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a crown of oak awarded in the Capitoline games

  • 1 Capitōlīnus

        Capitōlīnus adj.    [Capitolium], of the Capitol, Capitoline: clivus: ludi, L.: quercus, a crown of oak awarded in the Capitoline games, Iu.— Plur m. as subst., the directors of the Capitoline games.
    * * *
    Capitolina, Capitolinum ADJ
    Capitoline; (one of 7 hills of Rome); of the Capitol; (temple of capitolinus Jupiter)

    Latin-English dictionary > Capitōlīnus

  • 2 Capitolini

    Căpĭtōlīnus, a, um, adj. [Capitolium], of or pertaining to the Capitol, Capitoline:

    clivus,

    Cic. Rab. Perd. 11, 31:

    sedes,

    id. Div. 1, 12, 19; 2, 20, 45:

    collis,

    Mart. 12, 21:

    area,

    Suet. Calig. 22; 34; Gell. 2, 10, 2.—Of Jupiter, Auct. Dom. 57, 144; Suet. Caes. 84; id. Aug. 30; 91; 94; id. Tib. 53; id. Dom. 4:

    dapes,

    that was given to Jupiter, Mart. 12, 48:

    Venus,

    Suet. Calig. 7:

    amphora, q. v.: ludi,

    Liv. 5, 50, 4:

    certamen,

    Suet. Dom. 13; cf. id. ib. 4:

    quercus,

    a crown of oak given to victors in the Capitoline games, Juv. 6, 387. —
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Căpĭtōlīnus, i, m., the Capitoline Hill, Auct. Her. 4, 32, 43.—
    2.
    Căpĭtōlīni, ōrum, m., persons who had the charge of these games, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 5, 2.— In sing., a cognomen of M. Manlius, on account of his rescue of the Capitol, Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 24.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Capitolini

  • 3 Capitolinus

    Căpĭtōlīnus, a, um, adj. [Capitolium], of or pertaining to the Capitol, Capitoline:

    clivus,

    Cic. Rab. Perd. 11, 31:

    sedes,

    id. Div. 1, 12, 19; 2, 20, 45:

    collis,

    Mart. 12, 21:

    area,

    Suet. Calig. 22; 34; Gell. 2, 10, 2.—Of Jupiter, Auct. Dom. 57, 144; Suet. Caes. 84; id. Aug. 30; 91; 94; id. Tib. 53; id. Dom. 4:

    dapes,

    that was given to Jupiter, Mart. 12, 48:

    Venus,

    Suet. Calig. 7:

    amphora, q. v.: ludi,

    Liv. 5, 50, 4:

    certamen,

    Suet. Dom. 13; cf. id. ib. 4:

    quercus,

    a crown of oak given to victors in the Capitoline games, Juv. 6, 387. —
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Căpĭtōlīnus, i, m., the Capitoline Hill, Auct. Her. 4, 32, 43.—
    2.
    Căpĭtōlīni, ōrum, m., persons who had the charge of these games, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 5, 2.— In sing., a cognomen of M. Manlius, on account of his rescue of the Capitol, Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 24.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Capitolinus

  • 4 lustrum

    1.
    lustrum, i, n. [1. luo, lavo; cf.: monstrum, moneo], a slough, bog, morass, puddle.
    I.
    Lit.:

    prodigunt in lutosos limites ac lustra, ut volutentur in luto,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 4, 8.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    A haunt or den of wild beasts:

    lustra ferarum,

    Verg. G. 2, 471; id. A. 3, 647:

    lustra horrida monstris,

    Val. Fl. 4, 370.—
    2.
    A wood, forest:

    postquam altos ventum in montes atque invia lustra,

    Verg. A. 4, 151:

    inter horrentia lustra,

    id. ib. 11, 570.—
    B.
    A house of ill-repute: ubi in lustra jacuisti? St. Egone in lustra? Plaut. Cas. 2, 3, 26:

    quod dem scortis, quodque in lustris comedim,

    id. Bacch. 4, 4, 91; id. Curc. 4, 2, 22: in lustris latet, Turp. ap. Non. 333, 15:

    in lustris, popinis, alea, vino tempus aetatis omne consumpsisses,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 11, 24:

    homo emersus ex diuturnis tenebris lustrorum,

    id. Sest. 9, 20.—
    2.
    Debauchery; cf.: lustra significant lacunas lutosas, quae sunt in silvis aprorum cubilia. A quā similitudine, hi, qui in locis abditis et sorditis ventri et gulae operam dant, dicuntur in lustris vitam agere, Paul. ex Fest. p. 120:

    domus, in qua lustra, libidines, luxuries, omnia denique inaudita vitia, versentur,

