M. 5, 158:

    praeter majorum cineres rapitur Lateranus,

    Juv. 8, 146.—
    B.
    Trop.
    1.
    In gen., over, beyond; against, contrary to, aside from:

    nihil praeter rem locuti sumus,

    beside the matter, irrelevant, Auct. Her. 4, 1, 1:

    praeter aetatem stultus,

    Plaut. Ep. 1, 2, 3:

    praeter aequom delinquere,

    id. Bacch. 3, 3, 14:

    multa praeter spem evenisse,

    id. Rud. 2, 3, 69; cf.:

    quor sedebas in foro Tu solus praeter alios,

    apart from, id. Ps. 3, 2, 13:

    praeter naturam praeterque fatum,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 4, 10:

    praeter consuetudinem,

    id. Div. 2, 28, 60:

    cum lacus Albanus praeter modum crevisset,

    id. ib. 1, 44, 100:

    quod mihi videre praeter aetatem tuam Facere,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 7.—
    2.
    In partic.
    a.
    Comparatively, of that which goes beyond something else, beyond, above, more than; esp.:

    praeter ceteros, alios, omnes, etc.: illud praeter alia mira miror,

    Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 140:

    praeter ceteros laborabis,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 15, § 43; id. Sull. 3, 7:

    quae me igitur res praeter ceteros impulit, ut, etc.,

    id. Rosc. Am. 1, 2:

    necesse est quod mihi consuli praecipuum fuit praeter alios, id jam privato cum ceteris esse commune,

    id. Sull. 3, 9:

    ut Argonautas praeter omnes candidum Medea mirata est ducem,

    Hor. Epod. 3, 9; Ter. And. 1, 1, 31.—With neg.:

    nonne ostendis te vereri, quod praeter ceteros tu metuere non debeas,

    less than the rest, Cic. Rosc. Am. 50, 145.—
    b.
    Of that besides which there is something else in addition, besides, together with, in addition to:

    ut praeter se denos ad colloquium adducerent,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    praeter imperatas pecunias,

    id. B. C. 3, 32:

    ut praeter auctoritatem vires quoque haberet,

    id. ib. 3, 57:

    praeter illud commodum, quod, etc., tum etiam, etc.,

    Col. 4, 18.—
    c.
    Exceptionally, besides, except:

    nec nobis praeter me alius est servos,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 244:

    hoc nemini praeter me videtur,

    Cic. Att. 1, 1, 2:

    omnibus sententiis praeter unam condemnatus est,

    id. Clu. 20, 55:

    neque vestitus, praeter pelles habeant,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 1:

    frumentum omne, praeter quod secum portaturi erant, comburunt,

    id. ib. 1, 5:

    nullas (litteras) acceperam praeter quae mihi binae redditae sunt, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 5, 3, 2:

    ex plurimis honoribus, praeter paucos non recepit,

    Suet. Tib. 26.—
    d.
    Praeter haec, for praeterea, besides that, besides, moreover (ante- and postclass.), Ter. Ad. 5, 3, 61; Cels. 2, 4.
    In composition, praeter has the signification of past, by, and beyond, or besides; e.
    g. praeterducere, praetermittere, praeterea.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > praeter

  • 18 secus

    1.
    sĕcus, n. indecl., v. sexus.
    2. I.
    Adj. [root seq- or secof sequor, q. v.], only comp. sĕquĭor, us, ōris, inferior, lower, worse (only post-class.; cf. Weissenb. ad Liv. 2, 37, 3):

    in sequiorem sexum,

    App. M. 7, p. 192, 7:

    sexus sequioris fetus,

    id. ib. 10, p. 249, 33;

    8, p. 206, 7: vitae sequioris,

    Dig. 2, 15, 8, § 11:

    fortuna sequior,

    Amm. 18, 6, 6.—
    II.
    Adv. (prop., following, later in rank or order, i. e. less than something mentioned before; hence, in gen.), otherwise, differently, not so; and esp. freq. with a negative (per litoten), not otherwise, i. e. even so, just so (opp. always to what is right, correct, or proper, not to what is wrong; cf. Krebs, Antibarb. p. 1056 sq.; for comp. forms, v. I. B. infra).
    A.
    Posit. (freq. and class.;

    syn. aliter): si illuc, quod volumus, eveniet, gaudebimus: Sin secus, patiemur animis aequis,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 6, 25:

    si bonus est, obnoxius sum: sin secus est, faciam, uti jubes,

    id. Trin. 4, 3, 57:

    oratorum genera esse dicuntur tamquam poëtarum. Id secus est,

    Cic. Opt. Gen. 1, 1; id. Rep. 1, 19, 32; cf. id. Att. 4, 17, 1:

