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ambiguity

  • 1 acera

    f.
    1 pavement (British), sidewalk (United States).
    2 side of the street (lado de la calle).
    3 sidewalk, footpath, walk, footway.
    4 facing of a wall, face of a wall, surface of a wall.
    pres.indicat.
    3rd person singular (él/ella/ello) present indicative of spanish verb: acerar.
    imperat.
    2nd person singular (tú) Imperative of Spanish verb: acerar.
    * * *
    1 pavement, US sidewalk
    \
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF pavement, sidewalk (EEUU)
    * * *
    a) ( para peatones) sidewalk (AmE), pavement (BrE)

    ser de la acera de enfrente — (fam) to be gay

    * * *
    = pavement, sidewalk, walkway, pedestrian walkway, footpath, street terrace.
    Ex. Examples would be: 'Is it against the law to ride a bicycle on the pavement?' 'What are the symptoms of a duodenal ulcer?'.
    Ex. Pavements is included in the American sense; as sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex. Areas that may be used include: windows; promenades and walkways; entrances and foyers.
    Ex. This article discusses the results of a survey of users of the Metro McGill Library situated on the pedestrian walkway of the McGill metro station, Montreal, Quebec.
    Ex. Equivalence relationships normally imply the selection of one form as the preferred term, as we have seen, so we make a cross-reference pointing from the non-preferred term to the preferred term: footpaths See Trails; Bovines USE Cattle.
    Ex. What we found was a bar with a street terrace that wouldn't have been out of place in Paris.
    ----
    * al filo de la acera = kerbside [curbside, -USA], curbside [kerbside, -UK].
    * bordillo de la acera = kerb [curb, -USA], curb [kerb, -UK].
    * en la acera = kerbside [curbside, -USA], curbside [kerbside, -UK].
    * * *
    a) ( para peatones) sidewalk (AmE), pavement (BrE)

    ser de la acera de enfrente — (fam) to be gay

    * * *
    = pavement, sidewalk, walkway, pedestrian walkway, footpath, street terrace.

    Ex: Examples would be: 'Is it against the law to ride a bicycle on the pavement?' 'What are the symptoms of a duodenal ulcer?'.

    Ex: Pavements is included in the American sense; as sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex: Areas that may be used include: windows; promenades and walkways; entrances and foyers.
    Ex: This article discusses the results of a survey of users of the Metro McGill Library situated on the pedestrian walkway of the McGill metro station, Montreal, Quebec.
    Ex: Equivalence relationships normally imply the selection of one form as the preferred term, as we have seen, so we make a cross-reference pointing from the non-preferred term to the preferred term: footpaths See Trails; Bovines USE Cattle.
    Ex: What we found was a bar with a street terrace that wouldn't have been out of place in Paris.
    * al filo de la acera = kerbside [curbside, -USA], curbside [kerbside, -UK].
    * bordillo de la acera = kerb [curb, -USA], curb [kerb, -UK].
    * en la acera = kerbside [curbside, -USA], curbside [kerbside, -UK].

    * * *
    1 (para peatones) sidewalk ( AmE), pavement ( BrE)
    2
    (lado de la calle): viven en la misma acera they live on the same side of the street
    * * *

     

    Del verbo acerar: ( conjugate acerar)

    acera es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) presente indicativo

    2ª persona singular (tú) imperativo

    Multiple Entries:
    acera    
    acerar
    acera sustantivo femenino
    sidewalk (AmE), pavement (BrE)
    acera sustantivo femenino pavement, US sidewalk
    ' acera' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    badén
    - derecha
    - derecho
    - gritar
    - opuesta
    - opuesto
    - vereda
    - andén
    - banqueta
    - ensanchar
    - estrechar
    - sardinel
    English:
    curb
    - pavement
    - sidewalk
    - foot
    - pull
    - side
    * * *
    acera nf
    1. [para peatones] Br pavement, US sidewalk;
    Fam
    ser de la otra acera, ser de la acera de enfrente [ser homosexual] to be one of them, to be queer
    2. [lado de la calle] side of the street;
    el colegio está en la acera de los pares/de la derecha the school is on the even-numbered/right-hand side of the street
    * * *
    f sidewalk, Br
    pavement;
    ser de la otra acera, ser de la acera de enfrente fam be gay
    * * *
    acera nf
    : sidewalk
    * * *
    acera n pavement

