Перевод: с латинского на английский

с английского на латинский

at a less suitable age

  • 1 aliēnus

        aliēnus    [alius].    I. Adj. with comp. and sup, of another, belonging to another, not one's own, foreign, alien, strange: res: puer, the child of another, T.: mos, T.: menses, of other climes, V.: pecuniae: in alienis finibus decertare, Cs.: salus, of others, Cs.: alienis manibus, by the hands of others, L.: insolens in re alienā, in dealing with other men's property: mālis ridens alienis, i. e. a forced laugh, H.: mulier, another man's wife: alieni viri sermones, of another woman's husband, L.: vestigia viri alieni, one not my husband, L.: volnus, intended for another, V.: alienam personam ferre, to assume a false character, L.: cornua, i. e. those of a stag, O.: alieno Marte pugnare (equites), i. e. on foot, L.: aes alienum, another's money, i. e. debt: aes alienum alienis nominibus, debts contracted on the security of others, S.: recte facere alieno metu, fear of another, T.: crevit ex metu alieno audacia, another's fear, L.: sacerdotium genti haud alienum, foreign to, L. — Alien from, not related, not allied, not friendly, strange: ab nostrā familiā, T.: omnia alienissimis crediderunt, to utter strangers, Cs.: ne a litteris quidem alienus, not unversed in.—Strange, unsuitable, incongruous, inadequate, inconsistent, unseasonable, different from: dignitatis alicuius: neque aliena consili (domus), not inconvenient for consultation, S.: illi causae: alienum maiestate suā: aliena huius existimatione suspicio: domus magis his aliena malis, freer from, H.: alienum a vitā meā, T.: a dignitate: non alienum esse videtur, proponere, etc., Cs.: non alienum videtur,... docere, N. — Averse, hostile, unfriendly, unfavorable to: (Caesar) a me: voluntates, unfriendliness: mens, hostility, S.: alieno a te animo: a causā nobilitatis, opposed to: a Murenā nullā re alienus, in nc respect unfriendly: alienum suis rationibus, dangerous to his plans, S.: alieno esse animo in Caesarem, Cs.: alieno loco proelium committunt, unfavorable, Cs.: alienissimo sibi loco conflixit, N. —Of time, unfitting, inconvenient, unfavorable, unseasonable: ad iudicium corrumpendum tempus: ad committendum proelium alienum esse tempus, Cs.: alieno tempore defendisse: alienore aetate, at a less suitable age, T.—Of the mind, estranged, disordered: illis aliena mens erat, qui, etc., S.—    II. Substt.:
    * * *
    I
    aliena -um, alienior -or -us, alienissimus -a -um ADJ
    foreign; unconnected; another's; contrary; unworthy; averse, hostile; mad
    II
    foreigner; outsider; stranger to the family; person/slave of another house

    Latin-English dictionary > aliēnus

  • 2 duo virī, duovirī or II virī (less correctly duūmvirī)

       duo virī, duovirī or II virī (less correctly duūmvirī) ōrum, m    a board of two persons, an extraordinary criminal court, duumviri (selected by Tullus Hostilius to try Horatius), L.; (by the people to try Manlius), L.; (to try Rabirius), C.: sacrorum, keepers of the Sibylline books, L.: navales, to build and equip a fleet, L.: ad aedem faciendam, to build a temple, L.—A board of colonial magistrates, Cs. — Each of the duo viri is called II vir or duūmvir, L.

    Latin-English dictionary > duo virī, duovirī or II virī (less correctly duūmvirī)

  • 3 absum

    ab-sum, āfui (better than abfui), āfŭtārus (aforem, afore), v. n., in its most general signif., to be away from, be absent.
    I.
    In gen.
    A.
    Absol. without designating the distance (opp. adsum):

    num ab domo absum?

    Plaut. Ep. 5, 2, 16:

    me absente atque insciente,

    id. Trin. 1, 2, 130:

    domini ubi absunt,

    are not at home, not present, Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 53: facile aerumnam ferre possum, si inde abest injuria, Caecil. ap. Non. 430, 18.—
    B.
    With reference to the distance in space or time; which is expressed either by a definite number, or, in gen., by the advs. multum, paulum (not parum, v. below) longe, etc.:

    edixit, ut ab urbe abesset milia pass. ducenta,

    Cic. Sest. 12, 29:

    castra, quae aberant bidui,

    id. Att. 5, 16:

    hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43:

    haud longe abesse oportet,

    he ought not to be far hence, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 166:

    legiones magnum spatium aberant,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 17:

    menses tres abest,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 66:

    haud permultum a me aberit infortunium,

    Ter. Heaut. 4, 2, 1; Cic. Fam. 2, 7.—With the simple abl. for ab:

    paulumque cum ejus villa abessemus,

    Cic. Ac. 1, 1 Görenz; but, ab ejus villa, B. and K.; cf.:

    nuptā abesse tuā,

    Ov. R. Am. 774.— With inter:

    nec longis inter se passibus absunt,

    Verg. A. 11, 907.—With prope, propius, proxime, to denote a short distance:

    nunc nobis prope abest exitium,

    is not far from, Plaut. Aul. 2, 3, 8;

    so with est: prope est a te Deus, tecum est,

    Sen. Ep. 41:

    loca, quae a Brundisio propius absunt, quam tu, biduum,

    Cic. Att. 8, 14:

    quoniam abes propius,

    since you are nearer, id. ib. 1, 1:

    existat aliquid, quod... absit longissime a vero,

    id. Ac. 2, 11, 36; so id. Deiot. 13; Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 16 al.—Hence the phrase: tantum abest, ut—ut, so far from that, etc. (Zumpt, §

    779), the origin of which is evident from the following examples from Cic. (the first two of which have been unjustly assailed): id tantum abest ab officio, ut nihil magis officio possit esse contrarium, Off. 1, 14 (with which comp. the person. expression: equidem tantum absum ab ista sententia, ut non modo non arbitrer... sed, etc.,

    id. de Or. 1, 60, 255):

    tantum abest ab eo, ut malum mors sit, ut verear, ne, etc.,

    id. Tusc. 1, 31, 76: ego vero istos tantum abest ut ornem, ut effici non possit, quin eos oderim, so far am I from that, id. Phil. 11, 14; sometimes etiam or quoque is added to the second clause, Lentul. ap. Cic. Fam. 12, 15, 2; Suet. Tib. 50; more rarely contra, Liv. 6, 31, 4. Sometimes the second ut is left out:

    tantum afuit, ut inflammares nostros animos: somnum isto loco vix tenebamus,

    Cic. Brut. 80, 278; on the contrary, once in Cic. with a third ut: tantum abest ut nostra miremur, ut usque eo difficiles ac morosi simus, ut nobis non satisfaciat ipse Demosthenes, Or. 29, 104.
    II.
    Hence,
    A.
    To be away from any thing unpleasant, to be freed or free from:

    a multis et magnis molestiis abes,

    Cic. Fam. 4, 3:

    a culpa,

    id. Rosc. Am. 20: a reprehensione temeritatis, Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23.
    B.
    To be removed from a thing by will, inclination, etc.; to be disinclined to (syn. abhorreo)' a consilio fugiendi, Cic. Att. 7, 24:

    ab istis studiis,

    id. Planc. 25:

    ceteri a periculis aberant,

    kept aloof from, avoided, Sall. C. 6, 3. toto aberant bello, Caes. B. G. 7, 63.
    C.
    To be removed from a thing in regard to condition or quality, i. e. to be different from, to differ = abhorrere abest a tua virtute et fide, Brut. et Cass. ap. Cic. Fam. 11, 2: istae kolakeiai non longe absunt a scelere, id. Att. 13, 30:

    haec non absunt a consuetudine somniorum,

    id. Divin. 1, 21, [p. 13] 42.—Since improvement, as well as deterioration, may constitute the ground of difference, so absum may, according to its connection, designate the one or the other:

    nullā re longius absumus a naturā ferarum,

    in nothing are we more elevated above the nature of the brute, Cic. Off. 1, 16, 50;

    so also the much-contested passage,

    Cic. Planc. 7, 17: longissime Plancius a te afuit, i. e. valde, plurimis suffragiis, te vicit, was far from you in the number of votes, i. e. had the majority; v. Wunder ad Planc. proleg. p. 83 sq.; on the other hand, to be less, inferior: longe te a pulchris abesse sensisti, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 339, 23:

    multum ab eis aberat L. Fufius,

    id. Brut. 62, 222; so Hor. A. P. 370.
    D.
    Not to be suitable, proper, or fit for a thing:

    quae absunt ab forensi contentione,

    Cic. Or. 11, 37:

    ab principis personā,

    Nep. Ep. 1, 2.
    E.
    To be wanting, = desum, Pac. ap. Cic. Fin. 5, 11, 31 (Trag. Rel. p. 122 Rib.):

    unum a praeturā tuā abest,

    one thing is wanting to your praetorship, Plaut. Ep. 1, 1, 25: quaeris id quod habes;

    quod abest non quaeris,

    Ter. Heaut. 5, 4, 16; cf. Lucr. 3, 970 and 1095.—After Cicero, constr. in this signif. with dat.:

    quid huic abesse poterit de maximarum rerum scientiā?

    Cic. de Or. 1, 11, 48:

    abest enim historia litteris nostris,

    history is yet wanting to our literature, id. Leg. 2, 5.—So esp. in the poets:

    donec virenti canities abest morosa,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 17; 3, 24, 64; Ov. M. 14, 371.—Hence the phrase non multum (neque multum), paulum, non (haud) procul, minimum, nihil abest, quin. not much, little, nothing is wanting that (Zumpt, Gr. § 540); but not parum, since parum in good classical authors does not correspond in meaning with non multum, but with non satis (v. parum):

    neque multum abesse ab eo, quin, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 2, 2; and absol.:

    neque multum afuit quin,

    id. B. C. 2, 35, 4:

    paulumque afuit quin, ib. § 2: legatos nostros haud procul afuit quin violarent,

    Liv. 5, 4 fin.:

    minimum afuit quin periret,

    was within a little of, Suet. Aug. 14:

    nihil afore credunt quin,

    Verg. A. 8, 147 al.
    F.
    Abesse alicui or ab aliquo, to be wanting to any one, to be of no assistance or service to (opp. adsum):

    ut mirari Torquatus desinat, me, qui Antonio afuerim, Sullam defendere,

    Cic. Sull. 5: facile etiam absentibus nobis ( without our aid) veritas se ipsa defendet, id. Ac. 2, 11, 36:

    longe iis fraternum nomen populi Romani afuturum,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 36. So also Cic. Planc. 5, 13: et quo plus intererat, eo plus aberas a me, the more I needed your assistance, the more you neglected me, v. Wunder ad h. l.; cf. also Sall. C. 20 fin.
    G.
    Cicero uses abesse to designate his banishment from Rome (which he would never acknowledge as such):

    qui nullā lege abessem,

    Cic. Sest. 34, 37; cf.: discessus. —Hence, absens, entis ( gen. plur. regul. absentium;

    absentum,

    Plaut. Stich. 1, 1, 5), P. a., absent (opp. praesens).
    A.
    In gen.:

    vos et praesentem me curā levatis et absenti magna solatia dedistis,

    Cic. Brut. 3, 11; so id. Off. 3, 33, 121; id. Verr. 2, 2, 17:

    quocirca (amici) et absentes adsunt et egentes abundant,

    id. Lael. 7, 23:

    ut loquerer tecum absens, cum coram id non licet,

    id. Att. 7, 15:

    me absente,

    id. Dom. 3; id. Cael. 50:

    illo absente,

    id. Tull. 17; id. Verr. 2, 60:

    absente accusatore,

    id. ib. 2, 99 al.— Sup.:

    mente absentissimus,

    Aug. Conf. 4, 4.—Of things (not thus in Cic.):

    Romae rus optas, absentem rusticus urbem tollis ad astra,

    Hor. S. 2, 7, 28; so,

    Rhodus,

    id. Ep. 1, 11, 21:

    rogus,

    Mart. 9, 77, 8:

    venti,

    Stat. Th. 5, 87:

    imagines rerum absentium,

    Quint. 6, 2, 29:

    versus,

    Gell. 20, 10.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    In conversat. lang.
    (α).
    Praesens absens, in one's presence or absence:

    postulo ut mihi tua domus te praesente absente pateat,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 8, 29.—
    (β).
    Absente nobis turbatumst, in our absence (so also:

    praesente nobis, v. praesens),

    Ter. Eun. 4, 3, 7; Afran. ap. Non. 76, 19 (Com. Rel. p. 165 Rib.).—
    2.
    In polit. lang., not appearing in public canvassings as a competitor:

    deligere (Scipio) iterum consul absens,

    Cic. Rep. 6, 11; so Liv. 4, 42, 1; 10, 22, 9.—
    3.
    = mortuus, deceased, Plaut. Cas. prol. 20; Vitr. 7, praef. § 8.—
    4.
    Ellipt.: absens in Lucanis, absent in Lucania, i. e. absent and in Lucania, Nep. Hann. 5, 3; so id. Att. 8, 6.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > absum

  • 4 apto

    apto, āvi, ātum, 1, v. freq. [apo], to fit, adapt, accommodate, apply, put on, adjust, etc. (cf. accommodo); absol., with dat. or less freq. with ad (in Cic. only once, as P. a.).
    I.
    Lit.
    a.
    Absol.:

    aptat cristas telaque,

    Verg. A. 11, 8:

    arma aptare,

    Liv. 5, 49, 3:

    remos,

    Curt. 9, 9, 12:

    tabulam,

    Col. 12, 56, 2:

    jubas,

    Sil. 5, 166:

    armamenta, vela,

    Quint. 10, 7, 23.—
    b.
    With dat.:

    aliquid umeris,

    Verg. A. 9, 364:

    arma corpori,

    Liv. 44, 34, 8:

    vincula collo,

    Ov. M. 10, 381:

    claves foribus,

    Mart. 9, 47:

    sagittas nervo,

    Verg. A. 10, 131:

    dexteris enses,

    Hor. Epod. 7, 2:

    tela flagello,

    Verg. A. 7, 731:

    os cucurbitulae corpori,

    Cels. 2, 11:

    anulum sibi,

    Sen. Ben. 3, 25, 1:

    digito (anulum),

    Suet. Tib. 73.—
    II.
    Trop.
    a.
    With the access. idea of fitting:

    bella citharae modis,

    Hor. C. 2, 12, 4; cf. id. Ep. 1, 3, 13.—And with ad:

    sed usum nec ad commoditatem ferendi nec ad ipsius munitionis firmamentum aptaverunt,

    Liv. 33, 5, 5:

    ad transeundum omnia aptaverant,

    Curt. 7, 8, 8:

    ad militares remus aptatur manus,

    i. e. is taken in hand by the soldiers, Sen. Agam. 425.—
    b.
    Without the access. idea of fitting, to prepare, get ready, furnish, put in order; constr. absol., with dat. or ad.
    (α).
    Absol.: aptate convivium, Pomp. ap. Non. p. 234, 30:

    idonea bello,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 111.—
    (β).
    With dat.:

    arma pugnae,

    Liv. 22, 5; cf.:

    aptat se pugnae,

    Verg. A. 10, 588;

    and, animos aptent armis,

    id. ib. 10, 259.—
    (γ).
    With ad:

    Aptat et armiferas miles ad arma manus,

    Ov. Am. 1, 13, 14:

    ad pugnam classem,

    Liv. 22, 5: ad primum se velut aspectum orationis aptare, Quint. 10, 2, 16.—Hence,
    c.
    With abl. of that with which something is fitted, furnished, provided:

    oppidi partes testudinibus et musculis, Auct. B. Alex. 1: biremes remigio,

    Verg. A. 8, 80:

    classem velis,

    id. ib. 3, 472; so,

    pinum armamentis,

    Ov. M. 11, 456: ut quisque se aptaverat armis, had fitted himself with arms, i. e. for battle, Liv. 9, 31.—Hence, aptātus, a, um, P. a., pr., fitted for something; thus, suitable, fit, appropriate, accommodated to (syn.: aptus, accommodatus): hoc verbum est ad id aptatum, quod ante dixerat, * Cic. de Or. 3, 40, 162:

    ad popularem delectationem,

    Quint. 2, 10, 11; so Sen. Contr. 6 al.:

    omnia rei aptata,

    id. Ep. 59.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > apto

  • 5 cado

    cădo, cĕcĭdi, cāsum, 3 ( part. pres. gen. plur. cadentūm, Verg. A. 10, 674; 12, 410), v. n. [cf. Sanscr. çad-, to fall away].
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In an extended sense, to be driven or carried by one ' s weight from a higher to a lower point, to fall down, be precipitated, sink down, go down, sink, fall (so mostly poet.; in prose, in place of it, the compounds decĭdo, occĭdo, excĭdo, etc.; cf. also ruo, labor;

    opp. surgo, sto): tum arbores in te cadent,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 25: (aves) praecipites cadunt in terram aut in aquam, fall headlong to the earth or into the water, Lucr. 6, 745; cf. id. 6, 828;

    imitated by Verg.: (apes) praecipites cadunt,

    Verg. G. 4, 80:

    nimbus, Ut picis e caelo demissum flumen, in undas Sic cadit, etc.,

    Lucr. 6, 258:

    cadit in terras vis flammea,

    id. 2, 215; so with in, id. 2, 209; 4, 1282; 6, 1006; 6, 1125; Prop. 4 (5), 4, 64:

    in patrios pedes,

    Ov. F. 2, 832.—With a different meaning:

    omnes plerumque cadunt in vulnus,

    in the direction of, towards their wound, Lucr. 4, 1049; cf.:

    prolapsa in vulnus moribunda cecidit,

    Liv. 1, 58, 11:

    cadit in vultus,

    Ov. M. 5, 292:

    in pectus,

    id. ib. 4, 579.—Less freq. with ad:

    ad terras,

    Plin. 2, 97, 99, § 216:

    ad terram,

    Quint. 5, 10, 84.—The place from which is designated by ab, ex, de:

    a summo cadere,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 4, 15:

    a mento cadit manus,

    Ov. F. 3, 20:

    aves ab alto,

    Plin. 10, 38, 54, § 112:

    ut cadat (avis) e regione loci,

    Lucr. 6, 824:

    ex arbore,

    Plin. 17, 20, 34, § 148; Dig. 50, 16, 30, § 4; 18, 1, 80, § 2:

    cecidisse de equo dicitur,

    Cic. Clu. 62, 175:

    cadere de equo,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 125 (for which Cæsar, Nepos, and Pliny employ decidere):

    de manibus arma cecidissent,

    Cic. Phil. 14, 7, 21; cf.:

    de manibus civium delapsa arma ipsa ceciderunt,

    id. Off. 1, 22, 77:

    cadunt altis de montibus umbrae,

    Verg. E. 1, 84:

    de caelo,

    Lucr. 5, 791; Ov. M. 2, 322:

    de matre (i. e. nasci),

    Claud. in Rufin. 1, 92.—With per:

    per inane profundum,

    Lucr. 2, 222:

    per aquas,

    id. 2, 230:

    per salebras altaque saxa,

    Mart. 11, 91; cf.:

    imbre per indignas usque cadente genas,

    Ov. Tr. 1, 3, 18.—With the adverb altius: altius atque cadant summotis nubibus imbres, and poured forth from a greater height, etc., Verg. E. 6, 38.—And absol.:

    folia nunc cadunt,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 24; Ter. Ad. 1, 1, 12; Lucr. 6, 297:

    ut pluere in multis regionibus et cadere imbres,

    id. 6, 415:

    cadens nix,

    id. 3, 21; 3, 402:

    velut si prolapsus cecidisset,

    Liv. 1, 56, 12: quaeque ita concus [p. 259] sa est, ut jam casura putetur, Ov. P. 2, 3, 59:

    cadentem Sustinuisse,

    id. M. 8, 148:

    saepius, of epileptics,

    Plin. Val. 12, 58:

    casuri, si leviter excutiantur, flosculi,

    Quint. 12, 10, 73.—
    2.
    Esp.
    a.
    Of heavenly bodies, to decline, set (opp. orior), Ov. F. 1, 295:

    oceani finem juxta solemque cadentem,

    Verg. A. 4, 480; 8, 59; Tac. G. 45:

    soli subjecta cadenti arva,

    Avien. Descr. Orb. 273; cf. Tac. Agr. 12:

    quā (nocte) tristis Orion cadit,

    Hor. Epod. 10, 10:

    Arcturus cadens,

    id. C. 3, 1, 27.—
    b.
    To separate from something by falling, to fall off or away, fall out, to drop off, be shed, etc.:

    nam tum dentes mihi cadebant primulum,

    Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 57:

    dentes cadere imperat aetas,

    Lucr. 5, 671; Sen. Ep. 12, 3; 83, 3:

    pueri qui primus ceciderit dens,

    Plin. 28, 4, 9, § 41:

    barba,

    Verg. E. 1, 29:

    quam multa in silvis autumni frigore primo Lapsa cadunt folia,

    id. A. 6, 310; cf. Cat. 11, 22; Hor. A. P. 61:

    lanigeris gregibus Sponte suā lanae cadunt,

    Ov. M. 7, 541:

    saetae,

    id. ib. 14, 303:

    quadrupedibus pilum cadere,

    Plin. 11, 39, 94, § 231:

    poma,

    Ov. M. 7, 586:

    cecidere manu quas legerat, herbae,

    id. ib. 14, 350:

    elapsae manibus cecidere tabellae,

    id. ib. 9, 571:

    et colus et fusus digitis cecidere remissis,

    id. ib. 4, 229.—
    c.
    Of a stream, to fall, empty itself:

    amnis Aretho cadit in sinum maris,

    Liv. 38, 4, 3; 38, 13, 6; 44, 31, 4:

    flumina in pontum cadent,

    Sen. Med. 406:

    flumina in Hebrum cadentia,

    Plin. 4, 11, 18, § 50:

    tandem in alterum amnem cadit,

    Curt. 6, 4, 6.—
    d.
    Of dice, to be thrown or cast; to turn up:

    illud, quod cecidit forte,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 23 sq.; Liv. 2, 12, 16.—
    e.
    Alicui (alicujus) ad pedes, to fall at one ' s feet in supplication, etc. (post-class. for abicio, proicio), Sen. Contr. 1, 1, 19; Eutr. 4, 7; Aug. Serm. 143, 4; Vulg. Joan. 11, 32 al.—
    f.
    Super collum allcujus, to embrace (late Lat.), Vulg. Luc. 15, 20.—
    B.
    In a more restricted sense.
    1.
    To fall, to fall down, drop, fall to, be precipitated, etc.; to sink down, to sink, settle (the usual class. signif. in prose and poetry):

    cadere in plano,

    Ov. Tr. 3, 4, 17 sq.:

    deorsum,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 2, 89:

    uspiam,

    Ter. Ad. 1, 1, 12:

    Brutus, velut si prolapsus cecidisset,

    Liv. 1, 56, 12; cf. id. 5, 21, 16; 1, 58, 12:

    dum timent, ne aliquando cadant, semper jacent,

    Quint. 8, 5, 32:

    sinistrā manu sinum ad ima crura deduxit (Caesar), quo honestius caderet,

    Suet. Caes. 82:

    cadere supinus,

    id. Aug. 43 fin.:

    in pectus pronus,

    Ov. M. 4, 579:

    cadunt toti montes,

    Lucr. 6, 546:

    radicitus exturbata (pinus) prona cadit,

    Cat. 64, 109:

    concussae cadunt urbes,

    Lucr. 5, 1236:

    casura moenia Troum,

    Ov. M. 13, 375; id. H. 13, 71:

    multaque praeterea ceciderunt moenia magnis motibus in terris,

    Lucr. 6, 588: languescunt omnia membra;

    bracchia palpebraeque cadunt,

    their arms and eyelids fall, id. 4, 953; 3, 596; so,

    ceciderunt artus,

    id. 3, 453:

    sed tibi tamen oculi, voltus, verba cecidissent,

    Cic. Dom. 52, 133; cf.:

    oculos vigiliā fatigatos cadentesque in opere detineo,

    Sen. Ep. 8, 1:

    patriae cecidere manus,

    Verg. A. 6, 33:

    cur facunda parum decoro Inter verba cadit lingua silentio?

    Hor. C. 4, 1, 36:

    cecidere illis animique manusque,

    Ov. M. 7, 347; Val. Fl. 1, 300; cf. II. F. infra.—
    2.
    In a pregn. signif. (as in most langg., to fall in battle, to die), to fall so as to be unable to rise, to fall dead, to fall, die (opp. vivere), Prop. 2 (3), 28, 42 (usu. of those who die in battle;

    hence most freq. in the histt.): hostes crebri cadunt,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 79 sq.:

    aut in acie cadendum fuit aut in aliquas insidias incidendum,

    Cic. Fam. 7, 3, 3; Curt. 4, 1, 28; Ov. M. 7, 142:

    ut cum dignitate potius cadamus quam cum ignominiā serviamus,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 14, 35:

    pauci de nostris cadunt,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 15; id. B. C. 3, 53:

    optimus quisque cadere aut sauciari,

    Sall. J. 92, 8; so id. C. 60, 6; id. J. 54, 10; Nep. Paus. 1, 2; id. Thras. 2, 7; id. Dat. 1, 2; 6, 1; 8, 3; Liv. 10, 35, 15 and 19; 21, 7, 10; 23, 21, 7; 29, 14, 8; Tac. G. 33; Hor. Ep. 1, 12, 27; Ov. M. 7, 142:

    per acies,

    Tac. A. 1, 2:

    pro patriā,

    Quint. 2, 15, 29:

    ante diem,

    Verg. A. 4, 620:

    bipenni,

    Ov. M. 12, 611:

    ense,

    Val. Fl. 1, 812.—Not in battle:

    inque pio cadit officio,

    Ov. M. 6, 250.—With abl. of means or instrument:

    suoque Marte (i. e. suā manu) cadunt,

    Ov. M. 3, 123; cf. Tac. A. 3, 42 fin.:

    suā manu cecidit,

    fell by his own hand, id. ib. 15, 71:

    exitu voluntario,

    id. H. 1, 40:

    muliebri fraude cadere,

    id. A. 2, 71: cecidere justā Morte Centauri, cecidit tremendae Flamma Chimaerae, Hor. C. 4, 2, 14 sq.:

    manu femineā,

    Sen. Herc. Oet. 1179:

    femineo Marte,

    Ov. M. 12, 610.—With abl. of agent with ab:

    torqueor, infesto ne vir ab hoste cadat,

    should be slain by, Ov. H. 9, 36; so id. M. 5, 192; Suet. Oth. 5:

    a centurione volneribus adversis tamquam in pugnā,

    Tac. A. 16, 9.—And without ab:

    barbarae postquam cecidere turmae Thessalo victore,

    Hor. C. 2, 4, 9; imitated by Claudian, IV. Cons. Hon. 89; Grat. Cyn. 315.—
    b.
    Of victims, to be slain or offered, to be sacrificed, to fall ( poet.):

    multa tibi ante aras nostrā cadet hostia dextrā,

    Verg. A. 1, 334:

    si tener pleno cadit haedus anno,

    Hor. C. 3, 18, 5; Tib. 1, 1, 23; 4, 1, 15; Ov. M. 7, 162; 13, 615; id. F. 4, 653.—
    3.
    In mal. part., = succumbo, to yield to, Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 104; Tib. 4, 10, 2; Sen. Contr. 1, 3, 7.—
    4.
    Matre cadens, just born ( poet.), Val. Fl. 1, 355; cf. of the custom of laying the new-born child at the father's feet: tellure cadens. Stat. S. 1, 2, 209; 5, 5, 69.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    To come or fall under, to fall, to be subject or exposed to something (more rare than its compound incidere, but class.); constr. usually with sub or in, sometimes with ad:

    sub sensus cadere nostros,

    i. e. to be perceived by the senses, Lucr. 1, 448:

    sub sensum,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 30, 48: in cernendi sensum. id. Tim. 3:

    sub oculos,

    id. Or. 3, 9:

    in conspectum,

    to become visible, id. Tusc. 1, 22, 50:

    sub aurium mensuram,

    id. Or. 20, 67:

    sponte suā (genus humanum) cecidit sub leges artaque jura,

    subjected itself to law and the force of right, Lucr. 5, 1146; so id. 3, 848:

    ad servitia,

    Liv. 1, 40, 3:

    utrorum ad regna,

    Lucr. 3, 836; so,

    sub imperium dicionemque Romanorum,

    Cic. Font. 5, 12 (1, 2):

    in potestatem unius,

    id. Att. 8, 3, 2:

    in cogitationem,

    to suggest itself to the thoughts, id. N. D. 1, 9, 21:

    in hominum disceptationem,

    id. de Or. 2, 2, 5:

    in deliberationem,

    id. Off. 1, 3, 9:

    in offensionem alicujus,

    id. N. D. 1, 30, 85:

    in morbum,

    id. Tusc. 1, 32, 79:

    in suspitionem alicujus,

    Nep. Paus. 2, 6:

    in calumniam,

    Quint. 9, 4, 57:

    abrupte cadere in narrationem,

    id. 4, 1, 79:

    in peccatum,

    Aug. in Psa. 65, 13.—
    B.
    In gen.: in or sub aliquem or aliquid, to belong to any object, to be in accordance with, agree with, refer to, be suitable to, to fit, suit, become (so esp. freq. in philos. and rhet. lang.):

    non cadit in hos mores, non in hunc pudorem, non in hanc vitam, non in hunc hominem ista suspitio,

    Cic. Sull. 27, 75:

    cadit ergo in bonum virum mentiri, emolumenti sui causā?

    id. Off. 3, 20, 81; so id. Cael. 29, 69; id. Har. Resp. 26, 56:

    haec Academica... in personas non cadebant,

    id. Att. 13, 19, 5:

    qui pedes in orationem non cadere quī possunt?

    id. Or. 56, 188:

    neque in unam formam cadunt omnia,

    id. ib. 11, 37; 57, 191; 27, 95; id. de Or. 3, 47, 182; Quint. 3, 7, 6; 4, 2, 37; 4, 2, 93; 6, prooem. § 5; 7, 2, 30 and 31; Plin. 35, 10, 36, § 82:

    heu, cadit in quemquam tantum scelus?

    Verg. E. 9, 17; Cic. Or. 27, 95; 11, 37; Quint. 3, 5, 16; 3, 6, 91; 5, 10, 30; 6, 3, 52; 7, 2, 31; 9, 1, 7;

    9, 3, 92: hoc quoque in rerum naturam cadit, ut, etc.,

    id. 2, 17, 32:

    in iis rebus, quae sub eandem rationem cadunt,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 30, 47; Quint. 8, 3, 56.—
    C.
    To fall upon a definite time (rare):

    considera, ne in alienissimum tempus cadat adventus tuus,

    Cic. Fam. 15, 14, 4:

    in id saeculum Romuli cecidit aetas, cum, etc.,

    id. Rep. 2, 10, 18.—Hence, in mercantile lang., of payments, to fall due: in eam diem cadere ( were due) nummos, qui a Quinto debentur, Cic. Att. 15, 20, 4.—
    D.
    (Acc. to I. 1. e.) Alicui, to fall to one (as by lot), fall to one ' s lot, happen to one, befall; and absol. (for accidere), to happen, come to pass, occur, result, turn out, fall out (esp. in an unexpected manner; cf. accido; very freq. in prose and poetry).
    1.
    Alicui:

    nihil ipsis jure incommodi cadere possit,

    Cic. Quint. 16, 51:

    hoc cecidit mihi peropportune, quod, etc.,

    id. de Or. 2, 4, 15; id. Att. 3, 1:

    insperanti mihi, cecidit, ut, etc.,

    id. de Or. 1, 21, 96; id. Att. 8, 3, 6; id. Mil. 30, 81:

    mihi omnia semper honesta et jucunda ceciderunt,

    id. Q. Fr. 1, 3, 1:

    sunt, quibus ad portas cecidit custodia sorti,

    Verg. G. 4, 165:

    haec aliis maledicta cadant,

    Tib. 1, 6, 85:

    neu tibi pro vano verba benigna cadunt,

    Prop. 1, 10, 24:

    ut illis... voluptas cadat dura inter saepe pericla,

    Hor. S. 1, 2, 40: verba cadentia, uttered at random, id. Ep. 1, 18, 12.—
    2.
    Ab sol., Afran. ap. Charis. p. 195 P.;

    Cic. Leg.2, 13, 33: verebar quorsum id casurum esset,

    how it would turn out, id. Att. 3, 24:

    aliorsum vota ceciderunt,

    Flor. 2, 4, 5:

    cum aliter res cecidisset ac putasses,

    had turned out differently from what was expected, Cic. Fam. 5, 19, 1:

    sane ita cadebat ut vellem,

    id. Att. 3, 7, 1; id. Div. 2, 52, 107; Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 12, 3; Cic. Verr. 1, 2, 5; Caes. B. C. 3, 73, Nep. Milt. 2, 5 Dähne:

    cum, quae tum maxime acciderant, casura praemonens, a furioso incepto eos deterreret,

    Liv. 36, 34, 3; 22, 40, 3; 35, 13, 9; 38, 46, 6; Plin. Pan. 31, 1; Tac. A. 2, 80; 6, 8; Suet. Tib. 14 al.; Verg. A. 2, 709:

    ut omnia fortiter fiant, feliciter cadant,

    Sen. Suas. 2, p. 14:

    multa. fortuito in melius casura,

    Tac. A. 2, 77.—With adj.:

    si non omnia caderent secunda,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 73:

    vota cadunt, i.e. rata sunt,

    are fulfilled, realized, Tib. 2, 2, 17 (diff. from Prop. 1, 17, 4; v. under F.).—
    3.
    With in and acc.: nimia illa libertas et populis et privatis in nimiam servitutem cadit (cf. metaballei), Cic. Rep. 1, 44, 68.—Esp.: in (ad) irritum or cassum, to be frustrated, fail, be or remain fruitless:

    omnia in cassum cadunt,

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 147; Lucr. 2, 1166:

    ad irritum cadens spes,

    Liv. 2, 6, 1; so Tac. H. 3, 26:

    in irritum,

    id. A. 15, 39; cf. with irritus, adj.:

    ut irrita promissa ejus caderent,

    Liv. 2, 31, 5:

    haud irritae cecidere minae,

    id. 6, 35, 10.—
    E.
    To fall, to become less (in strength, power, worth, etc.), to decrease, diminish, lessen:

    cadunt vires,

    Lucr. 5, 410:

    mercenarii milites pretia militiae casura in pace aegre ferebant,

    Liv. 34, 36, 7.—More freq. in an extended signif. (acc. to I. B. 2.),
    F. 1.
    In gen.: pellis item cecidit, vestis contempta ferina. declined in value, Lucr. 5, 1417:

    turpius est enim privatim cadere (i. e. fortunis everti) quam publice,

    Cic. Att. 16, 15, 6; so id. Fam. 6, 10, 2:

    atque ea quidem tua laus pariter cum re publicā cecidit,

    id. Off. 2, 13, 45:

    tanta civitas, si cadet,

    id. Har. Resp. 20, 42:

    huc cecidisse Germanici exercitus gloriam, ut, etc.,

    Tac. H. 3, 13:

    non tibi ingredienti fines ira cecidit?

    Liv. 2, 40, 7; Pers. 5, 91:

    amicitia nec debilitari animos aut cadere patitur,

    Cic. Lael. 7, 23:

    animus,

    to fail, Liv. 1, 11, 3; Ov. M. 11, 537; cf. id. ib. 7, 347:

    non debemus ita cadere animis, etc.,

    to lose courage, be disheartened, Cic. Fam. 6, 1, 4:

    tam graviter,

    id. Off. 1, 21, 73; cf. Sen. Ep. 8, 3.—Esp., to fail in speaking:

    magnus orator est... minimeque in lubrico versabitur, et si semel constiterit numquam cadet,

    Cic. Or. 28, 98:

    alte enim cadere non potest,

    id. ib. —So in the lang. of the jurists, causā or formulā, to lose one ' s cause or suit:

    causā cadere,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 19, 57; so id. de Or. 1, 36, 166 sq.; id. Fam. 7, 14, 1; Quint. 7, 3, 17; Luc. 2, 554; Suet. Calig. 39:

    formulā cadere,

    Sen. Ep. 48, 10; Quint. 3, 6, 69.—With in:

    ita quemquam cadere in judicio, ut, etc.,

    Cic. Mur. 28, 58.—Also absol.:

    cadere,

    Tac. H. 4, 6; and:

    criminibus repetundarum,

    id. ib. 1, 77:

    conjurationis crimine,

    id. A. 6, 14:

    ut cecidit Fortuna Phrygum,

    Ov. M. 13, 435:

    omniaque ingrato litore vota cadunt, i. e. irrita sunt,

    remain unfulfilled, unaccomplished, Prop. 1, 17, 4 (diff. from Tib. 2, 2, 17; v. above, D. 2.); cf.:

    at mea nocturno verba cadunt zephyro,

    Prop. 1, 16, 34:

    multa renascentur, quae jam cecidere, cadentque Quae nunc sunt in honore vocabula,

    to fall into disuse, grow out of date, Hor. A. P. 70 —Hence of theatrical representations, to fall through, to fail, be condemned (opp. stare, to win applause;

    the fig. derived from combatants): securus cadat an recto stet fabula talo,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 176.— Impers.. periculum est, ne cadatur, Aug. Don. Persev. 1.—
    2.
    Esp. of the wind (opp. surgo), to abate, subside, die away, etc.:

    cadit Eurus et umida surgunt Nubila,

    Ov. M. 8, 2:

    ventus premente nebulā cecidit,

    Liv. 29, 27, 10:

    cadente jam Euro,

    id. 25, 27, 11:

    venti vis omnis cecidit,

    id. 26, 39, 8:

    ubi primum aquilones ceciderunt,

    id. 36, 43, 11; cf.:

    sic cunctus pelagi cecidit fragor,

    Verg. A. 1, 154:

    ventosi ceciderunt murmuris aurae,

    id. E. 9, 58; id. G. 1, 354 Serv. and Wagn.—
    G.
    Rhet. and gram. t. t. of words, syllables, clauses, etc., to be terminated, end, close:

    verba melius in syllabas longiores cadunt,

    Cic. Or. 57, 194; 67, 223: qua (littera [p. 260] sc. m) nullum Graece verbum cadit, Quint. 12, 10, 31:

    plerique censent cadere tantum numerose oportere terminarique sententiam,

    Cic. Or. 59, 199; so id. Brut. 8, 34:

    apto cadens oratio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 32:

    numerus opportune cadens,

    id. 9, 4, 27:

    ultima syllaba in gravem vel duas graves cadit semper,

    id. 12, 10, 33 Spald.: similiter cadentia = omoioptôta, the ending of words with the same cases or verbal forms, diff. from similiter desinentia = omoioteleuta, similar endings of any kind, Cic. de Or. 3, 54, 206; id. Or. 34, 135; Auct. Her. 4, 20, 28; Quint. 9, 4, 42; cf. id. 9, 4, 18; 9, 3, 78; 9, 3, 79; 1, 7, 23; Aquil. Rom. Figur. §§ 25 and 26.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > cado

  • 6 compono

    com-pōno ( conp-), posui (COMPOSEIVERVNT, C. I. L. 1, 199, 2), positum (compostus, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21 Lorenz; Verg. A. 1, 249; Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; Varr ap. Sen. Ep. 56, 6), 3, v. a., to put, place, lay, bring or set together, to unite, join, connect, collect, aggregate, compose, to order, arrange, adjust, etc. (class. and very freq.).
    I.
    In gen., of different objects.
    A. 1.
    Of things in gen.:

    aridum lignum,

    Hor. C. 3, 17, 14:

    composita fronde,

    Prop. 1, 20, 22:

    uvas in tecto in cratibus,

    Cato, R. R. 112, 2:

    in quo (loco) erant ea conposita, quibus rex te numerare constituerat,

    Cic. Deiot. 6, 17:

    (amomum) manipulatim leniter componitur,

    Plin. 12, 13, 28, § 48:

    amphoras in culleum,

    Cato, R. R. 113, 2:

    ligna in caminum,

    id. ib. 37, 5.—
    b.
    To bring into contact, fit together, join:

    quid... in operibus manu factis tam compositum tamque compactum et coagmentatum inveniri potest?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 74: cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis conpono, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 260, 28:

    tum latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus,

    id. ib. p. 260, 30:

    conponens manibusque manus atque ori bus ora,

    Verg. A. 8, 486:

    Mercurio Sais fertur Virgineum conposuisse latus,

    Prop. 2, 2, 12; cf.

    caput,

    Tib. 1, 5, 8.—Hence, of broken limbs, etc., med. t. t., to set:

    ossa,

    Cels. 8, 10, 2:

    jugulum,

    id. 8, 8, 8 et saep.—
    c.
    Esp., to pack up for a journey, etc.:

    omnia composta sunt quae donavi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21:

    i ergo intro et compone quae tecum simul Ferantur,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 5:

    dum tota domus raeda componitur una,

    Juv. 3, 10.—
    2.
    Of persons:

    is (Saturnus) genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis Composuit,

    Verg. A. 8, 322:

    et tabula una duos poterit componere amantes,

    Prop. 2, 26, 33 (3, 22, 13); cf. II. C. 5. infra.—
    B.
    To set in opposition.
    1.
    To bring together in hostility, to oppose, to couple, pair, match in combat (cf. compositio, III.); esp. of gladiators, etc.: Samnis, spurcus homo, cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo Post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus, Lucil. Sat. ap. Non. p. 257, 18; cf. Cic. Opt. Gen. 6, 17:

    Rupili et Persi par pugnat, uti non Compositum melius cum Bitho Bacchius,

    Hor. S. 1, 7, 20 Orell. ad loc.:

    staturam habere Threcis cum Threce conpositi,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, praef. 8;

    and in gen.: si quis casus duos inter se bonos viros composuerit,

    Quint. 2, 17, 34:

    cuive virum mallem memet componere,

    Sil. 10, 70:

    componimur Vecordi Decio,

    id. 11, 212:

    hunc fatis,

    id. 1, 39:

    cum ventis, pelagique furentibus undis Composuit mortale genus,

    Luc. 3, 196;

    and fig.: pergis pugnantia secum Frontibus adversis componere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 103:

    ecce par deo dignum, vir fortis cum fortuna mala conpositus,

    Sen. Prov. 1, 2, 9:

    non illa (rhetorice) secum ipsa componitur,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33;

    and of a judicial contest: accita Epicharis et cum indice composita,

    confronted, Tac. A. 15, 51; 16, 10.—
    2.
    To oppose by way of comparison, to compare, contrast.
    (α).
    With acc. and dat.: quid est, cur componere ausis mihi te aut me tibi? Att. ap. Non. p. 257, 15 (Trag. Rel. v. 147 Rib.):

    nec divis homines componier aequom'st,

    Cat. 68, 141: composita dicta evolvunt, Quae cum componas, dicta factis discrepant, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 21 (Trag. Rel. v. 48 Rib.):

    si parva licet conponere magnis,

    Verg. G. 4, 176:

    parvis conponere magna solebam,

    id. E. 1, 23; Ov. M. 5, [p. 392] 416:

    audes cladi componere nostrae, Nympha, tuam?

    id. ib. 15, 530:

    divinis humana,

    Aus. Ecl. 1, 10.—
    (β).
    With acc. and cum:

    ubi Metelli dicta cum factis conposuit,

    Sall. J. 48, 1: causam suam cum causa adversarii. Quint. 7, 2, 22.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Of the parts of a whole, or of a whole as made up of parts.
    1. (α).
    With ex:

    exercitus ejus conpositus ex variis gentibus,

    Sall. J. 18, 3:

    genus humanum ex corpore et anima conpositum,

    id. ib. 2, 1:

    liber ex alienis orationibus compositus,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 14, 47:

    antidoton... ex multis atque interim contrariis quoque inter se effectibus,

    Quint. 1, 10, 6:

    ex quo (umore) componi debet (medicamentum),

    Cels. 6, 7, 1 fin.
    (β).
    With abl.:

    mensam gramine,

    Sil. 15, 51.—
    (γ).
    With acc. alone:

    medicamentum,

    Col. 6, 4, 1; Scrib. Comp. 10.—
    2.
    Esp., of buildings, etc., to construct, build:

    qui cuncta conposuit,

    i. e. the Creator, Cic. Univ. 13:

    urbem,

    Verg. A. 3, 387:

    illa (templa) deis,

    Ov. F. 1, 708 Burm. ad loc.:

    aggere conposito tumuli,

    Verg. A. 7, 6:

    deletas Thebas,

    Prop. 2, 6, 5.—
    3.
    Of words, to compound:

    vitilitigatores ex vitiis et litigatoribus, Plin. praef. § 32: verba composita (opp. simplicia),

    Quint. 1, 5, 3.—
    4.
    Of writings, speeches, etc.
    a.
    To compose, write, construct (very freq.):

    leges,

    Lucr. 4, 966:

    compone hoc, quod postulo, de argento: de reliquo videro,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16, § 36:

    quartum librum,

    id. de Or. 2, 55, 224:

    libros,

    id. Fam. 16, 20; Plin. Ep. 9, 9, 1:

    libellos,

    Quint. 12, 8, 5:

    actiones,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 8; Quint. 11, 3, 68:

    argumentum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 4, 3:

    edictum eis verbis,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 45, § 116:

    edictum eorum arbitratu,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 46, §

    119: artes,

    books of instruction, id. Brut. 12, 48; id. Ac. 2, 13, 40:

    artificium,

    id. de Or. 2, 19, 83:

    commentarium consulatus mei,

    id. Att. 1, 19, 10; Quint. 1, 8, 19:

    quarum (litterarum) exemplum,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    quandam disciplinae formulam,

    id. Ac. 1, 4, 17:

    stipulationum et judiciorum formulas,

    id. Leg. 1, 4, 14:

    interdictum,

    id. Caecin. 21, 59:

    poema,

    id. ad Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4; cf. Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 77; Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 60:

    senatus consultum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 22, 2:

    testimonium,

    id. Att. 15, 15, 1:

    verba ad religionem deorum immortalium,

    id. Dom. 47, 124:

    de judicialibus causis aliqua,

    Quint. 3, 6, 104:

    aliquid de ratione dicendi, id. prooem. 1: quae de ortu vitaque Scapulae composita erant,

    Tac. A. 16, 14:

    Apion... inmortalitate donari a se scripsit ad quos aliqua conponebat, Plin. praef. § 25: carmen,

    Cic. Mur. 12, 26:

    carmina,

    Tac. Or. 12; id. A. 3, 49:

    epistulas,

    id. ib. 2, 70:

    litteras nomine Marcelli,

    Liv. 27, 28, 4; Tac. A. 11, 20:

    orationem habere ad conciliandos plebis animos conpositam,

    Liv. 1, 35, 2:

    blanditias tremula voce,

    Tib. 1, 2, 91:

    meditata manu verba trementi,

    Ov. M. 9, 521:

    versus,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 8:

    mollem versum,

    Prop. 1, 7, 19:

    cantus,

    Tib. 1, 2, 53:

    in morem annalium,

    Tac. Or. 22:

    orationes adversus aliquem,

    id. ib. 37:

    litteras ad aliquem,

    id. A. 15, 8; 14, 22:

    probra in Gaium,

    id. ib. 6, 9;

    14, 50: multa et atrocia in Macronem,

    id. ib. 6, 44 (38) et saep.—
    b.
    Transf., of the subjects, etc., treated, to write about, treat, celebrate:

    tuas laudes,

    Tib. 4, 1, 35:

    res gestas,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 251:

    tempora Iliaca,

    Vell. 1, 3, 2:

    bellum Troicum,

    id. 1, 5, 3:

    Juli Africani vitam componendo, spem hominibus fecisti plurium ejus modi librorum,

    Tac. Or. 14:

    veteres populi Romani res,

    id. A. 4, 32:

    Neronis res,

    id. ib. 1, 1; 11, 11.—
    B.
    From the notion of closing.
    1.
    To put away, put aside, put in place:

    armamentis conplicandis, conponendis studuimus,

    i. e. folding up the sails and lowering the masts, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 80:

    (tempus) ad componenda armamenta expediendumque remigem,

    Liv. 26, 39, 8:

    vela contrahit malosque inclinat et simul armamenta componens, etc.,

    id. 36, 44, 2:

    arma,

    Hor. C. 4, 14, 52:

    tristes istos conpone libellos,

    put aside, Prop. 1, 9, 13.—
    2.
    To store up, put away, collect:

    nec... Aut conponere opes norant aut parcere parto,

    Verg. A. 8, 317:

    ego conposito securus acervo Despiciam dites,

    Tib. 1, 1, 77;

    so fig.: condo et compono quae mox depromere possim,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 12.— So esp. to preserve, pack, put up fruits, meat, etc., for future use:

    pernas,

    Cato, R. R. 162, 12:

    tergora (suis),

    Col. 12, 55, 2: siccatos coliculos, id. 12, 9, 1:

    caepam in fidelia,

    id. 12, 10, 2:

    herbas,

    id. 12, 13, 2:

    poma,

    id. 12, 47, 5:

    olivas,

    Pall. Nov. 22, 5:

    herbam olla nova,

    Scrib. Comp. 60:

    faenum,

    Dig. 19, 2, 11, § 4:

    fructus in urceis, capsellis,

    ib. 33, 7, 12, §1.—
    3.
    Of the ashes or remains of the dead, to adjust, lay out, to collect and inurn, inter, bury:

    tu mea conpones et dices, ossa, Properti, Haec tua sunt,

    Prop. 2, 24, 35 (3, 19, 19):

    cinerem,

    Ov. F. 3, 547:

    cinerem ossaque,

    Val. Fl. 7, 203:

    sic ego conponi versus in ossa velim,

    Tib. 3, 2, 26.—Hence, in gen., of persons, to bury:

    quem... prope cognatos conpositum cineres,

    Cat. 68, 98:

    omnes composui (meos),

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 28:

    compositi busta avi,

    Ov. F. 5, 426:

    Pisonem Verania uxor... T. Vinium Crispina filia composuere,

    Tac. H. 1, 47:

    componi tumulo eodem,

    Ov. M. 4, 157:

    toro Mortua componar,

    id. ib. 9, 504:

    alto Conpositus lecto,

    Pers. 3, 104:

    aliquem terra,

    Sil. 9, 95.—
    4. a.
    Of things: omnia noctis erant placida composta quiete, Varr. Atac. ap. Sen. Contr. 3, 16:

    cum mare compositum est,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 259:

    aquas,

    id. H. 13, 136:

    fessum tumentes Composuit pelagus ventis patientibus undas,

    Luc. 5, 702.—
    b.
    Of persons:

    nec vigilantibus, sed etiam quiete compositis,

    Quint. 11, 2, 5:

    ubi jam thalamis se conposuere,

    Verg. G. 4, 189:

    defessa membra,

    id. ib. 4, 438:

    si bene conpositus somno vinoque jacebit,

    Ov. Am. 1, 4, 53.—
    5.
    To end strife, confusion, etc., to compose, pacify, allay, settle, calm, appease, quiet, tranquillize, reconcile, etc., that which is disturbed or at variance.
    a.
    With personal object:

    aversos amicos,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 29:

    ceteros clementia,

    Tac. A. 12, 55:

    comitia praetorum,

    id. ib. 14, 28; id. H. 1, 85:

    juvenes concitatos,

    Quint. 1, 10, 32; cf.:

    barbarum animos,

    Tac. A. 14, 39:

    gentem,

    Sil. 17, 356.—Esp. of the mind:

    prima (pars philosophiae) conponit animum,

    Sen. Ep. 89, 9:

    argumentum conpositae mentis,

    id. ib. 2, 1; Cels. 3, 18; Sil. 11, 352:

    mentem somno,

    id. 3, 162:

    religio saevas componit mentis,

    id. 13, 317.—
    b.
    Of places, countries, etc.:

    C. Caesar componendae Armeniae deligitur,

    Tac. A. 2, 4:

    Campaniam,

    id. H. 4, 3:

    Daciam,

    id. ib. 3, 53.—
    c.
    With abstr. or indef. objects:

    si possum hoc inter vos conponere,

    Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 23; cf.:

    vides, inter nos sic haec potius cum bona Ut componamus gratia quam cum mala?

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 17:

    gaudens conponi foedere bellum,

    Verg. A. 12, 109; so,

    bellum,

    Sall. J. 97, 2; Nep. Hann. 6, 2; id. Alcib. 8, 3; Vell. 2, 25, 1; Asin. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 3:

    bella,

    Tac. A. 3, 56:

    cum vellet pro communi amico controversias regum componere,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 109:

    uti per colloquia omnes controversiae componantur,

    id. ib. 1, 9 fin.:

    curas,

    Verg. A. 4, 341; Sil. 12, 682:

    lites,

    Verg. E. 3, 108:

    seditionem civilem,

    Suet. Caes. 4:

    statum Orientis,

    id. Calig. 1:

    Romanus Ardeae turbatas seditione res... composuit,

    Liv. 4, 10, 6; 3, 53, 1:

    legatorum res et bello turbatas,

    id. 45, 16, 2:

    res Germanicas,

    Suet. Vit. 9:

    discordias,

    Tac. H. 4, 50:

    compositis praesentibus,

    id. A. 1, 45:

    odia et certamina,

    id. ib. 15, 2.—Less freq. transf., with the result as object:

    pacem componi volo Meo patri cum matre,

    Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 113:

    si pax cum Carthaginiensibus componi nequisset,

    Liv. 30, 40, 13:

    at me conposita pace fefellit Amor,

    Prop. 2, 2, 2:

    pax circa Brundusium composita,

    Vell. 2, 75, 3:

    pacem cum Pyrrho,

    Just. 18, 2, 6; cf. D. 2. infra.—
    d.
    Absol.:

    coheredes mei conponere et transigere cupiebant,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 1, 7; and so impers. pass.:

    posteaquam id quod maxime volui fieri non potuit, ut componeretur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    Pompei summam esse... voluntatem, ut componeretur atque ab armis discederetur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 16.—
    C. 1.
    In gen., to arrange, adjust, order, set in order:

    aulaeis se superbis Aurea sponda, of one's attitude on a couch,

    Verg. A. 1, 697:

    ad ictum militaris gladii conposita cervice,

    Sen. Cons. Marc. 26, 2:

    diductis aedificia angulis vidimus moveri iterumque conponi,

    id. Q. N. 6, 30, 4:

    si ad rem pertinet, quomodo caelo adfecto conpositisque sideribus quodque animal oriatur,

    Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98:

    tibi enim gratias agebat, quod signa componenda suscepisses,

    id. Att. 4, 9, 1.—
    2.
    Esp., milit. t. t.:

    se ad confligendum, Sisenn. ap. Non p. 257, 13: exercitum in hibernaculis, Sali J. 103, 1: in secunda (acie) cohortis, id. H. inc. Fragm. 44 Dietsch: stabant conpositi suis quisque ordinibus (opp. incompositi),

    Liv. 44, 38, 11:

    conpositi numero in turmas,

    Verg. A. 11, 599:

    cunctos licentia vagos compositus invadit = compositis ordinibus,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    agmen,

    id. ib. 2, 89; 5, 1; id. A. 12, 16:

    ordines,

    id. H. 4, 33:

    vagos paventesque Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. ib. 3, 35:

    pugnae exercitum,

    id. A. 13, 40:

    auxilia in numerum legionis,

    id. ib. 2, 80 Nipp. ad loc.:

    equitem per turmas,

    id. ib. 15, 29:

    insidias in montibus,

    Just. 1, 3, 11.—
    3.
    Of the order of words in language: quam lepide lexeis compostae! ut tesserulae omnes Arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato, Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; id. ap. Cic. Or. 44, 149; cf. id. ib. sq.:

    ut aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone,

    id. Brut. 17, 68.—
    4.
    With reference to orderly appearance, etc., of the clothing, hair; the expression of the countenance, etc., to lay, smooth, adjust:

    suon quisque loco'st? Vide capillum, satin compositu'st commode?

    Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 97:

    composito et delibuto capillo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 46, 135:

    comas,

    Ov. R. Am. 679:

    crines,

    Verg. G. 4, 417:

    ne turbarentur comae, quas componi, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 148:

    togam,

    to lay in proper folds, Hor. S. 2, 3, 77; Quint. 11, 3, 156; cf.:

    nec tamen ante adiit... Quam se composuit, quam circumspexit amictus,

    Ov. M. 4, 318:

    pulvinum facili manu,

    id. A. A. 1, 160; cf.

    torum,

    id. F. 3, 484:

    jam libet componere voltus,

    id. M. 13, 767:

    vultu composito, ne laeti excessu principis, etc.,

    Tac. A. 1, 7; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 5; cf.:

    (Tiberius) compositus ore,

    id. ib. 2, 34:

    vultum natura horridum... efferabat, componens ad speculum in omnem terrorem,

    distorting, Suet. Calig. 50.—
    5.
    In gen., to adjust, arrange, regulate, for the expression of something, or to accord with something; usu. ad aliquid:

    ad abstinentiam rursus, non secus ac modo ad balineum animum vultumque conposui,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 1, 6:

    orationis ipsius vultus ad id, quod efficere intendimus, compositus,

    Quint. 9, 1, 21:

    utraque manu ad modum aliquid portantium composita,

    id. 11, 3, 120:

    ge. stum oratoris ad similitudinem saltationis,

    id. 1, 11, 19:

    figuram ad imitationem alterius scripturae,

    id. 9, 2, 34:

    nec ad votum composita civitas,

    Tac. Or. 41:

    cuncta ad decorem inperi conposita,

    id. H. 1, 71:

    cunctis ad tristitiam conpositis,

    id. A. 3, 1. —Less freq. with dat.:

    voltus conponere famae Taedet,

    to adapt, Tib. 4, 7, 9:

    venturis carbasa ventis,

    Luc. 3, 596:

    me quoque mittendis rectum componite telis,

    id. 3, 717. —With in:

    Nero itinera urbis... veste servili in dissimulationem sui compositus pererrabat,

    disguised, made up, Tac. A. 13, 25. —
    D. (α).
    With acc.:

    ego itinera sic composueram, ut Nonis Quinctilibus Puteolis essem,

    Cic. Att. 15, 26, 3:

    quod adest memento Componere aequus,

    Hor. C. 3, 29, 33:

    conposita atque constituta re publica,

    Cic. Leg. 3, 18, 42:

    necdum compositis maturisve satis consiliis,

    Liv. 4, 13, 5:

    (diem) totum in consideranda causa componendaque posuisse,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 87:

    tempus in cognoscendis componendisque causis consumere,

    id. Or. 42, 143:

    ex sententia omnibus rebus paratis conpositisque,

    Sall. J. 43, 5; 94, 1:

    in senatu cuncta longis aliorum principatibus composita statim decernuntur,

    Tac. H. 2, 55:

    dum quae forent firmando Neronis imperio componuntur,

    id. A. 12, 68.—
    (β).
    With ad or in and acc. of the purpose for which, or the example according to which, etc.:

    cum alteri placeat auspicia ista ad utilitatem esse rei publicae conposita,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 32:

    omnia ad voluptatem multitudinis inperitae,

    Quint. 10, 1, 43:

    animum ad omnes casus,

    id. 12, 9, 20; Val. Fl. 1, 321:

    satis igitur in hoc nos componet multa scribendi exercitatio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 114:

    cultum victumque non ad nova exempla conponere, sed ut majorum mores suadent,

    Sen. Tranq. 9, 2. —
    2. (α).
    In gen.: eum allegaverunt, suom qui servom diceret Cum auro esse apud me: conposita est fallacia, [p. 393] Ut, etc., Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 29:

    quin jam virginem Despondi: res composita'st,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 17:

    ita causa componitur, ut item palaestritae Bidini peterent ab Epicrate hereditatem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 22, § 54:

    societatem praedarum cum latronibus conposuisse,

    Sall. H. 4, 11 Dietsch:

    crimen ab inimicis Romae conpositum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 61, § 141:

    conpositis inter se rebus,

    Sall. J. 66, 2:

    ita conposito dolo digrediuntur,

    id. ib. 111, 4:

    conposito jam consilio,

    Liv. 3, 53, 3: ceteri proditores ea quae composita erant exspectabant;

    convenerat autem, etc.,

    id. 25, 9, 8:

    sub noctem susurri Composita repetantur hora,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 20:

    ictum jam foedus, et omnes Conpositae leges,

    Verg. A. 12, 315:

    compositis notis,

    Tib. 1, 2, 22:

    crimen ac dolum ultro,

    Tac. H. 1, 34:

    proditionem,

    id. ib. 2, 100:

    seditionem,

    id. ib. 4, 14:

    insidias,

    id. ib. 5, 22; id. A. 12, 54; 13, 47: pacem componere, v. B. 5. supra.—
    (β).
    With rel.-clause:

    cum summa concordia, quos dimitterent, quos retinerent, composuerunt,

    Liv. 40, 40, 14.—
    (γ).
    With inf.:

    ii, secretis conloquiis conponunt Gallos concire,

    Tac. A. 3, 40.—
    (δ).
    Pass. impers.:

    ut domi compositum cum Marcio erat,

    Liv. 2, 37, 1.—
    (ε).
    With ut and subj.:

    compositum inter ipsos ut Latiaris strueret dolum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68; cf. P. a. subst.
    3.
    In gen., to feign, invent, devise, contrive, in order to deceive or delude, etc.: composita dicta, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 22 (Trag. Rel. v. 47 Rib.):

    ne tu istic hodie malo tuo conpositis mendaciis Advenisti,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 211:

    nec bene mendaci risus conponitur ore,

    Tib. 3, 6, 35 (3, 7, 3):

    sed vobis facile'st verba et conponere fraudes,

    Prop. 2, 9, 31:

    insidias in me conponis inanes,

    id. 2, 32 (3, 30), 19:

    compositas insidias fatoque evitatas ementitur,

    Tac. A. 13, 47:

    si haec fabulosa et composita videntur,

    id. Or. 12; id. Agr. 40:

    quae ut augendae famae composita, sic reliqua non in obscuro habentur,

    id. A. 15, 16; cf.:

    vetustatem, ut cetera, in majus conponentem altores Jovis celebravisse,

    exaggerating, Sall. H. 3, 60 Dietsch.— Part. perf. with in and acc., pretending, assuming the appearance or expression:

    (Domitianus) paratus simulatione, in adrogantiam compositus audiit preces,

    Tac. Agr. 42:

    is in maestitiam compositus,

    id. H. 2, 9; 1, 54:

    in securitatem,

    id. A. 3, 44.—Rarely with ad:

    tunc compositus ad maestitiam,

    Tac. A. 13, 20.— Hence, P. a.: compŏsĭtus ( - postus), a, um.
    A.
    Well-arranged, ordered, or constituted, orderly, regular:

    quae (injuria) dum foris sunt, nil videtur mundius, Nec magis compositum quicquam nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 13: admiratus sum... sunchusin litterularum, quae solent tuae compositissimae et clarissimae esse, Cic. Att. 6, 9, 1:

    acrior impetu atque animis quam compositior ullo ordine pugna fuit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 13:

    intellegitur, etiamsi non adjecero, conpositum ordinatumque fore talem virum,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 8, 3:

    composita et quieta et beata respublica,

    Tac. Or. 36. —Of writings:

    quare in his quoque libris erant eadem aliqua... omnia vero compositiora et elaborata,

    Quint. 1, pr. § 8; cf.:

    illa quae curam fatentur et ficta atque composita videri etiam volunt,

    elaborate, id. 8, pr. § 23.— Transf., of the orator himself:

    si aut compositi oratoris bene structam collocationem dissolvas permutatione verborum,

    Cic. Or. 70, 232.—
    B.
    Fitly disposed for any purpose, prepared, apt, fit, adapted, qualified, suitable, ready:

    perficiam ut nemo umquam paratior, vigilantior, compositior ad judicium venisse videatur,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 1, 11; so,

    equus bene natura compositus,

    Auct. Her. 4, 46, 59.— With ad or in and acc., or with dat.:

    arte quadam ab juventa in ostentationem (virtutum) compositus,

    Liv. 26, 19, 3 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    alius historiae magis idoneus, alius compositus ad carmen,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7:

    aeque in adulationem compositus (sacerdos),

    Curt. 4, 7, 26:

    (Attici) non maxime ad risum compositi,

    Quint. 6, 3, 18:

    natura atque arte compositus alliciendis etiam Muciani moribus,

    Tac. H. 2, 5.—
    C.
    Quiet, peaceful, undisturbed, calm, composed, unimpassioned, etc.:

    ut peractis quae agenda fuerint salvo jam et composito die possis ibi manere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 2:

    lenis et nitidi et compositi generis amatores,

    Quint. 10, 1, 44:

    actio,

    id. 11, 3, 110:

    aetas,

    mature, sedate, Tac. A. 13, 1: adfectus mites atque compositi, Quint. 6, 2, 9:

    supercilium (opp. erectum),

    id. 11, 3, 74:

    repetitio eorum (civium) labefactabat compositam civitatem,

    Flor. 3, 23, 3.—
    D.
    Compound, composite, made up of parts (opp. simplex):

    verba,

    Quint. 1, 5, 3; 1, 6, 38; 7, 9, 5:

    voces,

    id. 1, 5, 65; cf. id. 1, 5, 9; 2, 12, 3.—Hence, subst.: compŏsĭtum ( conp-), i, n., that which is agreed, an agreement, compact, etc.; only abl. in the phrases,
    (α).
    Ex composito, according to agreement, by agreement, in concert, Sall. H. 2, 12 Dietsch:

    tum ex composito orta vis,

    Liv. 1, 9, 10; 5, 14, 2; 36, 25, 1; 40, 48, 4; Suet. Claud. 37; Tac. H. 4, 66.—
    (β).
    De composito, by agreement, App. Mag. 1, p. 273; and,
    (γ).
    More rarely in the same sense, composito alone, Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 29; Nep. Dat. 6, 6; Verg. A. 2, 129.—Hence also adv.: compŏsĭtē ( conp-), in an orderly, regular, or skilful manner, orderly, regularly, properly (class. but rare;

    not in Quint.): ambulare,

    Col. 6, 2, 5:

    indutus,

    Gell. 1, 5, 2:

    composite et apte dicere,

    Cic. Or. 71, 236:

    composite, ornate, copiose eloqui,

    id. De Or. 1, 11, 48:

    composite atque magnifice casum reipublicae miserati,

    Sall. C. 51, 9:

    bene et composite disseruit,

    id. Ib. 52.— Comp.:

    compositius cuncta quam festinantius agerent,

    Tac. A. 15, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > compono

  • 7 compositum

    com-pōno ( conp-), posui (COMPOSEIVERVNT, C. I. L. 1, 199, 2), positum (compostus, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21 Lorenz; Verg. A. 1, 249; Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; Varr ap. Sen. Ep. 56, 6), 3, v. a., to put, place, lay, bring or set together, to unite, join, connect, collect, aggregate, compose, to order, arrange, adjust, etc. (class. and very freq.).
    I.
    In gen., of different objects.
    A. 1.
    Of things in gen.:

    aridum lignum,

    Hor. C. 3, 17, 14:

    composita fronde,

    Prop. 1, 20, 22:

    uvas in tecto in cratibus,

    Cato, R. R. 112, 2:

    in quo (loco) erant ea conposita, quibus rex te numerare constituerat,

    Cic. Deiot. 6, 17:

    (amomum) manipulatim leniter componitur,

    Plin. 12, 13, 28, § 48:

    amphoras in culleum,

    Cato, R. R. 113, 2:

    ligna in caminum,

    id. ib. 37, 5.—
    b.
    To bring into contact, fit together, join:

    quid... in operibus manu factis tam compositum tamque compactum et coagmentatum inveniri potest?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 74: cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis conpono, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 260, 28:

    tum latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus,

    id. ib. p. 260, 30:

    conponens manibusque manus atque ori bus ora,

    Verg. A. 8, 486:

    Mercurio Sais fertur Virgineum conposuisse latus,

    Prop. 2, 2, 12; cf.

    caput,

    Tib. 1, 5, 8.—Hence, of broken limbs, etc., med. t. t., to set:

    ossa,

    Cels. 8, 10, 2:

    jugulum,

    id. 8, 8, 8 et saep.—
    c.
    Esp., to pack up for a journey, etc.:

    omnia composta sunt quae donavi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21:

    i ergo intro et compone quae tecum simul Ferantur,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 5:

    dum tota domus raeda componitur una,

    Juv. 3, 10.—
    2.
    Of persons:

    is (Saturnus) genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis Composuit,

    Verg. A. 8, 322:

    et tabula una duos poterit componere amantes,

    Prop. 2, 26, 33 (3, 22, 13); cf. II. C. 5. infra.—
    B.
    To set in opposition.
    1.
    To bring together in hostility, to oppose, to couple, pair, match in combat (cf. compositio, III.); esp. of gladiators, etc.: Samnis, spurcus homo, cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo Post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus, Lucil. Sat. ap. Non. p. 257, 18; cf. Cic. Opt. Gen. 6, 17:

    Rupili et Persi par pugnat, uti non Compositum melius cum Bitho Bacchius,

    Hor. S. 1, 7, 20 Orell. ad loc.:

    staturam habere Threcis cum Threce conpositi,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, praef. 8;

    and in gen.: si quis casus duos inter se bonos viros composuerit,

    Quint. 2, 17, 34:

    cuive virum mallem memet componere,

    Sil. 10, 70:

    componimur Vecordi Decio,

    id. 11, 212:

    hunc fatis,

    id. 1, 39:

    cum ventis, pelagique furentibus undis Composuit mortale genus,

    Luc. 3, 196;

    and fig.: pergis pugnantia secum Frontibus adversis componere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 103:

    ecce par deo dignum, vir fortis cum fortuna mala conpositus,

    Sen. Prov. 1, 2, 9:

    non illa (rhetorice) secum ipsa componitur,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33;

    and of a judicial contest: accita Epicharis et cum indice composita,

    confronted, Tac. A. 15, 51; 16, 10.—
    2.
    To oppose by way of comparison, to compare, contrast.
    (α).
    With acc. and dat.: quid est, cur componere ausis mihi te aut me tibi? Att. ap. Non. p. 257, 15 (Trag. Rel. v. 147 Rib.):

    nec divis homines componier aequom'st,

    Cat. 68, 141: composita dicta evolvunt, Quae cum componas, dicta factis discrepant, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 21 (Trag. Rel. v. 48 Rib.):

    si parva licet conponere magnis,

    Verg. G. 4, 176:

    parvis conponere magna solebam,

    id. E. 1, 23; Ov. M. 5, [p. 392] 416:

    audes cladi componere nostrae, Nympha, tuam?

    id. ib. 15, 530:

    divinis humana,

    Aus. Ecl. 1, 10.—
    (β).
    With acc. and cum:

    ubi Metelli dicta cum factis conposuit,

    Sall. J. 48, 1: causam suam cum causa adversarii. Quint. 7, 2, 22.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Of the parts of a whole, or of a whole as made up of parts.
    1. (α).
    With ex:

    exercitus ejus conpositus ex variis gentibus,

    Sall. J. 18, 3:

    genus humanum ex corpore et anima conpositum,

    id. ib. 2, 1:

    liber ex alienis orationibus compositus,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 14, 47:

    antidoton... ex multis atque interim contrariis quoque inter se effectibus,

    Quint. 1, 10, 6:

    ex quo (umore) componi debet (medicamentum),

    Cels. 6, 7, 1 fin.
    (β).
    With abl.:

    mensam gramine,

    Sil. 15, 51.—
    (γ).
    With acc. alone:

    medicamentum,

    Col. 6, 4, 1; Scrib. Comp. 10.—
    2.
    Esp., of buildings, etc., to construct, build:

    qui cuncta conposuit,

    i. e. the Creator, Cic. Univ. 13:

    urbem,

    Verg. A. 3, 387:

    illa (templa) deis,

    Ov. F. 1, 708 Burm. ad loc.:

    aggere conposito tumuli,

    Verg. A. 7, 6:

    deletas Thebas,

    Prop. 2, 6, 5.—
    3.
    Of words, to compound:

    vitilitigatores ex vitiis et litigatoribus, Plin. praef. § 32: verba composita (opp. simplicia),

    Quint. 1, 5, 3.—
    4.
    Of writings, speeches, etc.
    a.
    To compose, write, construct (very freq.):

    leges,

    Lucr. 4, 966:

    compone hoc, quod postulo, de argento: de reliquo videro,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16, § 36:

    quartum librum,

    id. de Or. 2, 55, 224:

    libros,

    id. Fam. 16, 20; Plin. Ep. 9, 9, 1:

    libellos,

    Quint. 12, 8, 5:

    actiones,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 8; Quint. 11, 3, 68:

    argumentum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 4, 3:

    edictum eis verbis,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 45, § 116:

    edictum eorum arbitratu,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 46, §

    119: artes,

    books of instruction, id. Brut. 12, 48; id. Ac. 2, 13, 40:

    artificium,

    id. de Or. 2, 19, 83:

    commentarium consulatus mei,

    id. Att. 1, 19, 10; Quint. 1, 8, 19:

    quarum (litterarum) exemplum,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    quandam disciplinae formulam,

    id. Ac. 1, 4, 17:

    stipulationum et judiciorum formulas,

    id. Leg. 1, 4, 14:

    interdictum,

    id. Caecin. 21, 59:

    poema,

    id. ad Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4; cf. Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 77; Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 60:

    senatus consultum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 22, 2:

    testimonium,

    id. Att. 15, 15, 1:

    verba ad religionem deorum immortalium,

    id. Dom. 47, 124:

    de judicialibus causis aliqua,

    Quint. 3, 6, 104:

    aliquid de ratione dicendi, id. prooem. 1: quae de ortu vitaque Scapulae composita erant,

    Tac. A. 16, 14:

    Apion... inmortalitate donari a se scripsit ad quos aliqua conponebat, Plin. praef. § 25: carmen,

    Cic. Mur. 12, 26:

    carmina,

    Tac. Or. 12; id. A. 3, 49:

    epistulas,

    id. ib. 2, 70:

    litteras nomine Marcelli,

    Liv. 27, 28, 4; Tac. A. 11, 20:

    orationem habere ad conciliandos plebis animos conpositam,

    Liv. 1, 35, 2:

    blanditias tremula voce,

    Tib. 1, 2, 91:

    meditata manu verba trementi,

    Ov. M. 9, 521:

    versus,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 8:

    mollem versum,

    Prop. 1, 7, 19:

    cantus,

    Tib. 1, 2, 53:

    in morem annalium,

    Tac. Or. 22:

    orationes adversus aliquem,

    id. ib. 37:

    litteras ad aliquem,

    id. A. 15, 8; 14, 22:

    probra in Gaium,

    id. ib. 6, 9;

    14, 50: multa et atrocia in Macronem,

    id. ib. 6, 44 (38) et saep.—
    b.
    Transf., of the subjects, etc., treated, to write about, treat, celebrate:

    tuas laudes,

    Tib. 4, 1, 35:

    res gestas,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 251:

    tempora Iliaca,

    Vell. 1, 3, 2:

    bellum Troicum,

    id. 1, 5, 3:

    Juli Africani vitam componendo, spem hominibus fecisti plurium ejus modi librorum,

    Tac. Or. 14:

    veteres populi Romani res,

    id. A. 4, 32:

    Neronis res,

    id. ib. 1, 1; 11, 11.—
    B.
    From the notion of closing.
    1.
    To put away, put aside, put in place:

    armamentis conplicandis, conponendis studuimus,

    i. e. folding up the sails and lowering the masts, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 80:

    (tempus) ad componenda armamenta expediendumque remigem,

    Liv. 26, 39, 8:

    vela contrahit malosque inclinat et simul armamenta componens, etc.,

    id. 36, 44, 2:

    arma,

    Hor. C. 4, 14, 52:

    tristes istos conpone libellos,

    put aside, Prop. 1, 9, 13.—
    2.
    To store up, put away, collect:

    nec... Aut conponere opes norant aut parcere parto,

    Verg. A. 8, 317:

    ego conposito securus acervo Despiciam dites,

    Tib. 1, 1, 77;

    so fig.: condo et compono quae mox depromere possim,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 12.— So esp. to preserve, pack, put up fruits, meat, etc., for future use:

    pernas,

    Cato, R. R. 162, 12:

    tergora (suis),

    Col. 12, 55, 2: siccatos coliculos, id. 12, 9, 1:

    caepam in fidelia,

    id. 12, 10, 2:

    herbas,

    id. 12, 13, 2:

    poma,

    id. 12, 47, 5:

    olivas,

    Pall. Nov. 22, 5:

    herbam olla nova,

    Scrib. Comp. 60:

    faenum,

    Dig. 19, 2, 11, § 4:

    fructus in urceis, capsellis,

    ib. 33, 7, 12, §1.—
    3.
    Of the ashes or remains of the dead, to adjust, lay out, to collect and inurn, inter, bury:

    tu mea conpones et dices, ossa, Properti, Haec tua sunt,

    Prop. 2, 24, 35 (3, 19, 19):

    cinerem,

    Ov. F. 3, 547:

    cinerem ossaque,

    Val. Fl. 7, 203:

    sic ego conponi versus in ossa velim,

    Tib. 3, 2, 26.—Hence, in gen., of persons, to bury:

    quem... prope cognatos conpositum cineres,

    Cat. 68, 98:

    omnes composui (meos),

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 28:

    compositi busta avi,

    Ov. F. 5, 426:

    Pisonem Verania uxor... T. Vinium Crispina filia composuere,

    Tac. H. 1, 47:

    componi tumulo eodem,

    Ov. M. 4, 157:

    toro Mortua componar,

    id. ib. 9, 504:

    alto Conpositus lecto,

    Pers. 3, 104:

    aliquem terra,

    Sil. 9, 95.—
    4. a.
    Of things: omnia noctis erant placida composta quiete, Varr. Atac. ap. Sen. Contr. 3, 16:

    cum mare compositum est,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 259:

    aquas,

    id. H. 13, 136:

    fessum tumentes Composuit pelagus ventis patientibus undas,

    Luc. 5, 702.—
    b.
    Of persons:

    nec vigilantibus, sed etiam quiete compositis,

    Quint. 11, 2, 5:

    ubi jam thalamis se conposuere,

    Verg. G. 4, 189:

    defessa membra,

    id. ib. 4, 438:

    si bene conpositus somno vinoque jacebit,

    Ov. Am. 1, 4, 53.—
    5.
    To end strife, confusion, etc., to compose, pacify, allay, settle, calm, appease, quiet, tranquillize, reconcile, etc., that which is disturbed or at variance.
    a.
    With personal object:

    aversos amicos,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 29:

    ceteros clementia,

    Tac. A. 12, 55:

    comitia praetorum,

    id. ib. 14, 28; id. H. 1, 85:

    juvenes concitatos,

    Quint. 1, 10, 32; cf.:

    barbarum animos,

    Tac. A. 14, 39:

    gentem,

    Sil. 17, 356.—Esp. of the mind:

    prima (pars philosophiae) conponit animum,

    Sen. Ep. 89, 9:

    argumentum conpositae mentis,

    id. ib. 2, 1; Cels. 3, 18; Sil. 11, 352:

    mentem somno,

    id. 3, 162:

    religio saevas componit mentis,

    id. 13, 317.—
    b.
    Of places, countries, etc.:

    C. Caesar componendae Armeniae deligitur,

    Tac. A. 2, 4:

    Campaniam,

    id. H. 4, 3:

    Daciam,

    id. ib. 3, 53.—
    c.
    With abstr. or indef. objects:

    si possum hoc inter vos conponere,

    Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 23; cf.:

    vides, inter nos sic haec potius cum bona Ut componamus gratia quam cum mala?

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 17:

    gaudens conponi foedere bellum,

    Verg. A. 12, 109; so,

    bellum,

    Sall. J. 97, 2; Nep. Hann. 6, 2; id. Alcib. 8, 3; Vell. 2, 25, 1; Asin. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 3:

    bella,

    Tac. A. 3, 56:

    cum vellet pro communi amico controversias regum componere,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 109:

    uti per colloquia omnes controversiae componantur,

    id. ib. 1, 9 fin.:

    curas,

    Verg. A. 4, 341; Sil. 12, 682:

    lites,

    Verg. E. 3, 108:

    seditionem civilem,

    Suet. Caes. 4:

    statum Orientis,

    id. Calig. 1:

    Romanus Ardeae turbatas seditione res... composuit,

    Liv. 4, 10, 6; 3, 53, 1:

    legatorum res et bello turbatas,

    id. 45, 16, 2:

    res Germanicas,

    Suet. Vit. 9:

    discordias,

    Tac. H. 4, 50:

    compositis praesentibus,

    id. A. 1, 45:

    odia et certamina,

    id. ib. 15, 2.—Less freq. transf., with the result as object:

    pacem componi volo Meo patri cum matre,

    Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 113:

    si pax cum Carthaginiensibus componi nequisset,

    Liv. 30, 40, 13:

    at me conposita pace fefellit Amor,

    Prop. 2, 2, 2:

    pax circa Brundusium composita,

    Vell. 2, 75, 3:

    pacem cum Pyrrho,

    Just. 18, 2, 6; cf. D. 2. infra.—
    d.
    Absol.:

    coheredes mei conponere et transigere cupiebant,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 1, 7; and so impers. pass.:

    posteaquam id quod maxime volui fieri non potuit, ut componeretur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    Pompei summam esse... voluntatem, ut componeretur atque ab armis discederetur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 16.—
    C. 1.
    In gen., to arrange, adjust, order, set in order:

    aulaeis se superbis Aurea sponda, of one's attitude on a couch,

    Verg. A. 1, 697:

    ad ictum militaris gladii conposita cervice,

    Sen. Cons. Marc. 26, 2:

    diductis aedificia angulis vidimus moveri iterumque conponi,

    id. Q. N. 6, 30, 4:

    si ad rem pertinet, quomodo caelo adfecto conpositisque sideribus quodque animal oriatur,

    Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98:

    tibi enim gratias agebat, quod signa componenda suscepisses,

    id. Att. 4, 9, 1.—
    2.
    Esp., milit. t. t.:

    se ad confligendum, Sisenn. ap. Non p. 257, 13: exercitum in hibernaculis, Sali J. 103, 1: in secunda (acie) cohortis, id. H. inc. Fragm. 44 Dietsch: stabant conpositi suis quisque ordinibus (opp. incompositi),

    Liv. 44, 38, 11:

    conpositi numero in turmas,

    Verg. A. 11, 599:

    cunctos licentia vagos compositus invadit = compositis ordinibus,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    agmen,

    id. ib. 2, 89; 5, 1; id. A. 12, 16:

    ordines,

    id. H. 4, 33:

    vagos paventesque Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. ib. 3, 35:

    pugnae exercitum,

    id. A. 13, 40:

    auxilia in numerum legionis,

    id. ib. 2, 80 Nipp. ad loc.:

    equitem per turmas,

    id. ib. 15, 29:

    insidias in montibus,

    Just. 1, 3, 11.—
    3.
    Of the order of words in language: quam lepide lexeis compostae! ut tesserulae omnes Arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato, Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; id. ap. Cic. Or. 44, 149; cf. id. ib. sq.:

    ut aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone,

    id. Brut. 17, 68.—
    4.
    With reference to orderly appearance, etc., of the clothing, hair; the expression of the countenance, etc., to lay, smooth, adjust:

    suon quisque loco'st? Vide capillum, satin compositu'st commode?

    Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 97:

    composito et delibuto capillo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 46, 135:

    comas,

    Ov. R. Am. 679:

    crines,

    Verg. G. 4, 417:

    ne turbarentur comae, quas componi, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 148:

    togam,

    to lay in proper folds, Hor. S. 2, 3, 77; Quint. 11, 3, 156; cf.:

    nec tamen ante adiit... Quam se composuit, quam circumspexit amictus,

    Ov. M. 4, 318:

    pulvinum facili manu,

    id. A. A. 1, 160; cf.

    torum,

    id. F. 3, 484:

    jam libet componere voltus,

    id. M. 13, 767:

    vultu composito, ne laeti excessu principis, etc.,

    Tac. A. 1, 7; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 5; cf.:

    (Tiberius) compositus ore,

    id. ib. 2, 34:

    vultum natura horridum... efferabat, componens ad speculum in omnem terrorem,

    distorting, Suet. Calig. 50.—
    5.
    In gen., to adjust, arrange, regulate, for the expression of something, or to accord with something; usu. ad aliquid:

    ad abstinentiam rursus, non secus ac modo ad balineum animum vultumque conposui,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 1, 6:

    orationis ipsius vultus ad id, quod efficere intendimus, compositus,

    Quint. 9, 1, 21:

    utraque manu ad modum aliquid portantium composita,

    id. 11, 3, 120:

    ge. stum oratoris ad similitudinem saltationis,

    id. 1, 11, 19:

    figuram ad imitationem alterius scripturae,

    id. 9, 2, 34:

    nec ad votum composita civitas,

    Tac. Or. 41:

    cuncta ad decorem inperi conposita,

    id. H. 1, 71:

    cunctis ad tristitiam conpositis,

    id. A. 3, 1. —Less freq. with dat.:

    voltus conponere famae Taedet,

    to adapt, Tib. 4, 7, 9:

    venturis carbasa ventis,

    Luc. 3, 596:

    me quoque mittendis rectum componite telis,

    id. 3, 717. —With in:

    Nero itinera urbis... veste servili in dissimulationem sui compositus pererrabat,

    disguised, made up, Tac. A. 13, 25. —
    D. (α).
    With acc.:

    ego itinera sic composueram, ut Nonis Quinctilibus Puteolis essem,

    Cic. Att. 15, 26, 3:

    quod adest memento Componere aequus,

    Hor. C. 3, 29, 33:

    conposita atque constituta re publica,

    Cic. Leg. 3, 18, 42:

    necdum compositis maturisve satis consiliis,

    Liv. 4, 13, 5:

    (diem) totum in consideranda causa componendaque posuisse,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 87:

    tempus in cognoscendis componendisque causis consumere,

    id. Or. 42, 143:

    ex sententia omnibus rebus paratis conpositisque,

    Sall. J. 43, 5; 94, 1:

    in senatu cuncta longis aliorum principatibus composita statim decernuntur,

    Tac. H. 2, 55:

    dum quae forent firmando Neronis imperio componuntur,

    id. A. 12, 68.—
    (β).
    With ad or in and acc. of the purpose for which, or the example according to which, etc.:

    cum alteri placeat auspicia ista ad utilitatem esse rei publicae conposita,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 32:

    omnia ad voluptatem multitudinis inperitae,

    Quint. 10, 1, 43:

    animum ad omnes casus,

    id. 12, 9, 20; Val. Fl. 1, 321:

    satis igitur in hoc nos componet multa scribendi exercitatio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 114:

    cultum victumque non ad nova exempla conponere, sed ut majorum mores suadent,

    Sen. Tranq. 9, 2. —
    2. (α).
    In gen.: eum allegaverunt, suom qui servom diceret Cum auro esse apud me: conposita est fallacia, [p. 393] Ut, etc., Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 29:

    quin jam virginem Despondi: res composita'st,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 17:

    ita causa componitur, ut item palaestritae Bidini peterent ab Epicrate hereditatem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 22, § 54:

    societatem praedarum cum latronibus conposuisse,

    Sall. H. 4, 11 Dietsch:

    crimen ab inimicis Romae conpositum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 61, § 141:

    conpositis inter se rebus,

    Sall. J. 66, 2:

    ita conposito dolo digrediuntur,

    id. ib. 111, 4:

    conposito jam consilio,

    Liv. 3, 53, 3: ceteri proditores ea quae composita erant exspectabant;

    convenerat autem, etc.,

    id. 25, 9, 8:

    sub noctem susurri Composita repetantur hora,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 20:

    ictum jam foedus, et omnes Conpositae leges,

    Verg. A. 12, 315:

    compositis notis,

    Tib. 1, 2, 22:

    crimen ac dolum ultro,

    Tac. H. 1, 34:

    proditionem,

    id. ib. 2, 100:

    seditionem,

    id. ib. 4, 14:

    insidias,

    id. ib. 5, 22; id. A. 12, 54; 13, 47: pacem componere, v. B. 5. supra.—
    (β).
    With rel.-clause:

    cum summa concordia, quos dimitterent, quos retinerent, composuerunt,

    Liv. 40, 40, 14.—
    (γ).
    With inf.:

    ii, secretis conloquiis conponunt Gallos concire,

    Tac. A. 3, 40.—
    (δ).
    Pass. impers.:

    ut domi compositum cum Marcio erat,

    Liv. 2, 37, 1.—
    (ε).
    With ut and subj.:

    compositum inter ipsos ut Latiaris strueret dolum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68; cf. P. a. subst.
    3.
    In gen., to feign, invent, devise, contrive, in order to deceive or delude, etc.: composita dicta, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 22 (Trag. Rel. v. 47 Rib.):

    ne tu istic hodie malo tuo conpositis mendaciis Advenisti,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 211:

    nec bene mendaci risus conponitur ore,

    Tib. 3, 6, 35 (3, 7, 3):

    sed vobis facile'st verba et conponere fraudes,

    Prop. 2, 9, 31:

    insidias in me conponis inanes,

    id. 2, 32 (3, 30), 19:

    compositas insidias fatoque evitatas ementitur,

    Tac. A. 13, 47:

    si haec fabulosa et composita videntur,

    id. Or. 12; id. Agr. 40:

    quae ut augendae famae composita, sic reliqua non in obscuro habentur,

    id. A. 15, 16; cf.:

    vetustatem, ut cetera, in majus conponentem altores Jovis celebravisse,

    exaggerating, Sall. H. 3, 60 Dietsch.— Part. perf. with in and acc., pretending, assuming the appearance or expression:

    (Domitianus) paratus simulatione, in adrogantiam compositus audiit preces,

    Tac. Agr. 42:

    is in maestitiam compositus,

    id. H. 2, 9; 1, 54:

    in securitatem,

    id. A. 3, 44.—Rarely with ad:

    tunc compositus ad maestitiam,

    Tac. A. 13, 20.— Hence, P. a.: compŏsĭtus ( - postus), a, um.
    A.
    Well-arranged, ordered, or constituted, orderly, regular:

    quae (injuria) dum foris sunt, nil videtur mundius, Nec magis compositum quicquam nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 13: admiratus sum... sunchusin litterularum, quae solent tuae compositissimae et clarissimae esse, Cic. Att. 6, 9, 1:

    acrior impetu atque animis quam compositior ullo ordine pugna fuit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 13:

    intellegitur, etiamsi non adjecero, conpositum ordinatumque fore talem virum,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 8, 3:

    composita et quieta et beata respublica,

    Tac. Or. 36. —Of writings:

    quare in his quoque libris erant eadem aliqua... omnia vero compositiora et elaborata,

    Quint. 1, pr. § 8; cf.:

    illa quae curam fatentur et ficta atque composita videri etiam volunt,

    elaborate, id. 8, pr. § 23.— Transf., of the orator himself:

    si aut compositi oratoris bene structam collocationem dissolvas permutatione verborum,

    Cic. Or. 70, 232.—
    B.
    Fitly disposed for any purpose, prepared, apt, fit, adapted, qualified, suitable, ready:

    perficiam ut nemo umquam paratior, vigilantior, compositior ad judicium venisse videatur,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 1, 11; so,

    equus bene natura compositus,

    Auct. Her. 4, 46, 59.— With ad or in and acc., or with dat.:

    arte quadam ab juventa in ostentationem (virtutum) compositus,

    Liv. 26, 19, 3 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    alius historiae magis idoneus, alius compositus ad carmen,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7:

    aeque in adulationem compositus (sacerdos),

    Curt. 4, 7, 26:

    (Attici) non maxime ad risum compositi,

    Quint. 6, 3, 18:

    natura atque arte compositus alliciendis etiam Muciani moribus,

    Tac. H. 2, 5.—
    C.
    Quiet, peaceful, undisturbed, calm, composed, unimpassioned, etc.:

    ut peractis quae agenda fuerint salvo jam et composito die possis ibi manere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 2:

    lenis et nitidi et compositi generis amatores,

    Quint. 10, 1, 44:

    actio,

    id. 11, 3, 110:

    aetas,

    mature, sedate, Tac. A. 13, 1: adfectus mites atque compositi, Quint. 6, 2, 9:

    supercilium (opp. erectum),

    id. 11, 3, 74:

    repetitio eorum (civium) labefactabat compositam civitatem,

    Flor. 3, 23, 3.—
    D.
    Compound, composite, made up of parts (opp. simplex):

    verba,

    Quint. 1, 5, 3; 1, 6, 38; 7, 9, 5:

    voces,

    id. 1, 5, 65; cf. id. 1, 5, 9; 2, 12, 3.—Hence, subst.: compŏsĭtum ( conp-), i, n., that which is agreed, an agreement, compact, etc.; only abl. in the phrases,
    (α).
    Ex composito, according to agreement, by agreement, in concert, Sall. H. 2, 12 Dietsch:

    tum ex composito orta vis,

    Liv. 1, 9, 10; 5, 14, 2; 36, 25, 1; 40, 48, 4; Suet. Claud. 37; Tac. H. 4, 66.—
    (β).
    De composito, by agreement, App. Mag. 1, p. 273; and,
    (γ).
    More rarely in the same sense, composito alone, Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 29; Nep. Dat. 6, 6; Verg. A. 2, 129.—Hence also adv.: compŏsĭtē ( conp-), in an orderly, regular, or skilful manner, orderly, regularly, properly (class. but rare;

    not in Quint.): ambulare,

    Col. 6, 2, 5:

    indutus,

    Gell. 1, 5, 2:

    composite et apte dicere,

    Cic. Or. 71, 236:

    composite, ornate, copiose eloqui,

    id. De Or. 1, 11, 48:

    composite atque magnifice casum reipublicae miserati,

    Sall. C. 51, 9:

    bene et composite disseruit,

    id. Ib. 52.— Comp.:

    compositius cuncta quam festinantius agerent,

    Tac. A. 15, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > compositum

  • 8 conpono

    com-pōno ( conp-), posui (COMPOSEIVERVNT, C. I. L. 1, 199, 2), positum (compostus, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21 Lorenz; Verg. A. 1, 249; Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; Varr ap. Sen. Ep. 56, 6), 3, v. a., to put, place, lay, bring or set together, to unite, join, connect, collect, aggregate, compose, to order, arrange, adjust, etc. (class. and very freq.).
    I.
    In gen., of different objects.
    A. 1.
    Of things in gen.:

    aridum lignum,

    Hor. C. 3, 17, 14:

    composita fronde,

    Prop. 1, 20, 22:

    uvas in tecto in cratibus,

    Cato, R. R. 112, 2:

    in quo (loco) erant ea conposita, quibus rex te numerare constituerat,

    Cic. Deiot. 6, 17:

    (amomum) manipulatim leniter componitur,

    Plin. 12, 13, 28, § 48:

    amphoras in culleum,

    Cato, R. R. 113, 2:

    ligna in caminum,

    id. ib. 37, 5.—
    b.
    To bring into contact, fit together, join:

    quid... in operibus manu factis tam compositum tamque compactum et coagmentatum inveniri potest?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 74: cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis conpono, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 260, 28:

    tum latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus,

    id. ib. p. 260, 30:

    conponens manibusque manus atque ori bus ora,

    Verg. A. 8, 486:

    Mercurio Sais fertur Virgineum conposuisse latus,

    Prop. 2, 2, 12; cf.

    caput,

    Tib. 1, 5, 8.—Hence, of broken limbs, etc., med. t. t., to set:

    ossa,

    Cels. 8, 10, 2:

    jugulum,

    id. 8, 8, 8 et saep.—
    c.
    Esp., to pack up for a journey, etc.:

    omnia composta sunt quae donavi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21:

    i ergo intro et compone quae tecum simul Ferantur,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 5:

    dum tota domus raeda componitur una,

    Juv. 3, 10.—
    2.
    Of persons:

    is (Saturnus) genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis Composuit,

    Verg. A. 8, 322:

    et tabula una duos poterit componere amantes,

    Prop. 2, 26, 33 (3, 22, 13); cf. II. C. 5. infra.—
    B.
    To set in opposition.
    1.
    To bring together in hostility, to oppose, to couple, pair, match in combat (cf. compositio, III.); esp. of gladiators, etc.: Samnis, spurcus homo, cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo Post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus, Lucil. Sat. ap. Non. p. 257, 18; cf. Cic. Opt. Gen. 6, 17:

    Rupili et Persi par pugnat, uti non Compositum melius cum Bitho Bacchius,

    Hor. S. 1, 7, 20 Orell. ad loc.:

    staturam habere Threcis cum Threce conpositi,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, praef. 8;

    and in gen.: si quis casus duos inter se bonos viros composuerit,

    Quint. 2, 17, 34:

    cuive virum mallem memet componere,

    Sil. 10, 70:

    componimur Vecordi Decio,

    id. 11, 212:

    hunc fatis,

    id. 1, 39:

    cum ventis, pelagique furentibus undis Composuit mortale genus,

    Luc. 3, 196;

    and fig.: pergis pugnantia secum Frontibus adversis componere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 103:

    ecce par deo dignum, vir fortis cum fortuna mala conpositus,

    Sen. Prov. 1, 2, 9:

    non illa (rhetorice) secum ipsa componitur,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33;

    and of a judicial contest: accita Epicharis et cum indice composita,

    confronted, Tac. A. 15, 51; 16, 10.—
    2.
    To oppose by way of comparison, to compare, contrast.
    (α).
    With acc. and dat.: quid est, cur componere ausis mihi te aut me tibi? Att. ap. Non. p. 257, 15 (Trag. Rel. v. 147 Rib.):

    nec divis homines componier aequom'st,

    Cat. 68, 141: composita dicta evolvunt, Quae cum componas, dicta factis discrepant, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 21 (Trag. Rel. v. 48 Rib.):

    si parva licet conponere magnis,

    Verg. G. 4, 176:

    parvis conponere magna solebam,

    id. E. 1, 23; Ov. M. 5, [p. 392] 416:

    audes cladi componere nostrae, Nympha, tuam?

    id. ib. 15, 530:

    divinis humana,

    Aus. Ecl. 1, 10.—
    (β).
    With acc. and cum:

    ubi Metelli dicta cum factis conposuit,

    Sall. J. 48, 1: causam suam cum causa adversarii. Quint. 7, 2, 22.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Of the parts of a whole, or of a whole as made up of parts.
    1. (α).
    With ex:

    exercitus ejus conpositus ex variis gentibus,

    Sall. J. 18, 3:

    genus humanum ex corpore et anima conpositum,

    id. ib. 2, 1:

    liber ex alienis orationibus compositus,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 14, 47:

    antidoton... ex multis atque interim contrariis quoque inter se effectibus,

    Quint. 1, 10, 6:

    ex quo (umore) componi debet (medicamentum),

    Cels. 6, 7, 1 fin.
    (β).
    With abl.:

    mensam gramine,

    Sil. 15, 51.—
    (γ).
    With acc. alone:

    medicamentum,

    Col. 6, 4, 1; Scrib. Comp. 10.—
    2.
    Esp., of buildings, etc., to construct, build:

    qui cuncta conposuit,

    i. e. the Creator, Cic. Univ. 13:

    urbem,

    Verg. A. 3, 387:

    illa (templa) deis,

    Ov. F. 1, 708 Burm. ad loc.:

    aggere conposito tumuli,

    Verg. A. 7, 6:

    deletas Thebas,

    Prop. 2, 6, 5.—
    3.
    Of words, to compound:

    vitilitigatores ex vitiis et litigatoribus, Plin. praef. § 32: verba composita (opp. simplicia),

    Quint. 1, 5, 3.—
    4.
    Of writings, speeches, etc.
    a.
    To compose, write, construct (very freq.):

    leges,

    Lucr. 4, 966:

    compone hoc, quod postulo, de argento: de reliquo videro,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16, § 36:

    quartum librum,

    id. de Or. 2, 55, 224:

    libros,

    id. Fam. 16, 20; Plin. Ep. 9, 9, 1:

    libellos,

    Quint. 12, 8, 5:

    actiones,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 8; Quint. 11, 3, 68:

    argumentum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 4, 3:

    edictum eis verbis,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 45, § 116:

    edictum eorum arbitratu,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 46, §

    119: artes,

    books of instruction, id. Brut. 12, 48; id. Ac. 2, 13, 40:

    artificium,

    id. de Or. 2, 19, 83:

    commentarium consulatus mei,

    id. Att. 1, 19, 10; Quint. 1, 8, 19:

    quarum (litterarum) exemplum,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    quandam disciplinae formulam,

    id. Ac. 1, 4, 17:

    stipulationum et judiciorum formulas,

    id. Leg. 1, 4, 14:

    interdictum,

    id. Caecin. 21, 59:

    poema,

    id. ad Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4; cf. Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 77; Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 60:

    senatus consultum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 22, 2:

    testimonium,

    id. Att. 15, 15, 1:

    verba ad religionem deorum immortalium,

    id. Dom. 47, 124:

    de judicialibus causis aliqua,

    Quint. 3, 6, 104:

    aliquid de ratione dicendi, id. prooem. 1: quae de ortu vitaque Scapulae composita erant,

    Tac. A. 16, 14:

    Apion... inmortalitate donari a se scripsit ad quos aliqua conponebat, Plin. praef. § 25: carmen,

    Cic. Mur. 12, 26:

    carmina,

    Tac. Or. 12; id. A. 3, 49:

    epistulas,

    id. ib. 2, 70:

    litteras nomine Marcelli,

    Liv. 27, 28, 4; Tac. A. 11, 20:

    orationem habere ad conciliandos plebis animos conpositam,

    Liv. 1, 35, 2:

    blanditias tremula voce,

    Tib. 1, 2, 91:

    meditata manu verba trementi,

    Ov. M. 9, 521:

    versus,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 8:

    mollem versum,

    Prop. 1, 7, 19:

    cantus,

    Tib. 1, 2, 53:

    in morem annalium,

    Tac. Or. 22:

    orationes adversus aliquem,

    id. ib. 37:

    litteras ad aliquem,

    id. A. 15, 8; 14, 22:

    probra in Gaium,

    id. ib. 6, 9;

    14, 50: multa et atrocia in Macronem,

    id. ib. 6, 44 (38) et saep.—
    b.
    Transf., of the subjects, etc., treated, to write about, treat, celebrate:

    tuas laudes,

    Tib. 4, 1, 35:

    res gestas,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 251:

    tempora Iliaca,

    Vell. 1, 3, 2:

    bellum Troicum,

    id. 1, 5, 3:

    Juli Africani vitam componendo, spem hominibus fecisti plurium ejus modi librorum,

    Tac. Or. 14:

    veteres populi Romani res,

    id. A. 4, 32:

    Neronis res,

    id. ib. 1, 1; 11, 11.—
    B.
    From the notion of closing.
    1.
    To put away, put aside, put in place:

    armamentis conplicandis, conponendis studuimus,

    i. e. folding up the sails and lowering the masts, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 80:

    (tempus) ad componenda armamenta expediendumque remigem,

    Liv. 26, 39, 8:

    vela contrahit malosque inclinat et simul armamenta componens, etc.,

    id. 36, 44, 2:

    arma,

    Hor. C. 4, 14, 52:

    tristes istos conpone libellos,

    put aside, Prop. 1, 9, 13.—
    2.
    To store up, put away, collect:

    nec... Aut conponere opes norant aut parcere parto,

    Verg. A. 8, 317:

    ego conposito securus acervo Despiciam dites,

    Tib. 1, 1, 77;

    so fig.: condo et compono quae mox depromere possim,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 12.— So esp. to preserve, pack, put up fruits, meat, etc., for future use:

    pernas,

    Cato, R. R. 162, 12:

    tergora (suis),

    Col. 12, 55, 2: siccatos coliculos, id. 12, 9, 1:

    caepam in fidelia,

    id. 12, 10, 2:

    herbas,

    id. 12, 13, 2:

    poma,

    id. 12, 47, 5:

    olivas,

    Pall. Nov. 22, 5:

    herbam olla nova,

    Scrib. Comp. 60:

    faenum,

    Dig. 19, 2, 11, § 4:

    fructus in urceis, capsellis,

    ib. 33, 7, 12, §1.—
    3.
    Of the ashes or remains of the dead, to adjust, lay out, to collect and inurn, inter, bury:

    tu mea conpones et dices, ossa, Properti, Haec tua sunt,

    Prop. 2, 24, 35 (3, 19, 19):

    cinerem,

    Ov. F. 3, 547:

    cinerem ossaque,

    Val. Fl. 7, 203:

    sic ego conponi versus in ossa velim,

    Tib. 3, 2, 26.—Hence, in gen., of persons, to bury:

    quem... prope cognatos conpositum cineres,

    Cat. 68, 98:

    omnes composui (meos),

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 28:

    compositi busta avi,

    Ov. F. 5, 426:

    Pisonem Verania uxor... T. Vinium Crispina filia composuere,

    Tac. H. 1, 47:

    componi tumulo eodem,

    Ov. M. 4, 157:

    toro Mortua componar,

    id. ib. 9, 504:

    alto Conpositus lecto,

    Pers. 3, 104:

    aliquem terra,

    Sil. 9, 95.—
    4. a.
    Of things: omnia noctis erant placida composta quiete, Varr. Atac. ap. Sen. Contr. 3, 16:

    cum mare compositum est,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 259:

    aquas,

    id. H. 13, 136:

    fessum tumentes Composuit pelagus ventis patientibus undas,

    Luc. 5, 702.—
    b.
    Of persons:

    nec vigilantibus, sed etiam quiete compositis,

    Quint. 11, 2, 5:

    ubi jam thalamis se conposuere,

    Verg. G. 4, 189:

    defessa membra,

    id. ib. 4, 438:

    si bene conpositus somno vinoque jacebit,

    Ov. Am. 1, 4, 53.—
    5.
    To end strife, confusion, etc., to compose, pacify, allay, settle, calm, appease, quiet, tranquillize, reconcile, etc., that which is disturbed or at variance.
    a.
    With personal object:

    aversos amicos,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 29:

    ceteros clementia,

    Tac. A. 12, 55:

    comitia praetorum,

    id. ib. 14, 28; id. H. 1, 85:

    juvenes concitatos,

    Quint. 1, 10, 32; cf.:

    barbarum animos,

    Tac. A. 14, 39:

    gentem,

    Sil. 17, 356.—Esp. of the mind:

    prima (pars philosophiae) conponit animum,

    Sen. Ep. 89, 9:

    argumentum conpositae mentis,

    id. ib. 2, 1; Cels. 3, 18; Sil. 11, 352:

    mentem somno,

    id. 3, 162:

    religio saevas componit mentis,

    id. 13, 317.—
    b.
    Of places, countries, etc.:

    C. Caesar componendae Armeniae deligitur,

    Tac. A. 2, 4:

    Campaniam,

    id. H. 4, 3:

    Daciam,

    id. ib. 3, 53.—
    c.
    With abstr. or indef. objects:

    si possum hoc inter vos conponere,

    Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 23; cf.:

    vides, inter nos sic haec potius cum bona Ut componamus gratia quam cum mala?

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 17:

    gaudens conponi foedere bellum,

    Verg. A. 12, 109; so,

    bellum,

    Sall. J. 97, 2; Nep. Hann. 6, 2; id. Alcib. 8, 3; Vell. 2, 25, 1; Asin. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 3:

    bella,

    Tac. A. 3, 56:

    cum vellet pro communi amico controversias regum componere,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 109:

    uti per colloquia omnes controversiae componantur,

    id. ib. 1, 9 fin.:

    curas,

    Verg. A. 4, 341; Sil. 12, 682:

    lites,

    Verg. E. 3, 108:

    seditionem civilem,

    Suet. Caes. 4:

    statum Orientis,

    id. Calig. 1:

    Romanus Ardeae turbatas seditione res... composuit,

    Liv. 4, 10, 6; 3, 53, 1:

    legatorum res et bello turbatas,

    id. 45, 16, 2:

    res Germanicas,

    Suet. Vit. 9:

    discordias,

    Tac. H. 4, 50:

    compositis praesentibus,

    id. A. 1, 45:

    odia et certamina,

    id. ib. 15, 2.—Less freq. transf., with the result as object:

    pacem componi volo Meo patri cum matre,

    Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 113:

    si pax cum Carthaginiensibus componi nequisset,

    Liv. 30, 40, 13:

    at me conposita pace fefellit Amor,

    Prop. 2, 2, 2:

    pax circa Brundusium composita,

    Vell. 2, 75, 3:

    pacem cum Pyrrho,

    Just. 18, 2, 6; cf. D. 2. infra.—
    d.
    Absol.:

    coheredes mei conponere et transigere cupiebant,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 1, 7; and so impers. pass.:

    posteaquam id quod maxime volui fieri non potuit, ut componeretur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    Pompei summam esse... voluntatem, ut componeretur atque ab armis discederetur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 16.—
    C. 1.
    In gen., to arrange, adjust, order, set in order:

    aulaeis se superbis Aurea sponda, of one's attitude on a couch,

    Verg. A. 1, 697:

    ad ictum militaris gladii conposita cervice,

    Sen. Cons. Marc. 26, 2:

    diductis aedificia angulis vidimus moveri iterumque conponi,

    id. Q. N. 6, 30, 4:

    si ad rem pertinet, quomodo caelo adfecto conpositisque sideribus quodque animal oriatur,

    Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98:

    tibi enim gratias agebat, quod signa componenda suscepisses,

    id. Att. 4, 9, 1.—
    2.
    Esp., milit. t. t.:

    se ad confligendum, Sisenn. ap. Non p. 257, 13: exercitum in hibernaculis, Sali J. 103, 1: in secunda (acie) cohortis, id. H. inc. Fragm. 44 Dietsch: stabant conpositi suis quisque ordinibus (opp. incompositi),

    Liv. 44, 38, 11:

    conpositi numero in turmas,

    Verg. A. 11, 599:

    cunctos licentia vagos compositus invadit = compositis ordinibus,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    agmen,

    id. ib. 2, 89; 5, 1; id. A. 12, 16:

    ordines,

    id. H. 4, 33:

    vagos paventesque Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. ib. 3, 35:

    pugnae exercitum,

    id. A. 13, 40:

    auxilia in numerum legionis,

    id. ib. 2, 80 Nipp. ad loc.:

    equitem per turmas,

    id. ib. 15, 29:

    insidias in montibus,

    Just. 1, 3, 11.—
    3.
    Of the order of words in language: quam lepide lexeis compostae! ut tesserulae omnes Arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato, Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; id. ap. Cic. Or. 44, 149; cf. id. ib. sq.:

    ut aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone,

    id. Brut. 17, 68.—
    4.
    With reference to orderly appearance, etc., of the clothing, hair; the expression of the countenance, etc., to lay, smooth, adjust:

    suon quisque loco'st? Vide capillum, satin compositu'st commode?

    Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 97:

    composito et delibuto capillo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 46, 135:

    comas,

    Ov. R. Am. 679:

    crines,

    Verg. G. 4, 417:

    ne turbarentur comae, quas componi, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 148:

    togam,

    to lay in proper folds, Hor. S. 2, 3, 77; Quint. 11, 3, 156; cf.:

    nec tamen ante adiit... Quam se composuit, quam circumspexit amictus,

    Ov. M. 4, 318:

    pulvinum facili manu,

    id. A. A. 1, 160; cf.

    torum,

    id. F. 3, 484:

    jam libet componere voltus,

    id. M. 13, 767:

    vultu composito, ne laeti excessu principis, etc.,

    Tac. A. 1, 7; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 5; cf.:

    (Tiberius) compositus ore,

    id. ib. 2, 34:

    vultum natura horridum... efferabat, componens ad speculum in omnem terrorem,

    distorting, Suet. Calig. 50.—
    5.
    In gen., to adjust, arrange, regulate, for the expression of something, or to accord with something; usu. ad aliquid:

    ad abstinentiam rursus, non secus ac modo ad balineum animum vultumque conposui,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 1, 6:

    orationis ipsius vultus ad id, quod efficere intendimus, compositus,

    Quint. 9, 1, 21:

    utraque manu ad modum aliquid portantium composita,

    id. 11, 3, 120:

    ge. stum oratoris ad similitudinem saltationis,

    id. 1, 11, 19:

    figuram ad imitationem alterius scripturae,

    id. 9, 2, 34:

    nec ad votum composita civitas,

    Tac. Or. 41:

    cuncta ad decorem inperi conposita,

    id. H. 1, 71:

    cunctis ad tristitiam conpositis,

    id. A. 3, 1. —Less freq. with dat.:

    voltus conponere famae Taedet,

    to adapt, Tib. 4, 7, 9:

    venturis carbasa ventis,

    Luc. 3, 596:

    me quoque mittendis rectum componite telis,

    id. 3, 717. —With in:

    Nero itinera urbis... veste servili in dissimulationem sui compositus pererrabat,

    disguised, made up, Tac. A. 13, 25. —
    D. (α).
    With acc.:

    ego itinera sic composueram, ut Nonis Quinctilibus Puteolis essem,

    Cic. Att. 15, 26, 3:

    quod adest memento Componere aequus,

    Hor. C. 3, 29, 33:

    conposita atque constituta re publica,

    Cic. Leg. 3, 18, 42:

    necdum compositis maturisve satis consiliis,

    Liv. 4, 13, 5:

    (diem) totum in consideranda causa componendaque posuisse,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 87:

    tempus in cognoscendis componendisque causis consumere,

    id. Or. 42, 143:

    ex sententia omnibus rebus paratis conpositisque,

    Sall. J. 43, 5; 94, 1:

    in senatu cuncta longis aliorum principatibus composita statim decernuntur,

    Tac. H. 2, 55:

    dum quae forent firmando Neronis imperio componuntur,

    id. A. 12, 68.—
    (β).
    With ad or in and acc. of the purpose for which, or the example according to which, etc.:

    cum alteri placeat auspicia ista ad utilitatem esse rei publicae conposita,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 32:

    omnia ad voluptatem multitudinis inperitae,

    Quint. 10, 1, 43:

    animum ad omnes casus,

    id. 12, 9, 20; Val. Fl. 1, 321:

    satis igitur in hoc nos componet multa scribendi exercitatio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 114:

    cultum victumque non ad nova exempla conponere, sed ut majorum mores suadent,

    Sen. Tranq. 9, 2. —
    2. (α).
    In gen.: eum allegaverunt, suom qui servom diceret Cum auro esse apud me: conposita est fallacia, [p. 393] Ut, etc., Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 29:

    quin jam virginem Despondi: res composita'st,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 17:

    ita causa componitur, ut item palaestritae Bidini peterent ab Epicrate hereditatem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 22, § 54:

    societatem praedarum cum latronibus conposuisse,

    Sall. H. 4, 11 Dietsch:

    crimen ab inimicis Romae conpositum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 61, § 141:

    conpositis inter se rebus,

    Sall. J. 66, 2:

    ita conposito dolo digrediuntur,

    id. ib. 111, 4:

    conposito jam consilio,

    Liv. 3, 53, 3: ceteri proditores ea quae composita erant exspectabant;

    convenerat autem, etc.,

    id. 25, 9, 8:

    sub noctem susurri Composita repetantur hora,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 20:

    ictum jam foedus, et omnes Conpositae leges,

    Verg. A. 12, 315:

    compositis notis,

    Tib. 1, 2, 22:

    crimen ac dolum ultro,

    Tac. H. 1, 34:

    proditionem,

    id. ib. 2, 100:

    seditionem,

    id. ib. 4, 14:

    insidias,

    id. ib. 5, 22; id. A. 12, 54; 13, 47: pacem componere, v. B. 5. supra.—
    (β).
    With rel.-clause:

    cum summa concordia, quos dimitterent, quos retinerent, composuerunt,

    Liv. 40, 40, 14.—
    (γ).
    With inf.:

    ii, secretis conloquiis conponunt Gallos concire,

    Tac. A. 3, 40.—
    (δ).
    Pass. impers.:

    ut domi compositum cum Marcio erat,

    Liv. 2, 37, 1.—
    (ε).
    With ut and subj.:

    compositum inter ipsos ut Latiaris strueret dolum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68; cf. P. a. subst.
    3.
    In gen., to feign, invent, devise, contrive, in order to deceive or delude, etc.: composita dicta, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 22 (Trag. Rel. v. 47 Rib.):

    ne tu istic hodie malo tuo conpositis mendaciis Advenisti,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 211:

    nec bene mendaci risus conponitur ore,

    Tib. 3, 6, 35 (3, 7, 3):

    sed vobis facile'st verba et conponere fraudes,

    Prop. 2, 9, 31:

    insidias in me conponis inanes,

    id. 2, 32 (3, 30), 19:

    compositas insidias fatoque evitatas ementitur,

    Tac. A. 13, 47:

    si haec fabulosa et composita videntur,

    id. Or. 12; id. Agr. 40:

    quae ut augendae famae composita, sic reliqua non in obscuro habentur,

    id. A. 15, 16; cf.:

    vetustatem, ut cetera, in majus conponentem altores Jovis celebravisse,

    exaggerating, Sall. H. 3, 60 Dietsch.— Part. perf. with in and acc., pretending, assuming the appearance or expression:

    (Domitianus) paratus simulatione, in adrogantiam compositus audiit preces,

    Tac. Agr. 42:

    is in maestitiam compositus,

    id. H. 2, 9; 1, 54:

    in securitatem,

    id. A. 3, 44.—Rarely with ad:

    tunc compositus ad maestitiam,

    Tac. A. 13, 20.— Hence, P. a.: compŏsĭtus ( - postus), a, um.
    A.
    Well-arranged, ordered, or constituted, orderly, regular:

    quae (injuria) dum foris sunt, nil videtur mundius, Nec magis compositum quicquam nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 13: admiratus sum... sunchusin litterularum, quae solent tuae compositissimae et clarissimae esse, Cic. Att. 6, 9, 1:

    acrior impetu atque animis quam compositior ullo ordine pugna fuit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 13:

    intellegitur, etiamsi non adjecero, conpositum ordinatumque fore talem virum,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 8, 3:

    composita et quieta et beata respublica,

    Tac. Or. 36. —Of writings:

    quare in his quoque libris erant eadem aliqua... omnia vero compositiora et elaborata,

    Quint. 1, pr. § 8; cf.:

    illa quae curam fatentur et ficta atque composita videri etiam volunt,

    elaborate, id. 8, pr. § 23.— Transf., of the orator himself:

    si aut compositi oratoris bene structam collocationem dissolvas permutatione verborum,

    Cic. Or. 70, 232.—
    B.
    Fitly disposed for any purpose, prepared, apt, fit, adapted, qualified, suitable, ready:

    perficiam ut nemo umquam paratior, vigilantior, compositior ad judicium venisse videatur,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 1, 11; so,

    equus bene natura compositus,

    Auct. Her. 4, 46, 59.— With ad or in and acc., or with dat.:

    arte quadam ab juventa in ostentationem (virtutum) compositus,

    Liv. 26, 19, 3 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    alius historiae magis idoneus, alius compositus ad carmen,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7:

    aeque in adulationem compositus (sacerdos),

    Curt. 4, 7, 26:

    (Attici) non maxime ad risum compositi,

    Quint. 6, 3, 18:

    natura atque arte compositus alliciendis etiam Muciani moribus,

    Tac. H. 2, 5.—
    C.
    Quiet, peaceful, undisturbed, calm, composed, unimpassioned, etc.:

    ut peractis quae agenda fuerint salvo jam et composito die possis ibi manere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 2:

    lenis et nitidi et compositi generis amatores,

    Quint. 10, 1, 44:

    actio,

    id. 11, 3, 110:

    aetas,

    mature, sedate, Tac. A. 13, 1: adfectus mites atque compositi, Quint. 6, 2, 9:

    supercilium (opp. erectum),

    id. 11, 3, 74:

    repetitio eorum (civium) labefactabat compositam civitatem,

    Flor. 3, 23, 3.—
    D.
    Compound, composite, made up of parts (opp. simplex):

    verba,

    Quint. 1, 5, 3; 1, 6, 38; 7, 9, 5:

    voces,

    id. 1, 5, 65; cf. id. 1, 5, 9; 2, 12, 3.—Hence, subst.: compŏsĭtum ( conp-), i, n., that which is agreed, an agreement, compact, etc.; only abl. in the phrases,
    (α).
    Ex composito, according to agreement, by agreement, in concert, Sall. H. 2, 12 Dietsch:

    tum ex composito orta vis,

    Liv. 1, 9, 10; 5, 14, 2; 36, 25, 1; 40, 48, 4; Suet. Claud. 37; Tac. H. 4, 66.—
    (β).
    De composito, by agreement, App. Mag. 1, p. 273; and,
    (γ).
    More rarely in the same sense, composito alone, Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 29; Nep. Dat. 6, 6; Verg. A. 2, 129.—Hence also adv.: compŏsĭtē ( conp-), in an orderly, regular, or skilful manner, orderly, regularly, properly (class. but rare;

    not in Quint.): ambulare,

    Col. 6, 2, 5:

    indutus,

    Gell. 1, 5, 2:

    composite et apte dicere,

    Cic. Or. 71, 236:

    composite, ornate, copiose eloqui,

    id. De Or. 1, 11, 48:

    composite atque magnifice casum reipublicae miserati,

    Sall. C. 51, 9:

    bene et composite disseruit,

    id. Ib. 52.— Comp.:

    compositius cuncta quam festinantius agerent,

    Tac. A. 15, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > conpono

  • 9 conposite

    com-pōno ( conp-), posui (COMPOSEIVERVNT, C. I. L. 1, 199, 2), positum (compostus, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21 Lorenz; Verg. A. 1, 249; Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; Varr ap. Sen. Ep. 56, 6), 3, v. a., to put, place, lay, bring or set together, to unite, join, connect, collect, aggregate, compose, to order, arrange, adjust, etc. (class. and very freq.).
    I.
    In gen., of different objects.
    A. 1.
    Of things in gen.:

    aridum lignum,

    Hor. C. 3, 17, 14:

    composita fronde,

    Prop. 1, 20, 22:

    uvas in tecto in cratibus,

    Cato, R. R. 112, 2:

    in quo (loco) erant ea conposita, quibus rex te numerare constituerat,

    Cic. Deiot. 6, 17:

    (amomum) manipulatim leniter componitur,

    Plin. 12, 13, 28, § 48:

    amphoras in culleum,

    Cato, R. R. 113, 2:

    ligna in caminum,

    id. ib. 37, 5.—
    b.
    To bring into contact, fit together, join:

    quid... in operibus manu factis tam compositum tamque compactum et coagmentatum inveniri potest?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 74: cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis conpono, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 260, 28:

    tum latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus,

    id. ib. p. 260, 30:

    conponens manibusque manus atque ori bus ora,

    Verg. A. 8, 486:

    Mercurio Sais fertur Virgineum conposuisse latus,

    Prop. 2, 2, 12; cf.

    caput,

    Tib. 1, 5, 8.—Hence, of broken limbs, etc., med. t. t., to set:

    ossa,

    Cels. 8, 10, 2:

    jugulum,

    id. 8, 8, 8 et saep.—
    c.
    Esp., to pack up for a journey, etc.:

    omnia composta sunt quae donavi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21:

    i ergo intro et compone quae tecum simul Ferantur,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 5:

    dum tota domus raeda componitur una,

    Juv. 3, 10.—
    2.
    Of persons:

    is (Saturnus) genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis Composuit,

    Verg. A. 8, 322:

    et tabula una duos poterit componere amantes,

    Prop. 2, 26, 33 (3, 22, 13); cf. II. C. 5. infra.—
    B.
    To set in opposition.
    1.
    To bring together in hostility, to oppose, to couple, pair, match in combat (cf. compositio, III.); esp. of gladiators, etc.: Samnis, spurcus homo, cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo Post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus, Lucil. Sat. ap. Non. p. 257, 18; cf. Cic. Opt. Gen. 6, 17:

    Rupili et Persi par pugnat, uti non Compositum melius cum Bitho Bacchius,

    Hor. S. 1, 7, 20 Orell. ad loc.:

    staturam habere Threcis cum Threce conpositi,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, praef. 8;

    and in gen.: si quis casus duos inter se bonos viros composuerit,

    Quint. 2, 17, 34:

    cuive virum mallem memet componere,

    Sil. 10, 70:

    componimur Vecordi Decio,

    id. 11, 212:

    hunc fatis,

    id. 1, 39:

    cum ventis, pelagique furentibus undis Composuit mortale genus,

    Luc. 3, 196;

    and fig.: pergis pugnantia secum Frontibus adversis componere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 103:

    ecce par deo dignum, vir fortis cum fortuna mala conpositus,

    Sen. Prov. 1, 2, 9:

    non illa (rhetorice) secum ipsa componitur,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33;

    and of a judicial contest: accita Epicharis et cum indice composita,

    confronted, Tac. A. 15, 51; 16, 10.—
    2.
    To oppose by way of comparison, to compare, contrast.
    (α).
    With acc. and dat.: quid est, cur componere ausis mihi te aut me tibi? Att. ap. Non. p. 257, 15 (Trag. Rel. v. 147 Rib.):

    nec divis homines componier aequom'st,

    Cat. 68, 141: composita dicta evolvunt, Quae cum componas, dicta factis discrepant, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 21 (Trag. Rel. v. 48 Rib.):

    si parva licet conponere magnis,

    Verg. G. 4, 176:

    parvis conponere magna solebam,

    id. E. 1, 23; Ov. M. 5, [p. 392] 416:

    audes cladi componere nostrae, Nympha, tuam?

    id. ib. 15, 530:

    divinis humana,

    Aus. Ecl. 1, 10.—
    (β).
    With acc. and cum:

    ubi Metelli dicta cum factis conposuit,

    Sall. J. 48, 1: causam suam cum causa adversarii. Quint. 7, 2, 22.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Of the parts of a whole, or of a whole as made up of parts.
    1. (α).
    With ex:

    exercitus ejus conpositus ex variis gentibus,

    Sall. J. 18, 3:

    genus humanum ex corpore et anima conpositum,

    id. ib. 2, 1:

    liber ex alienis orationibus compositus,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 14, 47:

    antidoton... ex multis atque interim contrariis quoque inter se effectibus,

    Quint. 1, 10, 6:

    ex quo (umore) componi debet (medicamentum),

    Cels. 6, 7, 1 fin.
    (β).
    With abl.:

    mensam gramine,

    Sil. 15, 51.—
    (γ).
    With acc. alone:

    medicamentum,

    Col. 6, 4, 1; Scrib. Comp. 10.—
    2.
    Esp., of buildings, etc., to construct, build:

    qui cuncta conposuit,

    i. e. the Creator, Cic. Univ. 13:

    urbem,

    Verg. A. 3, 387:

    illa (templa) deis,

    Ov. F. 1, 708 Burm. ad loc.:

    aggere conposito tumuli,

    Verg. A. 7, 6:

    deletas Thebas,

    Prop. 2, 6, 5.—
    3.
    Of words, to compound:

    vitilitigatores ex vitiis et litigatoribus, Plin. praef. § 32: verba composita (opp. simplicia),

    Quint. 1, 5, 3.—
    4.
    Of writings, speeches, etc.
    a.
    To compose, write, construct (very freq.):

    leges,

    Lucr. 4, 966:

    compone hoc, quod postulo, de argento: de reliquo videro,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16, § 36:

    quartum librum,

    id. de Or. 2, 55, 224:

    libros,

    id. Fam. 16, 20; Plin. Ep. 9, 9, 1:

    libellos,

    Quint. 12, 8, 5:

    actiones,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 8; Quint. 11, 3, 68:

    argumentum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 4, 3:

    edictum eis verbis,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 45, § 116:

    edictum eorum arbitratu,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 46, §

    119: artes,

    books of instruction, id. Brut. 12, 48; id. Ac. 2, 13, 40:

    artificium,

    id. de Or. 2, 19, 83:

    commentarium consulatus mei,

    id. Att. 1, 19, 10; Quint. 1, 8, 19:

    quarum (litterarum) exemplum,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    quandam disciplinae formulam,

    id. Ac. 1, 4, 17:

    stipulationum et judiciorum formulas,

    id. Leg. 1, 4, 14:

    interdictum,

    id. Caecin. 21, 59:

    poema,

    id. ad Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4; cf. Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 77; Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 60:

    senatus consultum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 22, 2:

    testimonium,

    id. Att. 15, 15, 1:

    verba ad religionem deorum immortalium,

    id. Dom. 47, 124:

    de judicialibus causis aliqua,

    Quint. 3, 6, 104:

    aliquid de ratione dicendi, id. prooem. 1: quae de ortu vitaque Scapulae composita erant,

    Tac. A. 16, 14:

    Apion... inmortalitate donari a se scripsit ad quos aliqua conponebat, Plin. praef. § 25: carmen,

    Cic. Mur. 12, 26:

    carmina,

    Tac. Or. 12; id. A. 3, 49:

    epistulas,

    id. ib. 2, 70:

    litteras nomine Marcelli,

    Liv. 27, 28, 4; Tac. A. 11, 20:

    orationem habere ad conciliandos plebis animos conpositam,

    Liv. 1, 35, 2:

    blanditias tremula voce,

    Tib. 1, 2, 91:

    meditata manu verba trementi,

    Ov. M. 9, 521:

    versus,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 8:

    mollem versum,

    Prop. 1, 7, 19:

    cantus,

    Tib. 1, 2, 53:

    in morem annalium,

    Tac. Or. 22:

    orationes adversus aliquem,

    id. ib. 37:

    litteras ad aliquem,

    id. A. 15, 8; 14, 22:

    probra in Gaium,

    id. ib. 6, 9;

    14, 50: multa et atrocia in Macronem,

    id. ib. 6, 44 (38) et saep.—
    b.
    Transf., of the subjects, etc., treated, to write about, treat, celebrate:

    tuas laudes,

    Tib. 4, 1, 35:

    res gestas,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 251:

    tempora Iliaca,

    Vell. 1, 3, 2:

    bellum Troicum,

    id. 1, 5, 3:

    Juli Africani vitam componendo, spem hominibus fecisti plurium ejus modi librorum,

    Tac. Or. 14:

    veteres populi Romani res,

    id. A. 4, 32:

    Neronis res,

    id. ib. 1, 1; 11, 11.—
    B.
    From the notion of closing.
    1.
    To put away, put aside, put in place:

    armamentis conplicandis, conponendis studuimus,

    i. e. folding up the sails and lowering the masts, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 80:

    (tempus) ad componenda armamenta expediendumque remigem,

    Liv. 26, 39, 8:

    vela contrahit malosque inclinat et simul armamenta componens, etc.,

    id. 36, 44, 2:

    arma,

    Hor. C. 4, 14, 52:

    tristes istos conpone libellos,

    put aside, Prop. 1, 9, 13.—
    2.
    To store up, put away, collect:

    nec... Aut conponere opes norant aut parcere parto,

    Verg. A. 8, 317:

    ego conposito securus acervo Despiciam dites,

    Tib. 1, 1, 77;

    so fig.: condo et compono quae mox depromere possim,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 12.— So esp. to preserve, pack, put up fruits, meat, etc., for future use:

    pernas,

    Cato, R. R. 162, 12:

    tergora (suis),

    Col. 12, 55, 2: siccatos coliculos, id. 12, 9, 1:

    caepam in fidelia,

    id. 12, 10, 2:

    herbas,

    id. 12, 13, 2:

    poma,

    id. 12, 47, 5:

    olivas,

    Pall. Nov. 22, 5:

    herbam olla nova,

    Scrib. Comp. 60:

    faenum,

    Dig. 19, 2, 11, § 4:

    fructus in urceis, capsellis,

    ib. 33, 7, 12, §1.—
    3.
    Of the ashes or remains of the dead, to adjust, lay out, to collect and inurn, inter, bury:

    tu mea conpones et dices, ossa, Properti, Haec tua sunt,

    Prop. 2, 24, 35 (3, 19, 19):

    cinerem,

    Ov. F. 3, 547:

    cinerem ossaque,

    Val. Fl. 7, 203:

    sic ego conponi versus in ossa velim,

    Tib. 3, 2, 26.—Hence, in gen., of persons, to bury:

    quem... prope cognatos conpositum cineres,

    Cat. 68, 98:

    omnes composui (meos),

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 28:

    compositi busta avi,

    Ov. F. 5, 426:

    Pisonem Verania uxor... T. Vinium Crispina filia composuere,

    Tac. H. 1, 47:

    componi tumulo eodem,

    Ov. M. 4, 157:

    toro Mortua componar,

    id. ib. 9, 504:

    alto Conpositus lecto,

    Pers. 3, 104:

    aliquem terra,

    Sil. 9, 95.—
    4. a.
    Of things: omnia noctis erant placida composta quiete, Varr. Atac. ap. Sen. Contr. 3, 16:

    cum mare compositum est,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 259:

    aquas,

    id. H. 13, 136:

    fessum tumentes Composuit pelagus ventis patientibus undas,

    Luc. 5, 702.—
    b.
    Of persons:

    nec vigilantibus, sed etiam quiete compositis,

    Quint. 11, 2, 5:

    ubi jam thalamis se conposuere,

    Verg. G. 4, 189:

    defessa membra,

    id. ib. 4, 438:

    si bene conpositus somno vinoque jacebit,

    Ov. Am. 1, 4, 53.—
    5.
    To end strife, confusion, etc., to compose, pacify, allay, settle, calm, appease, quiet, tranquillize, reconcile, etc., that which is disturbed or at variance.
    a.
    With personal object:

    aversos amicos,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 29:

    ceteros clementia,

    Tac. A. 12, 55:

    comitia praetorum,

    id. ib. 14, 28; id. H. 1, 85:

    juvenes concitatos,

    Quint. 1, 10, 32; cf.:

    barbarum animos,

    Tac. A. 14, 39:

    gentem,

    Sil. 17, 356.—Esp. of the mind:

    prima (pars philosophiae) conponit animum,

    Sen. Ep. 89, 9:

    argumentum conpositae mentis,

    id. ib. 2, 1; Cels. 3, 18; Sil. 11, 352:

    mentem somno,

    id. 3, 162:

    religio saevas componit mentis,

    id. 13, 317.—
    b.
    Of places, countries, etc.:

    C. Caesar componendae Armeniae deligitur,

    Tac. A. 2, 4:

    Campaniam,

    id. H. 4, 3:

    Daciam,

    id. ib. 3, 53.—
    c.
    With abstr. or indef. objects:

    si possum hoc inter vos conponere,

    Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 23; cf.:

    vides, inter nos sic haec potius cum bona Ut componamus gratia quam cum mala?

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 17:

    gaudens conponi foedere bellum,

    Verg. A. 12, 109; so,

    bellum,

    Sall. J. 97, 2; Nep. Hann. 6, 2; id. Alcib. 8, 3; Vell. 2, 25, 1; Asin. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 3:

    bella,

    Tac. A. 3, 56:

    cum vellet pro communi amico controversias regum componere,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 109:

    uti per colloquia omnes controversiae componantur,

    id. ib. 1, 9 fin.:

    curas,

    Verg. A. 4, 341; Sil. 12, 682:

    lites,

    Verg. E. 3, 108:

    seditionem civilem,

    Suet. Caes. 4:

    statum Orientis,

    id. Calig. 1:

    Romanus Ardeae turbatas seditione res... composuit,

    Liv. 4, 10, 6; 3, 53, 1:

    legatorum res et bello turbatas,

    id. 45, 16, 2:

    res Germanicas,

    Suet. Vit. 9:

    discordias,

    Tac. H. 4, 50:

    compositis praesentibus,

    id. A. 1, 45:

    odia et certamina,

    id. ib. 15, 2.—Less freq. transf., with the result as object:

    pacem componi volo Meo patri cum matre,

    Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 113:

    si pax cum Carthaginiensibus componi nequisset,

    Liv. 30, 40, 13:

    at me conposita pace fefellit Amor,

    Prop. 2, 2, 2:

    pax circa Brundusium composita,

    Vell. 2, 75, 3:

    pacem cum Pyrrho,

    Just. 18, 2, 6; cf. D. 2. infra.—
    d.
    Absol.:

    coheredes mei conponere et transigere cupiebant,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 1, 7; and so impers. pass.:

    posteaquam id quod maxime volui fieri non potuit, ut componeretur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    Pompei summam esse... voluntatem, ut componeretur atque ab armis discederetur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 16.—
    C. 1.
    In gen., to arrange, adjust, order, set in order:

    aulaeis se superbis Aurea sponda, of one's attitude on a couch,

    Verg. A. 1, 697:

    ad ictum militaris gladii conposita cervice,

    Sen. Cons. Marc. 26, 2:

    diductis aedificia angulis vidimus moveri iterumque conponi,

    id. Q. N. 6, 30, 4:

    si ad rem pertinet, quomodo caelo adfecto conpositisque sideribus quodque animal oriatur,

    Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98:

    tibi enim gratias agebat, quod signa componenda suscepisses,

    id. Att. 4, 9, 1.—
    2.
    Esp., milit. t. t.:

    se ad confligendum, Sisenn. ap. Non p. 257, 13: exercitum in hibernaculis, Sali J. 103, 1: in secunda (acie) cohortis, id. H. inc. Fragm. 44 Dietsch: stabant conpositi suis quisque ordinibus (opp. incompositi),

    Liv. 44, 38, 11:

    conpositi numero in turmas,

    Verg. A. 11, 599:

    cunctos licentia vagos compositus invadit = compositis ordinibus,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    agmen,

    id. ib. 2, 89; 5, 1; id. A. 12, 16:

    ordines,

    id. H. 4, 33:

    vagos paventesque Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. ib. 3, 35:

    pugnae exercitum,

    id. A. 13, 40:

    auxilia in numerum legionis,

    id. ib. 2, 80 Nipp. ad loc.:

    equitem per turmas,

    id. ib. 15, 29:

    insidias in montibus,

    Just. 1, 3, 11.—
    3.
    Of the order of words in language: quam lepide lexeis compostae! ut tesserulae omnes Arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato, Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; id. ap. Cic. Or. 44, 149; cf. id. ib. sq.:

    ut aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone,

    id. Brut. 17, 68.—
    4.
    With reference to orderly appearance, etc., of the clothing, hair; the expression of the countenance, etc., to lay, smooth, adjust:

    suon quisque loco'st? Vide capillum, satin compositu'st commode?

    Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 97:

    composito et delibuto capillo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 46, 135:

    comas,

    Ov. R. Am. 679:

    crines,

    Verg. G. 4, 417:

    ne turbarentur comae, quas componi, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 148:

    togam,

    to lay in proper folds, Hor. S. 2, 3, 77; Quint. 11, 3, 156; cf.:

    nec tamen ante adiit... Quam se composuit, quam circumspexit amictus,

    Ov. M. 4, 318:

    pulvinum facili manu,

    id. A. A. 1, 160; cf.

    torum,

    id. F. 3, 484:

    jam libet componere voltus,

    id. M. 13, 767:

    vultu composito, ne laeti excessu principis, etc.,

    Tac. A. 1, 7; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 5; cf.:

    (Tiberius) compositus ore,

    id. ib. 2, 34:

    vultum natura horridum... efferabat, componens ad speculum in omnem terrorem,

    distorting, Suet. Calig. 50.—
    5.
    In gen., to adjust, arrange, regulate, for the expression of something, or to accord with something; usu. ad aliquid:

    ad abstinentiam rursus, non secus ac modo ad balineum animum vultumque conposui,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 1, 6:

    orationis ipsius vultus ad id, quod efficere intendimus, compositus,

    Quint. 9, 1, 21:

    utraque manu ad modum aliquid portantium composita,

    id. 11, 3, 120:

    ge. stum oratoris ad similitudinem saltationis,

    id. 1, 11, 19:

    figuram ad imitationem alterius scripturae,

    id. 9, 2, 34:

    nec ad votum composita civitas,

    Tac. Or. 41:

    cuncta ad decorem inperi conposita,

    id. H. 1, 71:

    cunctis ad tristitiam conpositis,

    id. A. 3, 1. —Less freq. with dat.:

    voltus conponere famae Taedet,

    to adapt, Tib. 4, 7, 9:

    venturis carbasa ventis,

    Luc. 3, 596:

    me quoque mittendis rectum componite telis,

    id. 3, 717. —With in:

    Nero itinera urbis... veste servili in dissimulationem sui compositus pererrabat,

    disguised, made up, Tac. A. 13, 25. —
    D. (α).
    With acc.:

    ego itinera sic composueram, ut Nonis Quinctilibus Puteolis essem,

    Cic. Att. 15, 26, 3:

    quod adest memento Componere aequus,

    Hor. C. 3, 29, 33:

    conposita atque constituta re publica,

    Cic. Leg. 3, 18, 42:

    necdum compositis maturisve satis consiliis,

    Liv. 4, 13, 5:

    (diem) totum in consideranda causa componendaque posuisse,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 87:

    tempus in cognoscendis componendisque causis consumere,

    id. Or. 42, 143:

    ex sententia omnibus rebus paratis conpositisque,

    Sall. J. 43, 5; 94, 1:

    in senatu cuncta longis aliorum principatibus composita statim decernuntur,

    Tac. H. 2, 55:

    dum quae forent firmando Neronis imperio componuntur,

    id. A. 12, 68.—
    (β).
    With ad or in and acc. of the purpose for which, or the example according to which, etc.:

    cum alteri placeat auspicia ista ad utilitatem esse rei publicae conposita,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 32:

    omnia ad voluptatem multitudinis inperitae,

    Quint. 10, 1, 43:

    animum ad omnes casus,

    id. 12, 9, 20; Val. Fl. 1, 321:

    satis igitur in hoc nos componet multa scribendi exercitatio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 114:

    cultum victumque non ad nova exempla conponere, sed ut majorum mores suadent,

    Sen. Tranq. 9, 2. —
    2. (α).
    In gen.: eum allegaverunt, suom qui servom diceret Cum auro esse apud me: conposita est fallacia, [p. 393] Ut, etc., Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 29:

    quin jam virginem Despondi: res composita'st,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 17:

    ita causa componitur, ut item palaestritae Bidini peterent ab Epicrate hereditatem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 22, § 54:

    societatem praedarum cum latronibus conposuisse,

    Sall. H. 4, 11 Dietsch:

    crimen ab inimicis Romae conpositum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 61, § 141:

    conpositis inter se rebus,

    Sall. J. 66, 2:

    ita conposito dolo digrediuntur,

    id. ib. 111, 4:

    conposito jam consilio,

    Liv. 3, 53, 3: ceteri proditores ea quae composita erant exspectabant;

    convenerat autem, etc.,

    id. 25, 9, 8:

    sub noctem susurri Composita repetantur hora,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 20:

    ictum jam foedus, et omnes Conpositae leges,

    Verg. A. 12, 315:

    compositis notis,

    Tib. 1, 2, 22:

    crimen ac dolum ultro,

    Tac. H. 1, 34:

    proditionem,

    id. ib. 2, 100:

    seditionem,

    id. ib. 4, 14:

    insidias,

    id. ib. 5, 22; id. A. 12, 54; 13, 47: pacem componere, v. B. 5. supra.—
    (β).
    With rel.-clause:

    cum summa concordia, quos dimitterent, quos retinerent, composuerunt,

    Liv. 40, 40, 14.—
    (γ).
    With inf.:

    ii, secretis conloquiis conponunt Gallos concire,

    Tac. A. 3, 40.—
    (δ).
    Pass. impers.:

    ut domi compositum cum Marcio erat,

    Liv. 2, 37, 1.—
    (ε).
    With ut and subj.:

    compositum inter ipsos ut Latiaris strueret dolum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68; cf. P. a. subst.
    3.
    In gen., to feign, invent, devise, contrive, in order to deceive or delude, etc.: composita dicta, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 22 (Trag. Rel. v. 47 Rib.):

    ne tu istic hodie malo tuo conpositis mendaciis Advenisti,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 211:

    nec bene mendaci risus conponitur ore,

    Tib. 3, 6, 35 (3, 7, 3):

    sed vobis facile'st verba et conponere fraudes,

    Prop. 2, 9, 31:

    insidias in me conponis inanes,

    id. 2, 32 (3, 30), 19:

    compositas insidias fatoque evitatas ementitur,

    Tac. A. 13, 47:

    si haec fabulosa et composita videntur,

    id. Or. 12; id. Agr. 40:

    quae ut augendae famae composita, sic reliqua non in obscuro habentur,

    id. A. 15, 16; cf.:

    vetustatem, ut cetera, in majus conponentem altores Jovis celebravisse,

    exaggerating, Sall. H. 3, 60 Dietsch.— Part. perf. with in and acc., pretending, assuming the appearance or expression:

    (Domitianus) paratus simulatione, in adrogantiam compositus audiit preces,

    Tac. Agr. 42:

    is in maestitiam compositus,

    id. H. 2, 9; 1, 54:

    in securitatem,

    id. A. 3, 44.—Rarely with ad:

    tunc compositus ad maestitiam,

    Tac. A. 13, 20.— Hence, P. a.: compŏsĭtus ( - postus), a, um.
    A.
    Well-arranged, ordered, or constituted, orderly, regular:

    quae (injuria) dum foris sunt, nil videtur mundius, Nec magis compositum quicquam nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 13: admiratus sum... sunchusin litterularum, quae solent tuae compositissimae et clarissimae esse, Cic. Att. 6, 9, 1:

    acrior impetu atque animis quam compositior ullo ordine pugna fuit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 13:

    intellegitur, etiamsi non adjecero, conpositum ordinatumque fore talem virum,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 8, 3:

    composita et quieta et beata respublica,

    Tac. Or. 36. —Of writings:

    quare in his quoque libris erant eadem aliqua... omnia vero compositiora et elaborata,

    Quint. 1, pr. § 8; cf.:

    illa quae curam fatentur et ficta atque composita videri etiam volunt,

    elaborate, id. 8, pr. § 23.— Transf., of the orator himself:

    si aut compositi oratoris bene structam collocationem dissolvas permutatione verborum,

    Cic. Or. 70, 232.—
    B.
    Fitly disposed for any purpose, prepared, apt, fit, adapted, qualified, suitable, ready:

    perficiam ut nemo umquam paratior, vigilantior, compositior ad judicium venisse videatur,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 1, 11; so,

    equus bene natura compositus,

    Auct. Her. 4, 46, 59.— With ad or in and acc., or with dat.:

    arte quadam ab juventa in ostentationem (virtutum) compositus,

    Liv. 26, 19, 3 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    alius historiae magis idoneus, alius compositus ad carmen,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7:

    aeque in adulationem compositus (sacerdos),

    Curt. 4, 7, 26:

    (Attici) non maxime ad risum compositi,

    Quint. 6, 3, 18:

    natura atque arte compositus alliciendis etiam Muciani moribus,

    Tac. H. 2, 5.—
    C.
    Quiet, peaceful, undisturbed, calm, composed, unimpassioned, etc.:

    ut peractis quae agenda fuerint salvo jam et composito die possis ibi manere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 2:

    lenis et nitidi et compositi generis amatores,

    Quint. 10, 1, 44:

    actio,

    id. 11, 3, 110:

    aetas,

    mature, sedate, Tac. A. 13, 1: adfectus mites atque compositi, Quint. 6, 2, 9:

    supercilium (opp. erectum),

    id. 11, 3, 74:

    repetitio eorum (civium) labefactabat compositam civitatem,

    Flor. 3, 23, 3.—
    D.
    Compound, composite, made up of parts (opp. simplex):

    verba,

    Quint. 1, 5, 3; 1, 6, 38; 7, 9, 5:

    voces,

    id. 1, 5, 65; cf. id. 1, 5, 9; 2, 12, 3.—Hence, subst.: compŏsĭtum ( conp-), i, n., that which is agreed, an agreement, compact, etc.; only abl. in the phrases,
    (α).
    Ex composito, according to agreement, by agreement, in concert, Sall. H. 2, 12 Dietsch:

    tum ex composito orta vis,

    Liv. 1, 9, 10; 5, 14, 2; 36, 25, 1; 40, 48, 4; Suet. Claud. 37; Tac. H. 4, 66.—
    (β).
    De composito, by agreement, App. Mag. 1, p. 273; and,
    (γ).
    More rarely in the same sense, composito alone, Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 29; Nep. Dat. 6, 6; Verg. A. 2, 129.—Hence also adv.: compŏsĭtē ( conp-), in an orderly, regular, or skilful manner, orderly, regularly, properly (class. but rare;

    not in Quint.): ambulare,

    Col. 6, 2, 5:

    indutus,

    Gell. 1, 5, 2:

    composite et apte dicere,

    Cic. Or. 71, 236:

    composite, ornate, copiose eloqui,

    id. De Or. 1, 11, 48:

    composite atque magnifice casum reipublicae miserati,

    Sall. C. 51, 9:

    bene et composite disseruit,

    id. Ib. 52.— Comp.:

    compositius cuncta quam festinantius agerent,

    Tac. A. 15, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > conposite

  • 10 conpositum

    com-pōno ( conp-), posui (COMPOSEIVERVNT, C. I. L. 1, 199, 2), positum (compostus, Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21 Lorenz; Verg. A. 1, 249; Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; Varr ap. Sen. Ep. 56, 6), 3, v. a., to put, place, lay, bring or set together, to unite, join, connect, collect, aggregate, compose, to order, arrange, adjust, etc. (class. and very freq.).
    I.
    In gen., of different objects.
    A. 1.
    Of things in gen.:

    aridum lignum,

    Hor. C. 3, 17, 14:

    composita fronde,

    Prop. 1, 20, 22:

    uvas in tecto in cratibus,

    Cato, R. R. 112, 2:

    in quo (loco) erant ea conposita, quibus rex te numerare constituerat,

    Cic. Deiot. 6, 17:

    (amomum) manipulatim leniter componitur,

    Plin. 12, 13, 28, § 48:

    amphoras in culleum,

    Cato, R. R. 113, 2:

    ligna in caminum,

    id. ib. 37, 5.—
    b.
    To bring into contact, fit together, join:

    quid... in operibus manu factis tam compositum tamque compactum et coagmentatum inveniri potest?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 74: cum poclo bibo eodem, amplector, labra labellis conpono, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 260, 28:

    tum latus conponit lateri et cum pectore pectus,

    id. ib. p. 260, 30:

    conponens manibusque manus atque ori bus ora,

    Verg. A. 8, 486:

    Mercurio Sais fertur Virgineum conposuisse latus,

    Prop. 2, 2, 12; cf.

    caput,

    Tib. 1, 5, 8.—Hence, of broken limbs, etc., med. t. t., to set:

    ossa,

    Cels. 8, 10, 2:

    jugulum,

    id. 8, 8, 8 et saep.—
    c.
    Esp., to pack up for a journey, etc.:

    omnia composta sunt quae donavi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 7, 21:

    i ergo intro et compone quae tecum simul Ferantur,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 5:

    dum tota domus raeda componitur una,

    Juv. 3, 10.—
    2.
    Of persons:

    is (Saturnus) genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis Composuit,

    Verg. A. 8, 322:

    et tabula una duos poterit componere amantes,

    Prop. 2, 26, 33 (3, 22, 13); cf. II. C. 5. infra.—
    B.
    To set in opposition.
    1.
    To bring together in hostility, to oppose, to couple, pair, match in combat (cf. compositio, III.); esp. of gladiators, etc.: Samnis, spurcus homo, cum Pacideiano conponitur, optimus multo Post homines natos gladiator qui fuit unus, Lucil. Sat. ap. Non. p. 257, 18; cf. Cic. Opt. Gen. 6, 17:

    Rupili et Persi par pugnat, uti non Compositum melius cum Bitho Bacchius,

    Hor. S. 1, 7, 20 Orell. ad loc.:

    staturam habere Threcis cum Threce conpositi,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, praef. 8;

    and in gen.: si quis casus duos inter se bonos viros composuerit,

    Quint. 2, 17, 34:

    cuive virum mallem memet componere,

    Sil. 10, 70:

    componimur Vecordi Decio,

    id. 11, 212:

    hunc fatis,

    id. 1, 39:

    cum ventis, pelagique furentibus undis Composuit mortale genus,

    Luc. 3, 196;

    and fig.: pergis pugnantia secum Frontibus adversis componere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 103:

    ecce par deo dignum, vir fortis cum fortuna mala conpositus,

    Sen. Prov. 1, 2, 9:

    non illa (rhetorice) secum ipsa componitur,

    Quint. 2, 17, 33;

    and of a judicial contest: accita Epicharis et cum indice composita,

    confronted, Tac. A. 15, 51; 16, 10.—
    2.
    To oppose by way of comparison, to compare, contrast.
    (α).
    With acc. and dat.: quid est, cur componere ausis mihi te aut me tibi? Att. ap. Non. p. 257, 15 (Trag. Rel. v. 147 Rib.):

    nec divis homines componier aequom'st,

    Cat. 68, 141: composita dicta evolvunt, Quae cum componas, dicta factis discrepant, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 21 (Trag. Rel. v. 48 Rib.):

    si parva licet conponere magnis,

    Verg. G. 4, 176:

    parvis conponere magna solebam,

    id. E. 1, 23; Ov. M. 5, [p. 392] 416:

    audes cladi componere nostrae, Nympha, tuam?

    id. ib. 15, 530:

    divinis humana,

    Aus. Ecl. 1, 10.—
    (β).
    With acc. and cum:

    ubi Metelli dicta cum factis conposuit,

    Sall. J. 48, 1: causam suam cum causa adversarii. Quint. 7, 2, 22.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Of the parts of a whole, or of a whole as made up of parts.
    1. (α).
    With ex:

    exercitus ejus conpositus ex variis gentibus,

    Sall. J. 18, 3:

    genus humanum ex corpore et anima conpositum,

    id. ib. 2, 1:

    liber ex alienis orationibus compositus,

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 14, 47:

    antidoton... ex multis atque interim contrariis quoque inter se effectibus,

    Quint. 1, 10, 6:

    ex quo (umore) componi debet (medicamentum),

    Cels. 6, 7, 1 fin.
    (β).
    With abl.:

    mensam gramine,

    Sil. 15, 51.—
    (γ).
    With acc. alone:

    medicamentum,

    Col. 6, 4, 1; Scrib. Comp. 10.—
    2.
    Esp., of buildings, etc., to construct, build:

    qui cuncta conposuit,

    i. e. the Creator, Cic. Univ. 13:

    urbem,

    Verg. A. 3, 387:

    illa (templa) deis,

    Ov. F. 1, 708 Burm. ad loc.:

    aggere conposito tumuli,

    Verg. A. 7, 6:

    deletas Thebas,

    Prop. 2, 6, 5.—
    3.
    Of words, to compound:

    vitilitigatores ex vitiis et litigatoribus, Plin. praef. § 32: verba composita (opp. simplicia),

    Quint. 1, 5, 3.—
    4.
    Of writings, speeches, etc.
    a.
    To compose, write, construct (very freq.):

    leges,

    Lucr. 4, 966:

    compone hoc, quod postulo, de argento: de reliquo videro,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 16, § 36:

    quartum librum,

    id. de Or. 2, 55, 224:

    libros,

    id. Fam. 16, 20; Plin. Ep. 9, 9, 1:

    libellos,

    Quint. 12, 8, 5:

    actiones,

    Cic. Att. 6, 1, 8; Quint. 11, 3, 68:

    argumentum,

    Cic. Att. 15, 4, 3:

    edictum eis verbis,

    id. Verr. 2, 1, 45, § 116:

    edictum eorum arbitratu,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 46, §

    119: artes,

    books of instruction, id. Brut. 12, 48; id. Ac. 2, 13, 40:

    artificium,

    id. de Or. 2, 19, 83:

    commentarium consulatus mei,

    id. Att. 1, 19, 10; Quint. 1, 8, 19:

    quarum (litterarum) exemplum,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    quandam disciplinae formulam,

    id. Ac. 1, 4, 17:

    stipulationum et judiciorum formulas,

    id. Leg. 1, 4, 14:

    interdictum,

    id. Caecin. 21, 59:

    poema,

    id. ad Q. Fr. 3, 1, 4; cf. Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 77; Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 60:

    senatus consultum,

    Cic. Fam. 10, 22, 2:

    testimonium,

    id. Att. 15, 15, 1:

    verba ad religionem deorum immortalium,

    id. Dom. 47, 124:

    de judicialibus causis aliqua,

    Quint. 3, 6, 104:

    aliquid de ratione dicendi, id. prooem. 1: quae de ortu vitaque Scapulae composita erant,

    Tac. A. 16, 14:

    Apion... inmortalitate donari a se scripsit ad quos aliqua conponebat, Plin. praef. § 25: carmen,

    Cic. Mur. 12, 26:

    carmina,

    Tac. Or. 12; id. A. 3, 49:

    epistulas,

    id. ib. 2, 70:

    litteras nomine Marcelli,

    Liv. 27, 28, 4; Tac. A. 11, 20:

    orationem habere ad conciliandos plebis animos conpositam,

    Liv. 1, 35, 2:

    blanditias tremula voce,

    Tib. 1, 2, 91:

    meditata manu verba trementi,

    Ov. M. 9, 521:

    versus,

    Hor. S. 1, 4, 8:

    mollem versum,

    Prop. 1, 7, 19:

    cantus,

    Tib. 1, 2, 53:

    in morem annalium,

    Tac. Or. 22:

    orationes adversus aliquem,

    id. ib. 37:

    litteras ad aliquem,

    id. A. 15, 8; 14, 22:

    probra in Gaium,

    id. ib. 6, 9;

    14, 50: multa et atrocia in Macronem,

    id. ib. 6, 44 (38) et saep.—
    b.
    Transf., of the subjects, etc., treated, to write about, treat, celebrate:

    tuas laudes,

    Tib. 4, 1, 35:

    res gestas,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 251:

    tempora Iliaca,

    Vell. 1, 3, 2:

    bellum Troicum,

    id. 1, 5, 3:

    Juli Africani vitam componendo, spem hominibus fecisti plurium ejus modi librorum,

    Tac. Or. 14:

    veteres populi Romani res,

    id. A. 4, 32:

    Neronis res,

    id. ib. 1, 1; 11, 11.—
    B.
    From the notion of closing.
    1.
    To put away, put aside, put in place:

    armamentis conplicandis, conponendis studuimus,

    i. e. folding up the sails and lowering the masts, Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 80:

    (tempus) ad componenda armamenta expediendumque remigem,

    Liv. 26, 39, 8:

    vela contrahit malosque inclinat et simul armamenta componens, etc.,

    id. 36, 44, 2:

    arma,

    Hor. C. 4, 14, 52:

    tristes istos conpone libellos,

    put aside, Prop. 1, 9, 13.—
    2.
    To store up, put away, collect:

    nec... Aut conponere opes norant aut parcere parto,

    Verg. A. 8, 317:

    ego conposito securus acervo Despiciam dites,

    Tib. 1, 1, 77;

    so fig.: condo et compono quae mox depromere possim,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 12.— So esp. to preserve, pack, put up fruits, meat, etc., for future use:

    pernas,

    Cato, R. R. 162, 12:

    tergora (suis),

    Col. 12, 55, 2: siccatos coliculos, id. 12, 9, 1:

    caepam in fidelia,

    id. 12, 10, 2:

    herbas,

    id. 12, 13, 2:

    poma,

    id. 12, 47, 5:

    olivas,

    Pall. Nov. 22, 5:

    herbam olla nova,

    Scrib. Comp. 60:

    faenum,

    Dig. 19, 2, 11, § 4:

    fructus in urceis, capsellis,

    ib. 33, 7, 12, §1.—
    3.
    Of the ashes or remains of the dead, to adjust, lay out, to collect and inurn, inter, bury:

    tu mea conpones et dices, ossa, Properti, Haec tua sunt,

    Prop. 2, 24, 35 (3, 19, 19):

    cinerem,

    Ov. F. 3, 547:

    cinerem ossaque,

    Val. Fl. 7, 203:

    sic ego conponi versus in ossa velim,

    Tib. 3, 2, 26.—Hence, in gen., of persons, to bury:

    quem... prope cognatos conpositum cineres,

    Cat. 68, 98:

    omnes composui (meos),

    Hor. S. 1, 9, 28:

    compositi busta avi,

    Ov. F. 5, 426:

    Pisonem Verania uxor... T. Vinium Crispina filia composuere,

    Tac. H. 1, 47:

    componi tumulo eodem,

    Ov. M. 4, 157:

    toro Mortua componar,

    id. ib. 9, 504:

    alto Conpositus lecto,

    Pers. 3, 104:

    aliquem terra,

    Sil. 9, 95.—
    4. a.
    Of things: omnia noctis erant placida composta quiete, Varr. Atac. ap. Sen. Contr. 3, 16:

    cum mare compositum est,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 259:

    aquas,

    id. H. 13, 136:

    fessum tumentes Composuit pelagus ventis patientibus undas,

    Luc. 5, 702.—
    b.
    Of persons:

    nec vigilantibus, sed etiam quiete compositis,

    Quint. 11, 2, 5:

    ubi jam thalamis se conposuere,

    Verg. G. 4, 189:

    defessa membra,

    id. ib. 4, 438:

    si bene conpositus somno vinoque jacebit,

    Ov. Am. 1, 4, 53.—
    5.
    To end strife, confusion, etc., to compose, pacify, allay, settle, calm, appease, quiet, tranquillize, reconcile, etc., that which is disturbed or at variance.
    a.
    With personal object:

    aversos amicos,

    Hor. S. 1, 5, 29:

    ceteros clementia,

    Tac. A. 12, 55:

    comitia praetorum,

    id. ib. 14, 28; id. H. 1, 85:

    juvenes concitatos,

    Quint. 1, 10, 32; cf.:

    barbarum animos,

    Tac. A. 14, 39:

    gentem,

    Sil. 17, 356.—Esp. of the mind:

    prima (pars philosophiae) conponit animum,

    Sen. Ep. 89, 9:

    argumentum conpositae mentis,

    id. ib. 2, 1; Cels. 3, 18; Sil. 11, 352:

    mentem somno,

    id. 3, 162:

    religio saevas componit mentis,

    id. 13, 317.—
    b.
    Of places, countries, etc.:

    C. Caesar componendae Armeniae deligitur,

    Tac. A. 2, 4:

    Campaniam,

    id. H. 4, 3:

    Daciam,

    id. ib. 3, 53.—
    c.
    With abstr. or indef. objects:

    si possum hoc inter vos conponere,

    Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 23; cf.:

    vides, inter nos sic haec potius cum bona Ut componamus gratia quam cum mala?

    Ter. Phorm. 4, 3, 17:

    gaudens conponi foedere bellum,

    Verg. A. 12, 109; so,

    bellum,

    Sall. J. 97, 2; Nep. Hann. 6, 2; id. Alcib. 8, 3; Vell. 2, 25, 1; Asin. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 3:

    bella,

    Tac. A. 3, 56:

    cum vellet pro communi amico controversias regum componere,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 109:

    uti per colloquia omnes controversiae componantur,

    id. ib. 1, 9 fin.:

    curas,

    Verg. A. 4, 341; Sil. 12, 682:

    lites,

    Verg. E. 3, 108:

    seditionem civilem,

    Suet. Caes. 4:

    statum Orientis,

    id. Calig. 1:

    Romanus Ardeae turbatas seditione res... composuit,

    Liv. 4, 10, 6; 3, 53, 1:

    legatorum res et bello turbatas,

    id. 45, 16, 2:

    res Germanicas,

    Suet. Vit. 9:

    discordias,

    Tac. H. 4, 50:

    compositis praesentibus,

    id. A. 1, 45:

    odia et certamina,

    id. ib. 15, 2.—Less freq. transf., with the result as object:

    pacem componi volo Meo patri cum matre,

    Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 113:

    si pax cum Carthaginiensibus componi nequisset,

    Liv. 30, 40, 13:

    at me conposita pace fefellit Amor,

    Prop. 2, 2, 2:

    pax circa Brundusium composita,

    Vell. 2, 75, 3:

    pacem cum Pyrrho,

    Just. 18, 2, 6; cf. D. 2. infra.—
    d.
    Absol.:

    coheredes mei conponere et transigere cupiebant,

    Plin. Ep. 5, 1, 7; and so impers. pass.:

    posteaquam id quod maxime volui fieri non potuit, ut componeretur,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    Pompei summam esse... voluntatem, ut componeretur atque ab armis discederetur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 16.—
    C. 1.
    In gen., to arrange, adjust, order, set in order:

    aulaeis se superbis Aurea sponda, of one's attitude on a couch,

    Verg. A. 1, 697:

    ad ictum militaris gladii conposita cervice,

    Sen. Cons. Marc. 26, 2:

    diductis aedificia angulis vidimus moveri iterumque conponi,

    id. Q. N. 6, 30, 4:

    si ad rem pertinet, quomodo caelo adfecto conpositisque sideribus quodque animal oriatur,

    Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98:

    tibi enim gratias agebat, quod signa componenda suscepisses,

    id. Att. 4, 9, 1.—
    2.
    Esp., milit. t. t.:

    se ad confligendum, Sisenn. ap. Non p. 257, 13: exercitum in hibernaculis, Sali J. 103, 1: in secunda (acie) cohortis, id. H. inc. Fragm. 44 Dietsch: stabant conpositi suis quisque ordinibus (opp. incompositi),

    Liv. 44, 38, 11:

    conpositi numero in turmas,

    Verg. A. 11, 599:

    cunctos licentia vagos compositus invadit = compositis ordinibus,

    Tac. H. 4, 35:

    agmen,

    id. ib. 2, 89; 5, 1; id. A. 12, 16:

    ordines,

    id. H. 4, 33:

    vagos paventesque Vitellianos, sua quemque apud signa, componunt,

    id. ib. 3, 35:

    pugnae exercitum,

    id. A. 13, 40:

    auxilia in numerum legionis,

    id. ib. 2, 80 Nipp. ad loc.:

    equitem per turmas,

    id. ib. 15, 29:

    insidias in montibus,

    Just. 1, 3, 11.—
    3.
    Of the order of words in language: quam lepide lexeis compostae! ut tesserulae omnes Arte pavimento atque emblemate vermiculato, Lucil. ap. Cic. de Or. 3, 43, 171; id. ap. Cic. Or. 44, 149; cf. id. ib. sq.:

    ut aptior sit oratio, ipsa verba compone,

    id. Brut. 17, 68.—
    4.
    With reference to orderly appearance, etc., of the clothing, hair; the expression of the countenance, etc., to lay, smooth, adjust:

    suon quisque loco'st? Vide capillum, satin compositu'st commode?

    Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 97:

    composito et delibuto capillo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 46, 135:

    comas,

    Ov. R. Am. 679:

    crines,

    Verg. G. 4, 417:

    ne turbarentur comae, quas componi, etc.,

    Quint. 11, 3, 148:

    togam,

    to lay in proper folds, Hor. S. 2, 3, 77; Quint. 11, 3, 156; cf.:

    nec tamen ante adiit... Quam se composuit, quam circumspexit amictus,

    Ov. M. 4, 318:

    pulvinum facili manu,

    id. A. A. 1, 160; cf.

    torum,

    id. F. 3, 484:

    jam libet componere voltus,

    id. M. 13, 767:

    vultu composito, ne laeti excessu principis, etc.,

    Tac. A. 1, 7; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 5; cf.:

    (Tiberius) compositus ore,

    id. ib. 2, 34:

    vultum natura horridum... efferabat, componens ad speculum in omnem terrorem,

    distorting, Suet. Calig. 50.—
    5.
    In gen., to adjust, arrange, regulate, for the expression of something, or to accord with something; usu. ad aliquid:

    ad abstinentiam rursus, non secus ac modo ad balineum animum vultumque conposui,

    Plin. Ep. 7, 1, 6:

    orationis ipsius vultus ad id, quod efficere intendimus, compositus,

    Quint. 9, 1, 21:

    utraque manu ad modum aliquid portantium composita,

    id. 11, 3, 120:

    ge. stum oratoris ad similitudinem saltationis,

    id. 1, 11, 19:

    figuram ad imitationem alterius scripturae,

    id. 9, 2, 34:

    nec ad votum composita civitas,

    Tac. Or. 41:

    cuncta ad decorem inperi conposita,

    id. H. 1, 71:

    cunctis ad tristitiam conpositis,

    id. A. 3, 1. —Less freq. with dat.:

    voltus conponere famae Taedet,

    to adapt, Tib. 4, 7, 9:

    venturis carbasa ventis,

    Luc. 3, 596:

    me quoque mittendis rectum componite telis,

    id. 3, 717. —With in:

    Nero itinera urbis... veste servili in dissimulationem sui compositus pererrabat,

    disguised, made up, Tac. A. 13, 25. —
    D. (α).
    With acc.:

    ego itinera sic composueram, ut Nonis Quinctilibus Puteolis essem,

    Cic. Att. 15, 26, 3:

    quod adest memento Componere aequus,

    Hor. C. 3, 29, 33:

    conposita atque constituta re publica,

    Cic. Leg. 3, 18, 42:

    necdum compositis maturisve satis consiliis,

    Liv. 4, 13, 5:

    (diem) totum in consideranda causa componendaque posuisse,

    Cic. Brut. 22, 87:

    tempus in cognoscendis componendisque causis consumere,

    id. Or. 42, 143:

    ex sententia omnibus rebus paratis conpositisque,

    Sall. J. 43, 5; 94, 1:

    in senatu cuncta longis aliorum principatibus composita statim decernuntur,

    Tac. H. 2, 55:

    dum quae forent firmando Neronis imperio componuntur,

    id. A. 12, 68.—
    (β).
    With ad or in and acc. of the purpose for which, or the example according to which, etc.:

    cum alteri placeat auspicia ista ad utilitatem esse rei publicae conposita,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 13, 32:

    omnia ad voluptatem multitudinis inperitae,

    Quint. 10, 1, 43:

    animum ad omnes casus,

    id. 12, 9, 20; Val. Fl. 1, 321:

    satis igitur in hoc nos componet multa scribendi exercitatio,

    Quint. 9, 4, 114:

    cultum victumque non ad nova exempla conponere, sed ut majorum mores suadent,

    Sen. Tranq. 9, 2. —
    2. (α).
    In gen.: eum allegaverunt, suom qui servom diceret Cum auro esse apud me: conposita est fallacia, [p. 393] Ut, etc., Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 29:

    quin jam virginem Despondi: res composita'st,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 17:

    ita causa componitur, ut item palaestritae Bidini peterent ab Epicrate hereditatem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 22, § 54:

    societatem praedarum cum latronibus conposuisse,

    Sall. H. 4, 11 Dietsch:

    crimen ab inimicis Romae conpositum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 61, § 141:

    conpositis inter se rebus,

    Sall. J. 66, 2:

    ita conposito dolo digrediuntur,

    id. ib. 111, 4:

    conposito jam consilio,

    Liv. 3, 53, 3: ceteri proditores ea quae composita erant exspectabant;

    convenerat autem, etc.,

    id. 25, 9, 8:

    sub noctem susurri Composita repetantur hora,

    Hor. C. 1, 9, 20:

    ictum jam foedus, et omnes Conpositae leges,

    Verg. A. 12, 315:

    compositis notis,

    Tib. 1, 2, 22:

    crimen ac dolum ultro,

    Tac. H. 1, 34:

    proditionem,

    id. ib. 2, 100:

    seditionem,

    id. ib. 4, 14:

    insidias,

    id. ib. 5, 22; id. A. 12, 54; 13, 47: pacem componere, v. B. 5. supra.—
    (β).
    With rel.-clause:

    cum summa concordia, quos dimitterent, quos retinerent, composuerunt,

    Liv. 40, 40, 14.—
    (γ).
    With inf.:

    ii, secretis conloquiis conponunt Gallos concire,

    Tac. A. 3, 40.—
    (δ).
    Pass. impers.:

    ut domi compositum cum Marcio erat,

    Liv. 2, 37, 1.—
    (ε).
    With ut and subj.:

    compositum inter ipsos ut Latiaris strueret dolum,

    Tac. A. 4, 68; cf. P. a. subst.
    3.
    In gen., to feign, invent, devise, contrive, in order to deceive or delude, etc.: composita dicta, Att. ap. Non. p. 260, 22 (Trag. Rel. v. 47 Rib.):

    ne tu istic hodie malo tuo conpositis mendaciis Advenisti,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 211:

    nec bene mendaci risus conponitur ore,

    Tib. 3, 6, 35 (3, 7, 3):

    sed vobis facile'st verba et conponere fraudes,

    Prop. 2, 9, 31:

    insidias in me conponis inanes,

    id. 2, 32 (3, 30), 19:

    compositas insidias fatoque evitatas ementitur,

    Tac. A. 13, 47:

    si haec fabulosa et composita videntur,

    id. Or. 12; id. Agr. 40:

    quae ut augendae famae composita, sic reliqua non in obscuro habentur,

    id. A. 15, 16; cf.:

    vetustatem, ut cetera, in majus conponentem altores Jovis celebravisse,

    exaggerating, Sall. H. 3, 60 Dietsch.— Part. perf. with in and acc., pretending, assuming the appearance or expression:

    (Domitianus) paratus simulatione, in adrogantiam compositus audiit preces,

    Tac. Agr. 42:

    is in maestitiam compositus,

    id. H. 2, 9; 1, 54:

    in securitatem,

    id. A. 3, 44.—Rarely with ad:

    tunc compositus ad maestitiam,

    Tac. A. 13, 20.— Hence, P. a.: compŏsĭtus ( - postus), a, um.
    A.
    Well-arranged, ordered, or constituted, orderly, regular:

    quae (injuria) dum foris sunt, nil videtur mundius, Nec magis compositum quicquam nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 13: admiratus sum... sunchusin litterularum, quae solent tuae compositissimae et clarissimae esse, Cic. Att. 6, 9, 1:

    acrior impetu atque animis quam compositior ullo ordine pugna fuit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 13:

    intellegitur, etiamsi non adjecero, conpositum ordinatumque fore talem virum,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 8, 3:

    composita et quieta et beata respublica,

    Tac. Or. 36. —Of writings:

    quare in his quoque libris erant eadem aliqua... omnia vero compositiora et elaborata,

    Quint. 1, pr. § 8; cf.:

    illa quae curam fatentur et ficta atque composita videri etiam volunt,

    elaborate, id. 8, pr. § 23.— Transf., of the orator himself:

    si aut compositi oratoris bene structam collocationem dissolvas permutatione verborum,

    Cic. Or. 70, 232.—
    B.
    Fitly disposed for any purpose, prepared, apt, fit, adapted, qualified, suitable, ready:

    perficiam ut nemo umquam paratior, vigilantior, compositior ad judicium venisse videatur,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 1, 11; so,

    equus bene natura compositus,

    Auct. Her. 4, 46, 59.— With ad or in and acc., or with dat.:

    arte quadam ab juventa in ostentationem (virtutum) compositus,

    Liv. 26, 19, 3 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    alius historiae magis idoneus, alius compositus ad carmen,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7:

    aeque in adulationem compositus (sacerdos),

    Curt. 4, 7, 26:

    (Attici) non maxime ad risum compositi,

    Quint. 6, 3, 18:

    natura atque arte compositus alliciendis etiam Muciani moribus,

    Tac. H. 2, 5.—
    C.
    Quiet, peaceful, undisturbed, calm, composed, unimpassioned, etc.:

    ut peractis quae agenda fuerint salvo jam et composito die possis ibi manere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 2:

    lenis et nitidi et compositi generis amatores,

    Quint. 10, 1, 44:

    actio,

    id. 11, 3, 110:

    aetas,

    mature, sedate, Tac. A. 13, 1: adfectus mites atque compositi, Quint. 6, 2, 9:

    supercilium (opp. erectum),

    id. 11, 3, 74:

    repetitio eorum (civium) labefactabat compositam civitatem,

    Flor. 3, 23, 3.—
    D.
    Compound, composite, made up of parts (opp. simplex):

    verba,

    Quint. 1, 5, 3; 1, 6, 38; 7, 9, 5:

    voces,

    id. 1, 5, 65; cf. id. 1, 5, 9; 2, 12, 3.—Hence, subst.: compŏsĭtum ( conp-), i, n., that which is agreed, an agreement, compact, etc.; only abl. in the phrases,
    (α).
    Ex composito, according to agreement, by agreement, in concert, Sall. H. 2, 12 Dietsch:

    tum ex composito orta vis,

    Liv. 1, 9, 10; 5, 14, 2; 36, 25, 1; 40, 48, 4; Suet. Claud. 37; Tac. H. 4, 66.—
    (β).
    De composito, by agreement, App. Mag. 1, p. 273; and,
    (γ).
    More rarely in the same sense, composito alone, Ter. Phorm. 5, 1, 29; Nep. Dat. 6, 6; Verg. A. 2, 129.—Hence also adv.: compŏsĭtē ( conp-), in an orderly, regular, or skilful manner, orderly, regularly, properly (class. but rare;

    not in Quint.): ambulare,

    Col. 6, 2, 5:

    indutus,

    Gell. 1, 5, 2:

    composite et apte dicere,

    Cic. Or. 71, 236:

    composite, ornate, copiose eloqui,

    id. De Or. 1, 11, 48:

    composite atque magnifice casum reipublicae miserati,

    Sall. C. 51, 9:

    bene et composite disseruit,

    id. Ib. 52.— Comp.:

    compositius cuncta quam festinantius agerent,

    Tac. A. 15, 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > conpositum

  • 11 decet

    dĕcet, cuit, 2, v. impers. [Sanscr. dacas, fame; Gr. dokeô, to seem, think; Lat. decus, dignus]. It is seemly, comely, becoming,; it beseems, behooves, is fitting, suitable, proper (for syn. v. debeo init.):

    decere quasi aptum esse consentaneumque tempori et personae,

    Cic. Or. 22, 74; cf. also nunc quid aptum sit, hoc est, quid maxime deceat in oratione videamus, id. de Or. 3, 55, 210 (very freq. and class.; not in Caes.).—Constr., with nom. or inf. of the thing, and with acc.; less freq. with dat. of the pers.; sometimes absol.
    a.
    With nom. rei
    (α).
    and acc. pers.: Ph. Quin me aspice et contempla, ut haec (sc. vestis) me decet. Sc. Virtute formae id evenit, te ut deceat, quicquid habeas, Plaut. Most. 1, 3, 16 sq.; cf.:

    quem decet muliebris ornatus, quem incessus psaltriae, Cic. Clod. fragm. 5, p. 105 ed. Beier: te toga picta decet,

    Prop. 4, 4, 53 al.; Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 30; Quint. 8, 5, 28;

    and nec habitus triumphalis feminas deceat,

    id. 11, 1, 3; cf.:

    omnis Aristippum color decuit,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 17, 23:

    intonsus crinis deum,

    Tib. 1, 4, 38; cf.:

    neglecta decet multas coma,

    Ov. A. A. 3, 153; id. F. 2, 106 et saep.:

    id maxime quemque decet, quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113:

    quod omnes et semper et ubique decet,

    Quint. 11, 1, 14:

    non si quid Pholoen satis, Et te, Chlori, decet,

    Hor. Od. 3, 15, 8 et saep.:

    qui flexus deceat miserationem,

    Quint. 1, 11, 12:

    civitatem quis deceat status,

    Hor. Od. 3, 29, 25 et saep.—In plur.:

    quem tenues decuere togae nitidique capilli,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 14, 32:

    te non citharae decent,

    id. Od. 3, 15, 14:

    alba decent Cererem: vestes Cerealibus albas Sumite,

    Ov. F. 4, 619; id. M. 1, 457 et saep.:

    nec velle experiri, quam se aliena deceant,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113; Quint. 6, 1, 25:

    illa quoque diversa bonum virum decent,

    id. 11, 1, 42 et saep.:

    duo verba uni apposita ne versum quidem decuerint,

    id. 8, 6, 43.—
    (β).
    Without acc. pers.:

    nihil est difficilius quam quid deceat videre,

    Cic. Or. 21, 70; cf.:

    quid deceat et quid aptum sit personis,

    id. Off. 1, 34 fin.:

    casus singularis magis decuit,

    Quint. 8, 3, 20; id. 11, 3, 161 et saep.:

    idem fere in omni genere causarum et proderit et decebit,

    id. 11, 1, 14; cf. id. 9, 4, 21.—In plur.:

    ubi lepos, joci, risus, vinum, ebrietas decent,

    Plaut. Ps. prol. 20:

    cum magna pars est exhausta orationis, pene omnia decent,

    Quint. 11, 3, 147; 150; id. 11, 1, 48 et saep. —
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    istuc facinus nostro generi non decet,

    Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 188: certa est ratio quae deceat philosopho, Apul. Flor. 3, p. 355, 13; Plaut. Pers. 2, 2, 34; cf. infra. —
    b.
    With inf.
    (α).
    and acc. pers.:

    non te mihi irasci decet,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 3, 24:

    hanc maculam nos decet effugere,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 31:

    oratorem irasci minime decet,

    Cic. Tusc. 4, 25; Quint. 12, 6, 3; Ov. M. 3, 265; so freq. with inf. pass.:

    specimen naturae capi debet ex optima quaque natura,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 14, 32:

    mortalin' decuit violari vulnere divum?