    (ille est) quem dudum dixi. Hoc si secus reperies, etc.,

    Plaut. Capt. 3, 4, 92:

    videsne, quod paulo ante secus tibi videbatur,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 17, 26: magnum mehercule hominem, nemo dicet secus;

    sed, etc.,

    id. Brut. 85, 293:

    quod si ita esset... ad amicitiam esset aptissimus: quod longe secus est,

    id. Lael. 9, 29:

    omnia longe secus,

    id. Part. 5, 15:

    videtote, quanto secus ego fecerim, Cato ap. Charis, p. 192 P.: nobis aliter videtur: recte secusne, postea,

    whether rightly or not, right or wrong, Cic. Fin. 3, 13, 44:

    recte an secus,

    id. Pis. 28, 68; cf.:

    honestis an secus amicis uteretur,

    Tac. A. 13, 6 fin.:

    pro bene aut secus consulto,

    for good or ill, Liv. 7, 6; cf.:

    prout bene ac (al. aut) secus cessit,

    Plin. Pan. 44, 8:

    prout opportune proprieque aut secus collocata sunt (verba),

    Quint. 10, 2, 13:

    (artes) utiles aut secus,

    id. 2, 20, 1 et saep.—
    (β).
    With quam or atque: secus aetatem agerem, quam illi egissent, Cato ap. Charis, p. 195 P.; Ter. Phorm. 2, 3, 91:

    ne quid fiat secus quam volumus quamque oportet,

    Cic. Att. 6, 2, 2:

    eadem sunt membra in utriusque disputatione, sed paulo secus a me atque ab illo partita,

    id. de Or. 3, 30, 119.—
    b.
    Non (nec) secus or haud secus (the latter not in Cic.), not otherwise, i. e. even so, just so:

    educavit (eam) magna industria, Quasi si esset ex se nata, non multo secus,

    Plaut. Cas. prol. 46; cf.:

    fit obviam Clodio hora fere undecima aut non multo secus,

    Cic. Mil. 10, 29:

    quod non multo secus fieret,

    id. Fam. 4, 9, 2:

    bibitur, estur, quasi in popinā, haud secus,

    Plaut. Poen. 4, 2, 13:

    ita jam quasi canes, haud secus, circumstabant navem,

    id. Trin. 4, 1, 16:

    veluti qui anguem pressit, etc....Haud secus Androgeos visu tremefactus abibat,

    Verg. A. 2, 382:

    aequam memento rebus in arduis Servare mentem, non secus in bonis,

    Hor. C. 2, 3, 2:

    qualis in arvis movet arma leo,...Haud secus gliscit violentia Turno,

    Verg. A. 12, 9:

    nec secus apud principem ad mortem aguntur,

    Tac. A. 6, 10 et saep.— With gen.:

    alaeque et auxilia cohortium neque multo secus in iis virium,

    Tac. A. 4, 5 fin. —In negative questions:

    dedistine ei gladium, qui se occideret?...Quid secus est aut quid interest, dare te argentum, etc.,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 93.—
    (β).
    With ac or quam (the latter not in Cic.: non secus ac = non aliter ac; but: non secus quam = non minus quam, Zumpt ad Cic. Mur. 4, 10; cf.

    infra): numquam secus Habui illam, ac si ex me esset nata,

    Ter. Hec. 2, 3, 5:

    itaque illud quod dixi, non dixi secus ac sentiebam,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 6, 24; so,

    non secus ac,

    id. Mur. 4, 10; id. Planc. 1, 3; id. Fam. 3, 5, 4; Hor. A. P. 149; Ov. M. 15, 180 al.:

    haud secus ac,

    Sall. J. 79, 6; Verg. A. 3, 236 al.:

    accepit ad sese, haud secus quam si ex se simus natae,

    Plaut. Rud. 2, 3, 79; so,

    haud secus quam,

    Liv. 5, 36; 5, 41; 8, 8; 8, 9 et saep.; Ov. M. 12, 102 al.; Curt. 3, 2, 1; 8, 1, 21; 8, 11, 17:

    non secus quam,

    Ov. M. 2, 727; 12, 480:

    nec secus quam,

    Plaut. Am. 5, 1, 26; id. Capt. 2, 2, 23; 2, 3, 68: ne [p. 1657] secus quam, Tac. A. 4, 8.—In the poets freq. non (haud) secus ac, for introducing a comparison:

    non secus ac patriis acer Roma-nus in armis, etc.,

    Verg. G. 3, 346:

    non secus ac,

    id. A. 8, 243; 10, 272; 12, 856; Ov. M. 8, 162:

    non secus atque,

    Verg. A. 8, 391:

    haud secus atque,

    id. ib. 11, 456; Ov. M. 9, 40; cf. also without ac:

    non secus in jugis stupet Evias,

    Hor. C. 3, 25, 8.—
    2.
    Pregn., otherwise than as it should be, or, than is wished, i. e. not well, ill, badly (rare but class.):

    magna consolatio est, cum recordare, etiam si secus acciderit, te, etc.,

    Cic. Fam. 6, 21, 2:

    ea ipsa...secus ab eo in me ipsum facta esse,

    id. Att. 9, 9, 1:

    cum in alterā re causa nihil esset quin secus judicaret ipse de se,

    id. Quint. 9, 32:

    cadere,

    Tac. A. 2, 80; 6, 22: prius omnia pati decrevit;

    quam bellum sumere, quia temptatum antea secus cesserat,

    Sall. J. 20, 5:

    quod ubi secus procedit,

    id. ib. 25, 10:

    Quintus frater purgat se multum per litteras et affirmat nihil a se cuiquam de te secus esse dictum,

    Cic. Att. 1, 19, 11:

    loqui de aliquo (just before, irreligiose),

    Tac. A. 2, 50:

    scribere de aliquo,

    Liv. 8, 33, 15:

    existimare de aliquo,

    Cic. Clu. 44, 124; id. Fam. 3, 6, 6.—
    B.
    Comp. in four forms, which are often confused in MSS. and edd.; sĕquĭus, but with negatives or quo, eo, nihilo, etc., usu. sētĭus, less correctly sē-cĭus; also (ante-class.) sectĭus, Plaut. ap. Gell. 18, 94; id. Trin. 1, 2, 93 Ritschl (v. on the authorities for these forms, Neue, Formenl. 2, 691 sq.): nisi inpediret ingeni inbecillitas Metusque me, quo setius me colligam, so that I cannot (syn.:

    quo minus), Afran. ap. Charis, p. 195 (Com. Rel. v. 291 Rib.): impedimento est, quo setius lex feratur,

    Auct. Her. 1, 12, 21:

    quoniam in eo consistit, melius an sequius terrae mandaverit pater familias pecuniam,

    Col. 3, 4, 3:

    invitus, quod sequius sit, de meis civibus loquor,

    Liv. 2, 37, 3.—
    b.
    Non (haud) setius:

    instat non setius ac rotat ensem,

    none the less, just as much, Verg. A. 9, 441; so,

    non setius,

    id. G. 3, 367:

    nec setius,

    id. ib. 2, 277:

    haud setius,

    id. A. 7, 781:

    si servus meus esses, nihilo setius Mihi obsequiosus semper fuisti,

    no less, just as, Plaut. Capt. 2, 3, 57:

    nihilo setius,

    nevertheless, Ter. And. 3, 2, 27; cf. Caes. B. G. 1, 49; so,

    nihilo setius,

    id. ib. 4, 17; id. B. C. 3, 26; Suet. Vesp. 6; Nep. Con. 2, 4; cf.:

    nihilo tamen setius,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 4; 5, 7:

    tamen nihilo setius,

    Nep. Att. 22, 3:

    nec hōc setius,

    Lucr. 6, 315:

    nec eo setius,

    Suet. Caes. 8; id. Ner. 24; 42; id. Vit. 10; id. Dom. 12; id. Gram. 20; Nep. Milt. 2, 3:

    nec tamen eo setius,

    Suet. Dom. 2.—
    (β).
    With quam:

    haec nihilo mihi esse videntur sectius quam somnia,

    Plaut. Men. 5, 7, 57.—In negative questions:

    quid fecimus? quid diximus tibi sequius quam velles?