    Spanish-English dictionary > acera

  • 2 actualizar

    v.
    1 to update.
    El sistema actualiza los datos The system updates the information.
    2 to inform with the latest news, to keep posted, to keep informed, to bring up to date.
    Ricardo actualiza a María Richard informs Mary with the latest news.
    * * *
    1 (poner al día) to bring up to date, update
    2 (filosofía) to actualize
    * * *
    verb
    1) to update, to bring up to date
    * * *
    1.
    VT (=poner al día) to bring up to date, update; (Inform) to update; (Contabilidad) to discount
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <salarios/pensiones/legislación> to bring... up to date; <información/manual> to update
    * * *
    = bring + Nombre + up to date, contemporize, refresh, update [up-date], upgrade, revamp.
    Ex. While Jewett, contemplating the use of individual entries that could more easily be changed and brought up to date, found it desirable to rule that the entry should be under the latest name used by the author.
    Ex. There exists a failure of LC cataloging to contemporize archaic, or just simply awkward, forms that impair both access and credibility.
    Ex. It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    Ex. Here entry is made under the original author of an edition that has been revised, enlarged, updated, condensed, and so on by another person.
    Ex. Sometimes it will be necessary to upgrade CIP records once the book is published, and this process is undertaken by BLBSD as appropriate.
    Ex. Library schools must revamp their curricula and librarianship should become a respected profession.
    ----
    * actualizar los conocimientos = upgrade + Posesivo + skills.
    * actualizarse = change with + the times, move with + the times.
    * dejar de actualizar el catálogo = close down + catalogue.
    * persona encargada de actualizar = maintainer.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <salarios/pensiones/legislación> to bring... up to date; <información/manual> to update
    * * *
    = bring + Nombre + up to date, contemporize, refresh, update [up-date], upgrade, revamp.

    Ex: While Jewett, contemplating the use of individual entries that could more easily be changed and brought up to date, found it desirable to rule that the entry should be under the latest name used by the author.

    Ex: There exists a failure of LC cataloging to contemporize archaic, or just simply awkward, forms that impair both access and credibility.
    Ex: It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    Ex: Here entry is made under the original author of an edition that has been revised, enlarged, updated, condensed, and so on by another person.
    Ex: Sometimes it will be necessary to upgrade CIP records once the book is published, and this process is undertaken by BLBSD as appropriate.
    Ex: Library schools must revamp their curricula and librarianship should become a respected profession.
    * actualizar los conocimientos = upgrade + Posesivo + skills.
    * actualizarse = change with + the times, move with + the times.
    * dejar de actualizar el catálogo = close down + catalogue.
    * persona encargada de actualizar = maintainer.

    * * *
    actualizar [A4 ]
    vt
    1 ‹salarios/pensiones/legislación› to bring … up to date; ( Inf) ‹software› to upgrade
    2 ( Fil, Ling) to realize
    * * *

     

    actualizar ( conjugate actualizar) verbo transitivosalarios/pensiones/legislaciónto bring … up to date;
    información/manual to update;
    (Inf) ‹ software to upgrade
    actualizar verbo transitivo to update, bring up to date: tienes que actualizar tu ordenador, you've got to update your computer
    ' actualizar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    retool
    - retrofit
    - update
    * * *
    1. [información, datos] to update
    2. [tecnología, industria] to modernize
    3. Informát [software, hardware] to upgrade
    * * *
    v/t bring up to date, update
    * * *
    actualizar {21} vt
    : to modernize, to bring up to date
    * * *
    actualizar vb to update

    Spanish-English dictionary > actualizar

  • 3 alimentarse de

    v.
    to live on, to eat, to feed on, to feed upon.
    * * *
    (v.) = thrive on, feast on, prey on/upon
    Ex. It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    Ex. The author reports work since 1991 on building information carnivores, which intelligently hunt and feast on herbivores in Unix, on the Internet, and on the WWW.
    Ex. In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.
    * * *
    (v.) = thrive on, feast on, prey on/upon

    Ex: It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.