    Verg. A. 12, 797; Ter. And. prol. 16. —
    (β).
    Without acc.:

    injusta ab justis impetrare non decet,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 35:

    exemplis grandioribus decuit uti,

    Cic. Div. 1, 20; Ov. M. 8, 27:

    nunc decet caput impedire myrto: nunc et in umbrosis Fauno decet immolare lucis,

    Hor. Od. 1, 4, 9 sq.; id. Ep. 1, 17, 2; Pers. 3, 27.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    decet tantae majestati eas servare leges, quibus, etc.,

    Dig. 32, 1, 23:

    ita uti liberali esse ingenio decet,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 89:

    prima certe pensari decet populo utrum, etc.,

    Liv. 34, 58, 8.
    c.
    Absol.
    (α).
    with acc. pers.:

    ita ut vos decet,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 40; cf.:

    facis, ut te decet,

    Ter. Andr. 2, 5, 10; id. Heaut. 5, 5, 10:

    ita uti fortes decet milites,

    id. Eun. 4, 7, 44; cf.: id. Andr. 2, 6, 14:

    illum decet,

    Quint. 9, 4, 15 et saep.—
    (β).
    Without case:

    eia haud sic decet,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 35; cf. id. Hec. 2, 2, 10:

    fecisti ut decuerat,

    id. ib. 4, 4, 66:

    minus severe quam decuit,

    Cic. Phil. 6, 1:

    velata parte oris, quia sic decebat,

    it was becoming, Tac. A. 13, 45:

    nihil aliter ac deceat,

    id. Att. 6, 3, 8: perge;

    decet,

    Verg. A. 12, 153 et saep.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    ita nobis decet,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 5; id. Heaut. 5, 2, 12:

    locum editiorem quam victoribus decebat,

    Sall. H. 1, 98 (Serv. Verg. A. 8, 127.)— Hence, dĕcens, entis, P. a. (freq. in Hor., Ov., and post-Aug. prose, esp. Quint.; not in Verg.; in Cic. once adverbially, and cf. decentia), seemly, becoming, decent, proper, fit:

    amictus,

    Ov. Pont. 2, 5, 52; cf.:

    decentior amictus,

    Quint. 11, 3, 156;

    and sinus (togae) decentissimus,

    id. 11, 3, 140:

    ornatus,

    id. 2, 15, 21:

    motus,

    Hor. Od. 4, 13, 17; Quint. 1, 10, 26; cf.:

    corporis decens et accommodatus orationi motus,

    id. 11, 3, 29;

    and allevatio atque contractio humerorum,

    id. 11, 3, 83:

    decentissimum sponsalium genus,

    Sen. Ben. 1, 9 et saep.:

    quid verum atque decens,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 11:

    decentius erit servare pudorem,

    Quint. 11, 1, 78; cf. 8, 6, 6.—
    2.
    Esp. of corporeal fitness and symmetry, regularly, symmetrically, handsomely shaped; well-formed; noble:

    forma,

    Ov. Am. 3, 1, 9; cf.:

    habitus decentior quam sublimior,

    Tac. Agr. 44:

    facies,

    Ov. Tr. 3, 7, 33:

    malae,

    Hor. Od. 3, 27, 53:

    Venus,

    id. ib. 1, 18, 6; cf.:

    Cynthia,

    Prop. 4, 8, 52 (5, 8, 52 M.):

    Gratiae,

    Hor. Od. 1, 4, 6:

    (Paullus) et nobilis et decens,

    id. ib. 4, 1, 13: pulcher et decens toto corpore, Suct. Dom. 18; cf. Juv. 6, 161:

    sumptis decentior armis Minerva,

    Ov. H. 5, 35; Quint. 8, 3, 10 et saep.— Adv.: decenter (acc. to no. 1), becomingly, decently, properly, fitly:

    fictis nominibus decenter uti,

    Plin. Ep. 6, 21, 5; cf.:

    fieri,

    Quint. 11, 1, 79:

    singula quaeque locum teneant sortita decenter,

    Hor. A. P. 92; cf.:

    maesta,

    Ov. Am. 2, 5, 44.— Comp.: Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 216; Quint. 9, 1, 21 al.— Sup., a false reading for diligentissime, Cic. Caes. 26, 74.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > decet

  • 12 ex

    ex or ē (ex always before vowels, and elsewh. more freq. than e; e. g. in Cic. Rep. e occurs 19 times, but ex 61 times, before consonants—but no rule can be given for the usage; cf., e. g., ex and e together:

    qui ex corporum vinculis tamquam e carcere evolaverunt,

    Cic. Rep. 6, 14. But certain expressions have almost constantly the same form, as ex parte, ex sententia, ex senatus consulto, ex lege, ex tempore, etc.; but e regione, e re nata, e vestigio, e medio, and e republica used adverbially; v. Neue, Formenl. 2, 756 sq.), praep. with abl. [kindr. with Gr. ek, ex], denotes out from the interior of a thing, in opposition to in (cf. ab and de init.), out of, from.
    I.
    In space.
    A.
    Prop.:

    interea e portu nostra navis solvitur, Ubi portu exiimus, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3, 54:

    quam (sphaeram) M. Marcelli avus captis Syracusis ex urbe locupletissima atque ornatissima sustulisset, cum aliud nihil ex tanta praeda domum suam deportavisset,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 14:

    influxit non tenuis quidam e Graecia rivulus in hanc urbem,

    id. ib. 2, 19:

    visam, ecquae advenerit In portum ex Epheso navis mercatoria,

    Plaut. Bacch. 2, 3, 2; cf. id. ib. 3, 2, 5;

    3, 6, 32 al.: magno de flumine malim quam ex hoc fonticulo tantundem sumere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 56; cf.:

    nec vos de paupere mensa Dona nec e puris spernite fictilibus,

    Tib. 1, 1, 38:

    clanculum ex aedibus me edidi foras,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 9; so freq. with verbs compounded with ex; also with verbs compounded with ab and de, v. abeo, abscedo, amoveo, aveho, etc.; decedo, deduco, defero, deicio, etc.—
    2.
    In a downward direction, from, down from, from off:

    ex spelunca saxum in crura ejus incidisse,

    Cic. Fat. 3, 6; cf. Liv. 35, 21:

    picis e caelo demissum flumen,

    Lucr. 6, 257:

    equestribus proeliis saepe ex equis desiliunt,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 2, 3; cf.:

    cecidisse ex equo dicitur,

    Cic. Clu. 62 fin.:

    e curru trahitur,

    id. Rep. 2, 41:

    e curru desilit,

    Ov. A. A. 1, 559 et saep., v. cado, decido, decurro, deduco, delabor, elabor, etc.—
    3.
    In an upward direction, from, above:

    collis paululum ex planitie editus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 8, 3:

    globum terrae eminentem e mari,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 28;

    and trop.: consilia erigendae ex tam gravi casu rei publicae,

    Liv. 6, 2.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    To indicate the country, and, in gen., the place from or out of which any person or thing comes, from:

    ex Aethiopia est usque haec,

    Ter. Eun. 3, 2, 18:

    quod erat ex eodem municipio,

    Cic. Clu. 17, 49; cf. id. ib. 5, 11.—Freq. without a verb:

    Philocrates ex Alide,

    Plaut. Capt. 3, 2, 10:

    ex Aethiopia ancillula,

    Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 85 Ruhnk.:

    negotiator ex Africa,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 5:

    Epicurei e Graecia,

    id. N. D. 1, 21, 58:

    Q. Junius ex Hispania quidam,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 27:

    ex India elephanti,

    Liv. 35, 32:

    civis Romanus e conventu Panhormitano,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 54 Zumpt; cf. id. ib. 2, 5, 59 fin.:

    meretrix e proxumo,

    Plaut. As. 1, 1, 38; cf. id. Aul. 2, 4, 11:

    puer ex aula (sc. regis barbari),

    Hor. C. 1, 29, 7:

    ex spelunca saxum,

    Cic. Fat. 3, 6:

    saxum ex capitolio,

    Liv. 35, 21, 6:

    ex equo cadere,

    Cic. Clu. 32, 175; cf. id. Fat. 3, 6; Auct. B. Hisp. 15 et saep.—
    2.
    To indicate the place from which any thing is done or takes place, from, down from: ibi tum derepente ex alto in altum despexit mare, Enn. ap. Non. 518, 6 (for which:

    a summo caelo despicere,

    Ov. A. A. 2, 87; and:

    de vertice montis despicere,

    id. M. 11, 503); cf.:

    T. Labienus... ex loco superiore conspicatus, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 26, 4:

    ex qua (villa) jam audieram fremitum clientium meorum,

    Cic. Fam. 7, 18, 3:

    ex hoc ipso loco permulta contra legem eam verba fecisti,

    id. de Imp. Pomp. 17, 52; so id. ib. 8 fin.; cf.:

    judices aut e plano aut e quaesitoris tribunali admonebat,

    Suet. Tib. 33:

    ex equo, ex prora, ex puppi pugnare,

    Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 202 and 209; cf. Caes. B. G. 2, 27, 3:

    ex vinculis causam dicere,

    id. ib. 1, 4, 1; Liv. 29, 19.—Hence the adverbial expressions, ex adverso, ex diverso, ex contrario, e regione, ex parte, e vestigio, etc.; v. the words adversus, diversus, etc.—Also, ex itinere, during or on a journey, on the march, without halting, Cic. Fam. 3, 9; Sall. C. 34, 2; Liv. 35, 24; Caes. B. G. 2, 6, 1; 3, 21, 2; id. B. C. 1, 24, 4; Sall. J. 56, 3 al.; cf.

    also: ex fuga,

    during the flight, Caes. B. G. 6, 35, 6; id. B. C. 3, 95; 96 fin.; Sall. J. 54, 4 Kritz.; Liv. 6, 29; 28, 23 al.
    II.
    In time.
    A.
    From a certain point of time, i. e. immediately after, directly after, after (in this sense more freq. than ab):

    Cotta ex consulatu est profectus in Galliam,

    Cic. Brut. 92, 318; so,

    ex consulatu,

    Liv. 4, 31 Drak.; 40, 1 fin.; 22, 49; 27, 34; Vell. 2, 33, 1 al.:

    ex praetura,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 20, 53; id. Mur. 7, 15; Caes. B. C. 1, 22, 4; 1, 31, 2:

    ex dictatura,

    Liv. 10, 5 fin.:

    ex eo magistratu,

    Vell. 2, 31 et saep.; cf.:

    Agrippa ex Asia (pro consule eam provinciam annuo imperio tenuerat) Moesiae praepositus est,

    Tac. H. 3, 46 fin.:

    statim e somno lavantur,

    id. G. 22:

    tanta repente vilitas annonae ex summa inopia et caritate rei frumentariae consecuta est,

    Cic. de Imp. Pomp. 15, 44; cf. Liv. 21, 39:

    ex aliquo graviore actu personam deponere,

    Quint. 6, 2, 35:

    mulier ex partu si, etc.,

    Cels. 2, 8:

    ex magnis rupibus nactus planitiem,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 70, 3; cf.: ex maximo bello tantum otium totae insulae conciliavit, ut, etc., Nop. Timol. 3, 2; and:

    ex magna desperatione tandem saluti redditus,

    Just. 12, 10, 1 et saep.:

    ex quo obses Romae fuit,

    since he was a hostage in Rome, Liv. 40, 5 fin. —So the phrase, aliud ex alio, one thing after another:

    me quotidie aliud ex alio impedit,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 19 fin.; Cic. Leg. 1, 4, 14 (cf. also, alius, D.):

    aliam rem ex alia cogitare,

    Ter. Eun. 4, 2, 3:

    alia ex aliis iniquiora postulando,

    Liv. 4, 2.—So, too, diem ex die exspectabam, one day after another, from day to day, Cic. Att. 7, 26 fin.; cf.:

    diem ex die ducere,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 16, 5 (v. dies, I. A. b.).—
    2.
    With names of office or calling, to denote one who has completed his term of office, or has relinquished his vocation. So in class. Lat. very dub.;

    for the passage,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 46, 4, belongs more correctly under III. B. It is, however, very common in post-class. Lat., esp. in inscriptions—ex consule, ex comite, ex duce, ex equite, ex praefecto, etc.— an ex-consul, etc. (for which, without good MS. authority, the nominatives exconsul, excomes, exdux, etc., are sometimes assumed, in analogy with proconsul, and subvillicus; cf. Schneid. Gram. 1, p. 562, note, and the authors there cited):

    vir excelsus ex quaestore et ex consule Tribonianus,

    Cod. Just. 1, 17, 2, § 9; cf.:

    Pupienus et Balbinus, ambo ex consulibus,

    Capitol. Gord. 22:

    duo ante ipsam aram a Gallicano ex consulibus et Maecenate ex ducibus interempti sunt,

    id. ib.:

    mandabat Domitiano, ex comite largitionum, praefecto, ut, etc.,

    Amm. 14, 7, 9:

    Serenianus ex duce,

    id. 14, 7, 7:

    INLVSTRIS EX PRAEFECTO praeTORIO ET EX PRAEFECTO VRbis,

    Inscr. Orell. 2355 al., v. Inscr. Orell. in Indice, p. 525.—

    And of a period of life: quem si Constans Imperator olim ex adulto jamque maturum audiret, etc.,

    i. e. who had outgrown the period of youth, and was now a man, Amm. 16, 7.—
    B.
    From and after a given time, from... onward, from, since (cf. ab, II. A. 2.):

    bonus volo jam ex hoc die esse,

    Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 10:

    itaque ex eo tempore res esse in vadimonium coepit,

    Cic. Quint. 5 fin.:

    nec vero usquam discedebam, nec a republica deiciebam oculos, ex eo die, quo, etc.,

    id. Phil. 1, 1:

    ex aeterno tempore,

    id. Fin. 1, 6, 17:

    ex hoc die,

    id. Rep. 1, 16:

    motum ex Metello consule civicum tractas,

    from the consulship of Metellus, Hor. C. 2, 1, 1:

    C. Pompeius Diogenes ex Kalendis Juliis cenaculum locat,

    Petr. 38, 10; so usually in forms of hiring; cf. Garaton. Cic. Phil. 2, 39, 100:

    ex ea die ad hanc diem,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 12 fin.:

    memoria tenent, me ex Kalendis Januariis ad hanc horam invigilasse rei publicae,

    id. Phil. 14, 7, 20.—Esp.: ex quo (sc. tempore), since: [p. 670] octavus annus est, ex quo, etc., Tac. Agr. 33; id. A. 14, 53:

    sextus decimus dies agitur, ex quo,

    id. H. 1, 29:

    sextus mensis est, ex quo,

    Curt. 10, 6, 9; Hor. Ep. 11, 5; so,

    ex eo,

    Tac. A. 12, 7; Suet. Caes. 22:

    ex illo,

    Ov. F. 5, 670; Stat. Silv. 1, 2, 81.—
    C.
    Less freq. in specifying a future date (after which something is to be done), from, after:

    Romae vereor ne ex Kal. Jan. magni tumultus sint,

    Cic. Fam. 16, 9, 3:

    hunc judicem ex Kal. Jan. non habemus... ex Kal. Jan. non judicabunt,

    id. Verr. 1, 10:

    ex Idibus Mart.... ex Idibus Mai.,

    id. Att. 5, 21, 9.
    III.
    In other relations, and in gen. where a going out or forth, a coming or springing out of any thing is conceivable.
    A.
    With verbs of taking out, or, in gen., of taking, receiving, deriving (both physically and mentally; so of perceiving, comprehending, inquiring, learning, hoping, etc.), away from, from, out of, of:

    solem e mundo tollere videntur, qui amicitiam e vita tollunt,

    Cic. Lael. 13, 47:

    ex omni populo deligendi potestas,

    id. Agr. 2, 9, 23:

    agro ex hoste capto,

    Liv. 41, 14, 3:

    cui cum liceret majores ex otio fructus capere,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 4:

    ex populo Romano bona accipere,

    Sall. J. 102:

    majorem laetitiam ex desiderio bonorum percepimus, quam ex laetitia improborum dolorem,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 4:

    quaesierat ex me Scipio,

    id. ib. 1, 13:

    ex te requirunt,

    id. ib. 2, 38:

    de quo studeo ex te audire, quid sentias,

    id. ib. 1, 11 fin.; 1, 30; 1, 46; 2, 38; cf.:

    intellexi ex tuis litteris te ex Turannio audisse, etc.,

    id. Att. 6, 9, 3:

    ex eo cum ab ineunte ejus aetate bene speravissem,

    id. Fam. 13, 16 et saep.; cf.:

    ex aliqua re aliquid nominare,

    id. N. D. 2, 20, 51:

    vocare,

    Tac. G. 2, 4; cf. id. ib. 4, 55; Sall. J. 5, 4.—
    B.
    In specifying a multitude from which something is taken, or of which it forms a part, out of, of:

    qui ex civitate in senatum, ex senatu in hoc consilium delecti estis,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 3 fin.:

    e vectoribus sorte ductus,

    id. Rep. 1, 34:

    ecquis est ex tanto populo, qui? etc.,

    id. Rab. Post. 17:

    homo ex numero disertorum postulabat, ut, etc.,

    id. de Or. 1, 37, 168: Q. Fulgentius, ex primo hastato (sc. ordine) legionis XIV., i. e. a soldier of the first division of hastati of the 14 th legion, Caes. B. C. 1, 46;

    v. hastatus: e barbaris ipsis nulli erant maritimi,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 4:

    unus ex illis decemviris,

    id. ib. 2, 37:

    ex omnibus seculis vix tria aut quatuor nominantur paria amicorum,

    id. Lael. 4, 15:

    aliquis ex vobis,

    id. Cael. 3, 7; id. Fam. 13, 1 fin.: id enim ei ex ovo videbatur aurum declarasse;

    reliquum, argentum,

    this of the egg, id. Div. 2, 65:

    quo e collegio (sc. decemvirorum),

    id. Rep. 2, 36:

    virgines ex sacerdotio Vestae,

    Flor. 1, 13, 12:

    alia ex hoc quaestu,

    Ter. Hec. 5, 1, 29 Ruhnk.; cf.:

    fuit eodem ex studio vir eruditus apud patres nostros,

    Cic. Mur. 36; Ov. Am. 2, 5, 54; Sen. Ben. 3, 9; id. Ep. 52, 3:

    qui sibi detulerat ex latronibus suis principatum,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 3:

    est tibi ex his, qui assunt, bella copia,

    id. Rep. 2, 40:

    Batavi non multum ex ripa, sed insulam Rheni amnis colunt,

    Tac. G. 29:

    acerrimum autem ex omnibus nostris sensibus esse sensum videndi,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 87, 357:

    ex tribus istis modis rerum publicarum velim scire quod optimum judices,

    id. Rep. 1, 30; cf. id. ib. 1, 35 et saep.—
    2.
    Sometimes a circumlocution for the subject. gen., of (cf. de):

    has (turres) altitudo puppium ex barbaris navibus superabat,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 14, 4:

    album ex ovo cum rosa mixtum,

    Cels. 4, 20:

    ex fraxino frondes, ex leguminibus paleae,

    Col. 7, 3, 21 sq. —
    C.
    To indicate the material of which any thing is made or consists, of:

    fenestrae e viminibus factae,

    Varr. R. R. 3, 9, 6; cf.:

    statua ex aere facta,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 21; and:

    ex eo auro buculam curasse faciendam,

    id. Div. 1, 24:

    substramen e palea,

    Varr. R. R. 3, 10, 4:

    pocula ex auro, vas vinarium ex una gemma pergrandi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 27:

    monilia e gemmis,

    Suet. Calig. 56:

    farina ex faba,

    Cels. 5, 28:

    potiones ex absinthio,

    id. ib. et saep.:

    Ennius (i. e. statua ejus) constitutus ex marmore,

    Cic. Arch. 9 fin.; cf. id. Ac. 2, 31, 100:

    (homo) qui ex animo constet et corpore caduco et infirmo,

    id. N. D. 1, 35, 98:

    natura concreta ex pluribus naturis,

    id. ib. 3, 14; id. Rep. 1, 45; id. Ac. 1, 2, 6: cum Epicuro autem hoc est plus negotii, quod e duplici genere voluptatis conjunctus est, id. Fin. 2, 14, 44 et saep.—
    D.
    To denote technically the material, out of, i. e. with which any thing to eat or drink, etc., is mixed or prepared (esp. freq. of medical preparations):

    resinam ex melle Aegyptiam,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 28:

    quo pacto ex jure hesterno panem atrum vorent,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 17:

    bibat jejunus ex aqua castoreum,

    Cels. 3, 23:

    aqua ex lauro decocta,

    id. 4, 2; cf.:

    farina tritici ex aceto cocta,

    Plin. 22, 25, 57, § 120:

    pullum hirundinis servatum ex sale,

    Cels. 4, 4:

    nuclei pinei ex melle, panis vel elota alica ex aqua mulsa (danda est),

    id. 4, 7 et saep.—So of the mixing of colors or flavors:

    bacae e viridi rubentes,

    Plin. 15, 30, 39, § 127:

    frutex ramosus, bacis e nigro rufis,

    id. ib. §

    132: id solum e rubro lacteum traditur,

    id. 12, 14, 30, § 52:

    e viridi pallens,

    id. 37, 8, 33, § 110:

    apes ex aureolo variae,

    Col. 9, 3, 2:

    sucus ex austero dulcis,

    Plin. 13, 9, 18, § 62; 21, 8, 26, § 50:

    ex dulci acre,

    id. 11, 15, 15, § 39; cf.

    trop.: erat totus ex fraude et mendacio factus,

    Cic. Clu. 26.—
    E.
    To indicate the cause or reason of any thing, from, through, by, by reason of, on account of:

    cum esset ex aere alieno commota civitas,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33:

    ex doctrina nobilis et clarus,

    id. Rab. Post. 9, 23:

    ex vulnere aeger,

    id. Rep. 2, 21; cf.:

    ex renibus laborare,

    id. Tusc. 2, 25:

    ex gravitate loci vulgari morbos,

    Liv. 25, 26:

    ex vino vacillantes, hesterna ex potatione oscitantes,

    Quint. 8, 33, 66:

    gravida e Pamphilo est,

    Ter. And. 1, 3, 11:

    credon' tibi hoc, nunc peperisse hanc e Pamphilo?

    id. ib. 3, 2, 17:

    ex se nati,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 35:

    ex quodam conceptus,

    id. ib. 2, 21:

    ex nimia potentia principum oritur interitus principum,

    id. ib. 1, 44:

    ex hac maxima libertate tyrannis gignitur,

    id. ib. et saep.:

    ex te duplex nos afficit sollicitudo,

    Cic. Brut. 97, 332; cf.:

    quoniam tum ex me doluisti, nunc ut duplicetur tuum ex me gaudium, praestabo,

    id. Fam. 16, 21, 3:

    in spem victoriae adductus ex opportunitate loci,

    Sall. J. 48, 2:

    veritus ex anni tempore et inopia aquae, ne siti conficeretur exercitus,

    id. ib. 50, 1 et saep.:

    ex Transalpinis gentibus triumphare,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 6, 18; id. Off. 2, 8, 28; cf. id. Fam. 3, 10, 1:

    gens Fabia saepe ex opulentissima Etrusca civitate victoriam tulit,

    Liv. 2, 50:

    ex tam propinquis stativis parum tuta frumentatio erat,

    i. e. on account of the proximity of the two camps, Liv. 31, 36:

    qua ex causa cum bellum Romanis Sabini intulissent,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 7:

    hic mihi (credo equidem ex hoc, quod eramus locuti) Africanus se ostendit,

    id. ib. 6, 10:

    quod ex eo sciri potest, quia, etc.,

    id. Tusc. 1, 18 fin.; cf. id. Leg. 1, 15, 43:

    causa... fuit ex eo, quod, etc.,

    id. Phil. 6, 1:

    ex eo fieri, ut, etc.,

    id. Lael. 13, 46:

    ex quo fit, ut, etc.,

    id. Rep. 1, 43:

    e quo efficitur, non ut, etc.,

    id. Fin. 2, 5, 15 et saep.—Sometimes between two substantives without a verb:

    non minor ex aqua postea quam ab hostibus clades,

    Flor. 4, 10, 8:

    ex nausea vomitus,

    Cels. 4, 5:

    ex hac clade atrox ira,

    Liv. 2, 51, 6:

    metus ex imperatore, contemptio ex barbaris,

    Tac. A. 11, 20:

    ex legato timor,

    id. Agr. 16 et saep.—
    2.
    In partic., to indicate that from which any thing derives its name, from, after, on account of:

    cui postea Africano cognomen ex virtute fuit,

    Sall. J. 5, 4; cf. Flor. 2, 6, 11:

    cui (sc. Tarquinio) cognomen Superbo ex moribus datum,

    id. 1, 7, 1:

    nomen ex vitio positum,

    Ov. F. 2, 601:

    quarum ex disparibus motionibus magnum annum mathematici nominaverunt,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 20; id. Leg. 1, 8; cf. id. Tusc. 4, 12; Plin. 11, 37, 45, § 123:

    holosteon sine duritia est, herba ex adverso appellata a Graecis,

    id. 27, 10, 65, § 91:

    quam urbem e suo nomine Romam jussit nominari,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 7:

    e nomine (nominibus),

    id. ib. 2, 20; Tac. A. 4, 55; id. G. 2; Just. 15, 4, 8; 20, 5, 9 et saep.—
    F.
    To indicate a transition, i. e. a change, alteration, from one state or condition to another, from, out of:

    si possum tranquillum facere ex irato mihi,

    Plaut. Cist. 3, 21:

    fierent juvenes subito ex infantibus parvis,

    Lucr. 1, 186:

    dii ex hominibus facti,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 10:

    ut exsistat ex rege dominus, ex optimatibus factio, ex populo turba et confusio,

    id. ib. 1, 45:

    nihil est tam miserabile quam ex beato miser,

    id. Part. 17; cf.:

    ex exsule consul,

    id. Manil. 4, 46:

    ex perpetuo annuum placuit, ex singulari duplex,

    Flor. 1, 9, 2: tua virtute nobis Romanos ex amicis amicissimos fecisti, Sall. J. 10:

    ex alto sapore excitati,

    Curt. 7, 11, 18.—
    G.
    Ex (e) re, ex usu or ex injuria, to or for the advantage or injury of any one:

    ex tua re non est, ut ego emoriar,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 3, 102; 104; cf. Ter. Phorm. 5, 7, 76: Cervius haec inter vicinus garrit aniles Ex re fabellas, i. e. fitting, suitable, pertinent (= pro commodo, quae cum re proposita conveniant), Hor. S. 2, 6, 78:

    aliquid facere bene et e re publica,

    for the good, the safety of the state, Cic. Phil. 10, 11, 25:

    e (not ex) re publica,

    id. ib. 3, 12, 30; 8, 4, 13; id. de Or. 2, 28, 124; id. Fam. 13, 8, 2; Liv. 23, 24; Suet. Caes. 19 et saep.:

    exque re publica,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 15, 38; 5, 13, 36:

    non ex usu nostro est,

    Plaut. Merc. 2, 3, 60; Ter. Hec. 4, 3, 10; Caes. B. G. 1, 30, 2; 1, 50 fin.; 5, 6 fin. al.; cf.:

    ex utilitate,

    Plin. Pan. 67, 4; Tac. A. 15, 43:

    ex nullius injuria,

    Liv. 45, 44, 11.—
    H.
    To designate the measure or rule, according to, after, in conformity with which any thing is done:

    (majores) primum jurare EX SVI ANIMI SENTENTIA quemque voluerunt,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 47 fin. (cf. Beier, Cic. Off. 3, 29, 108, and the references):

    ex omnium sententia constitutum est, etc.,

    id. Clu. 63, 177; cf.:

    ex senatus sententia,

    id. Fam. 12, 4:

    ex collegii sententia,

    Liv. 4, 53:

    ex amicorum sententia,

    id. 40, 29:

    ex consilii sententia,

    id. 45, 29 et saep.; cf.

    also: ex sententia, i. q. ex voluntate,

    according to one's wish, Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 96: Ter. Hec. 5, 4, 32; Cic. Fam. 12, 10, 2; id. Att. 5, 21 al.;

    and, in a like sense: ex mea sententia,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 2, 1; id. Merc. 2, 3, 36:

    ex senatus consulto,

    Cic. Rep. 3, 18; Sall. C. 42 fin.:

    ex edicto, ex decreto,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 56 fin.; id. Quint. 8, 30:

    ex lege,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 5, 19; id. Clu. 37, 103; id. Inv. 1, 38, 68: ex jure, Enn. ap. Gell. 20, 10, 4 (Ann. v. 276 ed. Vahl.); Varr. L. L. 6, § 64 Mull.; Cic. Mur. 12, 26; id. de Or. 1, 10, 41:

    ex foedere,

    Liv. 1, 23 et saep.:

    hunccine erat aequum ex illius more, an illum ex hujus vivere?

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 29; so,

    ex more,

    Sall. J. 61, 3; Verg. A. 5, 244; 8, 186; Ov. M. 14, 156; 15, 593; Plin. Ep. 3, 18; Flor. 4, 2, 79 al.; cf.:

    ex consuetudine,

    Cic. Clu. 13, 38; Caes. B. G. 1, 52, 4; 4, 32, 1; Sall. J. 71, 4; Quint. 2, 7, 1 al.:

    quod esse volunt e virtute, id est honeste vivere,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 11, 34:

    ex sua libidine moderantur,

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 1, 4; cf. Sall. C. 8, 1:

    ut magis ex animo rogare nihil possim,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 8, 3:

    eorum ex ingenio ingenium horum probant,

    Plaut. Trin. 4, 3, 42; cf. Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 118; Balb. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 7, A.:

    leges ex utilitate communi, non ex scriptione, quae in litteris est, interpretari,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 38; cf. id. Lael. 6, 21:

    nemo enim illum ex trunco corporis spectabat, sed ex artificio comico aestimabat,

    id. Rosc. Com. 10, 28; cf. Sall. C. 10, 5; Caes. B. G. 3, 20, 1; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 4, 2 al.:

    ex tuis verbis meum futurum corium pulcrum praedicas,

    Plaut. Ep. 5, 1, 19; cf. Cic. Fam. 7, 17; id. Att. 1, 3:

    nunc quae scribo, scribo ex opinione hominum atque fama,

    id. Fam. 12, 4 fin.:

    scripsit Tiberio, non ut profugus aut supplex, sed ex memoria prioris fortunae,

    Tac. A. 2, 63: quamquam haec quidem res non solum ex domestica est ratione;

    attingit etiam bellicam,

    Cic. Off. 1, 22, 76; cf. id. Quint. 11; 15 et saep.—E re rata, v. ratus.—
    I.
    To form adverbial expressions, such as: ex aequo, ex commodo, ex contrario, ex composito, ex confesso, ex destinato, ex diverso, ex facili, etc., ex affluenti, ex continenti;

    ex improviso, ex inopinato, etc., v. the words aequus, commodus, etc.

    Ex placed after its noun: variis ex,

    Lucr.
    2, 791:

    terris ex,

    id. 6, 788:

    quibus e sumus uniter apti,

    id. 3, 839; 5, 949.—E joined with que:

    que sacra quercu,

    Verg. E. 7, 13.
    IV.
    In composition, ex (cf. dis) before vowels and h, and before c, p, q, t (exagito, exeo, exigo, exoro, exuro, exhaurio; excedo, expello, exquiro, extraho); ef (sometimes ec) before f (effero, effluo, effringo; also in good MSS. ecfero, ecfari, ecfodio), elsewhere e (eblandior, educo, egredior, eicio, eligo, emitto, enitor, evado, eveho). A few exceptions are found, viz., in ex: epoto and epotus as well as expotus, and escendo as well as exscensio; in e: exbibo as well as ebibo; exballisto, exbola; exdorsuo; exfututa as well as effutuo; exfibulo; exlex, etc. After ex in compounds s is [p. 671] often elided in MSS. and edd. Both forms are correct, but the best usage and analogy favor the retaining of the s; so, exsaevio, exsanguis, exscensio, exscindo, exscribo, exsculpo, exseco, exsecror, exsequiae, exsequor, exsero, exsicco, exsilio, exsilium, exsisto, exsolvo, exsomnis, exsorbeo, exsors, exspecto, exspes, exspiro, exspolio, exspuo, exsterno, exstimulo, exstinguo, exstirpo, exsto, exstruo, exsudo, exsugo, exsul, exsulto, exsupero, exsurgo, exsuscito, and some others, with their derivv.; cf. Ribbeck, Prol. Verg. p. 445 sq. Only in escendere and escensio is the elision of x before s sustained by preponderant usage; cf. Neue, Formenl. 2, p. 766.—
    B.
    Signification.
    1.
    Primarily and most freq. of place, out or forth: exeo, elabor, educo, evado, etc.; and in an upward direction: emineo, effervesco, effero, erigo, exsurgo, exsulto, extollo, everto, etc.—Hence also, trop., out of ( a former nature), as in effeminare, qs. to change out of his own nature into that of a woman: effero, are, to render wild; thus ex comes to denote privation or negation, Engl. un-: exanimare, excusare, enodare, exonerare, effrenare, egelidus, I., elinguis, elumbis, etc.—
    2.
    Throughout, to the end: effervesco, effero, elugeo; so in the neuter verbs which in composition (esp. since the Aug. per.) become active: egredior, enavigo, eno, enitor, excedo, etc.—Hence, thoroughly, utterly, completely: elaudare, emori, enecare, evastare, evincere (but eminari and eminatio are false readings for minari and minatio; q. v.); and hence a simple enhancing of the principal idea: edurus, efferus, elamentabilis, egelidus, exacerbo, exaugeo, excolo, edisco, elaboro, etc. In many compounds, however, of post - Aug. and especially of post-class. Latinity this force of ex is no longer distinct; so in appellations of color: exalbidus, exaluminatus, etc.; so in exabusus, exambire, exancillatus, etc. Vid. Hand Turs. II. Pp. 613-662.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ex

  • 13 idoneus

    ĭdōnĕus, a, um, adj. [Sanscr. root indh-, idh-, to kindle; prop. bright, conspicuous; cf. Idus], fit for something (esp. for an action), meet, proper, becoming, suitable, apt, capable, convenient, sufficient (of persons and things; class. and very freq. in prose and poetry; syn.: aptus, opportunus); constr. most commonly with ad, qui, the dat., or absol.; less freq. with in aliquid, the abl., or the inf.
    (α).
    With ad:

    tot quidem non potuisti adducere homines magis ad hanc rem idoneos, etc.,

    Plaut. Poen. 3, 2, 6:

    non essem ad ullam causam idoneus, judices, si hoc non viderem,

    Cic. Clu. 6, 17:

    ad amicitiam esse idoneus,

    id. Lael. 17, 62:

    loco pro castris ad aciem instruendam opportuno atque idoneo,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 8, 3:

    cum statim auditoris animum nobis idoneum reddimus ad audiendum,

    Auct. Her. 1, 4, 6:

    est enim (lex) ratio mensque sapientis, ad jubendum et ad deterrendum idonea,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 4, 8:

    scientia opportunitatis idoneorum ad agendum temporum,

    id. Off. 1, 40, 142:

    ad captandos lacertos tempestates non sunt idoneae,

    id. Att. 2, 6, 1:

    consilia idonea ad hoc nostrum negotium,

    id. ib. 5, 6, 1 al.—
    (β).
    With qui, or a rel. adverb:

    video hercle ego te me arbitrari, Euclio, hominem idoneum, Quem senecta aetate ludos facias,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 2, 74; cf. Ter. And. 3, 2, 12; 4, 4, 18:

    utrum ille (Pompeius) idoneus non est, qui impetret, etc.,

    Cic. de Imp. Pomp. 19, 57:

    tibi fortasse idoneus fuit nemo, quem imitarere,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 16, § 41:

    idonea mihi Laelii persona visa est, quae de amicitia dissereret,

    id. Lael. 1, 4:

    et rem idoneam, de qua quaeratur, et homines dignos, quibuscum disseratur, putant,

    id. Ac. 2, 6, 18:

    nequeo mearum rerum initium ullum invenire idoneum, Unde exordiar narrare, quae, etc.,

    Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 1.—
    (γ).
    With dat.:

    erit alius (discipulus) historiae magis idoneus,

    Quint. 2, 8, 7; 12, 10, 49:

    idoneus arti Cuilibet,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 8:

    non sat idoneus Pugnae ferebaris,

    id. C. 2, 19, 26:

    vixi puellis nuper idoneus,

    id. ib. 3, 26, 1:

    cum idoneos rhetori pueros putaverunt,

    Quint. 2, 3, 1:

    Falernum mihi semper idoneum visum est deversorio,

    Cic. Fam. 6, 19, 1:

    castris idoneum locum deligit,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 10, 2; 7, 35, 4:

    ad cibos viribus conservandis idoneos redeunt,

    Quint. 2, 10, 6:

    (volunt poëtae) simul et jucunda et idonea dicere vitae,

    Hor. A. P. 334: metuensque futuri In pace, ut sapiens, aptarit idonea bello, id. S. 2, 2, 111:

    ut patriae sit idoneus,

    serviceable, Juv. 14, 71.—With dat. gerundi (post-Aug.):

    Julius, qui perferendis militum mandatis habebatur idoneus,

    Tac. A. 1, 23 fin.
    (δ).
    Absol.:

    cujus (Cethegi) eloquentiae est auctor, et idoneus quidem mea sententia, Q. Ennius, etc.,

    a proper, sufficient voucher, Cic. Brut. 15, 57:

    auctor,

    Quint. 1, 4, 20; 2, 4, 42:

    qui si adductus gratia minus idoneum hominem praemio affecisset, etc.,

    i. e. deserving, worthy, Cic. Balb. 3, 7; cf. id. Off. 2, 15, 54:

    idoneus suae rei quisque defensor,

    Quint. 4, 1, 46:

    imperator,

    id. 12, 3, 5:

    juvenis,

    id. 10, 5, 21: debitor, safe, able to pay (opp. inops), Dig. 4, 4, 27 fin.; so,

    tutor,

    ib. 26, 1, 9; 27, 8, 1:

    homines,

    ib. 35, 2, 88; cf. Sen. Ben. 4, 39:

    servi conscii, tempus idoneum, locus opportune captus ad eam rem,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 24, 68:

    tempora,

    Quint. 12, 11, 18; cf.:

    lex promulgata idoneo die,

    id. 2, 4, 35:

    minus idoneis (verbis) uti,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 34, 154; cf.:

    aptum atque idoneum verbum,

    Quint. 9, 4, 144:

    vox actoris,

    id. 12, 7, 1:

    lectio,

    id. ib. 8 praef. §

    28: cautio,

    Dig. 40, 4, 50:

    paries,

    safe, sound, ib. 39, 2, 36:

    navis,

    ib. 19, 2, 13:

    pignora,

    sufficient, satisfactory, ib. 22, 1, 33.— Comp. (post-class.):

    si persona idoneior accedat ad emptionem,

    Dig. 18, 2, 4, § 6; cf. ib. 47, 23, 2; 43, 29, 3; 50, 6, 5 fin.; Tert. adv. Herm. 18; Anim. 18 (al. idonior or idoneor). — Subst.:

    in deligendis idoneis judicium et diligentiam adhibere,

    Cic. Off. 2, 18, 62:

    cum idoneis collocutus,

    Liv. 34, 25, 7:

    nullo idoneo respondente,

    Suet. Ner. 44; Quint. 7, 4, 39:

    novum illud exemplum a dignis et idoneis ad indignos et non idoneos transfertur,

    Sall. C. 51, 27:

    per idoneos et secreti ejus socios,

    Tac. A. 2, 39:

    apud idonea provinciarum,

    i. e. at proper stations, id. ib. 4, 5.—
    (ε).
    With in and acc.:

    infirmi et in nullam spem idonei,

    Sen. Contr. 5, 33:

    componere materias in hoc idoneas, ut, etc.,

    Quint. 6, 3, 15.—
    * (ζ).
    With abl. (like dignus):

    res idoneas dignitate suā judicare,

    Auct. Her. 3, 3, 5.—
    (η).
    With inf. ( poet. and postclass.):

    fons etiam rivo dare nomen idoneus,

    i. e. large enough, Hor. Ep. 1, 16, 12:

    si torrere jecur quaeris idoneum,

    id. C. 4, 1, 12:

    accendi idonea,

    Sen. N. Q. 1, 15, 1.— Comp.:

    idoneor (late Lat.),

    Dig. 18, 2, 4, § 6; 47, 23, 2; Tert. adv. Herm. 18; id. de Anim. 18.—Hence, adv.: ĭdōnĕē, fitly, suitably, properly, duly, sufficiently (very rare):

    exordium est oratio animum auditoris idonee comparans ad reliquam dictionem,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 15, 20:

    ergo cavendum est idonee. Quid est idonee? Satisdato utique aut pignoribus datis,

    enough, Dig. 40, 5, 4:

    cavere,

    ib. 5, 3, 41; 27, 8, 1:

    magis idonee reficere parietem,

    more safely, solidly, ib. 39, 2, 41.— Comp.:

    idonius,

    Tert. Pall. 3 med.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > idoneus

  • 14 sua

    sŭus, a, um (old form sos, sa, sum; dat. plur. sis, Enn. ap. Fest. p. 301 Mull.; acc. sas. id. ib. p. 325 ib.; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 47; Schol. Pers. 1, 108; sing. sam for suam, Fest. p. 47 Mull.;

    so for suo, C. I. L. 5, 2007. In ante-class. verse su- with the following vowel freq. forms one syllable,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 48; id. Ps. 1, 3, 5; Ter. And. 1, 1, 68; Lucr. 1, 1022; v. Neue, Formenl. 2, 189 sqq.), pron. poss., 3 d pers. [root SVA-; Sanscr. sva, own; cf. sui; Gr. seWo-, whence sphe, etc., and he; cf. heos], of or belonging to himself, herself, etc.; his own, her own, etc.; his, her, its, their; one ' s; hers, theirs.
    I.
    Ordinary possessive use his, etc. (cf. the similar use of the pers. pron. sui, q. v.).
    A.
    With antecedent in the same sentence.
    1.
    The antecedent a subject-nominative, expressed or understood.
    (α).
    His:

    Caesar copias suas divisit,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 97:

    ille in sua sententia perseverat,

    id. ib. 1, 72:

    tantam habebat suarum rerum fiduciam,

    id. ib. 2, 37:

    cum sceleris sui socios Romae reliquisset,

    Cic. Cat. 3, 1, 3:

    cur ego non ignoscam si anteposuit suam salutem meae?

    id. Pis. 32, 79; id. Phil. 2, 18, 45; id. Mil. 10, 27; id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    Hanno praefecturam ejus (i.e. Muttinis) filio suo (Hannonis) dedit,

    Liv. 26, 40, 7:

    imperat princeps civibus suis,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 16, 2:

    nemo rem suam emit,

    id. Ben. 7, 4, 8.—
    (β).
    Her:

    mea Glycerium suos parentes repperit,

    Ter. And. 5, 6, 5:

    utinam haec ignoraret suum patrem,

    id. Phorm. 5, 6, 34:

    si nunc facere volt era officium suom,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 72:

    ne eadem mulier cum suo conjuge honestissimum adulescentem oppressisse videatur,

    Cic. Cael. 32, 78:

    si omnibus suis copiis excellentem virum res publica armasset,

    id. Phil. 13, 16, 32.—
    (γ).
    Its:

    omne animal, simul et ortum est, et se ipsum et omnes partes suas diligit,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 11, 33:

    cum mea domus ardore suo deflagrationem Italiae toti minaretur,

    id. Planc. 40, 95.—
    (δ).
    Their: (legiones) si consulem suum reliquerunt, vituperandae sunt Cic. Phil. 5, 2, 4:

    mittent aliquem de suo numero,

    id. ib. 11, 10, 25:

    rationem illi sententiae suae non fere reddebant,

    id. Tusc. 1, 17, 38:

    qui agellos suos redimere a piratis solebant,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 37, § 85:

    edicunt ut ad suum vestitum senatores redirent,

    id. Sest. 14, 32:

    suis finibus eos prohibent,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 1: Allobrogibus sese persuasuros existimabant ut per suos (Allobrogum) fines eos (Helvetios) ire paterentur, id. id. 1, 6;

    and distributively: ac naves onerariae LXIII. in portu expugnatae, quaedam cum suis oneribus, frumento, armis, aere, etc.,

    some with their several cargoes, Liv. 26, 47, 9.—
    2.
    With a subject-clause as antecedent:

    id sua sponte apparebat tuta celeribus consiliis praepositurum,

    was selfevident, Liv. 22, 38, 13:

    ad id quod sua sponte satis collectum animorum erat, indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur,

    id. 3, 62, 1:

    secutum tamen sua sponte est ut vilior ob ea regi Hannibal et suspectior fieret,

    id. 35, 14, 4. —
    3.
    With subject-acc. as antecedent:

    hanc dicam Athenis advenisse cum aliquo amatore suo, Plant. Mil. 2, 2, 86: doceo gratissimum esse in sua tribu Plancium,

    Cic. Planc. 19, 47:

    cupio eum suae causae confidere,

    id. Sest. 64, 135:

    suspicari debuit (Milo), eum (Clodium) ad villam suam (Clodii) deversurum,

    id. Mil. 19, 51: Medeam praedicant in fuga fratris sui membra dissipavisse, id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 22:

    (dixit) Caesarem pro sua dignitate debere et studium et iracundiam suam reipublicae dimittere,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    4.
    With object-acc. as antecedent.
    (α).
    Suus being an adjunct of the subject (generally rendered in Engl. by a pass. constr.):

    hunc pater suus de templo deduxit,

    he was taken from the temple by his father, Cic. Inv. 2, 17, 52:

    hunc sui cives e civitate ejecerunt,

    id. Sest. 68, 142:

    Alexandrum uxor sua... occidit,

    id. Inv. 2, 49, 144:

    illum ulciscentur mores sui,

    id. Att. 9, 12, 2:

    quodsi quem natura sua... forte deficiet,

    id. Or. 1, 14:

    utrumque regem sua multitudo consalutaverat,

    Liv. 1, 7, 1:

    quas (urbes) sua virtus ac dii juvent, magnas sibi opes facere,

    id. 1, 9, 3; 1, 7, 15; 6, 33, 5:

    quos nec sua conscientia impulerit, nec, etc.,

    id. 26, 33, 3; 25, 14, 7:

    consulem C. Marium servus suus interemit,

    Val. Max. 6, 8, 2:

    quis non Vedium Pollionem pejus oderat quam servi sui?

    Sen. Clem. 1, 18, 2:

    sera dies sit qua illum gens sua caelo adserat,

    id. Cons. Poll. 12 (31), 5.—With the antecedent understood from the principal sentence:

    ita forma simili pueri ut mater sua internoscere (sc. eos) non posset,

    Plaut. Men. prol. 19; and with suus as adjunct both of the subject and of the antecedent: jubet salvere suos vir uxorem suam, id. merc. 4, 3, 11. —
    (β).
    With impers. verbs:

    sunt homines, quos libidinis infamiaeque suae neque pudeat neque taedeat,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 12, 35:

    video fore ut inimicos tuos poeniteat intemperantiae suae,

    id. Fam. 3, 10, 1:

    si Caesarem beneficii sui poeniteret,

    id. Lig. 10, 29; so id. Agr. 2, 11, 26:

    jam ne nobilitatis quidem suae plebejos poenitere,

    Liv. 10, 7, 8:

    militem jam minus virtutis poenitere suae,

    id. 22, 12, 10.—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of other members of the sentence:

    ad parentes suos ducas Silenium,

    Plaut. Cist. 2, 3, 86. nam is illius filiam conicit in navem clam matrem suam (i.e. filiae), id. Mil. 2, 1, 34:

    eosdem ad quaestoris sui aut imperatoris, aut commilitonum suorum pericula impulistis,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 17, 34:

    totum enim ex sua patria sustulisti,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 127; id. Or. 3, 32, 126: quem (Hammonium) tibi etiam suo nomine ( on his own account) commendo... itaque peto a te ut ejus procuratorem et ipsum suo nomine diligas, id. Fam. 13, 21, 2:

    Caesar Fabium in sua remittit hiberna,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 33; id. B. C. 3, 24:

    introire ad Ciceronem, et domi suae imparatum confodere,

    Sall. C. 28, 1:

    suis flammis delete Fidenas,

    i. e. the flames kindled by the Fidenates, Liv. 4, 33, 5:

    suo igni involvit hostes,

    Tac. A. 14, 30:

    quid Caesarem in sua fata inmisit?

    Sen. Ep. 94, 65; id. Q. N. 1, praef. 7; cf.

    with antecedent supplied from preceding sentence: non destiti rogare et petere (sc. Brutum) mea causa, suadere et hortari sua,

    Cic. Att. 6, 2, 7.—
    5.
    With dat. as antecedent.
    (α).
    As adjunct of subject (cf. 4. supra):

    suus rex reginae placet,

    a queen likes her own king, Plaut. Stich. 1, 2, 76:

    ei nunc alia ducenda'st domum, sua cognata Lemniensis,

    id. Cist. 1, 1, 101:

    Autronio nonne sodales, non collegae sui... defuerunt?

    Cic. Sull. 2, 7:

    si ceteris facta sua recte prosunt,

    id. Cat. 3, 12, 27:

    cui non magistri sui atque doctores, cui non... locus ipse... in mente versetur?

    id. Planc. 33, 81:

    haec omnia plane... Siculis erepta sunt: primum suae leges, etc.,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 13, § 33:

    Romanis multitudo sua auxit animum,

    Liv. 21, 50, 4:

    sicuti populo Romano sua fortuna labet,

    id. 42, 50, 7:

    Lanuvinis sacra sua reddita,

    id. 8, 14, 2:

    vilitas sua illis detrahit pretium,

    Sen. Ben. 4, 29, 2:

    nemo est cui felicitas sua satisfaciat,

    id. Ep. 115, 17:

    labor illi suus restitutus est,

    id. Brev. Vit. 20, 3:

    magnitudo sua singulis constat,

    id. Q. N. 1, 1, 10:

    tantum sapienti sua, quantum Dec omnis aetas patet,

    id. Ep. 53, 11. —

    With antecedent supplied from principal sentence: mater quod suasit sua Adulescens mulier fecit, i.e. ei,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 38.—
    (β).
    Of other words:

    regique Thebano regnum stabilivit suum,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 40:

    mittam hodie huic suo die natali malam rem magnam,

    id. Ps. 1, 3, 5:

    ego Metello non irascor, neque ei suam vacationem eripio,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 68, § 164:

    desinant insidiari domui suae consuli,

    id. Cat. 1, 13, 32:

    quibus ea res honori fuerit a suis civibus,

    id. Mil. 35, 96: Scipio suas res Syracusanis restituit, Liv. [p. 1824] 29, 1, 17:

    nos non suas (leges Lacedaemoniis arbitror) ademisse, sed nostras leges dedisse,

    id. 39, 37, 6:

    Graccho et Tuditano provinciae Lucani et Galliae cum suis exercitibus prorogatae,

    id. 25, 3, 5.—
    6.
    With gen., abl., or object of a prep. as antecedent:

    nec illius animi aciem praestringit splendor sui nominis,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    nolite a sacris patriis Junonis Sospitae domesticum et suum consulem avellere,

    id. Mur. 41, 90:

    quamvis tu magna mihi scripseris de Bruti adventu ad suas legiones,

    id. Att. 14, 13, 12:

    suae legis ad scriptum ipsam quoque sententiam adjungere,

    the meaning of their law to which they refer, id. Inv. 2, 49, 147:

    cum ambitio alterius suam primum apud eos majestatem solvisset,

    Liv. 22, 42, 12:

    nunc causam instituendorum ludorum ab origine sua repetam,

    Val. Max. 2, 4, 4:

    Jubam in regno suo non locorum notitia adjuvet, non popularium pro rege suo virtus,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 10; id. Ben. 7, 6, 3; id. Clem. 1, 3, 4.—Esp. with cujusque as antecedent:

    in qua deliberatione ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 33, 119 (v. II. D. 2. infra).— Abl.:

    operam dare ut sua lex ipso scripto videatur niti,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 147 (cf. supra):

    (Caesar reperiebat) ad Galbam propter justitiam prudentiamque suam totius belli summam deferri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    credere, ad suum concilium a Jove deos advocari,

    Sen. Q. N. 2, 42, 1.—
    7.
    With predic. nom. as antecedent:

    sapientissimi artis suae professores sunt a quibus et propria studia verecunde et aliena callide administrantur,

    Val. Max. 8, 12, 1.—
    8.
    With appositive noun.
    (α).
    With gram. subject as antecedent:

    hoc Anaximandro, populari ac sodali suo, non persuasit,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 37, 118:

    vidit fortissimum virum, inimicissimum suum,

    id. Mil. 9, 25:

    (hic) fuit in Creta contubernalis Saturnini, propinqui sui,

    id. Planc. 11, 27:

    ut non per L. Crassum, adfinem suum... causam illam defenderit,

    id. Balb. 21, 49:

    ne cum hoc T. Broccho, avunculo, ne cum ejus filio, consobrino suo, ne nobiscum vivat,

    id. Lig. 4, 11:

    Caesar mittit ad eum A. Clodium, suum atque illius familiarem,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 57.—
    (β).
    With object as antecedent:

    Dicaearchum cum Aristoxeno, aequali et condiscipulo suo, omittamus,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 18, 41:

    tres fratres optimos, non solum sibi ipsos, neque nobis, necessariis suis, sed etiam rei publicae condonavit,

    id. Lig. 12, 36:

    Varroni, quem, sui generis hominem,... vulgus extrahere ad consulatum nitebatur,

    Liv. 22, 34, 2.—
    (γ).
    With appositive noun as antecedent:

    si P. Scipionem, clarissimum virum, majorumque suorum simillimum res publica tenere potuisset,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 14, 29:

    M. Fabi Ambusti, potentis viri cum inter sui corporis homines, tum ad plebem, etc.,

    Liv. 6, 34, 5:

    C. vero Fabricii, et Q. Aemilii Papi, principum saeculi sui, domibus argentum fuisse confitear oportet,

    Val. Max. 4, 4, 3.—
    9.
    In participial clauses.
    (α).
    The antecedent being the logical subject of the participle, and other than the principal subject:

    credamus igitur Panaetio, a Platone suo dissentienti ( = qui dissentiebat),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 32, 79:

    ea Sex. Roscium, expulsum ex suis bonis, recepit domum,

    id. Rosc. Am. 10, 27:

    diffidentemque rebus suis confirmavit,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 23:

    Dejotarum ad me venientem cum omnibus copiis suis, certiorem feci, etc.,

    id. Fam. 15, 4, 7; id. Cat. 4, 9, 18: si hominis et suis et populi Romani ornamentis amplissimi ( being greatly distinguished) causam repudiassem, id. Mur. 4, 8:

    stupentes tribunos et suam jam vicem magis anxios quam, etc., liberavit consensus populi Romani,

    Liv. 8, 35, 1; 22, 42, 8:

    manet in folio scripta querela suo ( = quam scripsit),

    Ov. F. 5, 224; cf. in abl. absol.:

    et ipsis (hostibus) regressis in castra sua,

    Liv. 22, 60, 9:

    quibus (speculis) si unum ostenderis hominem, populus adparet, unaquaque parte faciem exprimente sua,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 5, 5.—
    (β).
    The logical subject of the participle, being also the principal subject:

    sic a suis legionibus condemnatus irrupit in Galliam,

    Cic. Phil. 10, 10, 21:

    hunc agrum patres nostri, acceptum a majoribus suis ( = quem acceperant), perdiderunt,

    id. Agr. 2, 31, 84:

    ut in suis ordinibus dispositi dispersos adorirentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 92: Appius, odium in se aliorum suo in eos metiens odio, haud ignaro, inquit, imminet fortuna, Liv. 3, 54, 3:

    ipsa capit Condita in pharetra ( = quae condiderat) tela minora sua,

    Ov. F. 2, 326; cf. in abl. absol.:

    Sopater, expositis suis difficultatibus ( = cum exposuisset, etc.): Timarchidem... perducit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 28, § 69:

    Caesar, primum suo deinde omnium ex conspectu remotis equis, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25:

    Campani, audita sua pariter sociorumque clade, legatos ad Hannibalem miserunt,

    Liv. 25, 15, 1:

    (Appius) deposito suo magistratu... domum est reductus,

    id. 4, 24, 7; 3, 35, 9; 9, 10, 13; 9, 41, 9.—
    (γ).
    The antecedent being the principal subject, not the logical subject of the participle:

    M. Papirius dicitur Gallo, barbam suam (i.e. Papirii) permulcenti,... iram movisse,

    Liv. 5, 41, 9: cum Gracchus, verecundia deserendi socios, implorantis fidem suam populique Romani, substitisset. id. 23, 36, 8; cf. in abl. absol.:

    si sine maximo dedecore, tam impeditis suis rebus, potuisset emori,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 10, 29; id. Mil. 14, 38; id. Planc. 21, 51; id. Clu. 14, 42:

    ita (consul) proelio uno accidit Vestinorum res, haudquaquam tamen incruento milite suo (consulis),

    Liv. 8, 29, 12; cf.

    with antecedent to be supplied: Campani, cum, robore juventutis suae acciso, nulla (sc. eis) propinqua spes esset, etc.,

    id. 7, 29, 7.—
    10.
    In gerund. construction. ( a) With subject as antecedent:

    mihi ipsa Roma ad complectendum conservatorem suum progredi visa est,

    Cic. Pis. 22, 52.—
    (β).
    With object, the logical subjects of the gerund as antecedent:

    cur iis persequendi juris sui... adimis potestatem?