    Cic. Cael. 23, 57:

    studere lustris,

    Plaut. As. 5, 2, 17:

    lustris perire,

    Lucr. 4, 1136:

    vino lustrisque confectus,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 3, 6:

    qui pugnent, marcere Campana luxuria, vino et scortis omnibusque lustris per totam hiemem confectos,

    Liv. 23, 45, 3.
    2.
    lustrum, i, n. [2. luo], a purificatory sacrifice, expiatory offering, lustration, made by the censors for the whole people once in five years, after completing the census, and in which a swine, a sheep, and a bull were offered (suovetaurilia): lustrum condere, to make the lustral sacrifice:

    lustrum condidit et taurum immolavit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 66, 268:

    censu perfecto edixit, ut omnes cives Romani in campo primā luce adessent. Ibi exercitum omnem suovetaurilibus lustravit: idque conditum lustrum appellatum, quia is censendo finis factus est,

    Liv. 1, 44; 3, 24; cf. id. 35, 9; 38, 36; 42, 10. The census could also be taken without being followed by a lustrum, Liv. 3, 22, 1; 24, 43, 4: sub lustrum censeri, at the close of the census, when the lustrum should begin:

    sub lustrum censeri, germani negotiatoris est (because these were usually not in Rome, and were included in the census last of all),

    Cic. Att. 1, 18, 8.—Being a religious ceremonial, the lustrum was sometimes omitted, when circumstances seemed to forbid it:

    census actus eo anno: lustrum propter Capitolium captum, consulem occisum, condi religiosum fuit,

    Liv. 3, 22, 1. Hence in part, doubtless, must be explained the small number of lustra actually celebrated; thus, A. U. C. 296:

    census perficitur, idque lustrum ab origine urbis decimum conditum ferunt,

    Liv. 3, 24, 10.—
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    A propitiatory offering:

    quinto die Delphis Apollini pro me exercitibusque et classibus lustra sacrificavi,

    Liv. 45, 41, 3.—
    B.
    A period of five years, a lustrum (because every five years a lustrum was performed).
    1.
    In gen.:

    cujus octavum trepidavit aetas Claudere lustrum,

    Hor. C. 2, 4, 24; Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 78; Mart. 10, 38, 9.—
    2.
    As the period of taxation, in reference to the imposition of duties, Varr, L. L. 6, 2, 11:

    hoc ipso lustro,

    Cic. Att. 6, 2, 5:

    superioris lustri reliqua,

    id. Fam. 2, 13, 3.—
    C.
    In gen., a period of several years; of four years (of the Julian calendar), Ov. F. 3, 163; cf. Plin. 2, 47, 47, § 122: ingens lustrum, the grand lustrum, a hundred years, at the end of which the ludi saeculares were celebrated, Mart. 4, 1, 7.—
    D.
    From the time of Domitian, the Capitoline games, recurring every fifth year, Suet. Dom. 4; Censor. de Die Nat. 18; cf. Stat. S. 4, 2, 60:

    certamine Jovis Capitolini lustro sexto,

    Inscr. Grut. 332, 3;

    called lustri certamen,

    Aur. Vict. Caes. 27, 7.—
    E.
    Hectoris Lustra (not Lytra), title of a tragedy of Ennius; v. Trag. Rel. p. 28 sq. Rib.; Vahl. Enn. p. 113 sq.—
    F.
    The term of a lease:

    priore lustro,

    Plin. Ep. 9, 37, 2.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > lustrum