    Ex: The author reports work since 1991 on building information carnivores, which intelligently hunt and feast on herbivores in Unix, on the Internet, and on the WWW.
    Ex: In the semi-arid central plateau, tortoises are commonly preyed upon by raptors, some of which roost on ledges in the backs of small rock shelters.

    Spanish-English dictionary > alimentarse de

  • 4 ambigüedad

    f.
    ambiguity, duplicity, double meaning, ambiguous meaning.
    * * *
    1 ambiguity
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino ambiguity
    * * *
    = ambiguity, slipperiness, hesitancy, double meaning, equivocation.
    Ex. In pursuing brevity, however, care must be exercised to avoid ambiguity.
    Ex. The point here is the difficulty of definition and the slipperiness of terminology.
    Ex. Librarian hesitancy to weed individual titles or types of titles also was cited as an important factor discouraging weeding.
    Ex. In times of dictatorship artists resort to a language of double meaning to express unpopular opinions.
    Ex. We stand with the Secretary-General of the United Nations and other distinguished speakers in stating without equivocation that everyone has the right to freedom of expression.
    ----
    * ambigüedad de funciones = role ambiguity.
    * ambigüedades = double-talk.
    * eliminación de ambigüedades = disambiguation.
    * eliminar ambigüedades = disambiguate.
    * falta de ambigüedad = unambiguity.
    * resolución de la ambigüedad entre términos = term disambiguation, word sense disambiguation.
    * sin ambigüedad = unambiguous.
    * * *
    femenino ambiguity
    * * *
    = ambiguity, slipperiness, hesitancy, double meaning, equivocation.

    Ex: In pursuing brevity, however, care must be exercised to avoid ambiguity.

    Ex: The point here is the difficulty of definition and the slipperiness of terminology.
    Ex: Librarian hesitancy to weed individual titles or types of titles also was cited as an important factor discouraging weeding.
    Ex: In times of dictatorship artists resort to a language of double meaning to express unpopular opinions.
    Ex: We stand with the Secretary-General of the United Nations and other distinguished speakers in stating without equivocation that everyone has the right to freedom of expression.
    * ambigüedad de funciones = role ambiguity.
    * ambigüedades = double-talk.
    * eliminación de ambigüedades = disambiguation.
    * eliminar ambigüedades = disambiguate.
    * falta de ambigüedad = unambiguity.
    * resolución de la ambigüedad entre términos = term disambiguation, word sense disambiguation.
    * sin ambigüedad = unambiguous.

    * * *
    ambiguity
    * * *

    ambigüedad sustantivo femenino
    ambiguity
    ambigüedad sustantivo femenino ambiguity
    ' ambigüedad' also found in these entries:
    English:
    ambiguity
    * * *
    ambiguity;
    con ambigüedad ambiguously
    * * *
    f ambiguity
    * * *
    : ambiguity

    Spanish-English dictionary > ambigüedad

  • 5 ambigüedad de funciones

    Ex. Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.
    * * *

    Ex: Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ambigüedad de funciones

  • 6 ambivalencia

    f.
    ambivalence.
    * * *
    1 ambivalence
    * * *
    * * *
    femenino ambivalence
    * * *
    = ambivalence, duplicity.
    Ex. J E Tucker and E E Willoughby reviewed Wing's bibliography twice and reveal an ambivalence about it repeated by almost every reviewer.
    Ex. An ambiguity only exists when there is duplicity, indistinctiveness, or uncertainty in the meaning of the words used in the contract.
    * * *
    femenino ambivalence
    * * *
    = ambivalence, duplicity.

    Ex: J E Tucker and E E Willoughby reviewed Wing's bibliography twice and reveal an ambivalence about it repeated by almost every reviewer.

    Ex: An ambiguity only exists when there is duplicity, indistinctiveness, or uncertainty in the meaning of the words used in the contract.