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 6, 21:

    si senatui doloris sui de me declarandi potestas esset erepta,

    id. Sest. 23, 51:

    nec tribunis plebis (spatium datur) sui periculi deprecandi,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5.—
    (γ).
    With antecedent dependent on the gerund:

    eamque rem illi putant a suum cuique tribuendo appellatam,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 19.—
    11.
    As adjunct of a noun dependent on a subjectinf., with its logical subject as antecedent:

    magnum Miloni fuit, conficere illam pestem nulla sua invidia?

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40:

    neque enim fuit Gabinii, remittere tantum de suo nec regis, imponere tantum plus suis,

    his claim, id. Rab. Post. 11, 31:

    Piso, cui fructum pietatis suae neque ex me neque a populo Romano ferre licuit,

    id. Sest. 31, 68:

    ei cujus magis intersit, vel sua, vel rei publicae causa vivere,

    id. Off. 3, 23, 90:

    sapientis est consilium explicare suum de maximis rebus,

    id. Or. 2, 81, 333; id. Mil. 15, 41.—With logical subject understood:

    totam Italiam suis colonis ut complere (sc. eis) liceat, permittitur,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    maximum (sc. eis) solacium erit, propinquorum eodem monumento declarari, et virtutem suorum, et populi Romani pietatem,

    id. Phil. 14, 13, 35.
    B.
    Without gram. antec., one ' s, one ' s own.
    1.
    Dependent on subject-inff.:

    ejusdem animi est, posteris suis amplitudinem nobis quam non acceperit tradere, et memoriam prope intermortuam generis sui, virtute renovare,

    Cic. Mur. 7, 16:

    siquidem atrocius est, patriae parentem quam suum occidere,

    id. Phil. 2, 13, 31:

    miliens perire est melius quam in sua civitate sine armorum praesidio non posse vivere,

    id. ib. 2, 44, 112: quanto est honestius, alienis injuriis quam suis commoveri, one ' s own, id. Verr. 2, 3, 72, § 169:

    contentum suis rebus esse maximae sunt certissimaeque divitiae,

    id. Par. 6, 51:

    ut non liceat sui commodi causa nocere alteri,

    id. Off. 3, 5, 23:

    detrahere de altero sui commodi causa,

    id. ib. 3, 5, 24:

    suis exemplis melius est uti,

    Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2:

    levius est sua decreta tollere quam aliorum,

    Liv. 3, 21. 5; 39, 5, 2;

    29, 37, 11: satius est vitae suae rationes quam frumenti publici nosse,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 18, 3:

    quanto satius est sua mala exstinguere quam aliena posteris tradere?

    id. Q. N. 3, praef. 5:

    cum initia beneficiorum suorum spectare, tum etiam exitus decet,

    id. Ben. 2, 14, 2; 3, 1, 5:

    Romani nominis gloriae, non suae, composuisse illa decuit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 16.—With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent: cum possimus ab Ennio sumere... exemplum, videtur esse arrogantia illa relinquere, et ad sua devenire, to one ' s own = to our own, Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2.—
    2.
    Without a subject-inf.:

    omnia torquenda sunt ad commodum suae causae... sua diligenter narrando,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 21, 30: ut in ceteris habenda ratio non sua (al. sui) solum, sed etiam aliorum, id. Off. 1, 39, 139:

    erat Dareo mite ac tractabile ingenium, nisi suam naturam plerumque fortuna corrumperet (suam not referring to Dareo),

    Curt. 3, 2, 17 MSS. (Foss, mansuetam). — With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent (cf. 1. supra):

    non erit ista amicitia sed mercatura quaedam utilitatum suarum,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 44, 122; cf.: pro suo possidere, II. A. 2. a. g; and Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73, II. A. 2. b. a; cf. also II. B. 1. a; II. B. 5. c.; II. B. 7. b.; II. C. 8. b. b infra.
    C.
    With antec. in a previous sentence. Here ejus, eorum, earum are used for his, her, their, unless the clause is oblique in regard to the antecedent, i. e. the antecedent is conceived as the author of the statement.
    1.
    In clauses dependent on a verbum sentiendi or dicendi, expressed or understood, referring to the grammatical or logical subject of the verb.
    a.
    In infinitive clauses:

    (Clodius) Caesaris potentiam suam potentiam esse dicebat,

    Cic. Mil. 32, 88:

    (Caelius) a sua (causa) putat ejus (i.e. Ascitii) esse sejunctam,

    id. Cael. 10, 24:

    ipsos certo scio non negare ad haec bona Chrysogonum accessisse impulsu suo (referring to ipsos),

    id. Rosc. Am. 37, 107:

    hostes viderunt,... suorum tormentorum usum spatio propinquitatis interire,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 16:

    docent, sui judicii rem non esse,

    id. ib. 1, 13.—The reference of suus may be ambiguous, esp. if an infinitive is dependent on another:

    hoc Verrem dicere ajebant, te... opera sua consulem factum, i.e. Verris, though grammatically it might refer to the subj. of aiebant,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 10, 29:

    (Ariovistus) dixit neminem secum sine sua pernicie contendisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 36; cf. the context with, in all, eleven reflexive pronouns referring to four different antecedents (populus Romanus, Ariovistus, Caesar, nemo); cf.

    also: occurrebat ei, mancam praeturam suam futuram consule Milone,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25; 32, 88; Liv. 3, 42, 2.—
    b.
    Suus in a clause dependent on inf.:

    scio equidem, ut, qui argentum afferret atque expressam imaginem suam (i.e. militis) huc ad nos, cum eo ajebat velle mitti mulierem,

    Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 55:

    isti bonorum emptores arbitrantur, vos hic sedere qui excipiatis eos qui de suis (i.e. emptorum) manibus effugerint,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 52, 151:

    Siculi venisse tempus ajebant ut commoda sua defenderem,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 1, 3:

    ut tunc tandem sentiret recuperanda esse quae prius sua culpa amissa forent,

    Liv. 44, 8, 4. —

    Ambiguous: velle Pompejum se Caesari purgatum, ne ea quae reipublicae causa egerit (Pompejus) in suam (i.e. Caesaris) contumeliam vertat (where suam might be referred to Pompejus),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    c.
    In oblique clauses introduced by ut or ne, or clauses subordinate to such:

    Cassius constituit ut ludi absente te fierent suo nomine,

    Cic. Att. 15, 11, 2:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam tam nefariam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    id. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Nasidius eos magnopere hortatur ut rursus cum Bruti classe, additis suis (i.e. Nasidii) auxiliis confligant,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 3:

    (regem) denuntiasse sibi ut triduo regni sui decederent finibus,

    Liv. 42, 25, 12:

    Sabinae mulieres, hinc patres, hinc viros orantes, ne parricidio macularent partus suos (i.e. mulierum),

    id. 1, 13, 2:

    Patron praecepit suis ut arma induerent, ad omne imperium suum parati,

    Curt. 5, 11, 1.—With reflex. pron., referring to a different antecedent:

    ad hanc (Laidem) Demosthenes clanculum adit, et ut sibi copiam sui faceret, petit,

    Gell. 1, 8, 5. —
    d.
    In subordinate clauses introduced by quin or quod:

    (Dejotarus) non recusat quin id suum facinus judices,

    Cic. Deiot. 15, 43; so id. ib. 4, 15;

    16, 45: parietes hujus curiae tibi gratias agere gestiunt, quod futura sit illa auctoritas in his majorum suorum et suis sedibus,

    id. Marcell. 3, 10:

    quidni gauderet quod iram suam nemo sentiret?

    Sen. Troad. 3, 13:

    querenti quod uxor sua e fico se suspendisset,

    Quint. 6, 3, 88;

    and with intentional ambiguity: cum Proculejus quereretur de filio quod is mortem suam expectaret,

    id. 9, 3, 68. —
    e.
    In interrogative clauses:

    si, quod officii sui sit, non occurrit animo, nihil umquam omnino aget,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 8, 25:

    ut non auderet iterum dicere quot milia fundus suus abesset ab urbe,

    id. Caecin. 10, [p. 1825] 28:

    donec sciat unisquisque quid sui, quid alieni sit,

    Liv. 6, 27, 8:

    rex ignarus, quae cum Hannibale legatis suis convenisset, quaeque legati ejus ad se allaturi fuissent,

    id. 23, 39, 2:

    postquam animadvertit quantus agminis sui terror esset,

    id. 43, 19, 5. —
    2.
    In a virtually oblique clause.
    a.
    In final clause, introduced by ut, ne, or rel., referring to the subject of the purpose:

    me a portu praemisit domum, ut haec nuntiem uxori suae,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 41:

    quasi Appius ille Caecus viam muniverit, non qua populus uteretur, sed ubi impune sui posteri latrocinarentur, i. e. Appii,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    quae gens ad Caesarem legatos mise. rat, ut suis omnibus facultatibus uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 80:

    inde castra movent, ne qua vis sociis suis ab Romano exercitu inferri possit,

    Liv. 43, 23, 5:

    (Romani) Albam a fundamentis proruerunt, ne memoria originum suarum exstaret,

    id. 26, 13, 16:

    oppidani nuntios Romam, qui certiorem de suo casu senatum facerent, misere,

    id. 6, 33, 7; cf.:

    tanto intervallo ab hostibus consedit, ut nec adventus suus propinquitate nimia nosci posset, et, etc.,

    Liv. 10, 20, 7:

    Datames locum delegit talem ut non multum obesse multitudo hostium suae paucitati posset,

    Nep. Dat. 7, 3:

    quid si gubernator a diis procellas petat ut gratior ars sua periculo fiat?

    Sen. Ben. 6, 25, 4. —
    b.
    In other dependent clauses represented as conceived by an antecedent in the principal sentence:

    Sulla, si sibi suus pudor ac dignitas non prodesset, nullum auxilium requisivit ( = negavit se defendi velle, si, etc.),

    Cic. Sull. 5, 15:

    Paetus omnes libros quos frater suus reliquisset mihi donavit ( = dixit se donare libros quos, etc.),

    id. Att. 2, 1, 12:

    non enim a te emit, sed, priusquam tu suum sibi venderes, ipse possedit ( = potitus est, ne, etc.),

    id. Phil. 2, 37, 96:

    Africanus, si sua res ageretur, testimonium non diceret,

    id. Rosc. Am. 36, 3:

    ille ipse (Pompejus) proposuit epistulam illam, in qua est Pro tuis rebus gestis amplissimis. Amplioribusne quam suis, quam Africani?

    id. Att. 8, 9, 2:

    spiritus dabat (Manlio) quod... vinculorum suorum invidiam dictator fugisset,

    Liv. 6, 18, 4:

    (Numa) Camenis eum lucum sacravit, quod earum ibi concilia cum conjuge sua Egeria essent,

    id. 1, 21, 3:

    adulescens deos omnis invocare ad gratiam illi pro se referendam, quoniam sibi nequaquam satis facultatis pro suo animo atque illius erga se esset,

    id. 26, 50, 4 (cf. D. 1. a. infra).
    D.
    In the place of ejus.
    1.
    In clauses virtually oblique, but with indicative, being conceived by the antecedent (hence suus, not ejus), but asserted as fact by the author (hence indicative, not subjunctive):

    Cicero tibi mandat ut Aristodemo idem respondeas, quod de fratre suo (Ciceronis) respondisti,

    Cic. Att. 2, 7, 4:

    oriundi ab Sabinis, ne, quia post Tatii mortem ab sua parte non erat regnatum, imperium amitterent, sui corporis creari regem volebant,

    Liv. 1, 17, 2:

    C. Caesar villam pulcherrimam, quia mater sua aliquando in illa custodita erat, diruit,

    Sen. Ira, 3, 21, 5:

    Philemonem, a manu servum, qui necem suam per venenum inimicis promiserat, non gravius quam simplici morte punivit,

    Suet. Caes. 74; cf.:

    quomodo excandescunt si quid e juba sua decisum est,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 12, 3.—
    2.
    To avoid ambiguity:

    petunt rationes illius (Catilinae) ut orbetur consilio res publica, ut minuatur contra suum (i.e. Catilinae) furorem imperatorum copia (instead of ejus, which might be referred to res publica),

    Cic. Mur. 39, 83:

    equites a cornibus positos, cum jam pelleretur media peditum suorum acies, incurrisse ab lateribus ferunt,

    Liv. 1, 37, 3.—
    3.
    Colloquially and in epistolary style suus is used emphatically instead of ejus, with the meaning own, peculiar: deinde ille actutum subferret suus servus poenas Sosia, his own slave (opp. Mercury, who personates Sosias), Plaut. Am. 3, 4, 19: mira erant in civitatibus ipsorum furta Graecorum quae magistratus sui fecerant, their own magistrates ( = ipsorum), Cic. Att. 6, 2, 5:

    in quibus (litteris Bruti) unum alienum summa sua prudentia (est), ut spectem ludos suos,

    his peculiar prudence, id. ib. 15, 26, 1; so,

    quod quidem ille (Nero) decernebat, quorumdam dolo ad omina sui exitus vertebatur,

    Tac. A. 16, 24; cf. II. A. 1. b and g; II. A. 2. a. b; II. B. 3.—
    4.
    Without particular emphasis (mostly ante- and post-class. and poet.):

    tum erit tempestiva cum semen suum maturum erit,

    Cato, R. R. 31:

    vitis si macra erit, sarmenta sua concidito minute,

    id. ib. 37:

    qui sic purgatus erit, diuturna valetudine utatur, neque ullus morbus veniet, nisi sua culpa,

    id. ib. 157:

    Cimon in eandem invidiam incidit quam pater suus,

    Nep. Cim. 3, 1:

    id qua ratione consecutus sit (Lysander) latet. Non enim virtute sui exercitus factum est, etc.,

    id. Lys. 1, 2:

    ipse sub Esquiliis, ubi erat regia sua, Concidit,

    Ov. F. 6, 601:

    quodque suus conjux riguo collegerat horto, Truncat olus foliis,

    id. M. 8, 646; so id. ib. 15, 819.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    As substt.
    1.
    sui, suorum, m., his, their (etc.) friends, soldiers, fellow-beings, equals, adherents, followers, partisans, posterity, slaves, family, etc., of persons in any near connection with the antecedent.
    (α).
    (Corresp. to the regular usage, I. A. B. C.) Cupio abducere ut reddam (i.e. eam) suis, to her family, friends, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 77; cf. id. ib. 1, 2, 66:

    cum animus societatem caritatis coierit cum suis, omnesque natura conjunctos suos duxerit,

    fellow-beings, Cic. Leg. 1, 23, 60:

    mulier ingeniosa praecepit suis omnia Caelio pollicerentur,

    her slaves, id. Cael. 25, 62:

    quo facilius et nostras domos obire, et ipse a suis coli possit,

    his friends, id. ib. 7, 18:

    qua gratiam beneficii vestri cum suorum laude conjungant,

    their family, id. Agr. 2, 1, 1:

    vellem hanc contemptionem pecuniae suis reliquisset,

    to his posterity, id. Phil. 3, 6, 16:

    cum divisurum se urbem palam suis polliceretur,

    his partisans, id. ib. 13, 9, 19:

    Caesar, cohortatus suos, proelium commisit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25; so,

    Curio exercitum reduxit, suis omnibus praeter Fabium incolumibus,

    id. B. C. 2, 35:

    Caesar receptui suorum timens,

    id. ib. 3, 46:

    certior ab suis factus est, praeclusas esse portas,

    id. ib. 2, 20:

    omnium suorum consensu, Curio bellum ducere parabat,

    id. ib. 2, 37: so,

    Pompejus suorum omnium hortatu statuerat proelio decertare,

    id. ib. 3, 86:

    Caesar Brundisium ad suos severius scripsit,

    to his officers, id. ib. 3, 25:

    naviculam conscendit cum paucis suis,

    a few of his followers, id. ib. 3, 104:

    multum cum suis consiliandi causa secreto praeter consuetudinem loqueretur,

    id. ib. 1, 19:

    nupsit Melino, adulescenti inprimis inter suos et honesto et nobili,

    his equals, associates, Cic. Clu. 5, 11:

    rex raptim a suis in equum impositus fugit,

    his suite, Liv. 41, 4, 7:

    subsidio suorum proelium restituere,

    comrades, id. 21, 52, 10:

    feras bestias... ad opem suis ferendam avertas,

    their young, id. 26, 13, 12:

    abstulit sibi in suos potestatem,

    his slaves, Sen. Ira, 3, 12, 6:

    Besso et Nabarzani nuntiaverant sui regem... interemptum esse,

    their fellow - conspirators, Curt. 5, 12, 14. — Very rarely sing.:

    ut bona mens suis omnibus fuerit. Si quem libido abripuit, illorum eum, cum quibus conjuravit, non suum judicet esse,

    Liv. 39, 16, 5.—
    (β).
    Irregular use (acc. to I. D.): sui = ejus amici, etc. (freq.;

    the absolute use of ejus in this sense being inadmissible): quasi vero quisquam dormiat? ne sui quidem hoc velint, non modo ipse (sui = ejus amici, liberi),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 38, 92:

    is (annus) ejus omnem spem... morte pervertit. Fuit hoc luctuosum suis, acerbum patriae, etc.,

    id. Or. 3, 2, 8:

    quadrigas, quia per suos ( = ipsius milites) agendae erant, in prima acie locaverat rex,

    Liv. 37, 41, 8:

    auctoritatem Pisistrati qui inter suos ( = ejus cives) maxima erat,

    id. 37, 12:

    quo cum multitudine adversariorum sui superarentur, ipse fuit superior, etc.,

    Nep. Hann. 8, 4; v. g.—
    (γ).
    Without antecedent (cf. I. B. supra): quoties necesse est fallere aut falli a suis, by one ' s friends, Sen. Phoen. 493.—
    (δ).
    Sing.: sŭa, suae. f., a sweetheart, mistress (rare): illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit. Cic. Phil. 2, 28. 69:

    cedo quid hic faciet sua?

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 92.—
    2.
    sŭum, i, n., and more freq. sŭa, suorum, n. plur., = one ' s property.
    a.
    Sing.
    (α).
    Lit.:

    nec suom adimerem alteri,

    his property, his own, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 38 (34):

    nunc si ille salvos revenit, reddam suom sibi (v. D. 3. a. infra),

    id. ib. 1, 2, 119:

    illum studeo quam facillime ad suum pervenire,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 26, 4:

    populi Romani hanc esse consuetudinem ut socios sui nihil deperdere velit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43; cf. Cic. Rab. Post. 11, 3, I. A. 11. supra:

    nec donare illi de suo dicimur,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 4, 2; so esp. with quisque; v. infra — Hence, de suo = per se, or sua sponte;

    (stellae) quae per igneos tractus labentia inde splendorem trahant caloremque, non de suo clara,

    Sen. Q. N. 7, 1, 6. —
    (β).
    Trop.:

    meum mihi placebat, illi suum (of a literary essay),

    Cic. Att. 14, 20, 3: suom quemque decet, his own manners, etc., Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 11; so, expendere oportet quid quisque habeat sui ( what peculiarities) nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant;

    id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113.—
    (γ).
    Jurid. term: aliquid pro suo possidere, to possess in the belief of one ' s legal right:

    pro suo possessio tale est, cum dominium nobis acquiri putamus. Et ea causa possidemus ex qua acquiritur, et praeterea pro suo,

    Dig. 41, 10, 1;

    so without an antecedent, and referring to a first person: item re donata, pro donato et pro suo possideo,

    ib. 41, 10, 1; v. the whole tit. ib. 42, 10 (Pro suo); cf. ib. 23, 3, 67; cf. C., infra fin.;

    similarly: usucapere pro suo = acquire dominion by a possession pro suo, Fragm. Vat. 111: res pro suo, quod justam causam possidendi habet, usucapit,

    id. ib. 260; Dig. 41, 3, 27. —
    b.
    Plur.
    (α).
    One ' s property:

    Roscius tibi omnia sua praeter animam tradidit,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 50, 146:

    qui etiam hostibus externis victis sua saepissime reddiderunt,

    id. Agr. 1, 6, 19:

    tu autem vicinis tuis Massiliensibus sua reddis,

    id. Att. 14, 14, 6:

    Remi legatos miserunt qui dicerent se suaque omnia in fidem atque potestatem populi Romani permittere,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 3, 2; 1, 11, 2; 2, 13, 2:

    ipsi milites alveos informes quibus se suaque transveherent, faciebant,

    their baggage, Liv. 21, 26, 9:

    docere eos qui sua permisere fortunae,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, praef. 7; so without an antecedent, one ' s own property (cf. I. B. 2. supra):

    hanc ob causam maxime ut sua tenerentur res publicae constitutae sunt,

    Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73;

    rarely = eorum res: quod vero etiam sua reddiderint (i.e. Gallis),

    Liv. 39, 55, 3. —
    (β).
    One ' s own affairs:

    aliena ut melius videant et dijudicent Quam sua,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 96:

    cognoscunt... immobile agmen et sua quemque molientem,

    Liv. 10, 20, 8:

    omnia ei hostium non secus quam sua nota erant,

    id. 22, 41, 5:

    aliena cum suis perdidit,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 16, 3.— Absol., referring to a noun fem.: sua (finxit) C. Cassius ( = suas persuasiones; cf.

    the context),

    Quint. 6, 3, 90.
    B.
    Predicative uses: suum esse, facere, fieri, putare, etc., like a gen. poss., to be, etc., the property, or under the dominion, control, power of the antecedent.
    1.
    Of property in things.
    (α).
    Corporeal:

    scripsit causam dicere Prius aurum quare sit suum,

    Ter. Eun. prol. 11:

    nihil erat cujusquam quod non hoc anno suum fore putabat (Clodius),

    Cic. Mil. 32, 87:

    quia suum cujusque fit, eorum quae natura fuerant communia quod cuique obtigit, id quisque teneat,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 21:

    Juba suam esse praedicans praedam,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84:

    gratum sibi populum facturum, si omnes res Neapolitanorum suas duxissent,

    Liv. 22, 32, 8: libros esse dicimus Ciceronis;

    eosdem Dorus librarius suos vocat,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 1:

    cum enim istarum personarum nihil suum esse possit,

    since these persons can own nothing, Gai. Inst. 2, 96; cf. Dig. 1, 7, 15 pr.—Virtually predicative:

    referas ad eos qui suam rem nullam habent ( = rem quae sua sit),

    nothing of their own, Cic. Phil. 2, 6, 15:

    qui in potestate nostra est, nihil suum habere potest,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 84. — ( b) Of literary works:

    quae convenere in Andriam ex Perinthia Fatetur transtulisse, atque usum pro suis ( = quasi sua essent),

    Ter. And. prol. 14:

    potest autem... quae tum audiet... ingenue pro suis dicere,

    his own thoughts, Quint. 12, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of a country or people:

    suum facere = suae dicionis facere: commemorat ut (Caesar) magnam partem Italiae beneficio atque auctoritate eorum suam fecerit,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 32:

    in quam (Asiam) jam ex parte suam fecerit,

    Liv. 44, 24, 4:

    crudelissima ac superbissima gens sua omnia suique arbitrii facit,

    id. 21, 44, 5.—
    (δ).
    Trop.:

    omnia sua putavit quae vos vestra esse velletis,

    Cic. Phil. 11, 12, 27:

    non meminit, illum exercitum senatus populique Romani esse, non suum,

    id. ib. 13, 6, 4: [p. 1826] probavit, non rempublicam suam esse, sed se reipublicae, Sen. Clem. 1, 19, 8;

    so of incorporeal things: hi si velint scire quam brevis eorum vita sit, cogitent ex quota parte sua sit,

    how much of it is their own, id. Brev. Vit. 19, 3; so, suum facere, to appropriate:

    prudentis est, id quod in quoque optimum est, si possit, suum facere,

    Quint. 10, 2, 26:

    quaeremus quomodo animus (hanc virtutem) usu suam faciat,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 3, 1.—
    2.
    Of persons.
    (α).
    Under a master ' s or father ' s control:

    ut lege caverent, ne quis quem civitatis mutandae causa suum faceret, neve alienaret,

    make any one his slave, Liv. 41, 8, 12: quid eam tum? suamne esse ajebat, his daughter, i.e. in his power? Ter. And. 5, 4, 29:

    eduxit mater pro sua ( = quasi sua esset),

    id. Eun. 1, 2, 76.—
    (β).
    Reflexively = sui juris, independent, one ' s own master or mistress, not subject to another ' s control, under one ' s own control (v. sui juris, infra):

    ancilla, quae mea fuit hodie, sua nunc est,

    Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of moral power over others: suus = devoted to one:

    hice hoc munere arbitrantur Suam Thaidem esse,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 38:

    eos hic fecit suos Paulo sumptu,

    id. Ad. 5, 4, 21:

    sed istunc exora, ut (mulierem) suam esse adsimulet,

    to be friendly to him, id. Heaut. 2, 3, 117:

    cum Antonio sic agens ut perspiciat, si in eo negotio nobis satisfecerit, totum me futurum suum,

    Cic. Att. 14, 1 a, 2:

    Alpheus... utebatur populo sane suo,

    devoted to him, id. Quint. 7, 29.— Poet.: vota suos habuere deos, the vows (inst. of the persons uttering them) had the gods on their side, Ov. M. 4, 373. —
    (δ).
    Of power over one's self, etc.:

    nam qui sciet ubi quidque positum sit, quaque eo veniat, is poterit eruere, semperque esse in disputando suus,

    self-possessed, Cic. Fin. 4, 4, 10:

    inaestimabile bonum est suum fieri,

    selfcontrol, Sen. Ep. 75, 18:

    (furiosus) qui suus non est,

    Dig. 42, 4, 7, § 9:

    vix sua, vix sanae virgo Niseia compos Mentis erat,

    Ov. M. 8, 35. —
    3.
    Suum est, as impers. predicate: = ejus est, characteristic of, peculiar to one (very rare):

    dixit antea, sed suum illud est, nihil ut affirmet,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 42, 99.
    C.
    Attributive usages, almost always (except in Seneca) with suus before its noun.
    1.
    The property, relations, affairs, etc., of one opposed to those of another, own.
    a.
    Opposition expressed:

    nihil de suo casu, multa de vestro querebatur,

    Cic. Balb. 8, 21:

    sua sibi propiora pericula quam mea loquebantur,

    id. Sest. 18, 40:

    suasque et imperatoris laudes canentes,

    Liv. 45, 38, 12:

    damnatione collegae et sua,

    id. 22, 35, 3:

    Senecae fratris morte pavidum et pro sua incolumitate pavidum,

    Tac. A. 14, 73:

    velut pro Vitellio conquerentes suum dolorem proferebant,

    id. H. 3, 37;

    opp. alienus: ut suo potius tempore mercatorem admitterent, quam celerius alieno,

    at a time convenient to themselves, Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 11. —Without antecedent, opp. externus:

    (Platoni) duo placet esse motus, unum suum, alterum externum, esse autem divinius quod ipsum ex se sua sponte moveatur, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 12, 32. —
    b.
    Implied:

    voluptatem suis se finibus tenere jubeamus,

    within the limits assigned to it, Cic. Fin. 3, 1, 1:

    cum vobis immortale monumentum suis paene manibus senatus... exstruxerit,

    id. Phil. 14, 12, 33:

    superiores (amnes) in Italia, hic (Rhodanus) trans Alpes, hospitales suas tantum, nec largiores quam intulere aquas vehentes,

    Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 224: colligitur aqua ex imbribus;

    ex suo fonte nativa est,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 3:

    pennas ambo non habuere suas (non suas = alienas),

    Ov. Tr. 3, 4, 24. —
    c.
    In particular phrases. ( a) Sua sponte and suo Marte, of one ' s own accord, by one ' s self, without the suggestion, influence, aid, etc., of others:

    Caesar bellum contra Antonium sua sponte suscepit,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 2, 5:

    sua sponte ad Caesarem in jus adierunt,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 87.—So of things, = per se, by or of itself, for itself, for its own sake:

    jus et omne honestum sua sponte expetendum (cf. in the context: per se igitur jus est expetendum),

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 48: justitium sua sponte inceptum priusquam indiceretur, by itself, i. e. without a decree, Liv. 9, 7, 8; so,

    sortes sua sponte attenuatas,

    id. 22, 1, 11 (cf. id. 22, 38, 13; 35, 14, 4, I. A. 2., supra): rex enim ipse, sua sponte, nullis commentariis Caesaris, simul atque audivit ejus interitum suo Marte res suas recuperavit, Cic. Phil. 2, 37, 95.—
    (β).
    Suus locus, in milit. lang., one ' s own ground, position, or lines:

    restitit suo loco Romana acies (opp. to the advance of the enemy),

    Liv. 22, 16, 2.—So figuratively:

    et staturas suo loco leges,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2:

    aciem instruxit primum suis locis, pauloque a castris Pompeji longius,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84 (cf.: suo loco, 7. b. g, infra).—
    (γ).
    For suo jure v. 3. infra.—
    (δ).
    Sua Venus = one's own Venus, i. e. good luck (v. Venus): ille non est mihi par virtutibus, nec officiis;

    sed habuit suam Venerem,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 28, 2. —
    2.
    Of private relations (opp. to public):

    ut in suis rebus, ita in re publica luxuriosus nepos,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 18, 48:

    deinde ut communibus pro communibus utatur, privatis ut suis,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 20:

    quod oppidum Labienus sua pecunia exaedificaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 15:

    militibus agros ex suis possessionibus pollicetur,

    i. e. his private property, id. ib. 1, 17; Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 3. —
    3.
    Of just rights or claims:

    imperatori senatuique honos suus redditus,

    due to them, Liv. 3, 10, 3:

    neque inpedimento fuit, quominus religionibus suus tenor suaque observatio redderetur,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 8:

    quibus omnibus debetur suus decor,

    Quint. 11, 1, 41. —

    So distributively: is mensibus suis dimisit legionem,

    in the month in which each soldier was entitled to his discharge, Liv. 40, 41, 8. — Esp.: suo jure (so, meo, nostro, tuo, etc., jure), by his own right:

    Tullus Hostilius qui suo jure in porta nomen inscripsit,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 12, 26:

    earum rerum hic A. Licinius fructum a me repetere prope suo jure debet,

    id. Arch. 1, 1; id. Marcell. 2, 6; id. Phil. 2, 25, 62; id. Balb. 8, 21:

    numquam illum res publica suo jure esset ulta,

    by its unquestionable right, id. Mil. 33, 88. —
    4.
    Of that to which one is exclusively devoted:

    huic quaestioni suum diem dabimus,

    a day for its exclusive discussion, Sen. Ep. 94, 52:

    homini autem suum bonum ratio est,

    his exclusive good, id. ib. 76, 10:

    in majorem me quaestionem vocas, cui suus locus, suus dies dandus est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 46, 1. —

    With proprius: mentio inlata apud senatum est, rem suo proprio magistratu egere,

    that the business needed a particular officer exclusively for itself, Liv. 4, 8, 4:

    et Hannibalem suo proprio occupandum bello,

    id. 27, 38, 7; cf.:

    dissupasset hostes, ni suo proprio eum proelio equites Volscorum exceptum tenuissent,

    in which they alone fought, id. 3, 70, 4:

    mare habet suas venas quibus impletur,

    by which it alone is fed, Sen. Q. N. 3, 14, 3. —
    5.
    According to one ' s liking, of one ' s own choice.
    a.
    Of persons, devoted to one, friendly, dear:

    Milone occiso (Clodius) habuisset suos consules,

    after his own heart, Cic. Mil. 33, 89:

    collegit ipse se contra suum Clodium,

    his dear Clodius, id. Pis. 12, 27 (cf.: suum facere, habere, II. B. 2. g).—
    b.
    Of things, favorable.
    (α).
    Of place: neque Jugurtham nisi... suo loco pugnam facere, on his own ground, i. e. chosen by him, favorable, Sall. J. 61, 1:

    hic magna auxilia expectabant et suis locis bellum in hiemem ducere cogitabant,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 61; cf.:

    numquam nostris locis laboravimus,

    Liv. 9, 19, 15.—
    (β).
    Of time:

    cum Perseus suo maxime tempore et alieno hostibus incipere bellum posset,

    Liv. 42, 43, 3; v. 7. b, infra. —
    c.
    Of circumstances: sua occasio, a favorable opportunity; sometimes without antecedent:

    neque occasioni tuae desis, neque suam occasionem hosti des,

    Liv. 22, 39, 21:

    tantum abfuit ut ex incommodo alieno sua occasio peteretur,

    id. 4, 58, 2:

    aestuque suo Locros trajecit,

    a favorable tide, id. 23, 41, 11:

    ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 3:

    orba suis essent etiamnunc lintea ventis,

    Ov. M. 13, 195:

    aut ille Ventis iturus non suis,

    Hor. Epod. 9, 30. —
    6.
    Of persons or things, peculiar, particular:

    quae est ei (animo) natura? Propria, puto, et sua,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 29, 70:

    omnis enim motus animi suum quendam a natura habet vultum,

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 316:

    geometrae et musici... more quodam loquuntur suo. Ipsae rhetorum artes verbis in docendo quasi privatis utuntur ac suis,

    id. Fin. 3, 1, 4:

    sensus omnis habet suum finem,

    its peculiar limits, Quint. 9, 4, 61: animus cum suum ambitum complevit et finibus se suis cinxit, consummatum est summum bonum, Sen. Vit. Beat. 9, 3: est etiam in nominibus ( nouns) diverso collocatis sua gratia, their peculiar elegance, Quint. 9, 3, 86:

    ibi non bello aperto, sed suis artibus, fraude et insidiis, est paene circumventus,

    Liv. 21, 34, 1:

    nec Hannibalem fefellit, suis se artibus peti,

    id. 22, 16, 5:

    adversus hostem non virtute tantum, sed suis (i. e. hostis) etiam pugnare consiliis oportebat,

    Flor. 2, 6, 26:

    liberam Minucii temeritatem se suo modo expleturum,

    Liv. 22, 28, 2:

    equites ovantes sui moris carmine,

    id. 10, 26, 11:

    exsultans cum sui moris tripudiis,

    id. 21, 42, 3:

    tripudiantes suo more,

    id. 23, 26, 9.—So, suo Marte, referring to the style of fighting peculiar to the different arms:

    equitem suo alienoque Marte pugnare,

    that the cavalry were fighting both in their own style and in that of the other arms, Liv. 3, 62, 9; cf.: suo Marte, 1, c. a, supra.—And distributively ( = suus quisque):

    suos autem haec operum genera ut auctores, sic etiam amatores habent,

    Quint. 12, 10, 2:

    illa vero fatidica fulmina ex alto et ex suis venire sideribus,

    Plin. 2, 43, 43, § 113; cf.:

    quae quidem planiora suis exemplis reddentur,

    Val. Max. 3, 4 prooem.—
    7.
    Proper, right.
    a.
    Referring to one's ordinary or normal condition:

    quod certe non fecisset, si suum numerum naves habuissent,

    their regular complement, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 51, § 133. — So poet.:

    flecte ratem! numerum non habet illa suum,

    its full number, Ov. H. 10, 36:

    novus exercitus consulibus est decretus: binae legiones cum suo equitatu,

    Liv. 40, 36, 6:

    cum suo justo equitatu,

    id. 21, 17, 8:

    totam (disciplinam) in suum statum redegit,

    Val. Max. 2, 7, 2:

    tranquilla mente et vultu suo,

    with the ordinary expression of his face, Sen. Clem. 2, 6, 2:

    media pars aeris ab his (ignibus) submota, in frigore suo manet. Natura enim aeris gelida est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 10, 4:

    cornuaque in patriis non sua vidit aquis,

    not natural to her, Ov. H. 14, 90. —

    So, non suus, of ingrafted branches and their fruit: miraturque (arbos) novas frondis et non sua poma,

    Verg. G. 2, 82. —
    b.
    Of time, proper, regular, etc. (cf. 5. b, supra).
    (α).
    The regular time ( = stato tempore):

    signum quod semper tempore exoritur suo,

    Plaut. Rud. prol. 4:

    cum et recte et suo tempore pepererit,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 16: aestas suo tempore incanduit...;

    tam solstitium quam aequinoctium suos dies retulit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 16, 3:

    omnes venti vicibus suis spirant majore ex parte,

    Plin. 2, 47, 48, § 128. —
    (β).
    The right or proper time:

    salictum suo tempore caedito,

    Cato, R. R. 33:

    cessit e vita suo magis quam suorum civium tempore,

    the right time for himself, Cic. Brut. 1, 4; so,

    exstingui homini suo tempore optabile est,

    id. Sen. 23, 85:

    Scandilius dicit se suo tempore rediturum,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 60, § 139:

    si Ardeates sua tempora exspectare velint,

    Liv. 4, 7, 6:

    Chrysippus dicit, illum... opperiri debere suum tempus, ad quod velut dato signo prosiliat,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 25, 3:

    quam multi exercitus tempore suo victorem hostem pepulerunt!

    Liv. 44, 39, 4. — Without antecedent: sed suo tempore totius sceleris hujus fons aperietur. Cic. Phil. 14, 6, 15; cf.:

    de ordine laudis, etc., praecipiemus suo tempore,

    Quint. 2, 4, 21. —
    (γ).
    Suo loco = at the proper place:

    quae erant prudentiae propria suo loco dicta sunt,

    Cic. Off. 1, 40, 143:

    quod reddetur suo loco,

    Quint. 11, 1, 16:

    ut suo loco dicetur,

    Plin. 2, 90, 102, § 221:

    inscripta quae suis locis reddam,

    id. 1, prooem. § 27; Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2; cf. 1, c. b; 4. supra. —
    (δ).
    Suited, appropriate, adapted to one:

    in eodem fundo suum quidquid conseri oportet,

    Cato, R. R. 7:

    siquidem hanc vendidero pretio suo,

    at a suitable price, Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 30:

    in partes suas digerenda causa,

    Quint. 11, 1, 6:

    confundetur quidquid in suas partes natura digessit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 29, 8. — Poet.: haec ego dumque queror, lacrimae sua verba sequuntur, Deque meis oculis in tua membra cadunt, appropriate, i. e. tristia, Ov. H. 14, 67.—Without antecedent: suum quidquid genus talearum serito, any fit kind, i. e. suited to the ground, Cato, R. R. 48. —
    8.
    Own, with the notion of independence of, or dependence on others (cf. B. 2. g d).
    a.
    Of political independence: pacem condicionibus his fecerunt ut Capuae suae leges, sui magistratus essent, her own laws, i. e. not subject to Carthage, Liv. 23, 7, 2: liberos [p. 1827] eos ac suis legibus victuros, id. 25, 23, 4. —

    Esp. in the phrases suae potestatis or in sua potestate esse, suo jure uti, sui juris esse: Puteolos, qui nunc in sua potestate sunt, suo jure, libertate aequa utuntur, totos occupabunt,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 31, 86:

    Rhegini potestatis suae ad ultimum remanserunt,

    retained their self-government, Liv. 23, 30, 9:

    urbem ne quam formulae sui juris facerent,

    id. 38, 9, 10. —
    b.
    Of paternal authority.
    (α).
    Free from the power of the paterfamilias; in the phrases sui juris esse, suae potestatis esse, to be independent:

    quaedam personae sui juris sunt, quaedam alieno juri sunt subjectae, Gai,

    Inst. 1, 48:

    sui juris sunt familiarum suarum principes, id est pater familiae, itemque mater familiae,

    Ulp. Fragm. 4, 1:

    liberi parentum potestate liberantur emancipatione. Sed filius quidem ter manumissus sui juris fit, ceteri autem liberi una manumissione sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 1:

    morte patris filius et filia sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 2:

    patres familiarum sunt qui sunt suae potestatis,

    Dig. 1, 6, 4:

    si modo defunctus testator suae potestatis mortis tempore fuerit,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 147. —

    With indef. reference: si sui juris sumus,

    Dig. 46, 2, 20; cf.:

    pro suo possideo, 2. a. supra.—Attributively: sui juris arrogatio feminae,

    Cod. Just. 8, 47, 8:

    homo sui juris,

    ib. 10, § 5.— Trop.:

    sapiens numquam semiliber erit: integrae semper libertatis et sui juris,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 5, 3:

    non illarum coitu fieri cometen, sed proprium et sui juris esse,

    id. Q. N. 7, 12, 2: nullique sunt tam feri et sui juris adfectus, ut non disciplina perdomentur, id. Ira, 2, 12, 3. —
    (β).
    Subject to paternal authority, in the phrases suus heres, sui liberi; suus heres, an heir who had been in the paternal power of the deceased:

    CVI SVVS HERES NON SIT, XII. Tab. fr. 5, 4.—In the jurists without antecedent: sui et necessarii heredes sunt velut filius filiave, nepos neptisve ex filia, deinceps ceteri qui modo in potestate morientis fuerunt,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 156:

    (emancipati liberi) non sunt sui heredes,

    ib. 2, 135:

    alia facta est juris interpretatio inter suos heredes,

    ib. 3, 15:

    datur patrono adversus suos heredes bonorum possessio (where patrono is not the antecedent of suos),

    ib. 3, 41:

    sui heredes vel instituendi sunt vel exheredandi,

    Ulp. Fragm. 22, 14:

    accrescunt suis quidem heredibus in partem virilem, extraneis autem in partem dimidiam,

    id. ib. 22, 17. —

    Sui liberi, children in paternal power: de suis et legitimis liberis,

    Cod. Just. 6, 55 inscr.
    D.
    In particular connections.
    1.
    With ipse, his own, etc. (cf. Zumpt, Gram. § 696).
    a.
    Ipse agreeing with the antecedent of suus, the antecedent being,
    (α).
    A subjectnom.:

    (ingenium ejus) valet ipsum suis viribus,

    by its own strength, Cic. Cael. 19, 45:

    legio Martia non ipsa suis decretis hostem judicavit Antonium?

    by its own resolutions, id. Phil. 4, 2, 5:

    ruit ipse suis cladibus,

    id. ib. 14, 3, 8:

    si ex scriptis cognosci ipsi suis potuissent,

    id. de Or. 2, 2, 8:

    qui se ipse sua gravitate et castimonia defenderet,

    id. Cael. 5, 11:

    quod ipse suae civitatis imperium obtenturus esset,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 3:

    suamet ipsae fraude omnes interierunt,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9; 39, 49, 3:

    ut saeviret ipse in suum sanguinem effecerunt,

    id. 40, 5, 1:

    respicerent suum ipsi exercitum,

    id. 42, 52, 10; 21, 31, 12; 22, 38, 3; 6, 19, 6.—
    (β).
    A subject-acc.:

    sunt qui dicant eam sua ipsam peremptam mercede,

    Liv. 1, 11, 9:

    (tribuniciam potestatem) suis ipsam viribus dissolvi,

    id. 2, 44, 2.—
    (γ).
    An object in dat. or acc.:

    sic ut ipsis consistendi in suis munitionibus locus non esset,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 6:

    tribuni (hostem) intra suamet ipsum moenia compulere,

    Liv. 6, 36, 4:

    alios sua ipsos invidia opportunos interemit,

    id. 1, 54, 8; 22, 14, 13.—Suus as adjunct of subject (rare):

    aliquando sua praesidia in ipsos consurrexerunt,

    their own garrisons revolted against them, Sen. Clem. 1, 26, 1.—
    b.
    With gen. of ipse, strengthening the possessive notion (cf. 4.;

    post-Aug. and very rare, but freq. in modern Lat.): aves (foetus suos) libero caelo suaeque ipsorum fiduciae permittunt,

    Quint. 2, 6, 7 (but tuus ipsius occurs in Cic.:

    tuo ipsius studio,

    Cic. Mur. 4, 9:

    tuam ipsius amicitiam,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 4, § 7).—
    c.
    Both suus and ipse agreeing with the governing noun (very rare; not in Cic. or Caes.): quae tamen in ipso cursu suo dissipata est (= ipsa in cursu suo), in its very course, Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 3 dub.:

    suamet ipsa scelera,

    Sall. C. 23, 2 (Dietsch ex conj. ipse):

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    Liv. 2, 19, 5 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. ipsi):

    a suismet ipsis praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6 MSS. (Weissenb. ipsi).—
    2.
    With quisque, distributively, each ( every one)... his own; in prose quisque is generally preceded by suus.
    a.
    Quisque and suus in different cases.
    (α).
    Quisque as subjectnom.:

    sentit enim vim quisque suam quoad possit abuti,

    Lucr. 5, 1033:

    suo quisque loco cubet,

    Cato, R. R. 5:

    suum quisque noscat ingenium,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 114:

    ad suam quisque (me disciplinam) rapiet,

    id. Ac. 2, 36, 114:

    quod suos quisque servos in tali re facere voluisset,

    id. Mil. 10, 29:

    cum suo quisque auxilio uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 51:

    celeriter ad suos quisque ordines redit,

    id. ib. 3, 37.—In apposition with plur. subj. (freq. in Liv.):

    nunc alii sensus quo pacto quisque suam rem Sentiat,

    Lucr. 4, 522:

    ut omnes cives Romani in suis quisque centuriis prima luce adessent,

    that all the Roman citizens should be present, each in his own centuria, Liv. 1, 44, 1:

    hinc senatus, hinc plebs, suum quisque intuentes ducem constiterant,

    id. 6, 15, 3:

    ut (trigemini) pro sua quisque patria dimicent,

    id. 1, 24, 2:

    stabant compositi suis quisque ordinibus,

    id. 44, 38, 11:

    (consules) in suas quisque provincias proficiscuntur,

    id. 25, 12, 2; 25, 26, 13:

    in suo quaeque (stella) motu naturam suam exercent,

    Plin. 2, 39, 39, § 106.—With abl. absol.:

    omnes, velut dis auctoribus in spem suam quisque acceptis, proelium una voce poscunt,

    Liv. 21, 45, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    relictis suis quisque stationibus... concurrerunt,

    id. 32, 24, 4; 4, 44, 10; 39, 49, 3; 2, 38, 6.—
    (β).
    With acc. of quisque as subj.:

    fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae, App. Claud. ap. Ps.-Sall. Ep. ad Caes. Rep. c. l.: sui quemque juris et retinendi et dimittendi esse dominum,

    Cic. Balb. 13, 31:

    recipere se in domos suas quemque jussit,

    Liv. 25, 10, 9; and (ungrammatically) nom., as apposition to a subj.-acc.:

    se non modo suam quisque patriam, sed totam Siciliam relicturos,

    id. 26, 29, 3 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. quosque).—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of the subject-nom., with a case of quisque as object, attribut. gen., etc.:

    sua cujusque animantis natura est,

    Cic. Fin. 5, 9, 25:

    sua quemque fraus, suum facinus, suum scelus, etc., de sanitate ac mente deturbat,

    id. Pis. 20, 46:

    sua quemque fraus et suus terror maxime vexat,

    id. Rosc. Am. 24, 67:

    suum cuique incommodum ferendum est,

    id. Off. 3, 6, 30:

    ut solidum suum cuique solvatur,

    id. Rab. Post. 17, 46:

    ne suus cuique domi hostis esset,

    Liv. 3, 16, 3:

    ut sua cuique respublica in manu esset,

    id. 26, 8, 11:

    animus suus cuique ordinem pugnandi dabat,

    id. 22, 5, 8:

    tentorium suum cuique militi domus ac penates sunt,

    id. 44, 39, 5:

    suus cuique (stellae) color est,

    Plin. 2, 18, 16, § 79:

    trahit sua quemque voluptas,

    Verg. E. 2, 65:

    stat sua cuique dies,

    id. A. 10, 467.—
    (δ).
    As predicate-nom. (v. II. B.):

    opinionem, quae sua cuique conjectanti esse potest,

    Liv. 6, 12, 3.—
    (ε).
    As adjunct of subj.-acc.:

    suum cuique honorem et gradum redditum gaudeo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    scientiam autem suam cujusque artis esse,

    id. Fin. 5, 9, 26.—
    (ζ).
    As adjunct of an object, with a case of quisque as object or attribut. gen.: suam cuique sponsam, mihi meam: suum cuique amorem, mihi meum, Atil. Fragm. inc. 1: suom cuique per me uti atque frui licet, Cato ap. Gell. 13, 24 (23), 1:

    ut suo quemque appellem nomine,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 52:

    placet Stoicis suo quamque rem nomine appellare,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 22, 1:

    ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    id. Off. 1, 33, 119:

    justitia quae suum cuique distribuit,

    id. N. D. 3, 15, 38:

    in tribuendo suum cuique,

    id. Off. 1, 5, 14:

    Turnus sui cuique periculi recens erat documentum,

    Liv. 1, 52, 4:

    in trimatu suo cuique dimidiam esse mensuram futurae certum esse,

    Plin. 7, 15, 16, § 73:

    certa cuique rerum suarum possessio,

    Vell. 2, 89, 4; cf.: qua re suum unicuique studium suaque omnibus delectatio relinquatur, Ps.-Cic. Cons. 26, 93.—With quemque in apposition with acc. plur.:

    Camillus vidit intentos opifices suo quemque operi,

    Liv. 6, 25, 9; so cujusque in appos. with gen. plur.: trium clarissimorum suae cujusque gentis virorum mors, id. 39, 52, 7; and cuique with dat. plur.: sui cuique mores fingunt fortunam hominibus, Poet. ap. Nep. Att. 11, 6 (where Lachm. ad Lucr. 2, 372, reads quique, ex conj.; cf. b. b, infra).—
    b.
    Attraction of suus and quisque as adjuncts of nouns.
    (α).
    Attraction of suus:

    ut nemo sit nostrum quin in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium requirat acrius (= suum cujusque generis judicium),

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    quas tamen inter omnes (voces) est suo quoque in genere (vox) mediocris ( = inter omnes voces est mediocris vox, sua quoque in genere),

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 216:

    eo concilia suae cujusque regionis indici jussit (= sua cujusque regionis concilia),

    Liv. 45, 29, 10:

    equites suae cuique parti post principia collocat (= equites suos cuique parti),

    id. 3, 22, 6:

    cum motibus armorum et corporum suae cuique genti assuetis,

    id. 25, 17, 5:

    legiones deducebantur cum tribunis et centurionibus et sui cujusque ordinis militibus (= suis cujusque),

    Tac. A. 14, 27:

    quae sui cujusque sunt ingenii,

    Quint. 7, 10, 10 Halm (al. sua):

    sui cujusque ingenii poma vel semina gerunt (= sua cujusque),

    Col. 3, 1;

    and by a double attraction: has (cohortes) subsidiariae ternae et aliae totidem suae cujusque legionis subsequebantur (= has cohortes... totidem cujusque legionis, suam quaeque legionem, subsequebantur),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 83. —
    (β).
    Attraction of quisque:

    tanta ibi copia venustatum in suo quique loco sita,

    Plaut. Poen. 5, 4, 6 (al. quaeque):

    quodvis frumentum non tamen omne Quique suo genere inter se simile esse videbis,

    Lucr. 2, 372 Lachm. and Munro ad loc.:

    cum verba debeant sui cujusque generis copulari,

    Varr. L. L. 10, 48:

    in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    haec igitur proclivitas ad suum quodque genus aegrotatio dicatur,

    id. Tusc. 4, 12, 28:

    separatim greges sui cujusque generis nocte remeabant (= greges sui quisque generis),

    Liv. 24, 3, 5:

    ut sui cujusque mensis acciperet (frumentum),

    Suet. Aug. 40;

    and quisque both attracted and in its own case: quia cujusque partis naturae et in corpore et in animo sua quaeque vis sit (where either cujusque or quaeque is redundant),

    Cic. Fin. 5, 17, 46; v. Madv. ad loc.; Cato, R. R. 23 fin.;

    so esp. in the phrases suo quoque tempore, anno, die, loco, etc.: pecunia, quae in stipendium Romanis suo quoque anno penderetur, deerat (= suo quaeque anno),

    each instalment in the year when due, Liv. 33, 46, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    suo quoque loco,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 7, 2; 1, 22, 6:

    opera quae suis quibusque temporibus anni vilicum exsequi oporteret,

    Col. 11, 3:

    suo quoque tempore,

    Vitr. 2, 9, 4:

    nisi sua quaque die usurae exsolverentur (= sua quaeque die),

    Dig. 22, 1, 12 init.; 13, 7, 8, § 3:

    ut opera rustica suo quoque tempore faciat,

    ib. 19, 2, 25, § 3 (al. quaeque)—
    c.
    In the order quisque... suus.
    (α).
    In relative clauses, comparative clauses with ut, and interrogative clauses introduced by quid, etc., where quisque immediately follows the relative, etc.:

    ut quisque suom volt esse, ita est,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 45; cf.

    with sibi,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 49; id. Lael. 9, 30:

    expendere oportere quid quisque habeat sui... nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant. Id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    id. Off. 1, 31, 113:

    neque solum quid in senatu quisque civitatis suae dicerent ignorabant, sed, etc.,

    Liv. 32, 19, 9:

    gratius id fore laetiusque quod quisque sua manu ex hoste captum rettulerit,

    id. 5, 20, 8; 6, 25, 10; cf.:

    in quibus cum multa sint quae sua quisque dicere velit, nihil est quod quisque suum possit dicere,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 23, 1.—
    (β).
    If the emphasis is not on suus, but (for quisque, when emphatic, unusquisque is used) on some other word:

    in civitates quemque suas... dimisit,

    Liv. 21, 48, 2:

    in patriam quisque suam remissus est,

    Just. 33, 2, 8:

    in vestigio quemque suo vidit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 15; cf.:

    hospitibus quisque suis scribebant,

    id. 33, 45, 6:

    pro facultatibus quisque suis,

    id. 42, 53, 3; cf.:

    respiciendae sunt cuique facultates suae,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 15, 3:

    praecipitat quisque vitam suam et futuri desiderio laborat,

    id. Brev. Vit. 7, 5; id. Ben. 7, 5, 1:

    tunc praeceps quisque se proripit et penates suos deserit,

    id. Q. N. 6, 1, 5; 5, 18, 8:

    summum quisque causae suae judicem facit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 10: aestimatione nocturnae [p. 1828] quietis, dimidio quisque spatio vitae suae vivit, id. 7, 50, 51, § 167.—
    (γ).
    Poets adopt the order quisque suus when the metre requires it, Verg. A. 6, 743:

    oscula quisque suae matri tulerunt,

    Ov. F. 2, 715. —
    (δ).
    When suus and quisque belong to different clauses:

    atque earum quaeque, suum tenens munus... manet in lege naturae,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 13, 38. —
    d.
    Suus uterque, or uterque suus, distributively of two subjects:

    suas uterque legiones reducit in castra,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 40; 2, 28:

    ideo quod uterque suam legem confirmare debebit,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 142:

    cum sui utrosque adhortarentur,

    Liv. 1, 25, 1:

    ad utrumque ducem sui redierunt,

    id. 21, 29, 5:

    utraque (lex) sua via it,

    Sen. Ben. 6, 6, 1; cf.