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 22.—
    2.
    Pregn. (v. supra, I. A. 2.), ill, badly:

    sed memet moror, cum hoc ago setius,

    Plaut. Cist. 4, 2, 24: sin, id quod non spero, ratio talis sequius ceciderit, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 195 P. (Com. Rel. p. 291 Rib.):

    vereor ne homines de me sequius loquantur,

    Sen. Ben. 6, 42, 2.—
    III.
    Prep. with acc. (anteclass. and late Lat.), by, beside, along, on:

    id quod vulgus usurpat Secus illum sedi, hoc est secundum illum, et novum et sordidum est,

    Charis. p. 61 P.:

    dextra sinistra foramina utrimque secus laminas,

    Cato, R. R. 21, 2: ut quae secus mare essent locis regnaret, Enn. ap. Lact. 1, 11, 34:

    SECVS VIAM,

    Inscr. Orell. 3688 (but in Quint. 8, 2, 20; Plin. 24, 15, 85, § 135, the best MSS. have secundum):

    SECVS CONIVGEM,

    Inscr. Grut. 806, 5:

    secus viam,

    Vulg. Tob. 11, 5:

    secus mare,

    id. Matt. 13, 1 et saep.—
    B.
    Transf., according to, in proportion to:

    SECVS MERITA EIVS,

    Inscr. Orell. 7170.—
    3.
    Affixed to a pron., = side: altrinsecus, on the other side: utrinsecus, on both sides: circumsecus, on all sides, round about.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > secus