  • 5 Tarpeia

    Tarpēius, i, m.; Tarpēia, ae, f., a Roman proper name; so esp.,
    1.
    Sp. Tarpeius, the father of Tarpeia, who opened the citadel to the Sabines, Liv. 1, 11; Val. Max. 9, 6, 1.—
    2.
    Tarpeia, a Roman maiden, who treacherously opened the citadel to the Sabines, and for her reward was killed by the weight of their arms, which they cast upon her, Flor. 1, 1; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 2; cf. Liv. 1, 11, 6 sqq.; Ov. M. 14, 776.—Hence,
    A.
    Tarpēius, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    mons,

    the Tarpeian Rock, the name of a rock on the Capitoline Hill, from which criminals were thrown headlong, Varr. L. L. 5, § 41 Müll.; Liv. 1, 55;

    called also, saxum,

    id. 6, 20; Tac. A. 6, 19; Fest. p. 343 Müll.:

    rupes,

    Tac. H. 3, 71; and absol.:

    in Tarpeio fodientes,

    Plin. 28, 2, 4, § 15:

    ad Tarpeium raptus (Metellus),

    id. 7, 44, 45, § 143:

    arx,

    the citadel on the Capitoline Hill, Prop. 4, (5), 4, 29; Ov. M. 15, 866:

    pater,

    Capitoline Jupiter, Prop. 4 (5), 1, 7; cf.

    fulmina,

    Juv. 13, 78;

    and dei,

    who were worshipped on the Capitoline Hill, Luc. 8, 863:

    coronae,

    given to victors in the Capitoline games, Mart. 9, 41, 1; cf.

    frons,

    id. 9, 4, 8;

    and quercus,

    id. 4, 54, 1:

    lex,

    named after a certain Tarpeius, Cic. Rep. 2, 35, 60; Fest. p. 237 Müll.:

    pudicitia,

    of a Tarpeia, Prop. 1, 16, 2.—
    B.
    Tarpēiānus, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    haedus,

    of the Tarpeian Hill, Apic. 8, 6 and 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Tarpeia

  • 6 Tarpeianus

    Tarpēius, i, m.; Tarpēia, ae, f., a Roman proper name; so esp.,
    1.
    Sp. Tarpeius, the father of Tarpeia, who opened the citadel to the Sabines, Liv. 1, 11; Val. Max. 9, 6, 1.—
    2.
    Tarpeia, a Roman maiden, who treacherously opened the citadel to the Sabines, and for her reward was killed by the weight of their arms, which they cast upon her, Flor. 1, 1; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 2; cf. Liv. 1, 11, 6 sqq.; Ov. M. 14, 776.—Hence,
    A.
    Tarpēius, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    mons,

    the Tarpeian Rock, the name of a rock on the Capitoline Hill, from which criminals were thrown headlong, Varr. L. L. 5, § 41 Müll.; Liv. 1, 55;

    called also, saxum,

    id. 6, 20; Tac. A. 6, 19; Fest. p. 343 Müll.:

    rupes,

    Tac. H. 3, 71; and absol.:

    in Tarpeio fodientes,

    Plin. 28, 2, 4, § 15:

    ad Tarpeium raptus (Metellus),

    id. 7, 44, 45, § 143:

    arx,

    the citadel on the Capitoline Hill, Prop. 4, (5), 4, 29; Ov. M. 15, 866:

    pater,

    Capitoline Jupiter, Prop. 4 (5), 1, 7; cf.

    fulmina,

    Juv. 13, 78;

    and dei,

    who were worshipped on the Capitoline Hill, Luc. 8, 863:

    coronae,

    given to victors in the Capitoline games, Mart. 9, 41, 1; cf.

    frons,

    id. 9, 4, 8;

    and quercus,

    id. 4, 54, 1:

    lex,

    named after a certain Tarpeius, Cic. Rep. 2, 35, 60; Fest. p. 237 Müll.:

    pudicitia,

    of a Tarpeia, Prop. 1, 16, 2.—
    B.
    Tarpēiānus, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    haedus,

    of the Tarpeian Hill, Apic. 8, 6 and 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Tarpeianus