    * * *
    ambivalence
    * * *
    ambivalence
    * * *
    f ambivalence
    * * *
    : ambivalence

    Spanish-English dictionary > ambivalencia

  • 7 brutalidad

    f.
    1 brutality.
    2 brutal act.
    3 stupid action, stupid act, asininity.
    4 stupidity, idiocy, asininity.
    * * *
    1 (crueldad) brutality
    2 (necedad) stupid thing
    3 (cantidad) tremendous amount
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=cualidad) brutality
    2) (=acción)
    3) (=estupidez) stupidity
    4) *

    me gusta una brutalidad — I think it's great, I love it

    * * *
    a) ( violencia) brutality, savageness
    b) (acto, dicho)

    qué brutalidad, pegarle así a la pobre criatura! — what a brute, hitting the poor child like that!

    qué brutalidad, preguntarle eso! — how insensitive can you get, asking him a question like that!

    * * *
    = brutality, savagery.
    Ex. Nazi ideas and brutality were evident to all even at the time, as was the fact that they were rising to power.
    Ex. Is there any ambiguity in this phrase which can excuse the ALA's failure to defend Cuba's independent libraries from the savagery being inflicted upon them?.
    * * *
    a) ( violencia) brutality, savageness
    b) (acto, dicho)

    qué brutalidad, pegarle así a la pobre criatura! — what a brute, hitting the poor child like that!

    qué brutalidad, preguntarle eso! — how insensitive can you get, asking him a question like that!

    * * *
    = brutality, savagery.

    Ex: Nazi ideas and brutality were evident to all even at the time, as was the fact that they were rising to power.

    Ex: Is there any ambiguity in this phrase which can excuse the ALA's failure to defend Cuba's independent libraries from the savagery being inflicted upon them?.

    * * *
    1 (violencia) brutality, savageness
    2
    (acto, dicho): ¡qué brutalidad, pegarle así a la pobre criatura! what a brutish thing to do, hitting the poor child like that
    ¡qué brutalidad, decírselo así de golpe! how insensitive can you get, just telling him out of the blue like that!
    3 ( fam)
    (cantidad exagerada): hizo una brutalidad de comida he prepared tons o loads of food ( colloq)
    * * *

    brutalidad sustantivo femenino
    brutality, savageness
    brutalidad sustantivo femenino brutality
    ' brutalidad' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    barbarie
    English:
    barbarity
    - brutality
    * * *
    1. [cualidad] brutality;
    con brutalidad brutally
    2. [acción] atrocity;
    las brutalidades cometidas por el ejército the atrocities committed by the army
    3. [tontería] stupid thing;
    decir brutalidades to talk nonsense
    4. Fam [gran cantidad]
    * * *
    f brutality
    * * *
    crueldad: brutality

    Spanish-English dictionary > brutalidad

  • 8 budismo

    m.
    Buddhism.
    * * *
    1 Buddhism
    * * *
    * * *
    masculino Buddhism
    * * *
    Ex. By using parenthesis, the ambiguity can be eliminated; for example, Christianity in relation to ( Buddhism in India) versus (Christianity in relation to Buddhism) in India.
    * * *
    masculino Buddhism
    * * *

    Ex: By using parenthesis, the ambiguity can be eliminated; for example, Christianity in relation to ( Buddhism in India) versus (Christianity in relation to Buddhism) in India.

    * * *
    Buddhism
    * * *

    budismo sustantivo masculino
    Buddhism
    budismo sustantivo masculino Buddhism
    ' budismo' also found in these entries:
    English:
    Buddhism
    * * *
    Buddhism
    budismo zen Zen Buddhism
    * * *
    m Buddhism
    * * *
    : Buddhism
    * * *
    budismo n Buddism

    Spanish-English dictionary > budismo

  • 9 claridad de funciones

    (n.) = role clarity
    Ex. Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.
    * * *

    Ex: Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.

    Spanish-English dictionary > claridad de funciones

  • 10 claridad de responsabilidades

    (n.) = role clarity
    Ex. Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.
    * * *

    Ex: Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.

    Spanish-English dictionary > claridad de responsabilidades

  • 11 conflicto de funciones

    Ex. Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.
    * * *

    Ex: Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.

    Spanish-English dictionary > conflicto de funciones

  • 12 conflicto de responsabilidades

    Ex. Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.
    * * *

    Ex: Over the past 10 years, role conflict, role ambiguity, role clarity and job satisfaction have been given increased attention in the study of organisational behaviour for a number of occupational groups.