    uterque, in apposit.: nec ipsi tam inter se acriter contenderunt, quam studia excitaverant uterque sui corporis hominum,

    Liv. 26, 48, 6.—
    3.
    With sibi.
    (α).
    Sibi with pronom. force (cf. sui, IV. C. fin.):

    reddam suum sibi,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 119 ( = ei; but referred to b, infra, by Brix ad loc.); cf.:

    suam rem sibi salvam sistam,

    id. Poen. 5, 2, 123:

    idem lege sibi sua curationem petet,

    for himself, Cic. Agr. 2, 9, 22 (cf. id. Phil. 2, 37, 96;

    I. B. 2. b. supra): ut vindicare sibi suum fulgorem possint,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 11; cf.

    the formula of divorce: tuas res tibi habeto,

    Dig. 24, 2, 2.—Hence, illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit, Cic. Phil. 2, 28, 69.—
    (β).
    With sibi redundant, to strengthen suus (anteand post-class. and colloq.):

    quo pacto serviat suo sibi patri,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 5:

    eum necabam ilico per cerebrum pinna sua sibi, quasi turturem,

    id. Poen. 2, 40; v. sui, IV. C. and the passages there cited.—
    4.
    With gen. agreeing with the subject of suus:

    quas cum solus pertulisset ut sua unius in his gratia esset,

    that the credit of it should belong to him alone, Liv. 2, 8, 3:

    qui de sua unius sententia omnia gerat,

    id. 44, 22, 11; cf.:

    unam Aegyptus in hoc spem habet suam,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2.—For suus ipsius, etc., v. D. 1. b. supra.—
    5.
    With demonstr., rel., or indef. pronn. and adjj., of his, hers, etc.:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    to this booty of his, Cic. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Sestius cum illo exercitu suo,

    id. Sest. 5, 12:

    qua gravitate sua,

    id. ib. 61, 129:

    suam rem publicam illam defenderunt,

    that republic of theirs, id. ib. 67, 141:

    in istum civem suum,

    against this citizen of theirs, id. Balb. 18, 41:

    cum illo suo pari,

    id. Pis. 8, 18:

    te nulla sua calamitate civitas satiare potest?

    id. Phil. 8, 6, 19:

    dubitatis igitur, quin vos M. Laterensis ad suam spem aliquam delegerit,

    for some hope of his, id. Planc. 16, 39:

    non tam sua ulla spe quam militum impetu tractus,

    by any hope of his, Liv. 25, 21, 5:

    nullo suo merito,

    from no fault of theirs, id. 26, 29, 4:

    ipse arcano cum paucis familiaribus suis colloquitur,

    with a few of his friends, Caes. B. C. 1, 19.—
    6.
    With descriptive adjj.
    (α).
    Standing before the adj. and noun (so most freq.):

    suorum improbissimorum sermonum domicilium,

    Cic. Pis. 31, 76:

    causam sui dementissimi consilii,

    id. Phil. 2, 22, 53:

    suam insatiabilem crudelitatem,

    id. ib. 11, 3, 8:

    suis amplissimis fortunis,

    id. ib. 13, 8, 16:

    suum pristinum morem,

    id. Pis. 12, 27:

    suis lenissimis postulatis,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5: simili ratione Pompeius in suis veteribus castris consedit (suis emphatic; cf. b, infra), id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (β).
    Between the adj. and noun (less emphatic):

    pro eximiis suis beneficiis,

    Cic. Prov. Cons. 4, 7:

    propter summam suam humanitatem,

    id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    ex praeteritis suis officiis,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 60:

    Caesar in veteribus suis castris consedit,

    id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (γ).
    After adj. and noun:

    veterem amicum suum excepit,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    in illo ardenti tribunatu suo,

    id. Sest. 54, 116.—
    7.
    Objectively for the pers. pron. (rare):

    neque cuiquam mortalium injuriae suae parvae videntur ( = sibi illatae),

    Sall. C. 51, 11; so,

    neglectam ab Scipione et nimis leviter latam suam injuriam ratus,

    Liv. 29, 9, 9:

    ipsae enim leges te a cognitione sua judicio publico reppulerunt ( = a se cognoscendo),

    Cic. Balb. 14, 32:

    suam invidiam tali morte quaesitam ( = quaesitum esse ab eo ut homines se inviderent),

    Tac. A. 3, 16; so,

    nulla sua invidia,

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40.—
    8.
    Abl. fem. sua, with refert or interest, for gen. of the pers. pron.: neminem esse qui quomodo se habeat nihil sua censeat interesse, Cic. Fin. 5, 10, 30:

    si scit sua nihil interesse utrum anima per os, an per jugulum exeat,

    Sen. Ep. 76, 33; v. intersum, III.—
    9.
    Strengthened by the suffix - pte or -met.
    (α).
    By - pte (not used with ipse) affixed to the forms sua, suo, and (ante-class.) suum:

    quom illa osculata esset suumpte amicum,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 4, 38:

    ut terrena suopte nutu et suo pondere in terram ferantur,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 17, 40:

    ferri suopte pondere,

    id. N. D. 1, 25, 69:

    suapte natura,

    id. Fat. 18, 42:

    suapte vi et natura,

    id. ib. 19, 43; id. Fin. 1, 16, 54; 5, 22, 61:

    suopte ingenio,

    Liv. 25, 18; so id. 1, 25, 1; 1, 18, 4:

    suapte manu,

    Cic. Or. 3, 3, 10:

    locus suapte natura infestus,

    Liv. 44, 6, 9; so,

    suapte natura,

    id. 4, 22, 4:

    flumina suapte natura vasta,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 27, 8; so id. Ben. 4, 17, 2:

    sponte suapte,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 7, § 70.—
    (β).
    With - met, almost always followed by ipse (in all forms of suus except suus, suum, suae, and suorum):

    suomet ipsi more,

    Sall. J. 31, 6:

    suomet ipsi instrumento,

    Liv. 22, 14, 13:

    suomet ipsi metu,

    Tac. H. 3, 16 fin.:

    suamet ipsum pecunia,

    Sall. J. 8, 2:

    suamet ipsae fraude,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9:

    intra suamet ipsum moenia,

    id. 6, 36, 4:

    suismet ipsi praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6:

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    id. 2, 19, 5:

    suosmet ipsi cives,

    id. 2, 9, 5:

    suasmet ipse spes,

    Tac. A. 3, 66 fin. —Without ipse:

    populum suimet sanguinis mercede,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 1, 41, 25 Dietsch:

    magna pars suismet aut proxumorum telis obtruncabantur,

    id. ib. 2, 52 ib.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sua

  • 15 suum

    sŭus, a, um (old form sos, sa, sum; dat. plur. sis, Enn. ap. Fest. p. 301 Mull.; acc. sas. id. ib. p. 325 ib.; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 47; Schol. Pers. 1, 108; sing. sam for suam, Fest. p. 47 Mull.;

    so for suo, C. I. L. 5, 2007. In ante-class. verse su- with the following vowel freq. forms one syllable,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 48; id. Ps. 1, 3, 5; Ter. And. 1, 1, 68; Lucr. 1, 1022; v. Neue, Formenl. 2, 189 sqq.), pron. poss., 3 d pers. [root SVA-; Sanscr. sva, own; cf. sui; Gr. seWo-, whence sphe, etc., and he; cf. heos], of or belonging to himself, herself, etc.; his own, her own, etc.; his, her, its, their; one ' s; hers, theirs.
    I.
    Ordinary possessive use his, etc. (cf. the similar use of the pers. pron. sui, q. v.).
    A.
    With antecedent in the same sentence.
    1.
    The antecedent a subject-nominative, expressed or understood.
    (α).
    His:

    Caesar copias suas divisit,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 97:

    ille in sua sententia perseverat,

    id. ib. 1, 72:

    tantam habebat suarum rerum fiduciam,

    id. ib. 2, 37:

    cum sceleris sui socios Romae reliquisset,

    Cic. Cat. 3, 1, 3:

    cur ego non ignoscam si anteposuit suam salutem meae?

    id. Pis. 32, 79; id. Phil. 2, 18, 45; id. Mil. 10, 27; id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    Hanno praefecturam ejus (i.e. Muttinis) filio suo (Hannonis) dedit,

    Liv. 26, 40, 7:

    imperat princeps civibus suis,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 16, 2:

    nemo rem suam emit,

    id. Ben. 7, 4, 8.—
    (β).
    Her:

    mea Glycerium suos parentes repperit,

    Ter. And. 5, 6, 5:

    utinam haec ignoraret suum patrem,

    id. Phorm. 5, 6, 34:

    si nunc facere volt era officium suom,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 72:

    ne eadem mulier cum suo conjuge honestissimum adulescentem oppressisse videatur,

    Cic. Cael. 32, 78:

    si omnibus suis copiis excellentem virum res publica armasset,

    id. Phil. 13, 16, 32.—
    (γ).
    Its:

    omne animal, simul et ortum est, et se ipsum et omnes partes suas diligit,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 11, 33:

    cum mea domus ardore suo deflagrationem Italiae toti minaretur,

    id. Planc. 40, 95.—
    (δ).
    Their: (legiones) si consulem suum reliquerunt, vituperandae sunt Cic. Phil. 5, 2, 4:

    mittent aliquem de suo numero,

    id. ib. 11, 10, 25:

    rationem illi sententiae suae non fere reddebant,

    id. Tusc. 1, 17, 38:

    qui agellos suos redimere a piratis solebant,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 37, § 85:

    edicunt ut ad suum vestitum senatores redirent,

    id. Sest. 14, 32:

    suis finibus eos prohibent,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 1: Allobrogibus sese persuasuros existimabant ut per suos (Allobrogum) fines eos (Helvetios) ire paterentur, id. id. 1, 6;

    and distributively: ac naves onerariae LXIII. in portu expugnatae, quaedam cum suis oneribus, frumento, armis, aere, etc.,

    some with their several cargoes, Liv. 26, 47, 9.—
    2.
    With a subject-clause as antecedent:

    id sua sponte apparebat tuta celeribus consiliis praepositurum,

    was selfevident, Liv. 22, 38, 13:

    ad id quod sua sponte satis collectum animorum erat, indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur,

    id. 3, 62, 1:

    secutum tamen sua sponte est ut vilior ob ea regi Hannibal et suspectior fieret,

    id. 35, 14, 4. —
    3.
    With subject-acc. as antecedent:

    hanc dicam Athenis advenisse cum aliquo amatore suo, Plant. Mil. 2, 2, 86: doceo gratissimum esse in sua tribu Plancium,

    Cic. Planc. 19, 47:

    cupio eum suae causae confidere,

    id. Sest. 64, 135:

    suspicari debuit (Milo), eum (Clodium) ad villam suam (Clodii) deversurum,

    id. Mil. 19, 51: Medeam praedicant in fuga fratris sui membra dissipavisse, id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 22:

    (dixit) Caesarem pro sua dignitate debere et studium et iracundiam suam reipublicae dimittere,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    4.
    With object-acc. as antecedent.
    (α).
    Suus being an adjunct of the subject (generally rendered in Engl. by a pass. constr.):

    hunc pater suus de templo deduxit,

    he was taken from the temple by his father, Cic. Inv. 2, 17, 52:

    hunc sui cives e civitate ejecerunt,

    id. Sest. 68, 142:

    Alexandrum uxor sua... occidit,

    id. Inv. 2, 49, 144:

    illum ulciscentur mores sui,

    id. Att. 9, 12, 2:

    quodsi quem natura sua... forte deficiet,

    id. Or. 1, 14:

    utrumque regem sua multitudo consalutaverat,

    Liv. 1, 7, 1:

    quas (urbes) sua virtus ac dii juvent, magnas sibi opes facere,

    id. 1, 9, 3; 1, 7, 15; 6, 33, 5:

    quos nec sua conscientia impulerit, nec, etc.,

    id. 26, 33, 3; 25, 14, 7:

    consulem C. Marium servus suus interemit,

    Val. Max. 6, 8, 2:

    quis non Vedium Pollionem pejus oderat quam servi sui?

    Sen. Clem. 1, 18, 2:

    sera dies sit qua illum gens sua caelo adserat,

    id. Cons. Poll. 12 (31), 5.—With the antecedent understood from the principal sentence:

    ita forma simili pueri ut mater sua internoscere (sc. eos) non posset,

    Plaut. Men. prol. 19; and with suus as adjunct both of the subject and of the antecedent: jubet salvere suos vir uxorem suam, id. merc. 4, 3, 11. —
    (β).
    With impers. verbs:

    sunt homines, quos libidinis infamiaeque suae neque pudeat neque taedeat,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 12, 35:

    video fore ut inimicos tuos poeniteat intemperantiae suae,

    id. Fam. 3, 10, 1:

    si Caesarem beneficii sui poeniteret,

    id. Lig. 10, 29; so id. Agr. 2, 11, 26:

    jam ne nobilitatis quidem suae plebejos poenitere,

    Liv. 10, 7, 8:

    militem jam minus virtutis poenitere suae,

    id. 22, 12, 10.—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of other members of the sentence:

    ad parentes suos ducas Silenium,

    Plaut. Cist. 2, 3, 86. nam is illius filiam conicit in navem clam matrem suam (i.e. filiae), id. Mil. 2, 1, 34:

    eosdem ad quaestoris sui aut imperatoris, aut commilitonum suorum pericula impulistis,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 17, 34:

    totum enim ex sua patria sustulisti,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 127; id. Or. 3, 32, 126: quem (Hammonium) tibi etiam suo nomine ( on his own account) commendo... itaque peto a te ut ejus procuratorem et ipsum suo nomine diligas, id. Fam. 13, 21, 2:

    Caesar Fabium in sua remittit hiberna,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 33; id. B. C. 3, 24:

    introire ad Ciceronem, et domi suae imparatum confodere,

    Sall. C. 28, 1:

    suis flammis delete Fidenas,

    i. e. the flames kindled by the Fidenates, Liv. 4, 33, 5:

    suo igni involvit hostes,

    Tac. A. 14, 30:

    quid Caesarem in sua fata inmisit?

    Sen. Ep. 94, 65; id. Q. N. 1, praef. 7; cf.

    with antecedent supplied from preceding sentence: non destiti rogare et petere (sc. Brutum) mea causa, suadere et hortari sua,

    Cic. Att. 6, 2, 7.—
    5.
    With dat. as antecedent.
    (α).
    As adjunct of subject (cf. 4. supra):

    suus rex reginae placet,

    a queen likes her own king, Plaut. Stich. 1, 2, 76:

    ei nunc alia ducenda'st domum, sua cognata Lemniensis,

    id. Cist. 1, 1, 101:

    Autronio nonne sodales, non collegae sui... defuerunt?

    Cic. Sull. 2, 7:

    si ceteris facta sua recte prosunt,

    id. Cat. 3, 12, 27:

    cui non magistri sui atque doctores, cui non... locus ipse... in mente versetur?

    id. Planc. 33, 81:

    haec omnia plane... Siculis erepta sunt: primum suae leges, etc.,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 13, § 33:

    Romanis multitudo sua auxit animum,

    Liv. 21, 50, 4:

    sicuti populo Romano sua fortuna labet,

    id. 42, 50, 7:

    Lanuvinis sacra sua reddita,

    id. 8, 14, 2:

    vilitas sua illis detrahit pretium,

    Sen. Ben. 4, 29, 2:

    nemo est cui felicitas sua satisfaciat,

    id. Ep. 115, 17:

    labor illi suus restitutus est,

    id. Brev. Vit. 20, 3:

    magnitudo sua singulis constat,

    id. Q. N. 1, 1, 10:

    tantum sapienti sua, quantum Dec omnis aetas patet,

    id. Ep. 53, 11. —

    With antecedent supplied from principal sentence: mater quod suasit sua Adulescens mulier fecit, i.e. ei,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 38.—
    (β).
    Of other words:

    regique Thebano regnum stabilivit suum,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 40:

    mittam hodie huic suo die natali malam rem magnam,

    id. Ps. 1, 3, 5:

    ego Metello non irascor, neque ei suam vacationem eripio,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 68, § 164:

    desinant insidiari domui suae consuli,

    id. Cat. 1, 13, 32:

    quibus ea res honori fuerit a suis civibus,

    id. Mil. 35, 96: Scipio suas res Syracusanis restituit, Liv. [p. 1824] 29, 1, 17:

    nos non suas (leges Lacedaemoniis arbitror) ademisse, sed nostras leges dedisse,

    id. 39, 37, 6:

    Graccho et Tuditano provinciae Lucani et Galliae cum suis exercitibus prorogatae,

    id. 25, 3, 5.—
    6.
    With gen., abl., or object of a prep. as antecedent:

    nec illius animi aciem praestringit splendor sui nominis,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    nolite a sacris patriis Junonis Sospitae domesticum et suum consulem avellere,

    id. Mur. 41, 90:

    quamvis tu magna mihi scripseris de Bruti adventu ad suas legiones,

    id. Att. 14, 13, 12:

    suae legis ad scriptum ipsam quoque sententiam adjungere,

    the meaning of their law to which they refer, id. Inv. 2, 49, 147:

    cum ambitio alterius suam primum apud eos majestatem solvisset,

    Liv. 22, 42, 12:

    nunc causam instituendorum ludorum ab origine sua repetam,

    Val. Max. 2, 4, 4:

    Jubam in regno suo non locorum notitia adjuvet, non popularium pro rege suo virtus,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 10; id. Ben. 7, 6, 3; id. Clem. 1, 3, 4.—Esp. with cujusque as antecedent:

    in qua deliberatione ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 33, 119 (v. II. D. 2. infra).— Abl.:

    operam dare ut sua lex ipso scripto videatur niti,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 147 (cf. supra):

    (Caesar reperiebat) ad Galbam propter justitiam prudentiamque suam totius belli summam deferri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    credere, ad suum concilium a Jove deos advocari,

    Sen. Q. N. 2, 42, 1.—
    7.
    With predic. nom. as antecedent:

    sapientissimi artis suae professores sunt a quibus et propria studia verecunde et aliena callide administrantur,

    Val. Max. 8, 12, 1.—
    8.
    With appositive noun.
    (α).
    With gram. subject as antecedent:

    hoc Anaximandro, populari ac sodali suo, non persuasit,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 37, 118:

    vidit fortissimum virum, inimicissimum suum,

    id. Mil. 9, 25:

    (hic) fuit in Creta contubernalis Saturnini, propinqui sui,

    id. Planc. 11, 27:

    ut non per L. Crassum, adfinem suum... causam illam defenderit,

    id. Balb. 21, 49:

    ne cum hoc T. Broccho, avunculo, ne cum ejus filio, consobrino suo, ne nobiscum vivat,

    id. Lig. 4, 11:

    Caesar mittit ad eum A. Clodium, suum atque illius familiarem,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 57.—
    (β).
    With object as antecedent:

    Dicaearchum cum Aristoxeno, aequali et condiscipulo suo, omittamus,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 18, 41:

    tres fratres optimos, non solum sibi ipsos, neque nobis, necessariis suis, sed etiam rei publicae condonavit,

    id. Lig. 12, 36:

    Varroni, quem, sui generis hominem,... vulgus extrahere ad consulatum nitebatur,

    Liv. 22, 34, 2.—
    (γ).
    With appositive noun as antecedent:

    si P. Scipionem, clarissimum virum, majorumque suorum simillimum res publica tenere potuisset,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 14, 29:

    M. Fabi Ambusti, potentis viri cum inter sui corporis homines, tum ad plebem, etc.,

    Liv. 6, 34, 5:

    C. vero Fabricii, et Q. Aemilii Papi, principum saeculi sui, domibus argentum fuisse confitear oportet,

    Val. Max. 4, 4, 3.—
    9.
    In participial clauses.
    (α).
    The antecedent being the logical subject of the participle, and other than the principal subject:

    credamus igitur Panaetio, a Platone suo dissentienti ( = qui dissentiebat),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 32, 79:

    ea Sex. Roscium, expulsum ex suis bonis, recepit domum,

    id. Rosc. Am. 10, 27:

    diffidentemque rebus suis confirmavit,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 23:

    Dejotarum ad me venientem cum omnibus copiis suis, certiorem feci, etc.,

    id. Fam. 15, 4, 7; id. Cat. 4, 9, 18: si hominis et suis et populi Romani ornamentis amplissimi ( being greatly distinguished) causam repudiassem, id. Mur. 4, 8:

    stupentes tribunos et suam jam vicem magis anxios quam, etc., liberavit consensus populi Romani,

    Liv. 8, 35, 1; 22, 42, 8:

    manet in folio scripta querela suo ( = quam scripsit),

    Ov. F. 5, 224; cf. in abl. absol.:

    et ipsis (hostibus) regressis in castra sua,

    Liv. 22, 60, 9:

    quibus (speculis) si unum ostenderis hominem, populus adparet, unaquaque parte faciem exprimente sua,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 5, 5.—
    (β).
    The logical subject of the participle, being also the principal subject:

    sic a suis legionibus condemnatus irrupit in Galliam,

    Cic. Phil. 10, 10, 21:

    hunc agrum patres nostri, acceptum a majoribus suis ( = quem acceperant), perdiderunt,

    id. Agr. 2, 31, 84:

    ut in suis ordinibus dispositi dispersos adorirentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 92: Appius, odium in se aliorum suo in eos metiens odio, haud ignaro, inquit, imminet fortuna, Liv. 3, 54, 3:

    ipsa capit Condita in pharetra ( = quae condiderat) tela minora sua,

    Ov. F. 2, 326; cf. in abl. absol.:

    Sopater, expositis suis difficultatibus ( = cum exposuisset, etc.): Timarchidem... perducit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 28, § 69:

    Caesar, primum suo deinde omnium ex conspectu remotis equis, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25:

    Campani, audita sua pariter sociorumque clade, legatos ad Hannibalem miserunt,

    Liv. 25, 15, 1:

    (Appius) deposito suo magistratu... domum est reductus,

    id. 4, 24, 7; 3, 35, 9; 9, 10, 13; 9, 41, 9.—
    (γ).
    The antecedent being the principal subject, not the logical subject of the participle:

    M. Papirius dicitur Gallo, barbam suam (i.e. Papirii) permulcenti,... iram movisse,

    Liv. 5, 41, 9: cum Gracchus, verecundia deserendi socios, implorantis fidem suam populique Romani, substitisset. id. 23, 36, 8; cf. in abl. absol.:

    si sine maximo dedecore, tam impeditis suis rebus, potuisset emori,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 10, 29; id. Mil. 14, 38; id. Planc. 21, 51; id. Clu. 14, 42:

    ita (consul) proelio uno accidit Vestinorum res, haudquaquam tamen incruento milite suo (consulis),

    Liv. 8, 29, 12; cf.

    with antecedent to be supplied: Campani, cum, robore juventutis suae acciso, nulla (sc. eis) propinqua spes esset, etc.,

    id. 7, 29, 7.—
    10.
    In gerund. construction. ( a) With subject as antecedent:

    mihi ipsa Roma ad complectendum conservatorem suum progredi visa est,

    Cic. Pis. 22, 52.—
    (β).
    With object, the logical subjects of the gerund as antecedent:

    cur iis persequendi juris sui... adimis potestatem?

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 6, 21:

    si senatui doloris sui de me declarandi potestas esset erepta,

    id. Sest. 23, 51:

    nec tribunis plebis (spatium datur) sui periculi deprecandi,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5.—
    (γ).
    With antecedent dependent on the gerund:

    eamque rem illi putant a suum cuique tribuendo appellatam,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 19.—
    11.
    As adjunct of a noun dependent on a subjectinf., with its logical subject as antecedent:

    magnum Miloni fuit, conficere illam pestem nulla sua invidia?

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40:

    neque enim fuit Gabinii, remittere tantum de suo nec regis, imponere tantum plus suis,

    his claim, id. Rab. Post. 11, 31:

    Piso, cui fructum pietatis suae neque ex me neque a populo Romano ferre licuit,

    id. Sest. 31, 68:

    ei cujus magis intersit, vel sua, vel rei publicae causa vivere,

    id. Off. 3, 23, 90:

    sapientis est consilium explicare suum de maximis rebus,

    id. Or. 2, 81, 333; id. Mil. 15, 41.—With logical subject understood:

    totam Italiam suis colonis ut complere (sc. eis) liceat, permittitur,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    maximum (sc. eis) solacium erit, propinquorum eodem monumento declarari, et virtutem suorum, et populi Romani pietatem,

    id. Phil. 14, 13, 35.
    B.
    Without gram. antec., one ' s, one ' s own.
    1.
    Dependent on subject-inff.:

    ejusdem animi est, posteris suis amplitudinem nobis quam non acceperit tradere, et memoriam prope intermortuam generis sui, virtute renovare,

    Cic. Mur. 7, 16:

    siquidem atrocius est, patriae parentem quam suum occidere,

    id. Phil. 2, 13, 31:

    miliens perire est melius quam in sua civitate sine armorum praesidio non posse vivere,

    id. ib. 2, 44, 112: quanto est honestius, alienis injuriis quam suis commoveri, one ' s own, id. Verr. 2, 3, 72, § 169:

    contentum suis rebus esse maximae sunt certissimaeque divitiae,

    id. Par. 6, 51:

    ut non liceat sui commodi causa nocere alteri,

    id. Off. 3, 5, 23:

    detrahere de altero sui commodi causa,

    id. ib. 3, 5, 24:

    suis exemplis melius est uti,

    Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2:

    levius est sua decreta tollere quam aliorum,

    Liv. 3, 21. 5; 39, 5, 2;

    29, 37, 11: satius est vitae suae rationes quam frumenti publici nosse,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 18, 3:

    quanto satius est sua mala exstinguere quam aliena posteris tradere?

    id. Q. N. 3, praef. 5:

    cum initia beneficiorum suorum spectare, tum etiam exitus decet,

    id. Ben. 2, 14, 2; 3, 1, 5:

    Romani nominis gloriae, non suae, composuisse illa decuit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 16.—With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent: cum possimus ab Ennio sumere... exemplum, videtur esse arrogantia illa relinquere, et ad sua devenire, to one ' s own = to our own, Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2.—
    2.
    Without a subject-inf.:

    omnia torquenda sunt ad commodum suae causae... sua diligenter narrando,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 21, 30: ut in ceteris habenda ratio non sua (al. sui) solum, sed etiam aliorum, id. Off. 1, 39, 139:

    erat Dareo mite ac tractabile ingenium, nisi suam naturam plerumque fortuna corrumperet (suam not referring to Dareo),

    Curt. 3, 2, 17 MSS. (Foss, mansuetam). — With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent (cf. 1. supra):

    non erit ista amicitia sed mercatura quaedam utilitatum suarum,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 44, 122; cf.: pro suo possidere, II. A. 2. a. g; and Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73, II. A. 2. b. a; cf. also II. B. 1. a; II. B. 5. c.; II. B. 7. b.; II. C. 8. b. b infra.
    C.
    With antec. in a previous sentence. Here ejus, eorum, earum are used for his, her, their, unless the clause is oblique in regard to the antecedent, i. e. the antecedent is conceived as the author of the statement.
    1.
    In clauses dependent on a verbum sentiendi or dicendi, expressed or understood, referring to the grammatical or logical subject of the verb.
    a.
    In infinitive clauses:

    (Clodius) Caesaris potentiam suam potentiam esse dicebat,

    Cic. Mil. 32, 88:

    (Caelius) a sua (causa) putat ejus (i.e. Ascitii) esse sejunctam,

    id. Cael. 10, 24:

    ipsos certo scio non negare ad haec bona Chrysogonum accessisse impulsu suo (referring to ipsos),

    id. Rosc. Am. 37, 107:

    hostes viderunt,... suorum tormentorum usum spatio propinquitatis interire,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 16:

    docent, sui judicii rem non esse,

    id. ib. 1, 13.—The reference of suus may be ambiguous, esp. if an infinitive is dependent on another:

    hoc Verrem dicere ajebant, te... opera sua consulem factum, i.e. Verris, though grammatically it might refer to the subj. of aiebant,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 10, 29:

    (Ariovistus) dixit neminem secum sine sua pernicie contendisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 36; cf. the context with, in all, eleven reflexive pronouns referring to four different antecedents (populus Romanus, Ariovistus, Caesar, nemo); cf.

    also: occurrebat ei, mancam praeturam suam futuram consule Milone,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25; 32, 88; Liv. 3, 42, 2.—
    b.
    Suus in a clause dependent on inf.:

    scio equidem, ut, qui argentum afferret atque expressam imaginem suam (i.e. militis) huc ad nos, cum eo ajebat velle mitti mulierem,

    Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 55:

    isti bonorum emptores arbitrantur, vos hic sedere qui excipiatis eos qui de suis (i.e. emptorum) manibus effugerint,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 52, 151:

    Siculi venisse tempus ajebant ut commoda sua defenderem,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 1, 3:

    ut tunc tandem sentiret recuperanda esse quae prius sua culpa amissa forent,

    Liv. 44, 8, 4. —

    Ambiguous: velle Pompejum se Caesari purgatum, ne ea quae reipublicae causa egerit (Pompejus) in suam (i.e. Caesaris) contumeliam vertat (where suam might be referred to Pompejus),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    c.
    In oblique clauses introduced by ut or ne, or clauses subordinate to such:

    Cassius constituit ut ludi absente te fierent suo nomine,

    Cic. Att. 15, 11, 2:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam tam nefariam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    id. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Nasidius eos magnopere hortatur ut rursus cum Bruti classe, additis suis (i.e. Nasidii) auxiliis confligant,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 3:

    (regem) denuntiasse sibi ut triduo regni sui decederent finibus,

    Liv. 42, 25, 12:

    Sabinae mulieres, hinc patres, hinc viros orantes, ne parricidio macularent partus suos (i.e. mulierum),

    id. 1, 13, 2:

    Patron praecepit suis ut arma induerent, ad omne imperium suum parati,

    Curt. 5, 11, 1.—With reflex. pron., referring to a different antecedent:

    ad hanc (Laidem) Demosthenes clanculum adit, et ut sibi copiam sui faceret, petit,

    Gell. 1, 8, 5. —
    d.
    In subordinate clauses introduced by quin or quod:

    (Dejotarus) non recusat quin id suum facinus judices,

    Cic. Deiot. 15, 43; so id. ib. 4, 15;

    16, 45: parietes hujus curiae tibi gratias agere gestiunt, quod futura sit illa auctoritas in his majorum suorum et suis sedibus,

    id. Marcell. 3, 10:

    quidni gauderet quod iram suam nemo sentiret?

    Sen. Troad. 3, 13:

    querenti quod uxor sua e fico se suspendisset,

    Quint. 6, 3, 88;

    and with intentional ambiguity: cum Proculejus quereretur de filio quod is mortem suam expectaret,

    id. 9, 3, 68. —
    e.
    In interrogative clauses:

    si, quod officii sui sit, non occurrit animo, nihil umquam omnino aget,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 8, 25:

    ut non auderet iterum dicere quot milia fundus suus abesset ab urbe,

    id. Caecin. 10, [p. 1825] 28:

    donec sciat unisquisque quid sui, quid alieni sit,

    Liv. 6, 27, 8:

    rex ignarus, quae cum Hannibale legatis suis convenisset, quaeque legati ejus ad se allaturi fuissent,

    id. 23, 39, 2:

    postquam animadvertit quantus agminis sui terror esset,

    id. 43, 19, 5. —
    2.
    In a virtually oblique clause.
    a.
    In final clause, introduced by ut, ne, or rel., referring to the subject of the purpose:

    me a portu praemisit domum, ut haec nuntiem uxori suae,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 41:

    quasi Appius ille Caecus viam muniverit, non qua populus uteretur, sed ubi impune sui posteri latrocinarentur, i. e. Appii,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    quae gens ad Caesarem legatos mise. rat, ut suis omnibus facultatibus uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 80:

    inde castra movent, ne qua vis sociis suis ab Romano exercitu inferri possit,

    Liv. 43, 23, 5:

    (Romani) Albam a fundamentis proruerunt, ne memoria originum suarum exstaret,

    id. 26, 13, 16:

    oppidani nuntios Romam, qui certiorem de suo casu senatum facerent, misere,

    id. 6, 33, 7; cf.:

    tanto intervallo ab hostibus consedit, ut nec adventus suus propinquitate nimia nosci posset, et, etc.,

    Liv. 10, 20, 7:

    Datames locum delegit talem ut non multum obesse multitudo hostium suae paucitati posset,

    Nep. Dat. 7, 3:

    quid si gubernator a diis procellas petat ut gratior ars sua periculo fiat?

    Sen. Ben. 6, 25, 4. —
    b.
    In other dependent clauses represented as conceived by an antecedent in the principal sentence:

    Sulla, si sibi suus pudor ac dignitas non prodesset, nullum auxilium requisivit ( = negavit se defendi velle, si, etc.),

    Cic. Sull. 5, 15:

    Paetus omnes libros quos frater suus reliquisset mihi donavit ( = dixit se donare libros quos, etc.),

    id. Att. 2, 1, 12:

    non enim a te emit, sed, priusquam tu suum sibi venderes, ipse possedit ( = potitus est, ne, etc.),

    id. Phil. 2, 37, 96:

    Africanus, si sua res ageretur, testimonium non diceret,

    id. Rosc. Am. 36, 3:

    ille ipse (Pompejus) proposuit epistulam illam, in qua est Pro tuis rebus gestis amplissimis. Amplioribusne quam suis, quam Africani?

    id. Att. 8, 9, 2:

    spiritus dabat (Manlio) quod... vinculorum suorum invidiam dictator fugisset,

    Liv. 6, 18, 4:

    (Numa) Camenis eum lucum sacravit, quod earum ibi concilia cum conjuge sua Egeria essent,

    id. 1, 21, 3:

    adulescens deos omnis invocare ad gratiam illi pro se referendam, quoniam sibi nequaquam satis facultatis pro suo animo atque illius erga se esset,

    id. 26, 50, 4 (cf. D. 1. a. infra).
    D.
    In the place of ejus.
    1.
    In clauses virtually oblique, but with indicative, being conceived by the antecedent (hence suus, not ejus), but asserted as fact by the author (hence indicative, not subjunctive):

    Cicero tibi mandat ut Aristodemo idem respondeas, quod de fratre suo (Ciceronis) respondisti,

    Cic. Att. 2, 7, 4:

    oriundi ab Sabinis, ne, quia post Tatii mortem ab sua parte non erat regnatum, imperium amitterent, sui corporis creari regem volebant,

    Liv. 1, 17, 2:

    C. Caesar villam pulcherrimam, quia mater sua aliquando in illa custodita erat, diruit,

    Sen. Ira, 3, 21, 5:

    Philemonem, a manu servum, qui necem suam per venenum inimicis promiserat, non gravius quam simplici morte punivit,

    Suet. Caes. 74; cf.:

    quomodo excandescunt si quid e juba sua decisum est,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 12, 3.—
    2.
    To avoid ambiguity:

    petunt rationes illius (Catilinae) ut orbetur consilio res publica, ut minuatur contra suum (i.e. Catilinae) furorem imperatorum copia (instead of ejus, which might be referred to res publica),

    Cic. Mur. 39, 83:

    equites a cornibus positos, cum jam pelleretur media peditum suorum acies, incurrisse ab lateribus ferunt,

    Liv. 1, 37, 3.—
    3.
    Colloquially and in epistolary style suus is used emphatically instead of ejus, with the meaning own, peculiar: deinde ille actutum subferret suus servus poenas Sosia, his own slave (opp. Mercury, who personates Sosias), Plaut. Am. 3, 4, 19: mira erant in civitatibus ipsorum furta Graecorum quae magistratus sui fecerant, their own magistrates ( = ipsorum), Cic. Att. 6, 2, 5:

    in quibus (litteris Bruti) unum alienum summa sua prudentia (est), ut spectem ludos suos,

    his peculiar prudence, id. ib. 15, 26, 1; so,

    quod quidem ille (Nero) decernebat, quorumdam dolo ad omina sui exitus vertebatur,

    Tac. A. 16, 24; cf. II. A. 1. b and g; II. A. 2. a. b; II. B. 3.—
    4.
    Without particular emphasis (mostly ante- and post-class. and poet.):

    tum erit tempestiva cum semen suum maturum erit,

    Cato, R. R. 31:

    vitis si macra erit, sarmenta sua concidito minute,

    id. ib. 37:

    qui sic purgatus erit, diuturna valetudine utatur, neque ullus morbus veniet, nisi sua culpa,

    id. ib. 157:

    Cimon in eandem invidiam incidit quam pater suus,

    Nep. Cim. 3, 1:

    id qua ratione consecutus sit (Lysander) latet. Non enim virtute sui exercitus factum est, etc.,

    id. Lys. 1, 2:

    ipse sub Esquiliis, ubi erat regia sua, Concidit,

    Ov. F. 6, 601:

    quodque suus conjux riguo collegerat horto, Truncat olus foliis,

    id. M. 8, 646; so id. ib. 15, 819.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    As substt.
    1.
    sui, suorum, m., his, their (etc.) friends, soldiers, fellow-beings, equals, adherents, followers, partisans, posterity, slaves, family, etc., of persons in any near connection with the antecedent.
    (α).
    (Corresp. to the regular usage, I. A. B. C.) Cupio abducere ut reddam (i.e. eam) suis, to her family, friends, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 77; cf. id. ib. 1, 2, 66:

    cum animus societatem caritatis coierit cum suis, omnesque natura conjunctos suos duxerit,

    fellow-beings, Cic. Leg. 1, 23, 60:

    mulier ingeniosa praecepit suis omnia Caelio pollicerentur,

    her slaves, id. Cael. 25, 62:

    quo facilius et nostras domos obire, et ipse a suis coli possit,

    his friends, id. ib. 7, 18:

    qua gratiam beneficii vestri cum suorum laude conjungant,

    their family, id. Agr. 2, 1, 1:

    vellem hanc contemptionem pecuniae suis reliquisset,

    to his posterity, id. Phil. 3, 6, 16:

    cum divisurum se urbem palam suis polliceretur,

    his partisans, id. ib. 13, 9, 19:

    Caesar, cohortatus suos, proelium commisit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25; so,

    Curio exercitum reduxit, suis omnibus praeter Fabium incolumibus,

    id. B. C. 2, 35:

    Caesar receptui suorum timens,

    id. ib. 3, 46:

    certior ab suis factus est, praeclusas esse portas,

    id. ib. 2, 20:

    omnium suorum consensu, Curio bellum ducere parabat,

    id. ib. 2, 37: so,

    Pompejus suorum omnium hortatu statuerat proelio decertare,

    id. ib. 3, 86:

    Caesar Brundisium ad suos severius scripsit,

    to his officers, id. ib. 3, 25:

    naviculam conscendit cum paucis suis,

    a few of his followers, id. ib. 3, 104:

    multum cum suis consiliandi causa secreto praeter consuetudinem loqueretur,

    id. ib. 1, 19:

    nupsit Melino, adulescenti inprimis inter suos et honesto et nobili,

    his equals, associates, Cic. Clu. 5, 11:

    rex raptim a suis in equum impositus fugit,

    his suite, Liv. 41, 4, 7:

    subsidio suorum proelium restituere,

    comrades, id. 21, 52, 10:

    feras bestias... ad opem suis ferendam avertas,

    their young, id. 26, 13, 12:

    abstulit sibi in suos potestatem,

    his slaves, Sen. Ira, 3, 12, 6:

    Besso et Nabarzani nuntiaverant sui regem... interemptum esse,

    their fellow - conspirators, Curt. 5, 12, 14. — Very rarely sing.:

    ut bona mens suis omnibus fuerit. Si quem libido abripuit, illorum eum, cum quibus conjuravit, non suum judicet esse,

    Liv. 39, 16, 5.—
    (β).
    Irregular use (acc. to I. D.): sui = ejus amici, etc. (freq.;

    the absolute use of ejus in this sense being inadmissible): quasi vero quisquam dormiat? ne sui quidem hoc velint, non modo ipse (sui = ejus amici, liberi),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 38, 92:

    is (annus) ejus omnem spem... morte pervertit. Fuit hoc luctuosum suis, acerbum patriae, etc.,

    id. Or. 3, 2, 8:

    quadrigas, quia per suos ( = ipsius milites) agendae erant, in prima acie locaverat rex,

    Liv. 37, 41, 8:

    auctoritatem Pisistrati qui inter suos ( = ejus cives) maxima erat,

    id. 37, 12:

    quo cum multitudine adversariorum sui superarentur, ipse fuit superior, etc.,

    Nep. Hann. 8, 4; v. g.—
    (γ).
    Without antecedent (cf. I. B. supra): quoties necesse est fallere aut falli a suis, by one ' s friends, Sen. Phoen. 493.—
    (δ).
    Sing.: sŭa, suae. f., a sweetheart, mistress (rare): illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit. Cic. Phil. 2, 28. 69:

    cedo quid hic faciet sua?

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 92.—
    2.
    sŭum, i, n., and more freq. sŭa, suorum, n. plur., = one ' s property.
    a.
    Sing.
    (α).
    Lit.:

    nec suom adimerem alteri,

    his property, his own, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 38 (34):

    nunc si ille salvos revenit, reddam suom sibi (v. D. 3. a. infra),

    id. ib. 1, 2, 119:

    illum studeo quam facillime ad suum pervenire,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 26, 4:

    populi Romani hanc esse consuetudinem ut socios sui nihil deperdere velit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43; cf. Cic. Rab. Post. 11, 3, I. A. 11. supra:

    nec donare illi de suo dicimur,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 4, 2; so esp. with quisque; v. infra — Hence, de suo = per se, or sua sponte;

    (stellae) quae per igneos tractus labentia inde splendorem trahant caloremque, non de suo clara,

    Sen. Q. N. 7, 1, 6. —
    (β).
    Trop.:

    meum mihi placebat, illi suum (of a literary essay),

    Cic. Att. 14, 20, 3: suom quemque decet, his own manners, etc., Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 11; so, expendere oportet quid quisque habeat sui ( what peculiarities) nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant;

    id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113.—
    (γ).
    Jurid. term: aliquid pro suo possidere, to possess in the belief of one ' s legal right:

    pro suo possessio tale est, cum dominium nobis acquiri putamus. Et ea causa possidemus ex qua acquiritur, et praeterea pro suo,

    Dig. 41, 10, 1;

    so without an antecedent, and referring to a first person: item re donata, pro donato et pro suo possideo,

    ib. 41, 10, 1; v. the whole tit. ib. 42, 10 (Pro suo); cf. ib. 23, 3, 67; cf. C., infra fin.;

    similarly: usucapere pro suo = acquire dominion by a possession pro suo, Fragm. Vat. 111: res pro suo, quod justam causam possidendi habet, usucapit,

    id. ib. 260; Dig. 41, 3, 27. —
    b.
    Plur.
    (α).
    One ' s property:

    Roscius tibi omnia sua praeter animam tradidit,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 50, 146:

    qui etiam hostibus externis victis sua saepissime reddiderunt,

    id. Agr. 1, 6, 19:

    tu autem vicinis tuis Massiliensibus sua reddis,

    id. Att. 14, 14, 6:

    Remi legatos miserunt qui dicerent se suaque omnia in fidem atque potestatem populi Romani permittere,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 3, 2; 1, 11, 2; 2, 13, 2:

    ipsi milites alveos informes quibus se suaque transveherent, faciebant,

    their baggage, Liv. 21, 26, 9:

    docere eos qui sua permisere fortunae,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, praef. 7; so without an antecedent, one ' s own property (cf. I. B. 2. supra):

    hanc ob causam maxime ut sua tenerentur res publicae constitutae sunt,

    Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73;

    rarely = eorum res: quod vero etiam sua reddiderint (i.e. Gallis),

    Liv. 39, 55, 3. —
    (β).
    One ' s own affairs:

    aliena ut melius videant et dijudicent Quam sua,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 96:

    cognoscunt... immobile agmen et sua quemque molientem,

    Liv. 10, 20, 8:

    omnia ei hostium non secus quam sua nota erant,

    id. 22, 41, 5:

    aliena cum suis perdidit,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 16, 3.— Absol., referring to a noun fem.: sua (finxit) C. Cassius ( = suas persuasiones; cf.

    the context),

    Quint. 6, 3, 90.
    B.
    Predicative uses: suum esse, facere, fieri, putare, etc., like a gen. poss., to be, etc., the property, or under the dominion, control, power of the antecedent.
    1.
    Of property in things.
    (α).
    Corporeal:

    scripsit causam dicere Prius aurum quare sit suum,

    Ter. Eun. prol. 11:

    nihil erat cujusquam quod non hoc anno suum fore putabat (Clodius),

    Cic. Mil. 32, 87:

    quia suum cujusque fit, eorum quae natura fuerant communia quod cuique obtigit, id quisque teneat,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 21:

    Juba suam esse praedicans praedam,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84:

    gratum sibi populum facturum, si omnes res Neapolitanorum suas duxissent,

    Liv. 22, 32, 8: libros esse dicimus Ciceronis;

    eosdem Dorus librarius suos vocat,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 1:

    cum enim istarum personarum nihil suum esse possit,

    since these persons can own nothing, Gai. Inst. 2, 96; cf. Dig. 1, 7, 15 pr.—Virtually predicative:

    referas ad eos qui suam rem nullam habent ( = rem quae sua sit),

    nothing of their own, Cic. Phil. 2, 6, 15:

    qui in potestate nostra est, nihil suum habere potest,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 84. — ( b) Of literary works:

    quae convenere in Andriam ex Perinthia Fatetur transtulisse, atque usum pro suis ( = quasi sua essent),

    Ter. And. prol. 14:

    potest autem... quae tum audiet... ingenue pro suis dicere,

    his own thoughts, Quint. 12, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of a country or people:

    suum facere = suae dicionis facere: commemorat ut (Caesar) magnam partem Italiae beneficio atque auctoritate eorum suam fecerit,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 32:

    in quam (Asiam) jam ex parte suam fecerit,

    Liv. 44, 24, 4:

    crudelissima ac superbissima gens sua omnia suique arbitrii facit,

    id. 21, 44, 5.—
    (δ).
    Trop.:

    omnia sua putavit quae vos vestra esse velletis,

    Cic. Phil. 11, 12, 27:

    non meminit, illum exercitum senatus populique Romani esse, non suum,

    id. ib. 13, 6, 4: [p. 1826] probavit, non rempublicam suam esse, sed se reipublicae, Sen. Clem. 1, 19, 8;

    so of incorporeal things: hi si velint scire quam brevis eorum vita sit, cogitent ex quota parte sua sit,

    how much of it is their own, id. Brev. Vit. 19, 3; so, suum facere, to appropriate:

    prudentis est, id quod in quoque optimum est, si possit, suum facere,

    Quint. 10, 2, 26:

    quaeremus quomodo animus (hanc virtutem) usu suam faciat,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 3, 1.—
    2.
    Of persons.
    (α).
    Under a master ' s or father ' s control:

    ut lege caverent, ne quis quem civitatis mutandae causa suum faceret, neve alienaret,

    make any one his slave, Liv. 41, 8, 12: quid eam tum? suamne esse ajebat, his daughter, i.e. in his power? Ter. And. 5, 4, 29:

    eduxit mater pro sua ( = quasi sua esset),

    id. Eun. 1, 2, 76.—
    (β).
    Reflexively = sui juris, independent, one ' s own master or mistress, not subject to another ' s control, under one ' s own control (v. sui juris, infra):

    ancilla, quae mea fuit hodie, sua nunc est,

    Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of moral power over others: suus = devoted to one:

    hice hoc munere arbitrantur Suam Thaidem esse,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 38:

    eos hic fecit suos Paulo sumptu,

    id. Ad. 5, 4, 21:

    sed istunc exora, ut (mulierem) suam esse adsimulet,

    to be friendly to him, id. Heaut. 2, 3, 117:

    cum Antonio sic agens ut perspiciat, si in eo negotio nobis satisfecerit, totum me futurum suum,

    Cic. Att. 14, 1 a, 2:

    Alpheus... utebatur populo sane suo,

    devoted to him, id. Quint. 7, 29.— Poet.: vota suos habuere deos, the vows (inst. of the persons uttering them) had the gods on their side, Ov. M. 4, 373. —
    (δ).
    Of power over one's self, etc.:

    nam qui sciet ubi quidque positum sit, quaque eo veniat, is poterit eruere, semperque esse in disputando suus,

    self-possessed, Cic. Fin. 4, 4, 10:

    inaestimabile bonum est suum fieri,

    selfcontrol, Sen. Ep. 75, 18:

    (furiosus) qui suus non est,

    Dig. 42, 4, 7, § 9:

    vix sua, vix sanae virgo Niseia compos Mentis erat,

    Ov. M. 8, 35. —
    3.
    Suum est, as impers. predicate: = ejus est, characteristic of, peculiar to one (very rare):

    dixit antea, sed suum illud est, nihil ut affirmet,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 42, 99.
    C.
    Attributive usages, almost always (except in Seneca) with suus before its noun.
    1.
    The property, relations, affairs, etc., of one opposed to those of another, own.
    a.
    Opposition expressed:

    nihil de suo casu, multa de vestro querebatur,

    Cic. Balb. 8, 21:

    sua sibi propiora pericula quam mea loquebantur,

    id. Sest. 18, 40:

    suasque et imperatoris laudes canentes,

    Liv. 45, 38, 12:

    damnatione collegae et sua,

    id. 22, 35, 3:

    Senecae fratris morte pavidum et pro sua incolumitate pavidum,

    Tac. A. 14, 73:

    velut pro Vitellio conquerentes suum dolorem proferebant,

    id. H. 3, 37;

    opp. alienus: ut suo potius tempore mercatorem admitterent, quam celerius alieno,

    at a time convenient to themselves, Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 11. —Without antecedent, opp. externus:

    (Platoni) duo placet esse motus, unum suum, alterum externum, esse autem divinius quod ipsum ex se sua sponte moveatur, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 12, 32. —
    b.
    Implied:

    voluptatem suis se finibus tenere jubeamus,

    within the limits assigned to it, Cic. Fin. 3, 1, 1:

    cum vobis immortale monumentum suis paene manibus senatus... exstruxerit,

    id. Phil. 14, 12, 33:

    superiores (amnes) in Italia, hic (Rhodanus) trans Alpes, hospitales suas tantum, nec largiores quam intulere aquas vehentes,

    Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 224: colligitur aqua ex imbribus;

    ex suo fonte nativa est,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 3:

    pennas ambo non habuere suas (non suas = alienas),

    Ov. Tr. 3, 4, 24. —
    c.
    In particular phrases. ( a) Sua sponte and suo Marte, of one ' s own accord, by one ' s self, without the suggestion, influence, aid, etc., of others:

    Caesar bellum contra Antonium sua sponte suscepit,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 2, 5:

    sua sponte ad Caesarem in jus adierunt,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 87.—So of things, = per se, by or of itself, for itself, for its own sake:

    jus et omne honestum sua sponte expetendum (cf. in the context: per se igitur jus est expetendum),

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 48: justitium sua sponte inceptum priusquam indiceretur, by itself, i. e. without a decree, Liv. 9, 7, 8; so,

    sortes sua sponte attenuatas,

    id. 22, 1, 11 (cf. id. 22, 38, 13; 35, 14, 4, I. A. 2., supra): rex enim ipse, sua sponte, nullis commentariis Caesaris, simul atque audivit ejus interitum suo Marte res suas recuperavit, Cic. Phil. 2, 37, 95.—
    (β).
    Suus locus, in milit. lang., one ' s own ground, position, or lines:

    restitit suo loco Romana acies (opp. to the advance of the enemy),

    Liv. 22, 16, 2.—So figuratively:

    et staturas suo loco leges,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2:

    aciem instruxit primum suis locis, pauloque a castris Pompeji longius,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84 (cf.: suo loco, 7. b. g, infra).—
    (γ).
    For suo jure v. 3. infra.—
    (δ).
    Sua Venus = one's own Venus, i. e. good luck (v. Venus): ille non est mihi par virtutibus, nec officiis;

    sed habuit suam Venerem,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 28, 2. —
    2.
    Of private relations (opp. to public):

    ut in suis rebus, ita in re publica luxuriosus nepos,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 18, 48:

    deinde ut communibus pro communibus utatur, privatis ut suis,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 20:

    quod oppidum Labienus sua pecunia exaedificaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 15:

    militibus agros ex suis possessionibus pollicetur,

    i. e. his private property, id. ib. 1, 17; Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 3. —
    3.
    Of just rights or claims:

    imperatori senatuique honos suus redditus,

    due to them, Liv. 3, 10, 3:

    neque inpedimento fuit, quominus religionibus suus tenor suaque observatio redderetur,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 8:

    quibus omnibus debetur suus decor,

    Quint. 11, 1, 41. —

    So distributively: is mensibus suis dimisit legionem,

    in the month in which each soldier was entitled to his discharge, Liv. 40, 41, 8. — Esp.: suo jure (so, meo, nostro, tuo, etc., jure), by his own right:

    Tullus Hostilius qui suo jure in porta nomen inscripsit,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 12, 26:

    earum rerum hic A. Licinius fructum a me repetere prope suo jure debet,

    id. Arch. 1, 1; id. Marcell. 2, 6; id. Phil. 2, 25, 62; id. Balb. 8, 21:

    numquam illum res publica suo jure esset ulta,

    by its unquestionable right, id. Mil. 33, 88. —
    4.
    Of that to which one is exclusively devoted:

    huic quaestioni suum diem dabimus,

    a day for its exclusive discussion, Sen. Ep. 94, 52:

    homini autem suum bonum ratio est,

    his exclusive good, id. ib. 76, 10:

    in majorem me quaestionem vocas, cui suus locus, suus dies dandus est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 46, 1. —

    With proprius: mentio inlata apud senatum est, rem suo proprio magistratu egere,

    that the business needed a particular officer exclusively for itself, Liv. 4, 8, 4:

    et Hannibalem suo proprio occupandum bello,

    id. 27, 38, 7; cf.:

    dissupasset hostes, ni suo proprio eum proelio equites Volscorum exceptum tenuissent,

    in which they alone fought, id. 3, 70, 4:

    mare habet suas venas quibus impletur,

    by which it alone is fed, Sen. Q. N. 3, 14, 3. —
    5.
    According to one ' s liking, of one ' s own choice.
    a.
    Of persons, devoted to one, friendly, dear:

    Milone occiso (Clodius) habuisset suos consules,

    after his own heart, Cic. Mil. 33, 89:

    collegit ipse se contra suum Clodium,

    his dear Clodius, id. Pis. 12, 27 (cf.: suum facere, habere, II. B. 2. g).—
    b.
    Of things, favorable.
    (α).
    Of place: neque Jugurtham nisi... suo loco pugnam facere, on his own ground, i. e. chosen by him, favorable, Sall. J. 61, 1:

    hic magna auxilia expectabant et suis locis bellum in hiemem ducere cogitabant,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 61; cf.:

    numquam nostris locis laboravimus,

    Liv. 9, 19, 15.—
    (β).
    Of time:

    cum Perseus suo maxime tempore et alieno hostibus incipere bellum posset,

    Liv. 42, 43, 3; v. 7. b, infra. —
    c.
    Of circumstances: sua occasio, a favorable opportunity; sometimes without antecedent:

    neque occasioni tuae desis, neque suam occasionem hosti des,

    Liv. 22, 39, 21:

    tantum abfuit ut ex incommodo alieno sua occasio peteretur,

    id. 4, 58, 2:

    aestuque suo Locros trajecit,

    a favorable tide, id. 23, 41, 11:

    ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 3:

    orba suis essent etiamnunc lintea ventis,

    Ov. M. 13, 195:

    aut ille Ventis iturus non suis,

    Hor. Epod. 9, 30. —
    6.
    Of persons or things, peculiar, particular:

    quae est ei (animo) natura? Propria, puto, et sua,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 29, 70:

    omnis enim motus animi suum quendam a natura habet vultum,

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 316:

    geometrae et musici... more quodam loquuntur suo. Ipsae rhetorum artes verbis in docendo quasi privatis utuntur ac suis,

    id. Fin. 3, 1, 4:

    sensus omnis habet suum finem,

    its peculiar limits, Quint. 9, 4, 61: animus cum suum ambitum complevit et finibus se suis cinxit, consummatum est summum bonum, Sen. Vit. Beat. 9, 3: est etiam in nominibus ( nouns) diverso collocatis sua gratia, their peculiar elegance, Quint. 9, 3, 86:

    ibi non bello aperto, sed suis artibus, fraude et insidiis, est paene circumventus,

    Liv. 21, 34, 1:

    nec Hannibalem fefellit, suis se artibus peti,

    id. 22, 16, 5:

    adversus hostem non virtute tantum, sed suis (i. e. hostis) etiam pugnare consiliis oportebat,

    Flor. 2, 6, 26:

    liberam Minucii temeritatem se suo modo expleturum,

    Liv. 22, 28, 2:

    equites ovantes sui moris carmine,

    id. 10, 26, 11:

    exsultans cum sui moris tripudiis,

    id. 21, 42, 3:

    tripudiantes suo more,

    id. 23, 26, 9.—So, suo Marte, referring to the style of fighting peculiar to the different arms:

    equitem suo alienoque Marte pugnare,

    that the cavalry were fighting both in their own style and in that of the other arms, Liv. 3, 62, 9; cf.: suo Marte, 1, c. a, supra.—And distributively ( = suus quisque):

    suos autem haec operum genera ut auctores, sic etiam amatores habent,

    Quint. 12, 10, 2:

    illa vero fatidica fulmina ex alto et ex suis venire sideribus,

    Plin. 2, 43, 43, § 113; cf.:

    quae quidem planiora suis exemplis reddentur,

    Val. Max. 3, 4 prooem.—
    7.
    Proper, right.
    a.
    Referring to one's ordinary or normal condition:

    quod certe non fecisset, si suum numerum naves habuissent,

    their regular complement, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 51, § 133. — So poet.:

    flecte ratem! numerum non habet illa suum,

    its full number, Ov. H. 10, 36:

    novus exercitus consulibus est decretus: binae legiones cum suo equitatu,

    Liv. 40, 36, 6:

    cum suo justo equitatu,

    id. 21, 17, 8:

    totam (disciplinam) in suum statum redegit,

    Val. Max. 2, 7, 2:

    tranquilla mente et vultu suo,

    with the ordinary expression of his face, Sen. Clem. 2, 6, 2:

    media pars aeris ab his (ignibus) submota, in frigore suo manet. Natura enim aeris gelida est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 10, 4:

    cornuaque in patriis non sua vidit aquis,

    not natural to her, Ov. H. 14, 90. —

    So, non suus, of ingrafted branches and their fruit: miraturque (arbos) novas frondis et non sua poma,

    Verg. G. 2, 82. —
    b.
    Of time, proper, regular, etc. (cf. 5. b, supra).
    (α).
    The regular time ( = stato tempore):

    signum quod semper tempore exoritur suo,

    Plaut. Rud. prol. 4:

    cum et recte et suo tempore pepererit,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 16: aestas suo tempore incanduit...;

    tam solstitium quam aequinoctium suos dies retulit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 16, 3:

    omnes venti vicibus suis spirant majore ex parte,

    Plin. 2, 47, 48, § 128. —
    (β).
    The right or proper time:

    salictum suo tempore caedito,

    Cato, R. R. 33:

    cessit e vita suo magis quam suorum civium tempore,

    the right time for himself, Cic. Brut. 1, 4; so,

    exstingui homini suo tempore optabile est,

    id. Sen. 23, 85:

    Scandilius dicit se suo tempore rediturum,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 60, § 139:

    si Ardeates sua tempora exspectare velint,

    Liv. 4, 7, 6:

    Chrysippus dicit, illum... opperiri debere suum tempus, ad quod velut dato signo prosiliat,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 25, 3:

    quam multi exercitus tempore suo victorem hostem pepulerunt!