  • 7 Tarpeius

    Tarpēius, i, m.; Tarpēia, ae, f., a Roman proper name; so esp.,
    1.
    Sp. Tarpeius, the father of Tarpeia, who opened the citadel to the Sabines, Liv. 1, 11; Val. Max. 9, 6, 1.—
    2.
    Tarpeia, a Roman maiden, who treacherously opened the citadel to the Sabines, and for her reward was killed by the weight of their arms, which they cast upon her, Flor. 1, 1; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 2; cf. Liv. 1, 11, 6 sqq.; Ov. M. 14, 776.—Hence,
    A.
    Tarpēius, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    mons,

    the Tarpeian Rock, the name of a rock on the Capitoline Hill, from which criminals were thrown headlong, Varr. L. L. 5, § 41 Müll.; Liv. 1, 55;

    called also, saxum,

    id. 6, 20; Tac. A. 6, 19; Fest. p. 343 Müll.:

    rupes,

    Tac. H. 3, 71; and absol.:

    in Tarpeio fodientes,

    Plin. 28, 2, 4, § 15:

    ad Tarpeium raptus (Metellus),

    id. 7, 44, 45, § 143:

    arx,

    the citadel on the Capitoline Hill, Prop. 4, (5), 4, 29; Ov. M. 15, 866:

    pater,

    Capitoline Jupiter, Prop. 4 (5), 1, 7; cf.

    fulmina,

    Juv. 13, 78;

    and dei,

    who were worshipped on the Capitoline Hill, Luc. 8, 863:

    coronae,

    given to victors in the Capitoline games, Mart. 9, 41, 1; cf.

    frons,

    id. 9, 4, 8;

    and quercus,

    id. 4, 54, 1:

    lex,

    named after a certain Tarpeius, Cic. Rep. 2, 35, 60; Fest. p. 237 Müll.:

    pudicitia,

    of a Tarpeia, Prop. 1, 16, 2.—
    B.
    Tarpēiānus, a, um, adj., Tarpeian:

    haedus,

    of the Tarpeian Hill, Apic. 8, 6 and 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Tarpeius

  • 8 corōnō

        corōnō āvī, ātus, āre    [corona], to furnish with a garland, crown, wreathe: sedebat coronatus: templa, O.: deos fragili myrto, H.: vina, V.: epulae inibant coronati: alqm fronde, H.: coronatus malobathro capillos, H.: coronari Olympia, to be crowned in the Olympic games, H.—To surround, encompass, enclose, encircle, shut in: castra suggestā humo, Pr.: Silva coronat aquas, O.: omnem abitum custode, V.
    * * *
    coronare, coronavi, coronatus V
    wreathe, crown, deck with garlands; award prize; surround/encircle, ring round

    Latin-English dictionary > corōnō

  • 9 (lūdicer)

        (lūdicer) cra, crum, adj.    [ludus], belonging to play, serving for sport, done in sport, sportive: exercitatio: Praemia, awarded in the games, V.: res, the drama, H.

    Latin-English dictionary > (lūdicer)

  • 10 vāllāris

        vāllāris e, adj.    [vallum], of a rampart: corona, of the soldier who first scaled a rampart, L.
    * * *
    I
    crown/garland awarded to first soldier to scale an enemy rampart (vallum)
    II
    vallaris, vallare ADJ
    of a rampart/corona; of the first soldier to scale an enemy rampart (vallum)

    Latin-English dictionary > vāllāris

  • 11 Ambracia

    Ambrăcĭa, ae, f., = Ambrakia,
    I.
    A town in the south of Epirus, upon the gulf of the same name, now Arta, Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4; Cic. Ep. ad Brut. 6; Caes. B. C. 3, 36; Liv. 38, 4.—Hence,
    II.
    A.. Ambrăcĭ-ensis, e, adj., Ambracian, Liv. 38, 43.— Subst. plur., the inhabitants of Ambracia, Liv. 38, 43.—†
    B.
    Ambrăcĭōtēs, ae, m., = Ambrakiôtês, Ambracian; hence, vinum... Ambraciotes (v. abrotonites), Plin. 14, 7, 9, § 76.—
    C.
    Ambrăcĭus, a, um, adj., Ambracian (more freq. than Ambraciensis), Ov. H. 15, 164; Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4:

    Sinus Ambracius,

    Liv. 38, 4; Mel. 2, 3, in which Octavius conquered Antony and Cleopatra in a naval engagement: Ambraciae frondes, i.e. the laurel crown of the victors in the Actian games (v. Actium and Actiacus), Stat. S. 2, 2, 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Ambracia

  • 12 Ambraciensis

    Ambrăcĭa, ae, f., = Ambrakia,
    I.
    A town in the south of Epirus, upon the gulf of the same name, now Arta, Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4; Cic. Ep. ad Brut. 6; Caes. B. C. 3, 36; Liv. 38, 4.—Hence,
    II.
    A.. Ambrăcĭ-ensis, e, adj., Ambracian, Liv. 38, 43.— Subst. plur., the inhabitants of Ambracia, Liv. 38, 43.—†
    B.
    Ambrăcĭōtēs, ae, m., = Ambrakiôtês, Ambracian; hence, vinum... Ambraciotes (v. abrotonites), Plin. 14, 7, 9, § 76.—
    C.
    Ambrăcĭus, a, um, adj., Ambracian (more freq. than Ambraciensis), Ov. H. 15, 164; Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4:

    Sinus Ambracius,

    Liv. 38, 4; Mel. 2, 3, in which Octavius conquered Antony and Cleopatra in a naval engagement: Ambraciae frondes, i.e. the laurel crown of the victors in the Actian games (v. Actium and Actiacus), Stat. S. 2, 2, 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Ambraciensis

  • 13 Ambraciotes

    Ambrăcĭa, ae, f., = Ambrakia,
    I.
    A town in the south of Epirus, upon the gulf of the same name, now Arta, Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4; Cic. Ep. ad Brut. 6; Caes. B. C. 3, 36; Liv. 38, 4.—Hence,
    II.
    A.. Ambrăcĭ-ensis, e, adj., Ambracian, Liv. 38, 43.— Subst. plur., the inhabitants of Ambracia, Liv. 38, 43.—†
    B.
    Ambrăcĭōtēs, ae, m., = Ambrakiôtês, Ambracian; hence, vinum... Ambraciotes (v. abrotonites), Plin. 14, 7, 9, § 76.—
    C.
    Ambrăcĭus, a, um, adj., Ambracian (more freq. than Ambraciensis), Ov. H. 15, 164; Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4:

    Sinus Ambracius,

    Liv. 38, 4; Mel. 2, 3, in which Octavius conquered Antony and Cleopatra in a naval engagement: Ambraciae frondes, i.e. the laurel crown of the victors in the Actian games (v. Actium and Actiacus), Stat. S. 2, 2, 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Ambraciotes

  • 14 Ambracius

    Ambrăcĭa, ae, f., = Ambrakia,
    I.
    A town in the south of Epirus, upon the gulf of the same name, now Arta, Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4; Cic. Ep. ad Brut. 6; Caes. B. C. 3, 36; Liv. 38, 4.—Hence,
    II.
    A.. Ambrăcĭ-ensis, e, adj., Ambracian, Liv. 38, 43.— Subst. plur., the inhabitants of Ambracia, Liv. 38, 43.—†
    B.
    Ambrăcĭōtēs, ae, m., = Ambrakiôtês, Ambracian; hence, vinum... Ambraciotes (v. abrotonites), Plin. 14, 7, 9, § 76.—
    C.
    Ambrăcĭus, a, um, adj., Ambracian (more freq. than Ambraciensis), Ov. H. 15, 164; Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 4:

    Sinus Ambracius,

    Liv. 38, 4; Mel. 2, 3, in which Octavius conquered Antony and Cleopatra in a naval engagement: Ambraciae frondes, i.e. the laurel crown of the victors in the Actian games (v. Actium and Actiacus), Stat. S. 2, 2, 8.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Ambracius