    Spanish-English dictionary > conflicto de responsabilidades

  • 13 contradicción

    f.
    1 contradiction, ambiguity, inconsistency, self-contradiction.
    2 contradiction, denial, confutation, impugnation.
    * * *
    1 contradiction
    \
    estar en contradicción con to be inconsistent with, contradictory to
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *

    espíritu de contradicción: había en él cierto espíritu de contradicción — there were certain contradictions in his nature

    eres el espíritu de la contradicción, ahora piensas una cosa y luego cambias de idea — you're so contrary, one minute you think one thing, the next minute you've changed your mind

    contradicción de o en los términos — contradiction in terms

    * * *
    femenino contradiction
    * * *
    = contradiction, contradiction in terms, oxymoron, mixed signal.
    Ex. I notice that there seems to be something of a contradiction in Ms Marshall's approach.
    Ex. The use of the term ephemera is strictly accurate in the definitional sense describing those pieces of recorded knowledge it is applied to by librarians but is, nevertheless, a total contradiction in terms.
    Ex. The author argues that the 'digital library' is not an oxymoron, pointing to the fact that libraries face the problem of differentiating between the product that is managed in libraries, information, and the familiar container for that product (the book).
    Ex. Instead, this may come off as a sort of mixed signal considering that God has chosen to smite California right after a proposition was passed banning same sex marriage.
    ----
    * espíritu de la contradicción = contrary nature.
    * * *
    femenino contradiction
    * * *
    = contradiction, contradiction in terms, oxymoron, mixed signal.

    Ex: I notice that there seems to be something of a contradiction in Ms Marshall's approach.

    Ex: The use of the term ephemera is strictly accurate in the definitional sense describing those pieces of recorded knowledge it is applied to by librarians but is, nevertheless, a total contradiction in terms.
    Ex: The author argues that the 'digital library' is not an oxymoron, pointing to the fact that libraries face the problem of differentiating between the product that is managed in libraries, information, and the familiar container for that product (the book).
    Ex: Instead, this may come off as a sort of mixed signal considering that God has chosen to smite California right after a proposition was passed banning same sex marriage.
    * espíritu de la contradicción = contrary nature.

    * * *
    contradiction
    una persona llena de contradicciones a person full of contradictions
    eso está en abierta contradicción con lo que predica that is in direct conflict with o is a blatant contradiction of what he advocates
    * * *

    contradicción sustantivo femenino
    contradiction;

    contradicción sustantivo femenino contradiction

    ' contradicción' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    incoherencia
    - reñido
    English:
    contradiction
    - inconsistency
    * * *
    contradiction;
    estar en contradicción con to be in (direct) contradiction to;
    ¿una agresión pacífica? ¡eso es una contradicción! a peaceful attack? that's a contradiction in terms!
    * * *
    f contradiction;
    estar en contradicción con algo contradict sth, be a contradiction of sth
    * * *
    contradicción nf, pl - ciones : contradiction

    Spanish-English dictionary > contradicción

  • 14 dar cabida a

    to leave room for
    * * *
    (v.) = accommodate, include, hold, take, make + room (for), leave + room for, leave + room for
    Ex. Changes have been made to accommodate modern approaches or new groupings of subjects.
    Ex. Document descriptions may be included in catalogues, bibliographies and other listings of documents.
    Ex. If the search is made with a call number, a summary of copies with that call number which are held by the library is first displayed.
    Ex. A common standard serial interface is the RS232C which takes a 24-pin plug and is commonly used to connect many peripherals including printers and modems.
    Ex. A scheme should allow relocation, in order to rectify an inappropriate placement, to eliminate dual provision (more than one place for one subject) to make room for new subjects.
    Ex. In the former case, the layout of the text is adjusted to leave room for the graphics.
    Ex. Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    * * *
    (v.) = accommodate, include, hold, take, make + room (for), leave + room for, leave + room for

    Ex: Changes have been made to accommodate modern approaches or new groupings of subjects.