  • 19 ā

       ā    (before consonants), ab (before vowels, h, and some consonants, esp. l, n, r, s), abs (usu. only before t and q, esp. freq. before the pron. te), old af, praep. with abl., denoting separation or departure (opp. ad).    I. Lit., in space, from, away from, out of.    A. With motion: ab urbe proficisci, Cs.: a supero mari Flaminia (est via), leads: Nunc quidem paululum, inquit, a sole, a little out of the sun: usque a mari supero Romam proficisci, all the way from; with names of cities and small islands, or with domo, home (for the simple abl; of motion, away from, not out of, a place); hence, of raising a siege, of the march of soldiers, the setting out of a fleet, etc.: oppidum ab Aeneā fugiente a Troiā conditum: ab Alesiā, Cs.: profectus ab Orico cum classe, Cs.; with names of persons or with pronouns: cum a vobis discessero: videat forte hic te a patre aliquis exiens, i. e. from his house, T.; (praegn.): a rege munera repudiare, from, sent by, N.—    B. Without motion.    1. Of separation or distance: abesse a domo paulisper maluit: tum Brutus ab Romā aberat, S.: hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Cs.: a foro longe abesse: procul a castris hostes in collibus constiterunt, Cs.: cum esset bellum tam prope a Siciliā; so with numerals to express distance: ex eo loco ab milibus passuum octo, eight miles distant, Cs.: ab milibus passuum minus duobus castra posuerunt, less than two miles off, Cs.; so rarely with substantives: quod tanta machinatio ab tanto spatio instrueretur, so far away, Cs.—    2. To denote a side or direction, etc., at, on, in: ab sinistrā parte nudatis castris, on the left, Cs.: ab eā parte, quā, etc., on that side, S.: Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequanis flumen Rhenum, on the side of the Sequani, i. e. their country, Cs.: ab decumanā portā castra munita, at the main entrance, Cs.: crepuit hinc a Glycerio ostium, of the house of G., T.: (cornua) ab labris argento circumcludunt, on the edges, Cs.; hence, a fronte, in the van; a latere, on the flank; a tergo, in the rear, behind; a dextro cornu, on the right wing; a medio spatio, half way.—    II. Fig.    A. Of time.    1. Of a point of time, after: Caesar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dextrum cornu profectus, immediately after, Cs.: ab eo magistratu, after this office, S.: recens a volnere Dido, fresh from her wound, V.: in Italiam perventum est quinto mense a Carthagine, i. e. after leaving, L.: ab his, i. e. after these words, hereupon, O.: ab simili <*>ade domo profugus, i. e. after and in consequence of, L.—    2. Of a period of time, from, since, after: ab hora tertiā bibebatur, from the third hour: ab Sullā et Pompeio consulibus, since the consulship of: ab incenso Capitolio illum esse vigesumum annum, since, S.: augures omnes usque ab Romulo, since the time of: iam inde ab infelici pugnā ceciderant animi, from (and in consequence of), L.; hence, ab initio, a principio, a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, at first: ab integro, anew, afresh: ab... ad, from (a time)... to: cum ab horā septimā ad vesperum pugnatum sit, Cs.; with nouns or adjectives denoting a time of life: iam inde a pueritiā, T.: a pueritiā: a pueris: iam inde ab incunabulis, L.: a parvo, from a little child, or childhood, L.: ab parvulis, Cs.—    B. In other relations.    1. To denote separation, deterring, intermitting, distinction, difference, etc., from: quo discessum animi a corpore putent esse mortem: propius abesse ab ortu: alter ab illo, next after him, V.: Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus, next in rank to, H.: impotentia animi a temperantiā dissidens: alieno a te animo fuit, estranged; so with adjj. denoting free, strange, pure, etc.: res familiaris casta a cruore civili: purum ab humano cultu solum, L.: (opoidum) vacuum ab defensoribus, Cs.: alqm pudicum servare ab omni facto, etc., II.; with substt.: impunitas ab iudicio: ab armis quies dabatur, L.; or verbs: haec a custodiis loca vacabant, Cs.—    2. To denote the agent, by: qui (Mars) saepe spoliantem iam evertit et perculit ab abiecto, by the agency of: Laudari me abs te, a laudato viro: si quid ei a Caesare gravius accidisset, at Caesar's hands, Cs.: vetus umor ab igne percaluit solis, under, O.: a populo P. imperia perferre, Cs.: equo lassus ab indomito, H.: volgo occidebantur: per quos et a quibus? by whose hands and upon whose orders? factus ab arte decor, artificial, O.: destitutus ab spe, L.; (for the sake of the metre): correptus ab ignibus, O.; (poet. with abl. of means or instr.): intumuit venter ab undā, O.—Ab with abl. of agent for the dat., to avoid ambiguity, or for emphasis: quibus (civibus) est a vobis consulendum: te a me nostrae consuetudinis monendum esse puto.—    3. To denote source, origin, extraction, from, of: Turnus ab Ariciā, L.: si ego me a M. Tullio esse dicerem: oriundi ab Sabinis, L.: dulces a fontibus undae, V.—With verbs of expecting, fearing, hoping (cf. a parte), from, on the part of: a quo quidem genere, iudices, ego numquam timui: nec ab Romanis vobis ulla est spes, you can expect nothing from the Romans, L.; (ellipt.): haec a servorum bello pericula, threatened by: quem metus a praetore Romano stimulabat, fear of what the praetor might do, L.—With verbs of paying, etc., solvere, persolvere, dare (pecuniam) ab aliquo, to pay through, by a draft on, etc.: se praetor dedit, a quaestore numeravit, quaestor a mensā publicā, by an order on the quaestor: ei legat pecuniam a filio, to be paid by his son: scribe decem (milia) a Nerio, pay by a draft on Nerius, H.; cognoscere ab aliquā re, to know or learn by means of something (but ab aliquo, from some one): id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus cognovisse, Cs.; in giving an etymology: id ab re... interregnum appellatum, L.—Rarely with verbs of beginning and repeating: coepere a fame mala, L.: a se suisque orsus, Ta.—    4. With verbs of freeing from, defending, protecting, from, against: ut a proeliis quietem habuerant, L.: provincia a calamitate est defendenda: sustinere se a lapsu, L.—    5. With verbs and adjectives, to define the respect in which, in relation to, with regard to, in respect to, on the part of: orba ab optimatibus contio: mons vastus ab naturā et humano cultu, S.: ne ab re sint omissiores, too neglectful of money or property, T.: posse a facundiā, in the matter of eloquence, T.; cf. with laborare, for the simple abl, in, for want of: laborare ab re frumentariā, Cs.—    6. In stating a motive, from, out of, on account of, in consequence of: patres ab honore appellati, L.: inops tum urbs ab longinquā obsidione, L.—    7. Indicating a part of the whole, of, out of: scuto ab novissimis uni militi detracto, Cs.: a quibus (captivis) ad Senatum missus (Regulus).—    8. Marking that to which anything belongs: qui sunt ab eā disciplinā: nostri illi a Platone et Aristotele aiunt.—    9. Of a side or party: vide ne hoc totum sit a me, makes for my view: vir ab innocentiā clementissimus, in favor of.—10. In late prose, of an office: ab epistulis, a secretary, Ta. Note. Ab is not repeated with a following pron interrog. or relat.: Arsinoën, Stratum, Naupactum... fateris ab hostibus esse captas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis, quos, etc. It is often separated from the word which it governs: a nullius umquam me tempore aut commodo: a minus bono, S.: a satis miti principio, L.—The poets join a and que, making āque; but in good prose que is annexed to the following abl. (a meque, abs teque, etc.): aque Chao, V.: aque mero, O.—In composition, ab- stands before vowels, and h, b, d, i consonant, l, n, r, s; abs- before c, q, t; b is dropped, leaving as- before p; ā- is found in āfuī, āfore ( inf fut. of absum); and au- in auferō, aufugiō.
    * * *
    I
    Ah!; (distress/regret/pity, appeal/entreaty, surprise/joy, objection/contempt)
    II
    by (agent), from (departure, cause, remote origin/time); after (reference)
    III
    ante, abb. a.