  • 15 corono

    cŏrōno, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [corona], to furnish with a garland or crown, to crown, wreathe (class., esp. freq. in the poets).
    I.
    Lit., aliquid or aliquem:

    templa,

    Ov. M. 8, 264; cf.:

    postes lauro,

    Quint. 8, 6, 32:

    aras,

    Prop. 3 (4), 10, 19:

    deos fragili myrto,

    Hor. C. 3, 23, 15:

    puppim,

    Ov. F. 4, 335:

    cratera,

    Verg. G. 2, 528 (cf.:

    magnum cratera coronā Induit,

    id. A. 3, 525); so,

    crateras magnos statuunt et vina coronant,

    id. A. 1, 724; 7, 147 Forbig. ad loc. (cf. Nitsch. ad Hom. Od. 1, 419; Buttman, Lexil. 2, p. 100; others, less correctly, render, fill to the brim, comparing kratêras epestepsanto potoio, Hom. Il. 1, 470):

    epulae quas inibant propinqui coronati,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 25, 63.— Mid.:

    hederā coronantur Bacchico ritu,

    Macr. S. 1, 18, 2. —In the Gr. constr.:

    coronatus malobathro Syrio capillos,

    Hor. C. 2, 7, 7:

    eodem anno (459 A. U. C.) coronati primum ob res bello bene gestas ludos Romanos spectaverunt,

    Liv. 10, 47, 3; cf.

    of the crowning of victors (soldiers, poets, pugilists, etc.),

    Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 64; Quint. 10, 1, 66; 11, 2, 11; Plin. 15, 4, 5, § 19 al.;

    so also comoediam de sententiā judicum,

    to award the prize to it, Suet. Claud. 11.—Unusual constr.:

    tunc de oratoribus coronatus,

    i. e. crowned as victor in the contest with the orators, Suet. Dom. 13 (cf.:

    triumphare de aliquo, s. v. triumpho, I. A.).—And in the Gr. manner: quis... Magna coronari contemnat Olympia?

    to be crowned in the Olympic games, Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 50.—To the crowning of captives for sale (cf. corona, I. B.) reference is made in the passage: ut coronatus veniat, Cato ap. Gell. 6 (7), 4, 5.—
    B.
    Trop., to receive as the prize of victory:

    nomine novo coronari,

    Plin. 22, 5, 5, § 10.—
    II.
    Meton., to surround, encompass, enclose something in a circular form, to wreathe:

    cervices collumque,

    Lucr. 2, 802:

    Silva coronat aquas cingens latus omne,

    Ov. M. 5, 388; so id. ib. 9, 335:

    castra suggesta humo (previously praecingit),

    Prop. 4 (5), 4, 8; cf.:

    omnem abitum custode,

    Verg. A. 9, 380; and:

    nemus densā statione,

    Stat. Th. 2, 526:

    solem itineribus (stellarum),

    Vitr. 9, 4.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > corono

  • 16 lemniscus

    lemniscus, i, m., = lêmniskos.
    I.
    A pendent (purple?) ribbon, fastened to a victor's crown, at first of linden-bast or wool, afterwards of gold. A crown adorned with such a ribbon was the highest reward of a victor:

    tenuissimae earum (tiliarum), philyrae, coronarum lemniscis celebres, antiquorum honore,

    Plin. 16, 14, 25, § 65: lemnisci id est fascicolae coloriae, dependentes ex coronis, propterea dicuntur, quod [p. 1049] antiquissimum fuit genus coronarum lanearum, Paul. ex Fest. p. 115 Müll.; Plin. 21, 3, 4, § 6.—Such crowns were given as especial honors to guests at a feast:

    unguenta atque odores, lemniscos, corollas dari dapsilas,

    Plaut. Ps. 5, 1, 21:

    coronae datae lemniscis aureis interpositis,

    Capitol. Verr. 5:

    turba coronas lemniscosque jacientium,

    Liv. 33, 33, 2:

    ingestaeque aves, ac lemnisci, et bellaria,

    Suet. Ner. 25.—Crowns ornamented in this manner were given, also, to the victors in public games and to poets:

    et quae jamdudum tibi palma poëtica pollet, Lemnisco ornata est, quo mea palma caret,

    Aus. Epist. 20, 5; cf. Cic. Rosc. Am. 35, 100.—
    II.
    A tent or roll of lint dipped in a medicament, Veg. Vet. 2, 14, 3; 2, 48, 7 (in Cels. 7, 28, written as Greek).