    Ex: Document descriptions may be included in catalogues, bibliographies and other listings of documents.
    Ex: If the search is made with a call number, a summary of copies with that call number which are held by the library is first displayed.
    Ex: A common standard serial interface is the RS232C which takes a 24-pin plug and is commonly used to connect many peripherals including printers and modems.
    Ex: A scheme should allow relocation, in order to rectify an inappropriate placement, to eliminate dual provision (more than one place for one subject) to make room for new subjects.
    Ex: In the former case, the layout of the text is adjusted to leave room for the graphics.
    Ex: Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar cabida a

  • 15 dar lugar a

    to give rise to
    * * *
    (v.) = cause, generate, give + rise to, mean, result (in), leave + room for, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex. The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex. These changes have meant modifications, some very time-consuming, to serials catalogues in libraries.
    Ex. Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex. Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex. Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex. At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex. As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex. Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex. That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex. Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.
    * * *
    (v.) = cause, generate, give + rise to, mean, result (in), leave + room for, bring about, lead to, cause, open + the door to, give + cause to, give + occasion to

    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.

    Ex: Human indexers sometimes make inappropriate judgements, misinterpret ideas, have lapses of memory or concentration, and generate omissions and inconsistencies in their indexing.
    Ex: The method of indexing called post-coordinate indexing gives rise to physical forms of indexes which differ from the more 'traditional' catalogues mentioned above.
    Ex: These changes have meant modifications, some very time-consuming, to serials catalogues in libraries.
    Ex: Objective 1 results in what is known as a direct catalogue, because it gives direct access to a specific document.
    Ex: Pavements is included in the American sense; as Sidewalks does not rate a mention at all, this could leave room for ambiguity.
    Ex: Untruth brings about ill reputation and indignity.
    Ex: At each of these levels, entry of a 'd' for detail and a line number leads to display of the information about the item chosen.
    Ex: As usage of the language causes terms to become anachronistic, or as increases in our level of awareness reveal undesirable connotations, we seek to change subject heading terms.
    Ex: Thus Cutter opens the door to compounds and phrases of all kinds -- so long as they are 'nameable' -- and also opens the door to inversion, but gives no rule for this.
    Ex: That crucial evidence was withheld from the final report could give cause to bring charges of criminal negligence.
    Ex: Many soldiers took advantage of the impoverished conditions giving occasion to assaults, rapes and murders.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dar lugar a

  • 16 demasiado amplio

    (adj.) = overwide [over-wide]
    Ex. Overall, neither system proved ideal: LEXINET was deficient as regards lack of accessibility and excessive ambiguity; while the manual system gave rise to an over-wide variation of terms.
    * * *
    (adj.) = overwide [over-wide]

    Ex: Overall, neither system proved ideal: LEXINET was deficient as regards lack of accessibility and excessive ambiguity; while the manual system gave rise to an over-wide variation of terms.

    Spanish-English dictionary > demasiado amplio

  • 17 desconectado, lo

    = unconnected, the
    Ex. It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    * * *
    = unconnected, the

    Ex: It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.

    Spanish-English dictionary > desconectado, lo

  • 18 dispar, lo

    = disparate, the
    Ex. It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.
    * * *
    = disparate, the

    Ex: It thrives on ambiguity, irony, paradox, which bring the disparate and hitherto unconnected into relationship, revealing new shades of meaning, or refreshing the worn, the tired, the cliched.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dispar, lo

  • 19 doble sentido

    adj.
    ambiguous.
    m.
    double entendre, ambiguity, double meaning, ambiguousness.
    * * *
    double meaning
    * * *
    (n.) = double meaning, equivocation
    Ex. In times of dictatorship artists resort to a language of double meaning to express unpopular opinions.
    Ex. We stand with the Secretary-General of the United Nations and other distinguished speakers in stating without equivocation that everyone has the right to freedom of expression.
    * * *
    (n.) = double meaning, equivocation

    Ex: In times of dictatorship artists resort to a language of double meaning to express unpopular opinions.

    Ex: We stand with the Secretary-General of the United Nations and other distinguished speakers in stating without equivocation that everyone has the right to freedom of expression.