    in calendar expression a. d. = ante diem -- before the day

    Latin-English dictionary > ā

  • 20 ab-eō

        ab-eō iī, itūrus, īre    (abin' for abisne, T.), to go from, go away, go off, go forth, go, depart: ab urbe: ex eorum agris: ex conspectu, out of sight, Cs.: mater abit templo, O.: abire fugā, to flee, V.: in angulum aliquo, T.: unde abii, V.: exsulatum Tusculum abiit, L.: si periturus abis, to your death, V.: sublimis abiit, ascended, L.: telo extracto praeceps in volnus abiit, collapsed, L.: quo tantum mihi dexter abis? whither so far to the right? V.: nemo non donatus abibit, without a gift, V.: abeas parvis aequus alumnis, show yourself favorable as you go, H.: quae dederat abeuntibus, V.: sub iugum abire, L.: abi, nuntia Romanis, etc., L.; of things: cornus sub altum pectus abit, penetrates deeply, V.: sol... abeunte curru, as his chariot departs, H. — In partic., to pass away, disappear, vanish, cease, die: a vitā: illuc quo priores abierunt, Ph.; of time, to pass away, elapse, expire: abiit illud tempus: tota abit hora, H.; of other things: abeunt pallorque situsque, pass away, O.: inopia praeceps abierat, S.: in aera sucus corporis, O.— Of change, to pass over, be transferred: abeunt illuc omnia, unde orta sunt, return: in avi mores atque instituta, i. e. restore, L.; hence, to be changed, be transformed, be metamorphosed (poet.): in villos abeunt vestes, in crura lacerti, O.: comae in silvas abeunt, O. — Fig., to depart from, leave off, turn aside: ut ab iure non abeat: ne longius abeam, wander from the point: ad istas ineptias, have recourse to: illuc, unde abii, redeo, set out, H. —To retire from an office: cum magistratu abisset: abiens magistratu, L.—Of a consequence or result, to turn out, come off (of persons): ab iudicio turpissime victus: neutra acies laeta ex eo certamine abiit, L.: impune, Ph.: ne in ora hominum pro ludibrio abiret, i. e. lest he should be made ridiculous, L.: ne inrito incepto abiretur, L. —To turn out, end, terminate (of things): mirabar hoc si sic abiret, T.—To get off, escape: quem ad modum illinc abieris, vel potius paene non abieris, scimus, how you came off thence, or rather came near not getting off.—In auctions, not to be knocked down (to one): ne res abiret ab Apronio, i. e. that he may purchase.—To be postponed: in diem, T.— The imper. abi is often a simple exclamation or address, friendly or reproachful: abi, virum te iudico, go to, I pronounce you a man, T.: Non es avarus: abi; quid, etc., well, H.: abi, nescis inescare homines, begone, T.; in imprecations: abin hinc in malam rem? (i. e. abisne?), will you go and be hanged? T.: in malam pestem.

    Latin-English dictionary > ab-eō

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  • That Time — is a one act play by Samuel Beckett, written in English between 8 June 1974 and August 1975. It was specially written for actor Patrick Magee, who delivered its first performance, on the occasion of Beckett s seventieth birthday celebration, at… …   Wikipedia

  • beside\ the\ point — • beside the point • beside the question adj or adv. phr. Off the subject; about something different. What you meant to do is beside the point; the fact is you didn t do it. The judge told the witness that his remarks were beside the point.… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • beside\ the\ question — • beside the point • beside the question adj or adv. phr. Off the subject; about something different. What you meant to do is beside the point; the fact is you didn t do it. The judge told the witness that his remarks were beside the point.… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • beside — [bē sīd′, bisīd′] prep. [ME < OE bi sidan (dat. of side): see BY & SIDE] 1. by or at the side of; alongside; near 2. in comparison with [beside yours my share seems small] 3. BESIDES 4. not pertinent to …   English World dictionary

  • beside - besides — ◊ beside If one thing is beside another, it is next to it or at the side of it. Beside the shed was a huge wire birdcage. I sat down beside my wife. ◊ besides used as a preposition Besides means in addition to or as well as …   Useful english dictionary

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