    Liv. 44, 39, 4. — Without antecedent: sed suo tempore totius sceleris hujus fons aperietur. Cic. Phil. 14, 6, 15; cf.:

    de ordine laudis, etc., praecipiemus suo tempore,

    Quint. 2, 4, 21. —
    (γ).
    Suo loco = at the proper place:

    quae erant prudentiae propria suo loco dicta sunt,

    Cic. Off. 1, 40, 143:

    quod reddetur suo loco,

    Quint. 11, 1, 16:

    ut suo loco dicetur,

    Plin. 2, 90, 102, § 221:

    inscripta quae suis locis reddam,

    id. 1, prooem. § 27; Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2; cf. 1, c. b; 4. supra. —
    (δ).
    Suited, appropriate, adapted to one:

    in eodem fundo suum quidquid conseri oportet,

    Cato, R. R. 7:

    siquidem hanc vendidero pretio suo,

    at a suitable price, Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 30:

    in partes suas digerenda causa,

    Quint. 11, 1, 6:

    confundetur quidquid in suas partes natura digessit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 29, 8. — Poet.: haec ego dumque queror, lacrimae sua verba sequuntur, Deque meis oculis in tua membra cadunt, appropriate, i. e. tristia, Ov. H. 14, 67.—Without antecedent: suum quidquid genus talearum serito, any fit kind, i. e. suited to the ground, Cato, R. R. 48. —
    8.
    Own, with the notion of independence of, or dependence on others (cf. B. 2. g d).
    a.
    Of political independence: pacem condicionibus his fecerunt ut Capuae suae leges, sui magistratus essent, her own laws, i. e. not subject to Carthage, Liv. 23, 7, 2: liberos [p. 1827] eos ac suis legibus victuros, id. 25, 23, 4. —

    Esp. in the phrases suae potestatis or in sua potestate esse, suo jure uti, sui juris esse: Puteolos, qui nunc in sua potestate sunt, suo jure, libertate aequa utuntur, totos occupabunt,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 31, 86:

    Rhegini potestatis suae ad ultimum remanserunt,

    retained their self-government, Liv. 23, 30, 9:

    urbem ne quam formulae sui juris facerent,

    id. 38, 9, 10. —
    b.
    Of paternal authority.
    (α).
    Free from the power of the paterfamilias; in the phrases sui juris esse, suae potestatis esse, to be independent:

    quaedam personae sui juris sunt, quaedam alieno juri sunt subjectae, Gai,

    Inst. 1, 48:

    sui juris sunt familiarum suarum principes, id est pater familiae, itemque mater familiae,

    Ulp. Fragm. 4, 1:

    liberi parentum potestate liberantur emancipatione. Sed filius quidem ter manumissus sui juris fit, ceteri autem liberi una manumissione sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 1:

    morte patris filius et filia sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 2:

    patres familiarum sunt qui sunt suae potestatis,

    Dig. 1, 6, 4:

    si modo defunctus testator suae potestatis mortis tempore fuerit,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 147. —

    With indef. reference: si sui juris sumus,

    Dig. 46, 2, 20; cf.:

    pro suo possideo, 2. a. supra.—Attributively: sui juris arrogatio feminae,

    Cod. Just. 8, 47, 8:

    homo sui juris,

    ib. 10, § 5.— Trop.:

    sapiens numquam semiliber erit: integrae semper libertatis et sui juris,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 5, 3:

    non illarum coitu fieri cometen, sed proprium et sui juris esse,

    id. Q. N. 7, 12, 2: nullique sunt tam feri et sui juris adfectus, ut non disciplina perdomentur, id. Ira, 2, 12, 3. —
    (β).
    Subject to paternal authority, in the phrases suus heres, sui liberi; suus heres, an heir who had been in the paternal power of the deceased:

    CVI SVVS HERES NON SIT, XII. Tab. fr. 5, 4.—In the jurists without antecedent: sui et necessarii heredes sunt velut filius filiave, nepos neptisve ex filia, deinceps ceteri qui modo in potestate morientis fuerunt,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 156:

    (emancipati liberi) non sunt sui heredes,

    ib. 2, 135:

    alia facta est juris interpretatio inter suos heredes,

    ib. 3, 15:

    datur patrono adversus suos heredes bonorum possessio (where patrono is not the antecedent of suos),

    ib. 3, 41:

    sui heredes vel instituendi sunt vel exheredandi,

    Ulp. Fragm. 22, 14:

    accrescunt suis quidem heredibus in partem virilem, extraneis autem in partem dimidiam,

    id. ib. 22, 17. —

    Sui liberi, children in paternal power: de suis et legitimis liberis,

    Cod. Just. 6, 55 inscr.
    D.
    In particular connections.
    1.
    With ipse, his own, etc. (cf. Zumpt, Gram. § 696).
    a.
    Ipse agreeing with the antecedent of suus, the antecedent being,
    (α).
    A subjectnom.:

    (ingenium ejus) valet ipsum suis viribus,

    by its own strength, Cic. Cael. 19, 45:

    legio Martia non ipsa suis decretis hostem judicavit Antonium?

    by its own resolutions, id. Phil. 4, 2, 5:

    ruit ipse suis cladibus,

    id. ib. 14, 3, 8:

    si ex scriptis cognosci ipsi suis potuissent,

    id. de Or. 2, 2, 8:

    qui se ipse sua gravitate et castimonia defenderet,

    id. Cael. 5, 11:

    quod ipse suae civitatis imperium obtenturus esset,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 3:

    suamet ipsae fraude omnes interierunt,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9; 39, 49, 3:

    ut saeviret ipse in suum sanguinem effecerunt,

    id. 40, 5, 1:

    respicerent suum ipsi exercitum,

    id. 42, 52, 10; 21, 31, 12; 22, 38, 3; 6, 19, 6.—
    (β).
    A subject-acc.:

    sunt qui dicant eam sua ipsam peremptam mercede,

    Liv. 1, 11, 9:

    (tribuniciam potestatem) suis ipsam viribus dissolvi,

    id. 2, 44, 2.—
    (γ).
    An object in dat. or acc.:

    sic ut ipsis consistendi in suis munitionibus locus non esset,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 6:

    tribuni (hostem) intra suamet ipsum moenia compulere,

    Liv. 6, 36, 4:

    alios sua ipsos invidia opportunos interemit,

    id. 1, 54, 8; 22, 14, 13.—Suus as adjunct of subject (rare):

    aliquando sua praesidia in ipsos consurrexerunt,

    their own garrisons revolted against them, Sen. Clem. 1, 26, 1.—
    b.
    With gen. of ipse, strengthening the possessive notion (cf. 4.;

    post-Aug. and very rare, but freq. in modern Lat.): aves (foetus suos) libero caelo suaeque ipsorum fiduciae permittunt,

    Quint. 2, 6, 7 (but tuus ipsius occurs in Cic.:

    tuo ipsius studio,

    Cic. Mur. 4, 9:

    tuam ipsius amicitiam,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 4, § 7).—
    c.
    Both suus and ipse agreeing with the governing noun (very rare; not in Cic. or Caes.): quae tamen in ipso cursu suo dissipata est (= ipsa in cursu suo), in its very course, Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 3 dub.:

    suamet ipsa scelera,

    Sall. C. 23, 2 (Dietsch ex conj. ipse):

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    Liv. 2, 19, 5 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. ipsi):

    a suismet ipsis praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6 MSS. (Weissenb. ipsi).—
    2.
    With quisque, distributively, each ( every one)... his own; in prose quisque is generally preceded by suus.
    a.
    Quisque and suus in different cases.
    (α).
    Quisque as subjectnom.:

    sentit enim vim quisque suam quoad possit abuti,

    Lucr. 5, 1033:

    suo quisque loco cubet,

    Cato, R. R. 5:

    suum quisque noscat ingenium,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 114:

    ad suam quisque (me disciplinam) rapiet,

    id. Ac. 2, 36, 114:

    quod suos quisque servos in tali re facere voluisset,

    id. Mil. 10, 29:

    cum suo quisque auxilio uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 51:

    celeriter ad suos quisque ordines redit,

    id. ib. 3, 37.—In apposition with plur. subj. (freq. in Liv.):

    nunc alii sensus quo pacto quisque suam rem Sentiat,

    Lucr. 4, 522:

    ut omnes cives Romani in suis quisque centuriis prima luce adessent,

    that all the Roman citizens should be present, each in his own centuria, Liv. 1, 44, 1:

    hinc senatus, hinc plebs, suum quisque intuentes ducem constiterant,

    id. 6, 15, 3:

    ut (trigemini) pro sua quisque patria dimicent,

    id. 1, 24, 2:

    stabant compositi suis quisque ordinibus,

    id. 44, 38, 11:

    (consules) in suas quisque provincias proficiscuntur,

    id. 25, 12, 2; 25, 26, 13:

    in suo quaeque (stella) motu naturam suam exercent,

    Plin. 2, 39, 39, § 106.—With abl. absol.:

    omnes, velut dis auctoribus in spem suam quisque acceptis, proelium una voce poscunt,

    Liv. 21, 45, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    relictis suis quisque stationibus... concurrerunt,

    id. 32, 24, 4; 4, 44, 10; 39, 49, 3; 2, 38, 6.—
    (β).
    With acc. of quisque as subj.:

    fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae, App. Claud. ap. Ps.-Sall. Ep. ad Caes. Rep. c. l.: sui quemque juris et retinendi et dimittendi esse dominum,

    Cic. Balb. 13, 31:

    recipere se in domos suas quemque jussit,

    Liv. 25, 10, 9; and (ungrammatically) nom., as apposition to a subj.-acc.:

    se non modo suam quisque patriam, sed totam Siciliam relicturos,

    id. 26, 29, 3 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. quosque).—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of the subject-nom., with a case of quisque as object, attribut. gen., etc.:

    sua cujusque animantis natura est,

    Cic. Fin. 5, 9, 25:

    sua quemque fraus, suum facinus, suum scelus, etc., de sanitate ac mente deturbat,

    id. Pis. 20, 46:

    sua quemque fraus et suus terror maxime vexat,

    id. Rosc. Am. 24, 67:

    suum cuique incommodum ferendum est,

    id. Off. 3, 6, 30:

    ut solidum suum cuique solvatur,

    id. Rab. Post. 17, 46:

    ne suus cuique domi hostis esset,

    Liv. 3, 16, 3:

    ut sua cuique respublica in manu esset,

    id. 26, 8, 11:

    animus suus cuique ordinem pugnandi dabat,

    id. 22, 5, 8:

    tentorium suum cuique militi domus ac penates sunt,

    id. 44, 39, 5:

    suus cuique (stellae) color est,

    Plin. 2, 18, 16, § 79:

    trahit sua quemque voluptas,

    Verg. E. 2, 65:

    stat sua cuique dies,

    id. A. 10, 467.—
    (δ).
    As predicate-nom. (v. II. B.):

    opinionem, quae sua cuique conjectanti esse potest,

    Liv. 6, 12, 3.—
    (ε).
    As adjunct of subj.-acc.:

    suum cuique honorem et gradum redditum gaudeo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    scientiam autem suam cujusque artis esse,

    id. Fin. 5, 9, 26.—
    (ζ).
    As adjunct of an object, with a case of quisque as object or attribut. gen.: suam cuique sponsam, mihi meam: suum cuique amorem, mihi meum, Atil. Fragm. inc. 1: suom cuique per me uti atque frui licet, Cato ap. Gell. 13, 24 (23), 1:

    ut suo quemque appellem nomine,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 52:

    placet Stoicis suo quamque rem nomine appellare,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 22, 1:

    ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    id. Off. 1, 33, 119:

    justitia quae suum cuique distribuit,

    id. N. D. 3, 15, 38:

    in tribuendo suum cuique,

    id. Off. 1, 5, 14:

    Turnus sui cuique periculi recens erat documentum,

    Liv. 1, 52, 4:

    in trimatu suo cuique dimidiam esse mensuram futurae certum esse,

    Plin. 7, 15, 16, § 73:

    certa cuique rerum suarum possessio,

    Vell. 2, 89, 4; cf.: qua re suum unicuique studium suaque omnibus delectatio relinquatur, Ps.-Cic. Cons. 26, 93.—With quemque in apposition with acc. plur.:

    Camillus vidit intentos opifices suo quemque operi,

    Liv. 6, 25, 9; so cujusque in appos. with gen. plur.: trium clarissimorum suae cujusque gentis virorum mors, id. 39, 52, 7; and cuique with dat. plur.: sui cuique mores fingunt fortunam hominibus, Poet. ap. Nep. Att. 11, 6 (where Lachm. ad Lucr. 2, 372, reads quique, ex conj.; cf. b. b, infra).—
    b.
    Attraction of suus and quisque as adjuncts of nouns.
    (α).
    Attraction of suus:

    ut nemo sit nostrum quin in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium requirat acrius (= suum cujusque generis judicium),

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    quas tamen inter omnes (voces) est suo quoque in genere (vox) mediocris ( = inter omnes voces est mediocris vox, sua quoque in genere),

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 216:

    eo concilia suae cujusque regionis indici jussit (= sua cujusque regionis concilia),

    Liv. 45, 29, 10:

    equites suae cuique parti post principia collocat (= equites suos cuique parti),

    id. 3, 22, 6:

    cum motibus armorum et corporum suae cuique genti assuetis,

    id. 25, 17, 5:

    legiones deducebantur cum tribunis et centurionibus et sui cujusque ordinis militibus (= suis cujusque),

    Tac. A. 14, 27:

    quae sui cujusque sunt ingenii,

    Quint. 7, 10, 10 Halm (al. sua):

    sui cujusque ingenii poma vel semina gerunt (= sua cujusque),

    Col. 3, 1;

    and by a double attraction: has (cohortes) subsidiariae ternae et aliae totidem suae cujusque legionis subsequebantur (= has cohortes... totidem cujusque legionis, suam quaeque legionem, subsequebantur),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 83. —
    (β).
    Attraction of quisque:

    tanta ibi copia venustatum in suo quique loco sita,

    Plaut. Poen. 5, 4, 6 (al. quaeque):

    quodvis frumentum non tamen omne Quique suo genere inter se simile esse videbis,

    Lucr. 2, 372 Lachm. and Munro ad loc.:

    cum verba debeant sui cujusque generis copulari,

    Varr. L. L. 10, 48:

    in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    haec igitur proclivitas ad suum quodque genus aegrotatio dicatur,

    id. Tusc. 4, 12, 28:

    separatim greges sui cujusque generis nocte remeabant (= greges sui quisque generis),

    Liv. 24, 3, 5:

    ut sui cujusque mensis acciperet (frumentum),

    Suet. Aug. 40;

    and quisque both attracted and in its own case: quia cujusque partis naturae et in corpore et in animo sua quaeque vis sit (where either cujusque or quaeque is redundant),

    Cic. Fin. 5, 17, 46; v. Madv. ad loc.; Cato, R. R. 23 fin.;

    so esp. in the phrases suo quoque tempore, anno, die, loco, etc.: pecunia, quae in stipendium Romanis suo quoque anno penderetur, deerat (= suo quaeque anno),

    each instalment in the year when due, Liv. 33, 46, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    suo quoque loco,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 7, 2; 1, 22, 6:

    opera quae suis quibusque temporibus anni vilicum exsequi oporteret,

    Col. 11, 3:

    suo quoque tempore,

    Vitr. 2, 9, 4:

    nisi sua quaque die usurae exsolverentur (= sua quaeque die),

    Dig. 22, 1, 12 init.; 13, 7, 8, § 3:

    ut opera rustica suo quoque tempore faciat,

    ib. 19, 2, 25, § 3 (al. quaeque)—
    c.
    In the order quisque... suus.
    (α).
    In relative clauses, comparative clauses with ut, and interrogative clauses introduced by quid, etc., where quisque immediately follows the relative, etc.:

    ut quisque suom volt esse, ita est,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 45; cf.

    with sibi,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 49; id. Lael. 9, 30:

    expendere oportere quid quisque habeat sui... nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant. Id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    id. Off. 1, 31, 113:

    neque solum quid in senatu quisque civitatis suae dicerent ignorabant, sed, etc.,

    Liv. 32, 19, 9:

    gratius id fore laetiusque quod quisque sua manu ex hoste captum rettulerit,

    id. 5, 20, 8; 6, 25, 10; cf.:

    in quibus cum multa sint quae sua quisque dicere velit, nihil est quod quisque suum possit dicere,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 23, 1.—
    (β).
    If the emphasis is not on suus, but (for quisque, when emphatic, unusquisque is used) on some other word:

    in civitates quemque suas... dimisit,

    Liv. 21, 48, 2:

    in patriam quisque suam remissus est,

    Just. 33, 2, 8:

    in vestigio quemque suo vidit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 15; cf.:

    hospitibus quisque suis scribebant,

    id. 33, 45, 6:

    pro facultatibus quisque suis,

    id. 42, 53, 3; cf.:

    respiciendae sunt cuique facultates suae,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 15, 3:

    praecipitat quisque vitam suam et futuri desiderio laborat,

    id. Brev. Vit. 7, 5; id. Ben. 7, 5, 1:

    tunc praeceps quisque se proripit et penates suos deserit,

    id. Q. N. 6, 1, 5; 5, 18, 8:

    summum quisque causae suae judicem facit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 10: aestimatione nocturnae [p. 1828] quietis, dimidio quisque spatio vitae suae vivit, id. 7, 50, 51, § 167.—
    (γ).
    Poets adopt the order quisque suus when the metre requires it, Verg. A. 6, 743:

    oscula quisque suae matri tulerunt,

    Ov. F. 2, 715. —
    (δ).
    When suus and quisque belong to different clauses:

    atque earum quaeque, suum tenens munus... manet in lege naturae,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 13, 38. —
    d.
    Suus uterque, or uterque suus, distributively of two subjects:

    suas uterque legiones reducit in castra,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 40; 2, 28:

    ideo quod uterque suam legem confirmare debebit,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 142:

    cum sui utrosque adhortarentur,

    Liv. 1, 25, 1:

    ad utrumque ducem sui redierunt,

    id. 21, 29, 5:

    utraque (lex) sua via it,

    Sen. Ben. 6, 6, 1; cf.

    uterque, in apposit.: nec ipsi tam inter se acriter contenderunt, quam studia excitaverant uterque sui corporis hominum,

    Liv. 26, 48, 6.—
    3.
    With sibi.
    (α).
    Sibi with pronom. force (cf. sui, IV. C. fin.):

    reddam suum sibi,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 119 ( = ei; but referred to b, infra, by Brix ad loc.); cf.:

    suam rem sibi salvam sistam,

    id. Poen. 5, 2, 123:

    idem lege sibi sua curationem petet,

    for himself, Cic. Agr. 2, 9, 22 (cf. id. Phil. 2, 37, 96;

    I. B. 2. b. supra): ut vindicare sibi suum fulgorem possint,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 11; cf.

    the formula of divorce: tuas res tibi habeto,

    Dig. 24, 2, 2.—Hence, illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit, Cic. Phil. 2, 28, 69.—
    (β).
    With sibi redundant, to strengthen suus (anteand post-class. and colloq.):

    quo pacto serviat suo sibi patri,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 5:

    eum necabam ilico per cerebrum pinna sua sibi, quasi turturem,

    id. Poen. 2, 40; v. sui, IV. C. and the passages there cited.—
    4.
    With gen. agreeing with the subject of suus:

    quas cum solus pertulisset ut sua unius in his gratia esset,

    that the credit of it should belong to him alone, Liv. 2, 8, 3:

    qui de sua unius sententia omnia gerat,

    id. 44, 22, 11; cf.:

    unam Aegyptus in hoc spem habet suam,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2.—For suus ipsius, etc., v. D. 1. b. supra.—
    5.
    With demonstr., rel., or indef. pronn. and adjj., of his, hers, etc.:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    to this booty of his, Cic. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Sestius cum illo exercitu suo,

    id. Sest. 5, 12:

    qua gravitate sua,

    id. ib. 61, 129:

    suam rem publicam illam defenderunt,

    that republic of theirs, id. ib. 67, 141:

    in istum civem suum,

    against this citizen of theirs, id. Balb. 18, 41:

    cum illo suo pari,

    id. Pis. 8, 18:

    te nulla sua calamitate civitas satiare potest?

    id. Phil. 8, 6, 19:

    dubitatis igitur, quin vos M. Laterensis ad suam spem aliquam delegerit,

    for some hope of his, id. Planc. 16, 39:

    non tam sua ulla spe quam militum impetu tractus,

    by any hope of his, Liv. 25, 21, 5:

    nullo suo merito,

    from no fault of theirs, id. 26, 29, 4:

    ipse arcano cum paucis familiaribus suis colloquitur,

    with a few of his friends, Caes. B. C. 1, 19.—
    6.
    With descriptive adjj.
    (α).
    Standing before the adj. and noun (so most freq.):

    suorum improbissimorum sermonum domicilium,

    Cic. Pis. 31, 76:

    causam sui dementissimi consilii,

    id. Phil. 2, 22, 53:

    suam insatiabilem crudelitatem,

    id. ib. 11, 3, 8:

    suis amplissimis fortunis,

    id. ib. 13, 8, 16:

    suum pristinum morem,

    id. Pis. 12, 27:

    suis lenissimis postulatis,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5: simili ratione Pompeius in suis veteribus castris consedit (suis emphatic; cf. b, infra), id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (β).
    Between the adj. and noun (less emphatic):

    pro eximiis suis beneficiis,

    Cic. Prov. Cons. 4, 7:

    propter summam suam humanitatem,

    id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    ex praeteritis suis officiis,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 60:

    Caesar in veteribus suis castris consedit,

    id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (γ).
    After adj. and noun:

    veterem amicum suum excepit,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    in illo ardenti tribunatu suo,

    id. Sest. 54, 116.—
    7.
    Objectively for the pers. pron. (rare):

    neque cuiquam mortalium injuriae suae parvae videntur ( = sibi illatae),

    Sall. C. 51, 11; so,

    neglectam ab Scipione et nimis leviter latam suam injuriam ratus,

    Liv. 29, 9, 9:

    ipsae enim leges te a cognitione sua judicio publico reppulerunt ( = a se cognoscendo),

    Cic. Balb. 14, 32:

    suam invidiam tali morte quaesitam ( = quaesitum esse ab eo ut homines se inviderent),

    Tac. A. 3, 16; so,

    nulla sua invidia,

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40.—
    8.
    Abl. fem. sua, with refert or interest, for gen. of the pers. pron.: neminem esse qui quomodo se habeat nihil sua censeat interesse, Cic. Fin. 5, 10, 30:

    si scit sua nihil interesse utrum anima per os, an per jugulum exeat,

    Sen. Ep. 76, 33; v. intersum, III.—
    9.
    Strengthened by the suffix - pte or -met.
    (α).
    By - pte (not used with ipse) affixed to the forms sua, suo, and (ante-class.) suum:

    quom illa osculata esset suumpte amicum,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 4, 38:

    ut terrena suopte nutu et suo pondere in terram ferantur,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 17, 40:

    ferri suopte pondere,

    id. N. D. 1, 25, 69:

    suapte natura,

    id. Fat. 18, 42:

    suapte vi et natura,

    id. ib. 19, 43; id. Fin. 1, 16, 54; 5, 22, 61:

    suopte ingenio,

    Liv. 25, 18; so id. 1, 25, 1; 1, 18, 4:

    suapte manu,

    Cic. Or. 3, 3, 10:

    locus suapte natura infestus,

    Liv. 44, 6, 9; so,

    suapte natura,

    id. 4, 22, 4:

    flumina suapte natura vasta,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 27, 8; so id. Ben. 4, 17, 2:

    sponte suapte,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 7, § 70.—
    (β).
    With - met, almost always followed by ipse (in all forms of suus except suus, suum, suae, and suorum):

    suomet ipsi more,

    Sall. J. 31, 6:

    suomet ipsi instrumento,

    Liv. 22, 14, 13:

    suomet ipsi metu,

    Tac. H. 3, 16 fin.:

    suamet ipsum pecunia,

    Sall. J. 8, 2:

    suamet ipsae fraude,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9:

    intra suamet ipsum moenia,

    id. 6, 36, 4:

    suismet ipsi praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6:

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    id. 2, 19, 5:

    suosmet ipsi cives,

    id. 2, 9, 5:

    suasmet ipse spes,

    Tac. A. 3, 66 fin. —Without ipse:

    populum suimet sanguinis mercede,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 1, 41, 25 Dietsch:

    magna pars suismet aut proxumorum telis obtruncabantur,

    id. ib. 2, 52 ib.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > suum

  • 16 suus

    sŭus, a, um (old form sos, sa, sum; dat. plur. sis, Enn. ap. Fest. p. 301 Mull.; acc. sas. id. ib. p. 325 ib.; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 47; Schol. Pers. 1, 108; sing. sam for suam, Fest. p. 47 Mull.;

    so for suo, C. I. L. 5, 2007. In ante-class. verse su- with the following vowel freq. forms one syllable,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 48; id. Ps. 1, 3, 5; Ter. And. 1, 1, 68; Lucr. 1, 1022; v. Neue, Formenl. 2, 189 sqq.), pron. poss., 3 d pers. [root SVA-; Sanscr. sva, own; cf. sui; Gr. seWo-, whence sphe, etc., and he; cf. heos], of or belonging to himself, herself, etc.; his own, her own, etc.; his, her, its, their; one ' s; hers, theirs.
    I.
    Ordinary possessive use his, etc. (cf. the similar use of the pers. pron. sui, q. v.).
    A.
    With antecedent in the same sentence.
    1.
    The antecedent a subject-nominative, expressed or understood.
    (α).
    His:

    Caesar copias suas divisit,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 97:

    ille in sua sententia perseverat,

    id. ib. 1, 72:

    tantam habebat suarum rerum fiduciam,

    id. ib. 2, 37:

    cum sceleris sui socios Romae reliquisset,

    Cic. Cat. 3, 1, 3:

    cur ego non ignoscam si anteposuit suam salutem meae?

    id. Pis. 32, 79; id. Phil. 2, 18, 45; id. Mil. 10, 27; id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    Hanno praefecturam ejus (i.e. Muttinis) filio suo (Hannonis) dedit,

    Liv. 26, 40, 7:

    imperat princeps civibus suis,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 16, 2:

    nemo rem suam emit,

    id. Ben. 7, 4, 8.—
    (β).
    Her:

    mea Glycerium suos parentes repperit,

    Ter. And. 5, 6, 5:

    utinam haec ignoraret suum patrem,

    id. Phorm. 5, 6, 34:

    si nunc facere volt era officium suom,

    Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 72:

    ne eadem mulier cum suo conjuge honestissimum adulescentem oppressisse videatur,

    Cic. Cael. 32, 78:

    si omnibus suis copiis excellentem virum res publica armasset,

    id. Phil. 13, 16, 32.—
    (γ).
    Its:

    omne animal, simul et ortum est, et se ipsum et omnes partes suas diligit,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 11, 33:

    cum mea domus ardore suo deflagrationem Italiae toti minaretur,

    id. Planc. 40, 95.—
    (δ).
    Their: (legiones) si consulem suum reliquerunt, vituperandae sunt Cic. Phil. 5, 2, 4:

    mittent aliquem de suo numero,

    id. ib. 11, 10, 25:

    rationem illi sententiae suae non fere reddebant,

    id. Tusc. 1, 17, 38:

    qui agellos suos redimere a piratis solebant,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 37, § 85:

    edicunt ut ad suum vestitum senatores redirent,

    id. Sest. 14, 32:

    suis finibus eos prohibent,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 1: Allobrogibus sese persuasuros existimabant ut per suos (Allobrogum) fines eos (Helvetios) ire paterentur, id. id. 1, 6;

    and distributively: ac naves onerariae LXIII. in portu expugnatae, quaedam cum suis oneribus, frumento, armis, aere, etc.,

    some with their several cargoes, Liv. 26, 47, 9.—
    2.
    With a subject-clause as antecedent:

    id sua sponte apparebat tuta celeribus consiliis praepositurum,

    was selfevident, Liv. 22, 38, 13:

    ad id quod sua sponte satis collectum animorum erat, indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur,

    id. 3, 62, 1:

    secutum tamen sua sponte est ut vilior ob ea regi Hannibal et suspectior fieret,

    id. 35, 14, 4. —
    3.
    With subject-acc. as antecedent:

    hanc dicam Athenis advenisse cum aliquo amatore suo, Plant. Mil. 2, 2, 86: doceo gratissimum esse in sua tribu Plancium,

    Cic. Planc. 19, 47:

    cupio eum suae causae confidere,

    id. Sest. 64, 135:

    suspicari debuit (Milo), eum (Clodium) ad villam suam (Clodii) deversurum,

    id. Mil. 19, 51: Medeam praedicant in fuga fratris sui membra dissipavisse, id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 22:

    (dixit) Caesarem pro sua dignitate debere et studium et iracundiam suam reipublicae dimittere,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    4.
    With object-acc. as antecedent.
    (α).
    Suus being an adjunct of the subject (generally rendered in Engl. by a pass. constr.):

    hunc pater suus de templo deduxit,

    he was taken from the temple by his father, Cic. Inv. 2, 17, 52:

    hunc sui cives e civitate ejecerunt,

    id. Sest. 68, 142:

    Alexandrum uxor sua... occidit,

    id. Inv. 2, 49, 144:

    illum ulciscentur mores sui,

    id. Att. 9, 12, 2:

    quodsi quem natura sua... forte deficiet,

    id. Or. 1, 14:

    utrumque regem sua multitudo consalutaverat,

    Liv. 1, 7, 1:

    quas (urbes) sua virtus ac dii juvent, magnas sibi opes facere,

    id. 1, 9, 3; 1, 7, 15; 6, 33, 5:

    quos nec sua conscientia impulerit, nec, etc.,

    id. 26, 33, 3; 25, 14, 7:

    consulem C. Marium servus suus interemit,

    Val. Max. 6, 8, 2:

    quis non Vedium Pollionem pejus oderat quam servi sui?

    Sen. Clem. 1, 18, 2:

    sera dies sit qua illum gens sua caelo adserat,

    id. Cons. Poll. 12 (31), 5.—With the antecedent understood from the principal sentence:

    ita forma simili pueri ut mater sua internoscere (sc. eos) non posset,

    Plaut. Men. prol. 19; and with suus as adjunct both of the subject and of the antecedent: jubet salvere suos vir uxorem suam, id. merc. 4, 3, 11. —
    (β).
    With impers. verbs:

    sunt homines, quos libidinis infamiaeque suae neque pudeat neque taedeat,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 12, 35:

    video fore ut inimicos tuos poeniteat intemperantiae suae,

    id. Fam. 3, 10, 1:

    si Caesarem beneficii sui poeniteret,

    id. Lig. 10, 29; so id. Agr. 2, 11, 26:

    jam ne nobilitatis quidem suae plebejos poenitere,

    Liv. 10, 7, 8:

    militem jam minus virtutis poenitere suae,

    id. 22, 12, 10.—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of other members of the sentence:

    ad parentes suos ducas Silenium,

    Plaut. Cist. 2, 3, 86. nam is illius filiam conicit in navem clam matrem suam (i.e. filiae), id. Mil. 2, 1, 34:

    eosdem ad quaestoris sui aut imperatoris, aut commilitonum suorum pericula impulistis,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 17, 34:

    totum enim ex sua patria sustulisti,

    id. Verr. 2, 5, 49, § 127; id. Or. 3, 32, 126: quem (Hammonium) tibi etiam suo nomine ( on his own account) commendo... itaque peto a te ut ejus procuratorem et ipsum suo nomine diligas, id. Fam. 13, 21, 2:

    Caesar Fabium in sua remittit hiberna,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 33; id. B. C. 3, 24:

    introire ad Ciceronem, et domi suae imparatum confodere,

    Sall. C. 28, 1:

    suis flammis delete Fidenas,

    i. e. the flames kindled by the Fidenates, Liv. 4, 33, 5:

    suo igni involvit hostes,

    Tac. A. 14, 30:

    quid Caesarem in sua fata inmisit?

    Sen. Ep. 94, 65; id. Q. N. 1, praef. 7; cf.

    with antecedent supplied from preceding sentence: non destiti rogare et petere (sc. Brutum) mea causa, suadere et hortari sua,

    Cic. Att. 6, 2, 7.—
    5.
    With dat. as antecedent.
    (α).
    As adjunct of subject (cf. 4. supra):

    suus rex reginae placet,

    a queen likes her own king, Plaut. Stich. 1, 2, 76:

    ei nunc alia ducenda'st domum, sua cognata Lemniensis,

    id. Cist. 1, 1, 101:

    Autronio nonne sodales, non collegae sui... defuerunt?

    Cic. Sull. 2, 7:

    si ceteris facta sua recte prosunt,

    id. Cat. 3, 12, 27:

    cui non magistri sui atque doctores, cui non... locus ipse... in mente versetur?

    id. Planc. 33, 81:

    haec omnia plane... Siculis erepta sunt: primum suae leges, etc.,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 13, § 33:

    Romanis multitudo sua auxit animum,

    Liv. 21, 50, 4:

    sicuti populo Romano sua fortuna labet,

    id. 42, 50, 7:

    Lanuvinis sacra sua reddita,

    id. 8, 14, 2:

    vilitas sua illis detrahit pretium,

    Sen. Ben. 4, 29, 2:

    nemo est cui felicitas sua satisfaciat,

    id. Ep. 115, 17:

    labor illi suus restitutus est,

    id. Brev. Vit. 20, 3:

    magnitudo sua singulis constat,

    id. Q. N. 1, 1, 10:

    tantum sapienti sua, quantum Dec omnis aetas patet,

    id. Ep. 53, 11. —

    With antecedent supplied from principal sentence: mater quod suasit sua Adulescens mulier fecit, i.e. ei,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 38.—
    (β).
    Of other words:

    regique Thebano regnum stabilivit suum,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 40:

    mittam hodie huic suo die natali malam rem magnam,

    id. Ps. 1, 3, 5:

    ego Metello non irascor, neque ei suam vacationem eripio,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 68, § 164:

    desinant insidiari domui suae consuli,

    id. Cat. 1, 13, 32:

    quibus ea res honori fuerit a suis civibus,

    id. Mil. 35, 96: Scipio suas res Syracusanis restituit, Liv. [p. 1824] 29, 1, 17:

    nos non suas (leges Lacedaemoniis arbitror) ademisse, sed nostras leges dedisse,

    id. 39, 37, 6:

    Graccho et Tuditano provinciae Lucani et Galliae cum suis exercitibus prorogatae,

    id. 25, 3, 5.—
    6.
    With gen., abl., or object of a prep. as antecedent:

    nec illius animi aciem praestringit splendor sui nominis,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    nolite a sacris patriis Junonis Sospitae domesticum et suum consulem avellere,

    id. Mur. 41, 90:

    quamvis tu magna mihi scripseris de Bruti adventu ad suas legiones,

    id. Att. 14, 13, 12:

    suae legis ad scriptum ipsam quoque sententiam adjungere,

    the meaning of their law to which they refer, id. Inv. 2, 49, 147:

    cum ambitio alterius suam primum apud eos majestatem solvisset,

    Liv. 22, 42, 12:

    nunc causam instituendorum ludorum ab origine sua repetam,

    Val. Max. 2, 4, 4:

    Jubam in regno suo non locorum notitia adjuvet, non popularium pro rege suo virtus,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 10; id. Ben. 7, 6, 3; id. Clem. 1, 3, 4.—Esp. with cujusque as antecedent:

    in qua deliberatione ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 33, 119 (v. II. D. 2. infra).— Abl.:

    operam dare ut sua lex ipso scripto videatur niti,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 147 (cf. supra):

    (Caesar reperiebat) ad Galbam propter justitiam prudentiamque suam totius belli summam deferri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    credere, ad suum concilium a Jove deos advocari,

    Sen. Q. N. 2, 42, 1.—
    7.
    With predic. nom. as antecedent:

    sapientissimi artis suae professores sunt a quibus et propria studia verecunde et aliena callide administrantur,

    Val. Max. 8, 12, 1.—
    8.
    With appositive noun.
    (α).
    With gram. subject as antecedent:

    hoc Anaximandro, populari ac sodali suo, non persuasit,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 37, 118:

    vidit fortissimum virum, inimicissimum suum,

    id. Mil. 9, 25:

    (hic) fuit in Creta contubernalis Saturnini, propinqui sui,

    id. Planc. 11, 27:

    ut non per L. Crassum, adfinem suum... causam illam defenderit,

    id. Balb. 21, 49:

    ne cum hoc T. Broccho, avunculo, ne cum ejus filio, consobrino suo, ne nobiscum vivat,

    id. Lig. 4, 11:

    Caesar mittit ad eum A. Clodium, suum atque illius familiarem,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 57.—
    (β).
    With object as antecedent:

    Dicaearchum cum Aristoxeno, aequali et condiscipulo suo, omittamus,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 18, 41:

    tres fratres optimos, non solum sibi ipsos, neque nobis, necessariis suis, sed etiam rei publicae condonavit,

    id. Lig. 12, 36:

    Varroni, quem, sui generis hominem,... vulgus extrahere ad consulatum nitebatur,

    Liv. 22, 34, 2.—
    (γ).
    With appositive noun as antecedent:

    si P. Scipionem, clarissimum virum, majorumque suorum simillimum res publica tenere potuisset,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 14, 29:

    M. Fabi Ambusti, potentis viri cum inter sui corporis homines, tum ad plebem, etc.,

    Liv. 6, 34, 5:

    C. vero Fabricii, et Q. Aemilii Papi, principum saeculi sui, domibus argentum fuisse confitear oportet,

    Val. Max. 4, 4, 3.—
    9.
    In participial clauses.
    (α).
    The antecedent being the logical subject of the participle, and other than the principal subject:

    credamus igitur Panaetio, a Platone suo dissentienti ( = qui dissentiebat),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 32, 79:

    ea Sex. Roscium, expulsum ex suis bonis, recepit domum,

    id. Rosc. Am. 10, 27:

    diffidentemque rebus suis confirmavit,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 9, 23:

    Dejotarum ad me venientem cum omnibus copiis suis, certiorem feci, etc.,

    id. Fam. 15, 4, 7; id. Cat. 4, 9, 18: si hominis et suis et populi Romani ornamentis amplissimi ( being greatly distinguished) causam repudiassem, id. Mur. 4, 8:

    stupentes tribunos et suam jam vicem magis anxios quam, etc., liberavit consensus populi Romani,

    Liv. 8, 35, 1; 22, 42, 8:

    manet in folio scripta querela suo ( = quam scripsit),

    Ov. F. 5, 224; cf. in abl. absol.:

    et ipsis (hostibus) regressis in castra sua,

    Liv. 22, 60, 9:

    quibus (speculis) si unum ostenderis hominem, populus adparet, unaquaque parte faciem exprimente sua,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 5, 5.—
    (β).
    The logical subject of the participle, being also the principal subject:

    sic a suis legionibus condemnatus irrupit in Galliam,

    Cic. Phil. 10, 10, 21:

    hunc agrum patres nostri, acceptum a majoribus suis ( = quem acceperant), perdiderunt,

    id. Agr. 2, 31, 84:

    ut in suis ordinibus dispositi dispersos adorirentur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 92: Appius, odium in se aliorum suo in eos metiens odio, haud ignaro, inquit, imminet fortuna, Liv. 3, 54, 3:

    ipsa capit Condita in pharetra ( = quae condiderat) tela minora sua,

    Ov. F. 2, 326; cf. in abl. absol.:

    Sopater, expositis suis difficultatibus ( = cum exposuisset, etc.): Timarchidem... perducit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 28, § 69:

    Caesar, primum suo deinde omnium ex conspectu remotis equis, etc.,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25:

    Campani, audita sua pariter sociorumque clade, legatos ad Hannibalem miserunt,

    Liv. 25, 15, 1:

    (Appius) deposito suo magistratu... domum est reductus,

    id. 4, 24, 7; 3, 35, 9; 9, 10, 13; 9, 41, 9.—
    (γ).
    The antecedent being the principal subject, not the logical subject of the participle:

    M. Papirius dicitur Gallo, barbam suam (i.e. Papirii) permulcenti,... iram movisse,

    Liv. 5, 41, 9: cum Gracchus, verecundia deserendi socios, implorantis fidem suam populique Romani, substitisset. id. 23, 36, 8; cf. in abl. absol.:

    si sine maximo dedecore, tam impeditis suis rebus, potuisset emori,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 10, 29; id. Mil. 14, 38; id. Planc. 21, 51; id. Clu. 14, 42:

    ita (consul) proelio uno accidit Vestinorum res, haudquaquam tamen incruento milite suo (consulis),

    Liv. 8, 29, 12; cf.

    with antecedent to be supplied: Campani, cum, robore juventutis suae acciso, nulla (sc. eis) propinqua spes esset, etc.,

    id. 7, 29, 7.—
    10.
    In gerund. construction. ( a) With subject as antecedent:

    mihi ipsa Roma ad complectendum conservatorem suum progredi visa est,

    Cic. Pis. 22, 52.—
    (β).
    With object, the logical subjects of the gerund as antecedent:

    cur iis persequendi juris sui... adimis potestatem?

    Cic. Div. in Caecil. 6, 21:

    si senatui doloris sui de me declarandi potestas esset erepta,

    id. Sest. 23, 51:

    nec tribunis plebis (spatium datur) sui periculi deprecandi,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5.—
    (γ).
    With antecedent dependent on the gerund:

    eamque rem illi putant a suum cuique tribuendo appellatam,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 19.—
    11.
    As adjunct of a noun dependent on a subjectinf., with its logical subject as antecedent:

    magnum Miloni fuit, conficere illam pestem nulla sua invidia?

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40:

    neque enim fuit Gabinii, remittere tantum de suo nec regis, imponere tantum plus suis,

    his claim, id. Rab. Post. 11, 31:

    Piso, cui fructum pietatis suae neque ex me neque a populo Romano ferre licuit,

    id. Sest. 31, 68:

    ei cujus magis intersit, vel sua, vel rei publicae causa vivere,

    id. Off. 3, 23, 90:

    sapientis est consilium explicare suum de maximis rebus,

    id. Or. 2, 81, 333; id. Mil. 15, 41.—With logical subject understood:

    totam Italiam suis colonis ut complere (sc. eis) liceat, permittitur,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    maximum (sc. eis) solacium erit, propinquorum eodem monumento declarari, et virtutem suorum, et populi Romani pietatem,

    id. Phil. 14, 13, 35.
    B.
    Without gram. antec., one ' s, one ' s own.
    1.
    Dependent on subject-inff.:

    ejusdem animi est, posteris suis amplitudinem nobis quam non acceperit tradere, et memoriam prope intermortuam generis sui, virtute renovare,

    Cic. Mur. 7, 16:

    siquidem atrocius est, patriae parentem quam suum occidere,

    id. Phil. 2, 13, 31:

    miliens perire est melius quam in sua civitate sine armorum praesidio non posse vivere,

    id. ib. 2, 44, 112: quanto est honestius, alienis injuriis quam suis commoveri, one ' s own, id. Verr. 2, 3, 72, § 169:

    contentum suis rebus esse maximae sunt certissimaeque divitiae,

    id. Par. 6, 51:

    ut non liceat sui commodi causa nocere alteri,

    id. Off. 3, 5, 23:

    detrahere de altero sui commodi causa,

    id. ib. 3, 5, 24:

    suis exemplis melius est uti,

    Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2:

    levius est sua decreta tollere quam aliorum,

    Liv. 3, 21. 5; 39, 5, 2;

    29, 37, 11: satius est vitae suae rationes quam frumenti publici nosse,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 18, 3:

    quanto satius est sua mala exstinguere quam aliena posteris tradere?

    id. Q. N. 3, praef. 5:

    cum initia beneficiorum suorum spectare, tum etiam exitus decet,

    id. Ben. 2, 14, 2; 3, 1, 5:

    Romani nominis gloriae, non suae, composuisse illa decuit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 16.—With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent: cum possimus ab Ennio sumere... exemplum, videtur esse arrogantia illa relinquere, et ad sua devenire, to one ' s own = to our own, Auct. Her. 4, 1, 2.—
    2.
    Without a subject-inf.:

    omnia torquenda sunt ad commodum suae causae... sua diligenter narrando,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 21, 30: ut in ceteris habenda ratio non sua (al. sui) solum, sed etiam aliorum, id. Off. 1, 39, 139:

    erat Dareo mite ac tractabile ingenium, nisi suam naturam plerumque fortuna corrumperet (suam not referring to Dareo),

    Curt. 3, 2, 17 MSS. (Foss, mansuetam). — With 1 st pers. plur., as indef. antecedent (cf. 1. supra):

    non erit ista amicitia sed mercatura quaedam utilitatum suarum,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 44, 122; cf.: pro suo possidere, II. A. 2. a. g; and Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73, II. A. 2. b. a; cf. also II. B. 1. a; II. B. 5. c.; II. B. 7. b.; II. C. 8. b. b infra.
    C.
    With antec. in a previous sentence. Here ejus, eorum, earum are used for his, her, their, unless the clause is oblique in regard to the antecedent, i. e. the antecedent is conceived as the author of the statement.
    1.
    In clauses dependent on a verbum sentiendi or dicendi, expressed or understood, referring to the grammatical or logical subject of the verb.
    a.
    In infinitive clauses:

    (Clodius) Caesaris potentiam suam potentiam esse dicebat,

    Cic. Mil. 32, 88:

    (Caelius) a sua (causa) putat ejus (i.e. Ascitii) esse sejunctam,

    id. Cael. 10, 24:

    ipsos certo scio non negare ad haec bona Chrysogonum accessisse impulsu suo (referring to ipsos),

    id. Rosc. Am. 37, 107:

    hostes viderunt,... suorum tormentorum usum spatio propinquitatis interire,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 16:

    docent, sui judicii rem non esse,

    id. ib. 1, 13.—The reference of suus may be ambiguous, esp. if an infinitive is dependent on another:

    hoc Verrem dicere ajebant, te... opera sua consulem factum, i.e. Verris, though grammatically it might refer to the subj. of aiebant,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 10, 29:

    (Ariovistus) dixit neminem secum sine sua pernicie contendisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 36; cf. the context with, in all, eleven reflexive pronouns referring to four different antecedents (populus Romanus, Ariovistus, Caesar, nemo); cf.

    also: occurrebat ei, mancam praeturam suam futuram consule Milone,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25; 32, 88; Liv. 3, 42, 2.—
    b.
    Suus in a clause dependent on inf.:

    scio equidem, ut, qui argentum afferret atque expressam imaginem suam (i.e. militis) huc ad nos, cum eo ajebat velle mitti mulierem,

    Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 55:

    isti bonorum emptores arbitrantur, vos hic sedere qui excipiatis eos qui de suis (i.e. emptorum) manibus effugerint,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 52, 151:

    Siculi venisse tempus ajebant ut commoda sua defenderem,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 1, 3:

    ut tunc tandem sentiret recuperanda esse quae prius sua culpa amissa forent,

    Liv. 44, 8, 4. —

    Ambiguous: velle Pompejum se Caesari purgatum, ne ea quae reipublicae causa egerit (Pompejus) in suam (i.e. Caesaris) contumeliam vertat (where suam might be referred to Pompejus),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 8.—
    c.
    In oblique clauses introduced by ut or ne, or clauses subordinate to such:

    Cassius constituit ut ludi absente te fierent suo nomine,

    Cic. Att. 15, 11, 2:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam tam nefariam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    id. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Nasidius eos magnopere hortatur ut rursus cum Bruti classe, additis suis (i.e. Nasidii) auxiliis confligant,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 3:

    (regem) denuntiasse sibi ut triduo regni sui decederent finibus,

    Liv. 42, 25, 12:

    Sabinae mulieres, hinc patres, hinc viros orantes, ne parricidio macularent partus suos (i.e. mulierum),

    id. 1, 13, 2:

    Patron praecepit suis ut arma induerent, ad omne imperium suum parati,

    Curt. 5, 11, 1.—With reflex. pron., referring to a different antecedent:

    ad hanc (Laidem) Demosthenes clanculum adit, et ut sibi copiam sui faceret, petit,

    Gell. 1, 8, 5. —
    d.
    In subordinate clauses introduced by quin or quod:

    (Dejotarus) non recusat quin id suum facinus judices,

    Cic. Deiot. 15, 43; so id. ib. 4, 15;

    16, 45: parietes hujus curiae tibi gratias agere gestiunt, quod futura sit illa auctoritas in his majorum suorum et suis sedibus,

    id. Marcell. 3, 10:

    quidni gauderet quod iram suam nemo sentiret?

    Sen. Troad. 3, 13:

    querenti quod uxor sua e fico se suspendisset,

    Quint. 6, 3, 88;

    and with intentional ambiguity: cum Proculejus quereretur de filio quod is mortem suam expectaret,

    id. 9, 3, 68. —
    e.
    In interrogative clauses:

    si, quod officii sui sit, non occurrit animo, nihil umquam omnino aget,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 8, 25:

    ut non auderet iterum dicere quot milia fundus suus abesset ab urbe,

    id. Caecin. 10, [p. 1825] 28:

    donec sciat unisquisque quid sui, quid alieni sit,

    Liv. 6, 27, 8:

    rex ignarus, quae cum Hannibale legatis suis convenisset, quaeque legati ejus ad se allaturi fuissent,

    id. 23, 39, 2:

    postquam animadvertit quantus agminis sui terror esset,

    id. 43, 19, 5. —
    2.
    In a virtually oblique clause.
    a.
    In final clause, introduced by ut, ne, or rel., referring to the subject of the purpose:

    me a portu praemisit domum, ut haec nuntiem uxori suae,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 41:

    quasi Appius ille Caecus viam muniverit, non qua populus uteretur, sed ubi impune sui posteri latrocinarentur, i. e. Appii,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    quae gens ad Caesarem legatos mise. rat, ut suis omnibus facultatibus uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 80:

    inde castra movent, ne qua vis sociis suis ab Romano exercitu inferri possit,

    Liv. 43, 23, 5:

    (Romani) Albam a fundamentis proruerunt, ne memoria originum suarum exstaret,

    id. 26, 13, 16:

    oppidani nuntios Romam, qui certiorem de suo casu senatum facerent, misere,

    id. 6, 33, 7; cf.:

    tanto intervallo ab hostibus consedit, ut nec adventus suus propinquitate nimia nosci posset, et, etc.,

    Liv. 10, 20, 7:

    Datames locum delegit talem ut non multum obesse multitudo hostium suae paucitati posset,

    Nep. Dat. 7, 3:

    quid si gubernator a diis procellas petat ut gratior ars sua periculo fiat?

    Sen. Ben. 6, 25, 4. —
    b.
    In other dependent clauses represented as conceived by an antecedent in the principal sentence:

    Sulla, si sibi suus pudor ac dignitas non prodesset, nullum auxilium requisivit ( = negavit se defendi velle, si, etc.),

    Cic. Sull. 5, 15:

    Paetus omnes libros quos frater suus reliquisset mihi donavit ( = dixit se donare libros quos, etc.),

    id. Att. 2, 1, 12:

    non enim a te emit, sed, priusquam tu suum sibi venderes, ipse possedit ( = potitus est, ne, etc.),

    id. Phil. 2, 37, 96:

    Africanus, si sua res ageretur, testimonium non diceret,

    id. Rosc. Am. 36, 3:

    ille ipse (Pompejus) proposuit epistulam illam, in qua est Pro tuis rebus gestis amplissimis. Amplioribusne quam suis, quam Africani?

    id. Att. 8, 9, 2:

    spiritus dabat (Manlio) quod... vinculorum suorum invidiam dictator fugisset,

    Liv. 6, 18, 4:

    (Numa) Camenis eum lucum sacravit, quod earum ibi concilia cum conjuge sua Egeria essent,

    id. 1, 21, 3:

    adulescens deos omnis invocare ad gratiam illi pro se referendam, quoniam sibi nequaquam satis facultatis pro suo animo atque illius erga se esset,

    id. 26, 50, 4 (cf. D. 1. a. infra).
    D.
    In the place of ejus.
    1.
    In clauses virtually oblique, but with indicative, being conceived by the antecedent (hence suus, not ejus), but asserted as fact by the author (hence indicative, not subjunctive):

    Cicero tibi mandat ut Aristodemo idem respondeas, quod de fratre suo (Ciceronis) respondisti,

    Cic. Att. 2, 7, 4:

    oriundi ab Sabinis, ne, quia post Tatii mortem ab sua parte non erat regnatum, imperium amitterent, sui corporis creari regem volebant,

    Liv. 1, 17, 2:

    C. Caesar villam pulcherrimam, quia mater sua aliquando in illa custodita erat, diruit,

    Sen. Ira, 3, 21, 5:

    Philemonem, a manu servum, qui necem suam per venenum inimicis promiserat, non gravius quam simplici morte punivit,

    Suet. Caes. 74; cf.:

    quomodo excandescunt si quid e juba sua decisum est,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 12, 3.—
    2.
    To avoid ambiguity:

    petunt rationes illius (Catilinae) ut orbetur consilio res publica, ut minuatur contra suum (i.e. Catilinae) furorem imperatorum copia (instead of ejus, which might be referred to res publica),

    Cic. Mur. 39, 83:

    equites a cornibus positos, cum jam pelleretur media peditum suorum acies, incurrisse ab lateribus ferunt,

    Liv. 1, 37, 3.—
    3.
    Colloquially and in epistolary style suus is used emphatically instead of ejus, with the meaning own, peculiar: deinde ille actutum subferret suus servus poenas Sosia, his own slave (opp. Mercury, who personates Sosias), Plaut. Am. 3, 4, 19: mira erant in civitatibus ipsorum furta Graecorum quae magistratus sui fecerant, their own magistrates ( = ipsorum), Cic. Att. 6, 2, 5:

    in quibus (litteris Bruti) unum alienum summa sua prudentia (est), ut spectem ludos suos,

    his peculiar prudence, id. ib. 15, 26, 1; so,

    quod quidem ille (Nero) decernebat, quorumdam dolo ad omina sui exitus vertebatur,

    Tac. A. 16, 24; cf. II. A. 1. b and g; II. A. 2. a. b; II. B. 3.—
    4.
    Without particular emphasis (mostly ante- and post-class. and poet.):

    tum erit tempestiva cum semen suum maturum erit,

    Cato, R. R. 31:

    vitis si macra erit, sarmenta sua concidito minute,

    id. ib. 37:

    qui sic purgatus erit, diuturna valetudine utatur, neque ullus morbus veniet, nisi sua culpa,

    id. ib. 157:

    Cimon in eandem invidiam incidit quam pater suus,

    Nep. Cim. 3, 1:

    id qua ratione consecutus sit (Lysander) latet. Non enim virtute sui exercitus factum est, etc.,

    id. Lys. 1, 2:

    ipse sub Esquiliis, ubi erat regia sua, Concidit,

    Ov. F. 6, 601:

    quodque suus conjux riguo collegerat horto, Truncat olus foliis,

    id. M. 8, 646; so id. ib. 15, 819.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    As substt.
    1.
    sui, suorum, m., his, their (etc.) friends, soldiers, fellow-beings, equals, adherents, followers, partisans, posterity, slaves, family, etc., of persons in any near connection with the antecedent.
    (α).
    (Corresp. to the regular usage, I. A. B. C.) Cupio abducere ut reddam (i.e. eam) suis, to her family, friends, Ter. Eun. 1, 2, 77; cf. id. ib. 1, 2, 66:

    cum animus societatem caritatis coierit cum suis, omnesque natura conjunctos suos duxerit,

    fellow-beings, Cic. Leg. 1, 23, 60:

    mulier ingeniosa praecepit suis omnia Caelio pollicerentur,

    her slaves, id. Cael. 25, 62:

    quo facilius et nostras domos obire, et ipse a suis coli possit,

    his friends, id. ib. 7, 18:

    qua gratiam beneficii vestri cum suorum laude conjungant,

    their family, id. Agr. 2, 1, 1:

    vellem hanc contemptionem pecuniae suis reliquisset,

    to his posterity, id. Phil. 3, 6, 16:

    cum divisurum se urbem palam suis polliceretur,

    his partisans, id. ib. 13, 9, 19:

    Caesar, cohortatus suos, proelium commisit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 25; so,

    Curio exercitum reduxit, suis omnibus praeter Fabium incolumibus,

    id. B. C. 2, 35:

    Caesar receptui suorum timens,

    id. ib. 3, 46:

    certior ab suis factus est, praeclusas esse portas,

    id. ib. 2, 20:

    omnium suorum consensu, Curio bellum ducere parabat,

    id. ib. 2, 37: so,

    Pompejus suorum omnium hortatu statuerat proelio decertare,

    id. ib. 3, 86:

    Caesar Brundisium ad suos severius scripsit,

    to his officers, id. ib. 3, 25:

    naviculam conscendit cum paucis suis,

    a few of his followers, id. ib. 3, 104:

    multum cum suis consiliandi causa secreto praeter consuetudinem loqueretur,

    id. ib. 1, 19:

    nupsit Melino, adulescenti inprimis inter suos et honesto et nobili,

    his equals, associates, Cic. Clu. 5, 11:

    rex raptim a suis in equum impositus fugit,

    his suite, Liv. 41, 4, 7:

    subsidio suorum proelium restituere,

    comrades, id. 21, 52, 10:

    feras bestias... ad opem suis ferendam avertas,

    their young, id. 26, 13, 12:

    abstulit sibi in suos potestatem,

    his slaves, Sen. Ira, 3, 12, 6:

    Besso et Nabarzani nuntiaverant sui regem... interemptum esse,

    their fellow - conspirators, Curt. 5, 12, 14. — Very rarely sing.:

    ut bona mens suis omnibus fuerit. Si quem libido abripuit, illorum eum, cum quibus conjuravit, non suum judicet esse,

    Liv. 39, 16, 5.—
    (β).
    Irregular use (acc. to I. D.): sui = ejus amici, etc. (freq.;

    the absolute use of ejus in this sense being inadmissible): quasi vero quisquam dormiat? ne sui quidem hoc velint, non modo ipse (sui = ejus amici, liberi),

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 38, 92:

    is (annus) ejus omnem spem... morte pervertit. Fuit hoc luctuosum suis, acerbum patriae, etc.,

    id. Or. 3, 2, 8:

    quadrigas, quia per suos ( = ipsius milites) agendae erant, in prima acie locaverat rex,

    Liv. 37, 41, 8:

    auctoritatem Pisistrati qui inter suos ( = ejus cives) maxima erat,

    id. 37, 12:

    quo cum multitudine adversariorum sui superarentur, ipse fuit superior, etc.,

    Nep. Hann. 8, 4; v. g.—
    (γ).
    Without antecedent (cf. I. B. supra): quoties necesse est fallere aut falli a suis, by one ' s friends, Sen. Phoen. 493.—
    (δ).
    Sing.: sŭa, suae. f., a sweetheart, mistress (rare): illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit. Cic. Phil. 2, 28. 69:

    cedo quid hic faciet sua?

    Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 92.—
    2.
    sŭum, i, n., and more freq. sŭa, suorum, n. plur., = one ' s property.
    a.
    Sing.
    (α).
    Lit.:

    nec suom adimerem alteri,

    his property, his own, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 38 (34):

    nunc si ille salvos revenit, reddam suom sibi (v. D. 3. a. infra),

    id. ib. 1, 2, 119:

    illum studeo quam facillime ad suum pervenire,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 26, 4:

    populi Romani hanc esse consuetudinem ut socios sui nihil deperdere velit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43; cf. Cic. Rab. Post. 11, 3, I. A. 11. supra:

    nec donare illi de suo dicimur,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 4, 2; so esp. with quisque; v. infra — Hence, de suo = per se, or sua sponte;

    (stellae) quae per igneos tractus labentia inde splendorem trahant caloremque, non de suo clara,

    Sen. Q. N. 7, 1, 6. —
    (β).
    Trop.:

    meum mihi placebat, illi suum (of a literary essay),

    Cic. Att. 14, 20, 3: suom quemque decet, his own manners, etc., Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 11; so, expendere oportet quid quisque habeat sui ( what peculiarities) nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant;

    id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 113.—
    (γ).
    Jurid. term: aliquid pro suo possidere, to possess in the belief of one ' s legal right:

    pro suo possessio tale est, cum dominium nobis acquiri putamus. Et ea causa possidemus ex qua acquiritur, et praeterea pro suo,

    Dig. 41, 10, 1;

    so without an antecedent, and referring to a first person: item re donata, pro donato et pro suo possideo,

    ib. 41, 10, 1; v. the whole tit. ib. 42, 10 (Pro suo); cf. ib. 23, 3, 67; cf. C., infra fin.;

    similarly: usucapere pro suo = acquire dominion by a possession pro suo, Fragm. Vat. 111: res pro suo, quod justam causam possidendi habet, usucapit,

    id. ib. 260; Dig. 41, 3, 27. —
    b.
    Plur.
    (α).
    One ' s property:

    Roscius tibi omnia sua praeter animam tradidit,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 50, 146:

    qui etiam hostibus externis victis sua saepissime reddiderunt,

    id. Agr. 1, 6, 19:

    tu autem vicinis tuis Massiliensibus sua reddis,

    id. Att. 14, 14, 6:

    Remi legatos miserunt qui dicerent se suaque omnia in fidem atque potestatem populi Romani permittere,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 3, 2; 1, 11, 2; 2, 13, 2:

    ipsi milites alveos informes quibus se suaque transveherent, faciebant,

    their baggage, Liv. 21, 26, 9:

    docere eos qui sua permisere fortunae,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, praef. 7; so without an antecedent, one ' s own property (cf. I. B. 2. supra):

    hanc ob causam maxime ut sua tenerentur res publicae constitutae sunt,

    Cic. Off. 2, 21, 73;

    rarely = eorum res: quod vero etiam sua reddiderint (i.e. Gallis),

    Liv. 39, 55, 3. —
    (β).
    One ' s own affairs:

    aliena ut melius videant et dijudicent Quam sua,

    Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 96:

    cognoscunt... immobile agmen et sua quemque molientem,

    Liv. 10, 20, 8:

    omnia ei hostium non secus quam sua nota erant,

    id. 22, 41, 5:

    aliena cum suis perdidit,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 16, 3.— Absol., referring to a noun fem.: sua (finxit) C. Cassius ( = suas persuasiones; cf.

    the context),

    Quint. 6, 3, 90.
    B.
    Predicative uses: suum esse, facere, fieri, putare, etc., like a gen. poss., to be, etc., the property, or under the dominion, control, power of the antecedent.
    1.
    Of property in things.
    (α).
    Corporeal:

    scripsit causam dicere Prius aurum quare sit suum,

    Ter. Eun. prol. 11:

    nihil erat cujusquam quod non hoc anno suum fore putabat (Clodius),

    Cic. Mil. 32, 87:

    quia suum cujusque fit, eorum quae natura fuerant communia quod cuique obtigit, id quisque teneat,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 21:

    Juba suam esse praedicans praedam,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84:

    gratum sibi populum facturum, si omnes res Neapolitanorum suas duxissent,

    Liv. 22, 32, 8: libros esse dicimus Ciceronis;

    eosdem Dorus librarius suos vocat,

    Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 1:

    cum enim istarum personarum nihil suum esse possit,

    since these persons can own nothing, Gai. Inst. 2, 96; cf. Dig. 1, 7, 15 pr.—Virtually predicative:

    referas ad eos qui suam rem nullam habent ( = rem quae sua sit),

    nothing of their own, Cic. Phil. 2, 6, 15:

    qui in potestate nostra est, nihil suum habere potest,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 84. — ( b) Of literary works:

    quae convenere in Andriam ex Perinthia Fatetur transtulisse, atque usum pro suis ( = quasi sua essent),

    Ter. And. prol. 14:

    potest autem... quae tum audiet... ingenue pro suis dicere,

    his own thoughts, Quint. 12, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of a country or people:

    suum facere = suae dicionis facere: commemorat ut (Caesar) magnam partem Italiae beneficio atque auctoritate eorum suam fecerit,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 32:

    in quam (Asiam) jam ex parte suam fecerit,

    Liv. 44, 24, 4:

    crudelissima ac superbissima gens sua omnia suique arbitrii facit,

    id. 21, 44, 5.—
    (δ).
    Trop.:

    omnia sua putavit quae vos vestra esse velletis,

    Cic. Phil. 11, 12, 27:

    non meminit, illum exercitum senatus populique Romani esse, non suum,

    id. ib. 13, 6, 4: [p. 1826] probavit, non rempublicam suam esse, sed se reipublicae, Sen. Clem. 1, 19, 8;

    so of incorporeal things: hi si velint scire quam brevis eorum vita sit, cogitent ex quota parte sua sit,

    how much of it is their own, id. Brev. Vit. 19, 3; so, suum facere, to appropriate:

    prudentis est, id quod in quoque optimum est, si possit, suum facere,

    Quint. 10, 2, 26:

    quaeremus quomodo animus (hanc virtutem) usu suam faciat,

    Sen. Clem. 1, 3, 1.—
    2.
    Of persons.
    (α).
    Under a master ' s or father ' s control:

    ut lege caverent, ne quis quem civitatis mutandae causa suum faceret, neve alienaret,

    make any one his slave, Liv. 41, 8, 12: quid eam tum? suamne esse ajebat, his daughter, i.e. in his power? Ter. And. 5, 4, 29:

    eduxit mater pro sua ( = quasi sua esset),

    id. Eun. 1, 2, 76.—
    (β).
    Reflexively = sui juris, independent, one ' s own master or mistress, not subject to another ' s control, under one ' s own control (v. sui juris, infra):

    ancilla, quae mea fuit hodie, sua nunc est,

    Plaut. Pers. 4, 3, 3.—
    (γ).
    Of moral power over others: suus = devoted to one:

    hice hoc munere arbitrantur Suam Thaidem esse,

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 38:

    eos hic fecit suos Paulo sumptu,

    id. Ad. 5, 4, 21:

    sed istunc exora, ut (mulierem) suam esse adsimulet,

    to be friendly to him, id. Heaut. 2, 3, 117:

    cum Antonio sic agens ut perspiciat, si in eo negotio nobis satisfecerit, totum me futurum suum,

    Cic. Att. 14, 1 a, 2:

    Alpheus... utebatur populo sane suo,

    devoted to him, id. Quint. 7, 29.— Poet.: vota suos habuere deos, the vows (inst. of the persons uttering them) had the gods on their side, Ov. M. 4, 373. —
    (δ).
    Of power over one's self, etc.:

    nam qui sciet ubi quidque positum sit, quaque eo veniat, is poterit eruere, semperque esse in disputando suus,

    self-possessed, Cic. Fin. 4, 4, 10:

    inaestimabile bonum est suum fieri,

    selfcontrol, Sen. Ep. 75, 18:

    (furiosus) qui suus non est,

    Dig. 42, 4, 7, § 9:

    vix sua, vix sanae virgo Niseia compos Mentis erat,

    Ov. M. 8, 35. —
    3.
    Suum est, as impers. predicate: = ejus est, characteristic of, peculiar to one (very rare):

    dixit antea, sed suum illud est, nihil ut affirmet,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 42, 99.
    C.
    Attributive usages, almost always (except in Seneca) with suus before its noun.
    1.
    The property, relations, affairs, etc., of one opposed to those of another, own.
    a.
    Opposition expressed:

    nihil de suo casu, multa de vestro querebatur,

    Cic. Balb. 8, 21:

    sua sibi propiora pericula quam mea loquebantur,

    id. Sest. 18, 40:

    suasque et imperatoris laudes canentes,

    Liv. 45, 38, 12:

    damnatione collegae et sua,

    id. 22, 35, 3:

    Senecae fratris morte pavidum et pro sua incolumitate pavidum,

    Tac. A. 14, 73:

    velut pro Vitellio conquerentes suum dolorem proferebant,

    id. H. 3, 37;

    opp. alienus: ut suo potius tempore mercatorem admitterent, quam celerius alieno,

    at a time convenient to themselves, Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 11. —Without antecedent, opp. externus:

    (Platoni) duo placet esse motus, unum suum, alterum externum, esse autem divinius quod ipsum ex se sua sponte moveatur, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 12, 32. —
    b.
    Implied:

    voluptatem suis se finibus tenere jubeamus,

    within the limits assigned to it, Cic. Fin. 3, 1, 1:

    cum vobis immortale monumentum suis paene manibus senatus... exstruxerit,

    id. Phil. 14, 12, 33:

    superiores (amnes) in Italia, hic (Rhodanus) trans Alpes, hospitales suas tantum, nec largiores quam intulere aquas vehentes,

    Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 224: colligitur aqua ex imbribus;

    ex suo fonte nativa est,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 3:

    pennas ambo non habuere suas (non suas = alienas),

    Ov. Tr. 3, 4, 24. —
    c.
    In particular phrases. ( a) Sua sponte and suo Marte, of one ' s own accord, by one ' s self, without the suggestion, influence, aid, etc., of others:

    Caesar bellum contra Antonium sua sponte suscepit,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 2, 5:

    sua sponte ad Caesarem in jus adierunt,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 87.—So of things, = per se, by or of itself, for itself, for its own sake:

    jus et omne honestum sua sponte expetendum (cf. in the context: per se igitur jus est expetendum),

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 48: justitium sua sponte inceptum priusquam indiceretur, by itself, i. e. without a decree, Liv. 9, 7, 8; so,

    sortes sua sponte attenuatas,

    id. 22, 1, 11 (cf. id. 22, 38, 13; 35, 14, 4, I. A. 2., supra): rex enim ipse, sua sponte, nullis commentariis Caesaris, simul atque audivit ejus interitum suo Marte res suas recuperavit, Cic. Phil. 2, 37, 95.—
    (β).
    Suus locus, in milit. lang., one ' s own ground, position, or lines:

    restitit suo loco Romana acies (opp. to the advance of the enemy),

    Liv. 22, 16, 2.—So figuratively:

    et staturas suo loco leges,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2:

    aciem instruxit primum suis locis, pauloque a castris Pompeji longius,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 84 (cf.: suo loco, 7. b. g, infra).—
    (γ).
    For suo jure v. 3. infra.—
    (δ).
    Sua Venus = one's own Venus, i. e. good luck (v. Venus): ille non est mihi par virtutibus, nec officiis;

    sed habuit suam Venerem,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 28, 2. —
    2.
    Of private relations (opp. to public):

    ut in suis rebus, ita in re publica luxuriosus nepos,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 18, 48:

    deinde ut communibus pro communibus utatur, privatis ut suis,

    id. Off. 1, 7, 20:

    quod oppidum Labienus sua pecunia exaedificaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 15:

    militibus agros ex suis possessionibus pollicetur,

    i. e. his private property, id. ib. 1, 17; Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 3. —
    3.
    Of just rights or claims:

    imperatori senatuique honos suus redditus,

    due to them, Liv. 3, 10, 3:

    neque inpedimento fuit, quominus religionibus suus tenor suaque observatio redderetur,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 8:

    quibus omnibus debetur suus decor,

    Quint. 11, 1, 41. —

    So distributively: is mensibus suis dimisit legionem,

    in the month in which each soldier was entitled to his discharge, Liv. 40, 41, 8. — Esp.: suo jure (so, meo, nostro, tuo, etc., jure), by his own right:

    Tullus Hostilius qui suo jure in porta nomen inscripsit,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 12, 26:

    earum rerum hic A. Licinius fructum a me repetere prope suo jure debet,

    id. Arch. 1, 1; id. Marcell. 2, 6; id. Phil. 2, 25, 62; id. Balb. 8, 21:

    numquam illum res publica suo jure esset ulta,

    by its unquestionable right, id. Mil. 33, 88. —
    4.
    Of that to which one is exclusively devoted:

    huic quaestioni suum diem dabimus,

    a day for its exclusive discussion, Sen. Ep. 94, 52:

    homini autem suum bonum ratio est,

    his exclusive good, id. ib. 76, 10:

    in majorem me quaestionem vocas, cui suus locus, suus dies dandus est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 46, 1. —

    With proprius: mentio inlata apud senatum est, rem suo proprio magistratu egere,

    that the business needed a particular officer exclusively for itself, Liv. 4, 8, 4:

    et Hannibalem suo proprio occupandum bello,

    id. 27, 38, 7; cf.:

    dissupasset hostes, ni suo proprio eum proelio equites Volscorum exceptum tenuissent,

    in which they alone fought, id. 3, 70, 4:

    mare habet suas venas quibus impletur,

    by which it alone is fed, Sen. Q. N. 3, 14, 3. —
    5.
    According to one ' s liking, of one ' s own choice.
    a.
    Of persons, devoted to one, friendly, dear:

    Milone occiso (Clodius) habuisset suos consules,

    after his own heart, Cic. Mil. 33, 89:

    collegit ipse se contra suum Clodium,

    his dear Clodius, id. Pis. 12, 27 (cf.: suum facere, habere, II. B. 2. g).—
    b.
    Of things, favorable.
    (α).
    Of place: neque Jugurtham nisi... suo loco pugnam facere, on his own ground, i. e. chosen by him, favorable, Sall. J. 61, 1:

    hic magna auxilia expectabant et suis locis bellum in hiemem ducere cogitabant,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 61; cf.:

    numquam nostris locis laboravimus,

    Liv. 9, 19, 15.—
    (β).
    Of time:

    cum Perseus suo maxime tempore et alieno hostibus incipere bellum posset,

    Liv. 42, 43, 3; v. 7. b, infra. —
    c.
    Of circumstances: sua occasio, a favorable opportunity; sometimes without antecedent:

    neque occasioni tuae desis, neque suam occasionem hosti des,

    Liv. 22, 39, 21:

    tantum abfuit ut ex incommodo alieno sua occasio peteretur,

    id. 4, 58, 2:

    aestuque suo Locros trajecit,

    a favorable tide, id. 23, 41, 11:

    ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est,

    Sen. Ep. 71, 3:

    orba suis essent etiamnunc lintea ventis,

    Ov. M. 13, 195:

    aut ille Ventis iturus non suis,

    Hor. Epod. 9, 30. —
    6.
    Of persons or things, peculiar, particular:

    quae est ei (animo) natura? Propria, puto, et sua,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 29, 70:

    omnis enim motus animi suum quendam a natura habet vultum,

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 316:

    geometrae et musici... more quodam loquuntur suo. Ipsae rhetorum artes verbis in docendo quasi privatis utuntur ac suis,

    id. Fin. 3, 1, 4:

    sensus omnis habet suum finem,

    its peculiar limits, Quint. 9, 4, 61: animus cum suum ambitum complevit et finibus se suis cinxit, consummatum est summum bonum, Sen. Vit. Beat. 9, 3: est etiam in nominibus ( nouns) diverso collocatis sua gratia, their peculiar elegance, Quint. 9, 3, 86:

    ibi non bello aperto, sed suis artibus, fraude et insidiis, est paene circumventus,

    Liv. 21, 34, 1:

    nec Hannibalem fefellit, suis se artibus peti,

    id. 22, 16, 5:

    adversus hostem non virtute tantum, sed suis (i. e. hostis) etiam pugnare consiliis oportebat,

    Flor. 2, 6, 26:

    liberam Minucii temeritatem se suo modo expleturum,

    Liv. 22, 28, 2:

    equites ovantes sui moris carmine,

    id. 10, 26, 11:

    exsultans cum sui moris tripudiis,

    id. 21, 42, 3:

    tripudiantes suo more,

    id. 23, 26, 9.—So, suo Marte, referring to the style of fighting peculiar to the different arms:

    equitem suo alienoque Marte pugnare,

    that the cavalry were fighting both in their own style and in that of the other arms, Liv. 3, 62, 9; cf.: suo Marte, 1, c. a, supra.—And distributively ( = suus quisque):

    suos autem haec operum genera ut auctores, sic etiam amatores habent,

    Quint. 12, 10, 2:

    illa vero fatidica fulmina ex alto et ex suis venire sideribus,

    Plin. 2, 43, 43, § 113; cf.:

    quae quidem planiora suis exemplis reddentur,

    Val. Max. 3, 4 prooem.—
    7.
    Proper, right.
    a.
    Referring to one's ordinary or normal condition:

    quod certe non fecisset, si suum numerum naves habuissent,

    their regular complement, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 51, § 133. — So poet.:

    flecte ratem! numerum non habet illa suum,

    its full number, Ov. H. 10, 36:

    novus exercitus consulibus est decretus: binae legiones cum suo equitatu,

    Liv. 40, 36, 6:

    cum suo justo equitatu,

    id. 21, 17, 8:

    totam (disciplinam) in suum statum redegit,

    Val. Max. 2, 7, 2:

    tranquilla mente et vultu suo,

    with the ordinary expression of his face, Sen. Clem. 2, 6, 2:

    media pars aeris ab his (ignibus) submota, in frigore suo manet. Natura enim aeris gelida est,

    id. Q. N. 2, 10, 4:

    cornuaque in patriis non sua vidit aquis,

    not natural to her, Ov. H. 14, 90. —

    So, non suus, of ingrafted branches and their fruit: miraturque (arbos) novas frondis et non sua poma,

    Verg. G. 2, 82. —
    b.
    Of time, proper, regular, etc. (cf. 5. b, supra).
    (α).
    The regular time ( = stato tempore):

    signum quod semper tempore exoritur suo,

    Plaut. Rud. prol. 4:

    cum et recte et suo tempore pepererit,

    Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 16: aestas suo tempore incanduit...;

    tam solstitium quam aequinoctium suos dies retulit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 16, 3:

    omnes venti vicibus suis spirant majore ex parte,

    Plin. 2, 47, 48, § 128. —
    (β).
    The right or proper time:

    salictum suo tempore caedito,

    Cato, R. R. 33:

    cessit e vita suo magis quam suorum civium tempore,

    the right time for himself, Cic. Brut. 1, 4; so,

    exstingui homini suo tempore optabile est,

    id. Sen. 23, 85:

    Scandilius dicit se suo tempore rediturum,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 60, § 139:

    si Ardeates sua tempora exspectare velint,

    Liv. 4, 7, 6:

    Chrysippus dicit, illum... opperiri debere suum tempus, ad quod velut dato signo prosiliat,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 25, 3:

    quam multi exercitus tempore suo victorem hostem pepulerunt!

    Liv. 44, 39, 4. — Without antecedent: sed suo tempore totius sceleris hujus fons aperietur. Cic. Phil. 14, 6, 15; cf.:

    de ordine laudis, etc., praecipiemus suo tempore,

    Quint. 2, 4, 21. —
    (γ).
    Suo loco = at the proper place:

    quae erant prudentiae propria suo loco dicta sunt,

    Cic. Off. 1, 40, 143:

    quod reddetur suo loco,

    Quint. 11, 1, 16:

    ut suo loco dicetur,

    Plin. 2, 90, 102, § 221:

    inscripta quae suis locis reddam,

    id. 1, prooem. § 27; Sen. Ben. 2, 20, 2; cf. 1, c. b; 4. supra. —
    (δ).
    Suited, appropriate, adapted to one:

    in eodem fundo suum quidquid conseri oportet,

    Cato, R. R. 7:

    siquidem hanc vendidero pretio suo,

    at a suitable price, Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 30:

    in partes suas digerenda causa,

    Quint. 11, 1, 6:

    confundetur quidquid in suas partes natura digessit,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 29, 8. — Poet.: haec ego dumque queror, lacrimae sua verba sequuntur, Deque meis oculis in tua membra cadunt, appropriate, i. e. tristia, Ov. H. 14, 67.—Without antecedent: suum quidquid genus talearum serito, any fit kind, i. e. suited to the ground, Cato, R. R. 48. —
    8.
    Own, with the notion of independence of, or dependence on others (cf. B. 2. g d).
    a.
    Of political independence: pacem condicionibus his fecerunt ut Capuae suae leges, sui magistratus essent, her own laws, i. e. not subject to Carthage, Liv. 23, 7, 2: liberos [p. 1827] eos ac suis legibus victuros, id. 25, 23, 4. —

    Esp. in the phrases suae potestatis or in sua potestate esse, suo jure uti, sui juris esse: Puteolos, qui nunc in sua potestate sunt, suo jure, libertate aequa utuntur, totos occupabunt,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 31, 86:

    Rhegini potestatis suae ad ultimum remanserunt,

    retained their self-government, Liv. 23, 30, 9:

    urbem ne quam formulae sui juris facerent,

    id. 38, 9, 10. —
    b.
    Of paternal authority.
    (α).
    Free from the power of the paterfamilias; in the phrases sui juris esse, suae potestatis esse, to be independent:

    quaedam personae sui juris sunt, quaedam alieno juri sunt subjectae, Gai,

    Inst. 1, 48:

    sui juris sunt familiarum suarum principes, id est pater familiae, itemque mater familiae,

    Ulp. Fragm. 4, 1:

    liberi parentum potestate liberantur emancipatione. Sed filius quidem ter manumissus sui juris fit, ceteri autem liberi una manumissione sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 1:

    morte patris filius et filia sui juris fiunt,

    id. ib. 10, 2:

    patres familiarum sunt qui sunt suae potestatis,

    Dig. 1, 6, 4:

    si modo defunctus testator suae potestatis mortis tempore fuerit,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 147. —

    With indef. reference: si sui juris sumus,

    Dig. 46, 2, 20; cf.:

    pro suo possideo, 2. a. supra.—Attributively: sui juris arrogatio feminae,

    Cod. Just. 8, 47, 8:

    homo sui juris,

    ib. 10, § 5.— Trop.:

    sapiens numquam semiliber erit: integrae semper libertatis et sui juris,

    Sen. Brev. Vit. 5, 3:

    non illarum coitu fieri cometen, sed proprium et sui juris esse,

    id. Q. N. 7, 12, 2: nullique sunt tam feri et sui juris adfectus, ut non disciplina perdomentur, id. Ira, 2, 12, 3. —
    (β).
    Subject to paternal authority, in the phrases suus heres, sui liberi; suus heres, an heir who had been in the paternal power of the deceased:

    CVI SVVS HERES NON SIT, XII. Tab. fr. 5, 4.—In the jurists without antecedent: sui et necessarii heredes sunt velut filius filiave, nepos neptisve ex filia, deinceps ceteri qui modo in potestate morientis fuerunt,

    Gai. Inst. 2, 156:

    (emancipati liberi) non sunt sui heredes,

    ib. 2, 135:

    alia facta est juris interpretatio inter suos heredes,

    ib. 3, 15:

    datur patrono adversus suos heredes bonorum possessio (where patrono is not the antecedent of suos),

    ib. 3, 41:

    sui heredes vel instituendi sunt vel exheredandi,

    Ulp. Fragm. 22, 14:

    accrescunt suis quidem heredibus in partem virilem, extraneis autem in partem dimidiam,

    id. ib. 22, 17. —

    Sui liberi, children in paternal power: de suis et legitimis liberis,

    Cod. Just. 6, 55 inscr.
    D.
    In particular connections.
    1.
    With ipse, his own, etc. (cf. Zumpt, Gram. § 696).
    a.
    Ipse agreeing with the antecedent of suus, the antecedent being,
    (α).
    A subjectnom.:

    (ingenium ejus) valet ipsum suis viribus,

    by its own strength, Cic. Cael. 19, 45:

    legio Martia non ipsa suis decretis hostem judicavit Antonium?

    by its own resolutions, id. Phil. 4, 2, 5:

    ruit ipse suis cladibus,

    id. ib. 14, 3, 8:

    si ex scriptis cognosci ipsi suis potuissent,

    id. de Or. 2, 2, 8:

    qui se ipse sua gravitate et castimonia defenderet,

    id. Cael. 5, 11:

    quod ipse suae civitatis imperium obtenturus esset,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 3:

    suamet ipsae fraude omnes interierunt,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9; 39, 49, 3:

    ut saeviret ipse in suum sanguinem effecerunt,

    id. 40, 5, 1:

    respicerent suum ipsi exercitum,

    id. 42, 52, 10; 21, 31, 12; 22, 38, 3; 6, 19, 6.—
    (β).
    A subject-acc.:

    sunt qui dicant eam sua ipsam peremptam mercede,

    Liv. 1, 11, 9:

    (tribuniciam potestatem) suis ipsam viribus dissolvi,

    id. 2, 44, 2.—
    (γ).
    An object in dat. or acc.:

    sic ut ipsis consistendi in suis munitionibus locus non esset,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 6:

    tribuni (hostem) intra suamet ipsum moenia compulere,

    Liv. 6, 36, 4:

    alios sua ipsos invidia opportunos interemit,

    id. 1, 54, 8; 22, 14, 13.—Suus as adjunct of subject (rare):

    aliquando sua praesidia in ipsos consurrexerunt,

    their own garrisons revolted against them, Sen. Clem. 1, 26, 1.—
    b.
    With gen. of ipse, strengthening the possessive notion (cf. 4.;

    post-Aug. and very rare, but freq. in modern Lat.): aves (foetus suos) libero caelo suaeque ipsorum fiduciae permittunt,

    Quint. 2, 6, 7 (but tuus ipsius occurs in Cic.:

    tuo ipsius studio,

    Cic. Mur. 4, 9:

    tuam ipsius amicitiam,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 4, § 7).—
    c.
    Both suus and ipse agreeing with the governing noun (very rare; not in Cic. or Caes.): quae tamen in ipso cursu suo dissipata est (= ipsa in cursu suo), in its very course, Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 3 dub.:

    suamet ipsa scelera,

    Sall. C. 23, 2 (Dietsch ex conj. ipse):

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    Liv. 2, 19, 5 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. ipsi):

    a suismet ipsis praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6 MSS. (Weissenb. ipsi).—
    2.
    With quisque, distributively, each ( every one)... his own; in prose quisque is generally preceded by suus.
    a.
    Quisque and suus in different cases.
    (α).
    Quisque as subjectnom.:

    sentit enim vim quisque suam quoad possit abuti,

    Lucr. 5, 1033:

    suo quisque loco cubet,

    Cato, R. R. 5:

    suum quisque noscat ingenium,

    Cic. Off. 1, 31, 114:

    ad suam quisque (me disciplinam) rapiet,

    id. Ac. 2, 36, 114:

    quod suos quisque servos in tali re facere voluisset,

    id. Mil. 10, 29:

    cum suo quisque auxilio uteretur,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 51:

    celeriter ad suos quisque ordines redit,

    id. ib. 3, 37.—In apposition with plur. subj. (freq. in Liv.):

    nunc alii sensus quo pacto quisque suam rem Sentiat,

    Lucr. 4, 522:

    ut omnes cives Romani in suis quisque centuriis prima luce adessent,

    that all the Roman citizens should be present, each in his own centuria, Liv. 1, 44, 1:

    hinc senatus, hinc plebs, suum quisque intuentes ducem constiterant,

    id. 6, 15, 3:

    ut (trigemini) pro sua quisque patria dimicent,

    id. 1, 24, 2:

    stabant compositi suis quisque ordinibus,

    id. 44, 38, 11:

    (consules) in suas quisque provincias proficiscuntur,

    id. 25, 12, 2; 25, 26, 13:

    in suo quaeque (stella) motu naturam suam exercent,

    Plin. 2, 39, 39, § 106.—With abl. absol.:

    omnes, velut dis auctoribus in spem suam quisque acceptis, proelium una voce poscunt,

    Liv. 21, 45, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    relictis suis quisque stationibus... concurrerunt,

    id. 32, 24, 4; 4, 44, 10; 39, 49, 3; 2, 38, 6.—
    (β).
    With acc. of quisque as subj.:

    fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae, App. Claud. ap. Ps.-Sall. Ep. ad Caes. Rep. c. l.: sui quemque juris et retinendi et dimittendi esse dominum,

    Cic. Balb. 13, 31:

    recipere se in domos suas quemque jussit,

    Liv. 25, 10, 9; and (ungrammatically) nom., as apposition to a subj.-acc.:

    se non modo suam quisque patriam, sed totam Siciliam relicturos,

    id. 26, 29, 3 MSS. (Weissenb. ex conj. quosque).—
    (γ).
    As adjunct of the subject-nom., with a case of quisque as object, attribut. gen., etc.:

    sua cujusque animantis natura est,

    Cic. Fin. 5, 9, 25:

    sua quemque fraus, suum facinus, suum scelus, etc., de sanitate ac mente deturbat,

    id. Pis. 20, 46:

    sua quemque fraus et suus terror maxime vexat,

    id. Rosc. Am. 24, 67:

    suum cuique incommodum ferendum est,

    id. Off. 3, 6, 30:

    ut solidum suum cuique solvatur,

    id. Rab. Post. 17, 46:

    ne suus cuique domi hostis esset,

    Liv. 3, 16, 3:

    ut sua cuique respublica in manu esset,

    id. 26, 8, 11:

    animus suus cuique ordinem pugnandi dabat,

    id. 22, 5, 8:

    tentorium suum cuique militi domus ac penates sunt,

    id. 44, 39, 5:

    suus cuique (stellae) color est,

    Plin. 2, 18, 16, § 79:

    trahit sua quemque voluptas,

    Verg. E. 2, 65:

    stat sua cuique dies,

    id. A. 10, 467.—
    (δ).
    As predicate-nom. (v. II. B.):

    opinionem, quae sua cuique conjectanti esse potest,

    Liv. 6, 12, 3.—
    (ε).
    As adjunct of subj.-acc.:

    suum cuique honorem et gradum redditum gaudeo,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 136:

    scientiam autem suam cujusque artis esse,

    id. Fin. 5, 9, 26.—
    (ζ).
    As adjunct of an object, with a case of quisque as object or attribut. gen.: suam cuique sponsam, mihi meam: suum cuique amorem, mihi meum, Atil. Fragm. inc. 1: suom cuique per me uti atque frui licet, Cato ap. Gell. 13, 24 (23), 1:

    ut suo quemque appellem nomine,

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 52:

    placet Stoicis suo quamque rem nomine appellare,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 22, 1:

    ad suam cujusque naturam consilium est omne revocandum,

    id. Off. 1, 33, 119:

    justitia quae suum cuique distribuit,

    id. N. D. 3, 15, 38:

    in tribuendo suum cuique,

    id. Off. 1, 5, 14:

    Turnus sui cuique periculi recens erat documentum,

    Liv. 1, 52, 4:

    in trimatu suo cuique dimidiam esse mensuram futurae certum esse,

    Plin. 7, 15, 16, § 73:

    certa cuique rerum suarum possessio,

    Vell. 2, 89, 4; cf.: qua re suum unicuique studium suaque omnibus delectatio relinquatur, Ps.-Cic. Cons. 26, 93.—With quemque in apposition with acc. plur.:

    Camillus vidit intentos opifices suo quemque operi,

    Liv. 6, 25, 9; so cujusque in appos. with gen. plur.: trium clarissimorum suae cujusque gentis virorum mors, id. 39, 52, 7; and cuique with dat. plur.: sui cuique mores fingunt fortunam hominibus, Poet. ap. Nep. Att. 11, 6 (where Lachm. ad Lucr. 2, 372, reads quique, ex conj.; cf. b. b, infra).—
    b.
    Attraction of suus and quisque as adjuncts of nouns.
    (α).
    Attraction of suus:

    ut nemo sit nostrum quin in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium requirat acrius (= suum cujusque generis judicium),

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    quas tamen inter omnes (voces) est suo quoque in genere (vox) mediocris ( = inter omnes voces est mediocris vox, sua quoque in genere),

    id. de Or. 3, 57, 216:

    eo concilia suae cujusque regionis indici jussit (= sua cujusque regionis concilia),

    Liv. 45, 29, 10:

    equites suae cuique parti post principia collocat (= equites suos cuique parti),

    id. 3, 22, 6:

    cum motibus armorum et corporum suae cuique genti assuetis,

    id. 25, 17, 5:

    legiones deducebantur cum tribunis et centurionibus et sui cujusque ordinis militibus (= suis cujusque),

    Tac. A. 14, 27:

    quae sui cujusque sunt ingenii,

    Quint. 7, 10, 10 Halm (al. sua):

    sui cujusque ingenii poma vel semina gerunt (= sua cujusque),

    Col. 3, 1;

    and by a double attraction: has (cohortes) subsidiariae ternae et aliae totidem suae cujusque legionis subsequebantur (= has cohortes... totidem cujusque legionis, suam quaeque legionem, subsequebantur),

    Caes. B. C. 1, 83. —
    (β).
    Attraction of quisque:

    tanta ibi copia venustatum in suo quique loco sita,

    Plaut. Poen. 5, 4, 6 (al. quaeque):

    quodvis frumentum non tamen omne Quique suo genere inter se simile esse videbis,

    Lucr. 2, 372 Lachm. and Munro ad loc.:

    cum verba debeant sui cujusque generis copulari,

    Varr. L. L. 10, 48:

    in sensibus sui cujusque generis judicium,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 7, 19:

    haec igitur proclivitas ad suum quodque genus aegrotatio dicatur,

    id. Tusc. 4, 12, 28:

    separatim greges sui cujusque generis nocte remeabant (= greges sui quisque generis),

    Liv. 24, 3, 5:

    ut sui cujusque mensis acciperet (frumentum),

    Suet. Aug. 40;

    and quisque both attracted and in its own case: quia cujusque partis naturae et in corpore et in animo sua quaeque vis sit (where either cujusque or quaeque is redundant),

    Cic. Fin. 5, 17, 46; v. Madv. ad loc.; Cato, R. R. 23 fin.;

    so esp. in the phrases suo quoque tempore, anno, die, loco, etc.: pecunia, quae in stipendium Romanis suo quoque anno penderetur, deerat (= suo quaeque anno),

    each instalment in the year when due, Liv. 33, 46, 9 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    suo quoque loco,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 7, 2; 1, 22, 6:

    opera quae suis quibusque temporibus anni vilicum exsequi oporteret,

    Col. 11, 3:

    suo quoque tempore,

    Vitr. 2, 9, 4:

    nisi sua quaque die usurae exsolverentur (= sua quaeque die),

    Dig. 22, 1, 12 init.; 13, 7, 8, § 3:

    ut opera rustica suo quoque tempore faciat,

    ib. 19, 2, 25, § 3 (al. quaeque)—
    c.
    In the order quisque... suus.
    (α).
    In relative clauses, comparative clauses with ut, and interrogative clauses introduced by quid, etc., where quisque immediately follows the relative, etc.:

    ut quisque suom volt esse, ita est,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 45; cf.

    with sibi,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 18, 49; id. Lael. 9, 30:

    expendere oportere quid quisque habeat sui... nec velle experiri quam se aliena deceant. Id enim maxime quemque decet quod est cujusque maxime suum,

    id. Off. 1, 31, 113:

    neque solum quid in senatu quisque civitatis suae dicerent ignorabant, sed, etc.,

    Liv. 32, 19, 9:

    gratius id fore laetiusque quod quisque sua manu ex hoste captum rettulerit,

    id. 5, 20, 8; 6, 25, 10; cf.:

    in quibus cum multa sint quae sua quisque dicere velit, nihil est quod quisque suum possit dicere,

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 23, 1.—
    (β).
    If the emphasis is not on suus, but (for quisque, when emphatic, unusquisque is used) on some other word:

    in civitates quemque suas... dimisit,

    Liv. 21, 48, 2:

    in patriam quisque suam remissus est,

    Just. 33, 2, 8:

    in vestigio quemque suo vidit,

    Liv. 28, 22, 15; cf.:

    hospitibus quisque suis scribebant,

    id. 33, 45, 6:

    pro facultatibus quisque suis,

    id. 42, 53, 3; cf.:

    respiciendae sunt cuique facultates suae,

    Sen. Ben. 2, 15, 3:

    praecipitat quisque vitam suam et futuri desiderio laborat,

    id. Brev. Vit. 7, 5; id. Ben. 7, 5, 1:

    tunc praeceps quisque se proripit et penates suos deserit,

    id. Q. N. 6, 1, 5; 5, 18, 8:

    summum quisque causae suae judicem facit,

    Plin. 1, prooem. § 10: aestimatione nocturnae [p. 1828] quietis, dimidio quisque spatio vitae suae vivit, id. 7, 50, 51, § 167.—
    (γ).
    Poets adopt the order quisque suus when the metre requires it, Verg. A. 6, 743:

    oscula quisque suae matri tulerunt,

    Ov. F. 2, 715. —
    (δ).
    When suus and quisque belong to different clauses:

    atque earum quaeque, suum tenens munus... manet in lege naturae,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 13, 38. —
    d.
    Suus uterque, or uterque suus, distributively of two subjects:

    suas uterque legiones reducit in castra,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 40; 2, 28:

    ideo quod uterque suam legem confirmare debebit,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 49, 142:

    cum sui utrosque adhortarentur,

    Liv. 1, 25, 1:

    ad utrumque ducem sui redierunt,

    id. 21, 29, 5:

    utraque (lex) sua via it,

    Sen. Ben. 6, 6, 1; cf.

    uterque, in apposit.: nec ipsi tam inter se acriter contenderunt, quam studia excitaverant uterque sui corporis hominum,

    Liv. 26, 48, 6.—
    3.
    With sibi.
    (α).
    Sibi with pronom. force (cf. sui, IV. C. fin.):

    reddam suum sibi,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 119 ( = ei; but referred to b, infra, by Brix ad loc.); cf.:

    suam rem sibi salvam sistam,

    id. Poen. 5, 2, 123:

    idem lege sibi sua curationem petet,

    for himself, Cic. Agr. 2, 9, 22 (cf. id. Phil. 2, 37, 96;

    I. B. 2. b. supra): ut vindicare sibi suum fulgorem possint,

    Sen. Q. N. 1, 1, 11; cf.

    the formula of divorce: tuas res tibi habeto,

    Dig. 24, 2, 2.—Hence, illam suam suas res sibi habere jussit, Cic. Phil. 2, 28, 69.—
    (β).
    With sibi redundant, to strengthen suus (anteand post-class. and colloq.):

    quo pacto serviat suo sibi patri,

    Plaut. Capt. prol. 5:

    eum necabam ilico per cerebrum pinna sua sibi, quasi turturem,

    id. Poen. 2, 40; v. sui, IV. C. and the passages there cited.—
    4.
    With gen. agreeing with the subject of suus:

    quas cum solus pertulisset ut sua unius in his gratia esset,

    that the credit of it should belong to him alone, Liv. 2, 8, 3:

    qui de sua unius sententia omnia gerat,

    id. 44, 22, 11; cf.:

    unam Aegyptus in hoc spem habet suam,

    Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2.—For suus ipsius, etc., v. D. 1. b. supra.—
    5.
    With demonstr., rel., or indef. pronn. and adjj., of his, hers, etc.:

    postulat ut ad hanc suam praedam adjutores vos profiteamini,

    to this booty of his, Cic. Rosc. Am. 2, 6:

    Sestius cum illo exercitu suo,

    id. Sest. 5, 12:

    qua gravitate sua,

    id. ib. 61, 129:

    suam rem publicam illam defenderunt,

    that republic of theirs, id. ib. 67, 141:

    in istum civem suum,

    against this citizen of theirs, id. Balb. 18, 41:

    cum illo suo pari,

    id. Pis. 8, 18:

    te nulla sua calamitate civitas satiare potest?

    id. Phil. 8, 6, 19:

    dubitatis igitur, quin vos M. Laterensis ad suam spem aliquam delegerit,

    for some hope of his, id. Planc. 16, 39:

    non tam sua ulla spe quam militum impetu tractus,

    by any hope of his, Liv. 25, 21, 5:

    nullo suo merito,

    from no fault of theirs, id. 26, 29, 4:

    ipse arcano cum paucis familiaribus suis colloquitur,

    with a few of his friends, Caes. B. C. 1, 19.—
    6.
    With descriptive adjj.
    (α).
    Standing before the adj. and noun (so most freq.):

    suorum improbissimorum sermonum domicilium,

    Cic. Pis. 31, 76:

    causam sui dementissimi consilii,

    id. Phil. 2, 22, 53:

    suam insatiabilem crudelitatem,

    id. ib. 11, 3, 8:

    suis amplissimis fortunis,

    id. ib. 13, 8, 16:

    suum pristinum morem,

    id. Pis. 12, 27:

    suis lenissimis postulatis,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 5: simili ratione Pompeius in suis veteribus castris consedit (suis emphatic; cf. b, infra), id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (β).
    Between the adj. and noun (less emphatic):

    pro eximiis suis beneficiis,

    Cic. Prov. Cons. 4, 7:

    propter summam suam humanitatem,

    id. Fam. 15, 14, 1:

    ex praeteritis suis officiis,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 60:

    Caesar in veteribus suis castris consedit,

    id. ib. 3, 76.—
    (γ).
    After adj. and noun:

    veterem amicum suum excepit,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 16, 43:

    in illo ardenti tribunatu suo,

    id. Sest. 54, 116.—
    7.
    Objectively for the pers. pron. (rare):

    neque cuiquam mortalium injuriae suae parvae videntur ( = sibi illatae),

    Sall. C. 51, 11; so,

    neglectam ab Scipione et nimis leviter latam suam injuriam ratus,

    Liv. 29, 9, 9:

    ipsae enim leges te a cognitione sua judicio publico reppulerunt ( = a se cognoscendo),

    Cic. Balb. 14, 32:

    suam invidiam tali morte quaesitam ( = quaesitum esse ab eo ut homines se inviderent),

    Tac. A. 3, 16; so,

    nulla sua invidia,

    Cic. Mil. 15, 40.—
    8.
    Abl. fem. sua, with refert or interest, for gen. of the pers. pron.: neminem esse qui quomodo se habeat nihil sua censeat interesse, Cic. Fin. 5, 10, 30:

    si scit sua nihil interesse utrum anima per os, an per jugulum exeat,

    Sen. Ep. 76, 33; v. intersum, III.—
    9.
    Strengthened by the suffix - pte or -met.
    (α).
    By - pte (not used with ipse) affixed to the forms sua, suo, and (ante-class.) suum:

    quom illa osculata esset suumpte amicum,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 4, 38:

    ut terrena suopte nutu et suo pondere in terram ferantur,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 17, 40:

    ferri suopte pondere,

    id. N. D. 1, 25, 69:

    suapte natura,

    id. Fat. 18, 42:

    suapte vi et natura,

    id. ib. 19, 43; id. Fin. 1, 16, 54; 5, 22, 61:

    suopte ingenio,

    Liv. 25, 18; so id. 1, 25, 1; 1, 18, 4:

    suapte manu,

    Cic. Or. 3, 3, 10:

    locus suapte natura infestus,

    Liv. 44, 6, 9; so,

    suapte natura,

    id. 4, 22, 4:

    flumina suapte natura vasta,

    Sen. Q. N. 3, 27, 8; so id. Ben. 4, 17, 2:

    sponte suapte,

    Varr. L. L. 6, 7, § 70.—
    (β).
    With - met, almost always followed by ipse (in all forms of suus except suus, suum, suae, and suorum):

    suomet ipsi more,

    Sall. J. 31, 6:

    suomet ipsi instrumento,

    Liv. 22, 14, 13:

    suomet ipsi metu,

    Tac. H. 3, 16 fin.:

    suamet ipsum pecunia,

    Sall. J. 8, 2:

    suamet ipsae fraude,

    Liv. 8, 18, 9:

    intra suamet ipsum moenia,

    id. 6, 36, 4:

    suismet ipsi praesidiis,

    id. 8, 25, 6:

    suismet ipsis corporibus,

    id. 2, 19, 5:

    suosmet ipsi cives,

    id. 2, 9, 5:

    suasmet ipse spes,

    Tac. A. 3, 66 fin. —Without ipse:

    populum suimet sanguinis mercede,

    Sall. H. Fragm. 1, 41, 25 Dietsch:

    magna pars suismet aut proxumorum telis obtruncabantur,

    id. ib. 2, 52 ib.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > suus

  • 17 ā

       ā    (before consonants), ab (before vowels, h, and some consonants, esp. l, n, r, s), abs (usu. only before t and q, esp. freq. before the pron. te), old af, praep. with abl., denoting separation or departure (opp. ad).    I. Lit., in space, from, away from, out of.    A. With motion: ab urbe proficisci, Cs.: a supero mari Flaminia (est via), leads: Nunc quidem paululum, inquit, a sole, a little out of the sun: usque a mari supero Romam proficisci, all the way from; with names of cities and small islands, or with domo, home (for the simple abl; of motion, away from, not out of, a place); hence, of raising a siege, of the march of soldiers, the setting out of a fleet, etc.: oppidum ab Aeneā fugiente a Troiā conditum: ab Alesiā, Cs.: profectus ab Orico cum classe, Cs.; with names of persons or with pronouns: cum a vobis discessero: videat forte hic te a patre aliquis exiens, i. e. from his house, T.; (praegn.): a rege munera repudiare, from, sent by, N.—    B. Without motion.    1. Of separation or distance: abesse a domo paulisper maluit: tum Brutus ab Romā aberat, S.: hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat, Cs.: a foro longe abesse: procul a castris hostes in collibus constiterunt, Cs.: cum esset bellum tam prope a Siciliā; so with numerals to express distance: ex eo loco ab milibus passuum octo, eight miles distant, Cs.: ab milibus passuum minus duobus castra posuerunt, less than two miles off, Cs.; so rarely with substantives: quod tanta machinatio ab tanto spatio instrueretur, so far away, Cs.—    2. To denote a side or direction, etc., at, on, in: ab sinistrā parte nudatis castris, on the left, Cs.: ab eā parte, quā, etc., on that side, S.: Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequanis flumen Rhenum, on the side of the Sequani, i. e. their country, Cs.: ab decumanā portā castra munita, at the main entrance, Cs.: crepuit hinc a Glycerio ostium, of the house of G., T.: (cornua) ab labris argento circumcludunt, on the edges, Cs.; hence, a fronte, in the van; a latere, on the flank; a tergo, in the rear, behind; a dextro cornu, on the right wing; a medio spatio, half way.—    II. Fig.    A. Of time.    1. Of a point of time, after: Caesar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dextrum cornu profectus, immediately after, Cs.: ab eo magistratu, after this office, S.: recens a volnere Dido, fresh from her wound, V.: in Italiam perventum est quinto mense a Carthagine, i. e. after leaving, L.: ab his, i. e. after these words, hereupon, O.: ab simili <*>ade domo profugus, i. e. after and in consequence of, L.—    2. Of a period of time, from, since, after: ab hora tertiā bibebatur, from the third hour: ab Sullā et Pompeio consulibus, since the consulship of: ab incenso Capitolio illum esse vigesumum annum, since, S.: augures omnes usque ab Romulo, since the time of: iam inde ab infelici pugnā ceciderant animi, from (and in consequence of), L.; hence, ab initio, a principio, a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, at first: ab integro, anew, afresh: ab... ad, from (a time)... to: cum ab horā septimā ad vesperum pugnatum sit, Cs.; with nouns or adjectives denoting a time of life: iam inde a pueritiā, T.: a pueritiā: a pueris: iam inde ab incunabulis, L.: a parvo, from a little child, or childhood, L.: ab parvulis, Cs.—    B. In other relations.    1. To denote separation, deterring, intermitting, distinction, difference, etc., from: quo discessum animi a corpore putent esse mortem: propius abesse ab ortu: alter ab illo, next after him, V.: Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus, next in rank to, H.: impotentia animi a temperantiā dissidens: alieno a te animo fuit, estranged; so with adjj. denoting free, strange, pure, etc.: res familiaris casta a cruore civili: purum ab humano cultu solum, L.: (opoidum) vacuum ab defensoribus, Cs.: alqm pudicum servare ab omni facto, etc., II.; with substt.: impunitas ab iudicio: ab armis quies dabatur, L.; or verbs: haec a custodiis loca vacabant, Cs.—    2. To denote the agent, by: qui (Mars) saepe spoliantem iam evertit et perculit ab abiecto, by the agency of: Laudari me abs te, a laudato viro: si quid ei a Caesare gravius accidisset, at Caesar's hands, Cs.: vetus umor ab igne percaluit solis, under, O.: a populo P. imperia perferre, Cs.: equo lassus ab indomito, H.: volgo occidebantur: per quos et a quibus? by whose hands and upon whose orders? factus ab arte decor, artificial, O.: destitutus ab spe, L.; (for the sake of the metre): correptus ab ignibus, O.; (poet. with abl. of means or instr.): intumuit venter ab undā, O.—Ab with abl. of agent for the dat., to avoid ambiguity, or for emphasis: quibus (civibus) est a vobis consulendum: te a me nostrae consuetudinis monendum esse puto.—    3. To denote source, origin, extraction, from, of: Turnus ab Ariciā, L.: si ego me a M. Tullio esse dicerem: oriundi ab Sabinis, L.: dulces a fontibus undae, V.—With verbs of expecting, fearing, hoping (cf. a parte), from, on the part of: a quo quidem genere, iudices, ego numquam timui: nec ab Romanis vobis ulla est spes, you can expect nothing from the Romans, L.; (ellipt.): haec a servorum bello pericula, threatened by: quem metus a praetore Romano stimulabat, fear of what the praetor might do, L.—With verbs of paying, etc., solvere, persolvere, dare (pecuniam) ab aliquo, to pay through, by a draft on, etc.: se praetor dedit, a quaestore numeravit, quaestor a mensā publicā, by an order on the quaestor: ei legat pecuniam a filio, to be paid by his son: scribe decem (milia) a Nerio, pay by a draft on Nerius, H.; cognoscere ab aliquā re, to know or learn by means of something (but ab aliquo, from some one): id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus cognovisse, Cs.; in giving an etymology: id ab re... interregnum appellatum, L.—Rarely with verbs of beginning and repeating: coepere a fame mala, L.: a se suisque orsus, Ta.—    4. With verbs of freeing from, defending, protecting, from, against: ut a proeliis quietem habuerant, L.: provincia a calamitate est defendenda: sustinere se a lapsu, L.—    5. With verbs and adjectives, to define the respect in which, in relation to, with regard to, in respect to, on the part of: orba ab optimatibus contio: mons vastus ab naturā et humano cultu, S.: ne ab re sint omissiores, too neglectful of money or property, T.: posse a facundiā, in the matter of eloquence, T.; cf. with laborare, for the simple abl, in, for want of: laborare ab re frumentariā, Cs.—    6. In stating a motive, from, out of, on account of, in consequence of: patres ab honore appellati, L.: inops tum urbs ab longinquā obsidione, L.—    7. Indicating a part of the whole, of, out of: scuto ab novissimis uni militi detracto, Cs.: a quibus (captivis) ad Senatum missus (Regulus).—    8. Marking that to which anything belongs: qui sunt ab eā disciplinā: nostri illi a Platone et Aristotele aiunt.—    9. Of a side or party: vide ne hoc totum sit a me, makes for my view: vir ab innocentiā clementissimus, in favor of.—10. In late prose, of an office: ab epistulis, a secretary, Ta. Note. Ab is not repeated with a following pron interrog. or relat.: Arsinoën, Stratum, Naupactum... fateris ab hostibus esse captas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis, quos, etc. It is often separated from the word which it governs: a nullius umquam me tempore aut commodo: a minus bono, S.: a satis miti principio, L.—The poets join a and que, making āque; but in good prose que is annexed to the following abl. (a meque, abs teque, etc.): aque Chao, V.: aque mero, O.—In composition, ab- stands before vowels, and h, b, d, i consonant, l, n, r, s; abs- before c, q, t; b is dropped, leaving as- before p; ā- is found in āfuī, āfore ( inf fut. of absum); and au- in auferō, aufugiō.
    * * *
    I
    Ah!; (distress/regret/pity, appeal/entreaty, surprise/joy, objection/contempt)
    II
    by (agent), from (departure, cause, remote origin/time); after (reference)
    III
    ante, abb. a.

    in calendar expression a. d. = ante diem -- before the day

    Latin-English dictionary > ā

  • 18 accommodātē

        accommodātē adv. with comp. and sup.    [accommodatus], fitly, suitably, in accordance: ad veritatem: ad commune iudicium accommodatius: ad naturam accommodatissime.
    * * *
    accommodatius, accommodatissime ADV
    fittingly, in a suitable manner

    Latin-English dictionary > accommodātē

  • 19 accommodātus (adc-)

        accommodātus (adc-) adj. with comp. and sup    [P. of accommodo], fitted, fit, suitable, adapted, appropriate to, in accordance with: locus ad inflammandos calamitosorum animos: contionibus seditiose concitatis accommodatior: reliqua illis (navibus) essent aptiora et accommodatiora, Cs.: exemplum temporibus suis accommodatissimum. —Praegn., acceptable, useful: mihi maxime.

    Latin-English dictionary > accommodātus (adc-)

  • 20 accommodō (ad-c-)

        accommodō (ad-c-) āvī, ātus, āre,    to fit, adapt, put on, apply: coronam sibi ad caput: lateri ensem, V.: insignia, Cs.—Fig., to adjust, adapt, make fit for, accommodate: puppīs ad magnitudinem fluctuum, Cs.: oratio multitudinis est auribus accommodanda.—Esp., to attribute, ascribe as fitting: effigiem dis, Cu.—To apply, bring forward: testīs ad crimen, produce suitable witnesses: se ad rem p., devote oneself: ad alicuius arbitrium et nutum totum se, i. e. comply with; cf. ut ei de habitatione accommodes, i. e. comply with his wish.

    Latin-English dictionary > accommodō (ad-c-)

См. также в других словарях:

  • age group — noun a group of people having approximately the same age (Freq. 1) • Syn: ↑age bracket, ↑cohort • Hypernyms: ↑people • Hyponyms: ↑aged, ↑elderly, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • age — [[t]e͟ɪʤ[/t]] ♦ ages, ageing, aging, aged (The spelling aging is also used, mainly in American English.) 1) N VAR Your age is the number of years that you have lived. She has a nephew who is just ten years of age... At the age of sixteen he… …   English dictionary

  • age of caves —    The ages of individual caves may vary enormously. In most regions the youngest cave passages have reached their present dimensions during the last 10,000 years, or since the last Pleistocene glacial retreat. In higher latitudes most caves can… …   Lexicon of Cave and Karst Terminology

  • Stone Age — the period in the history of humankind, preceding the Bronze Age and the Iron Age, and marked by the use of stone implements and weapons: subdivided into the Paleolithic, Mesolithic, and Neolithic periods. [1860 65] * * * First known period of… …   Universalium

  • Bronze and Iron Age Poland — The Bronze and Iron Age cultures in Poland are known mainly from archeological research. Early Bronze Age cultures in Poland begin around 2400/2300 BC [ U źródeł Polski , p. 55, Sławomir Kadrow] . In the region the Iron Age commences ca. 750/700… …   Wikipedia

  • Raising of school leaving age in England and Wales — The Raising Of School Leaving Age (often shortened to ROSLA ) is the name given by Government to refer to changes regarding the legal age a child is permitted to leave compulsory education, usually falling under an Education Act. In most… …   Wikipedia

  • Modern Age of Comic Books — Watchmen (1986), one of the comics considered to signify the beginning of the Modern Age. Cover art by Dave Gibbons. Time span c.1985 present Related periods …   Wikipedia

  • The Diamond Age —   …   Wikipedia

  • Stockholm during the Age of Liberty — (1718 1772) is the period in the history of Stockholm when Sweden was governed by weak kings and a strong Riksdag where the Hats and Caps were fighting each others for influence.Nilsson, pp 187 188.] The Age of Grand Power ended with Great… …   Wikipedia

  • MACC (Multi Age Cluster Class) — Multi Age Cluster Class, commonly referred to in Coquitlam as Middle Age Cluster Class is originally a Vancouver based gifted education program meant to enrich the regular curriculum for students in grades 4 7 commonly referred to as MACC. The… …   Wikipedia

  • ancient Rome — ▪ ancient state, Europe, Africa, and Asia Introduction       the state centred on the city of Rome. This article discusses the period from the founding of the city and the regal period, which began in 753 BC, through the events leading to the… …   Universalium


Поделиться ссылкой на выделенное

Прямая ссылка:
Нажмите правой клавишей мыши и выберите «Копировать ссылку»

Мы используем куки для наилучшего представления нашего сайта. Продолжая использовать данный сайт, вы соглашаетесь с этим.