    Spanish-English dictionary > doble sentido

  • 20 duplicidad

    f.
    1 duplication.
    2 duplicity.
    3 falseness, double-dealing, doubleness, hypocrisy.
    * * *
    1 duplicity
    2 figurado duplicity, falseness
    * * *
    SF duplicity, deceitfulness
    * * *
    femenino duplicity, deceitfulness
    * * *
    = duplication, replication, duplicity.
    Ex. A catalogue code is a systematic arrangement of laws and statutes so as to avoid inconsistency and duplication in catalogues.
    Ex. In spite of diversity there is sufficient overlap and replication of materials for some centralised purchasing and centralised processing to be justifiable.
    Ex. An ambiguity only exists when there is duplicity, indistinctiveness, or uncertainty in the meaning of the words used in the contract.
    ----
    * duplicidad de esfuerzos = duplication of effort.
    * * *
    femenino duplicity, deceitfulness
    * * *
    = duplication, replication, duplicity.

    Ex: A catalogue code is a systematic arrangement of laws and statutes so as to avoid inconsistency and duplication in catalogues.

    Ex: In spite of diversity there is sufficient overlap and replication of materials for some centralised purchasing and centralised processing to be justifiable.
    Ex: An ambiguity only exists when there is duplicity, indistinctiveness, or uncertainty in the meaning of the words used in the contract.
    * duplicidad de esfuerzos = duplication of effort.

    * * *
    duplicity, deceitfulness
    * * *
    1. [repetición] duplication
    2. [falsedad] duplicity
    * * *
    f fig
    duplicity
    * * *
    : duplicity

    Spanish-English dictionary > duplicidad

См. также в других словарях:

  • ambiguity — I noun abstruseness, ambiguitas, bafflement, bewilderment, confounded meaning, confused meaning, confusion, disconcertion, doubtful meaning, doubtfulness, dubiety, dubiousness, duplexity in meaning, equivocalness, equivocation, incertitude,… …   Law dictionary

  • ambiguity — 1. Ambiguity in language denotes the possibility of more than one meaning being understood from what is heard or read. Intentional ambiguity can be effective, for example as a literary device or in advertising. Our concern here is with… …   Modern English usage

  • ambiguity — ambiguity, equivocation, tergiversation, double entendre are comparable when they denote expression or, more often, an expression, capable of more than one interpretation. Ambiguity is referable to an expression that admits of two or sometimes… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Ambiguity — Студийный альбом Brainstorm Дата выпуска 11 июля 1998 Жанр …   Википедия

  • ambiguity — UK US /ˌæmbɪˈgjuːəti/ noun [C or U] (plural ambiguities) ► a situation in which something has more than one possible meaning and may therefore cause confusion, or an example of this: »We wish to remove any ambiguity concerning our demands. »There …   Financial and business terms

  • Ambiguity — Am bi*gu i*ty, n.; pl. {Ambiguities}. [L. ambiguitas, fr. ambiguus: cf. F. ambiguit[ e].] The quality or state of being ambiguous; doubtfulness or uncertainty, particularly as to the signification of language, arising from its admitting of more… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ambiguity — (n.) c.1400, uncertainty, doubt, also capability of having two meanings, from M.L. ambiguitatem (nom. ambiguitas) double meaning, noun of state from ambiguus (see AMBIGUOUS (Cf. ambiguous)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • ambiguity — [n] uncertainty of meaning doubleentendre, double meaning, doubt, doubtfulness, dubiety, dubiousness, enigma, equivocacy, equivocality, equivocation, incertitude, inconclusiveness, indefiniteness, indeterminateness, obscurity, puzzle,… …   New thesaurus

  • ambiguity — ► NOUN (pl. ambiguities) ▪ uncertain or inexact meaning …   English terms dictionary

  • ambiguity — [am΄bə gyo͞o′ə tē] n. [ME ambiguite < L ambiguitas] 1. the quality or state of being ambiguous 2. pl. ambiguities an ambiguous word, statement, etc …   English World dictionary

  • Ambiguity — Sir John Tenniel s illustration of the Caterpillar for Lewis Carroll s Alice s Adventures in Wonderland is noted for its ambiguous central figure, whose head can be viewed as being a human male s face with a pointed nose and pointy chin or being… …   Wikipedia

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