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > lemniscus

  • 17 ad

       ad praep. with acc.    [cf. Eng. at].—Of approach (opp. to ab, as in to ex).    I. In space, to, toward: retorquet oculos ad urbem: una pars vergit ad septentriones, Cs.: tendens ad sidera palmas, V. —Fig.: ad alia vitia propensior, more inclined to. —Esp., ad dextram, sinistram, or laevam, to or on the right or left: ito ad dextram, T.: alqd ad dextram conspicere, Cs.: non rectā regione... sed ad laevam, L.—Designating the goal, to, toward: ad ripam convenire, Cs.: vocari ad cenam, H.: ad se adferre: reticulum ad narīs sibi admovebat (cf. accedit ad urbem, he approaches the city; and, accedit provinciae, it is added to the province).— Ad me, te, se, for domum meam, tuam, suam (in T. freq.): eamus ad me, T. — With gen., ellipt.: ad Dianae, to the temple of, T.: ad Castoris currere. — Used for dat: litteras dare ad aliquem, to write one a letter (cf. litteras dare alicui, to give a letter to one): domum ad te scribere: ad primam (epistulam) scribere, to answer.—Hence, librum ad aliquem mittere, scribere, to dedicate a book to one. —In titles, ad aliquem signifies to, addressed to.— With names of towns, ad answers to Whither? for the simple acc., i. e. to the vicinity of, to the neighborhood of: ad Aquinum accedere, approach: ut cum suis copiis iret ad Mutinam. — Of hostile movement or protection, against (cf. adversus): veniri ad se existimantes, Cs.: ipse ad hostem vehitur, N.: Romulus ad regem impetum facit (cf. in), L.: clipeos ad tela protecti obiciunt, V.: ad hos casūs provisa praesidia, Cs.—In war, of manner of fighting: ad pedes pugna venerat, was fought out on foot, L.: equitem ad pedes deducere, L.: pugna ad gladios venerat, L. — Emphatic of distance, to, even to, all the way to: a Salonis ad Oricum portūs... occupavit, Cs.: usque a Dianis ad Sinopum navigare. — Fig.: deverberasse usque ad necem, T.: virgis ad necem caedi.—Of nearness or proximity in gen. (cf. apud), near to, by, at, close by: ad forīs adsistere: Ianum ad infimum Argiletum fecit, L.: quod Romanis ad manum domi supplementum esset, at hand, L.: errantem ad flumina, V.; and ellipt.: pecunia utinam ad Opis maneret! — Of persons: qui primum pilum ad Caesarem duxerat, Cs.: ad me fuit, at my house: ad inferos poenas parricidi luent, among.—So, fig.: ad omnīs nationes sanctum, in the judgment of, Cs.: ut esset ad posteros monumentum, etc., L.: ad urbem esse (of a general outside of the walls): ad urbem cum imperio remanere, Cs.—With names of towns and verbs of rest: pons, qui erat ad Genavam, Cs.; and with an ordinal number and lapis: sepultus ad quintum lapidem, N.—    II. In time, about, toward: domum reductus ad vesperum, toward evening.—Till, until, to, even to, up to: usque ad hanc aetatem: ad multam noctem: amant ad quoddam tempus, until: quem ad finem? how long: ad quartam (sc. horam), H. — Hence, ad id (sc. tempus), till then: ad id dubios servare animos, L.— At, on, in, by: ad horam destinatam, at the appointed hour: frumentum ad diem dare. —    III. In number or amount, near, near to, almost, about, toward (cf. circiter): talenta ad quindecim coëgi, T.: annos ad quadraginta natus.—Adverb.: occisis ad hominum milibus quattuor, Cs.: ad duo milia et trecenti occisi, L.—Of a limit, to, unto, even to (rare): (viaticum) ad assem perdere, to the last farthing, H.: ad denarium solvere. —Esp., ad unum, to a single one, without exception: omnes ad unum idem sentiunt: exosus ad unum Troianos, V. —    IV. In other relations, with regard to, in respect of, in relation to, as to, to, in: ad honorem antecellere: nihil ad rem pertinet.—Ellipt.: rectene an secus, nihil ad nos: Quid ad praetorem? quid ad rem? i. e. what difference does it make? H.: quibus (auxiliaribus) ad pugnam confidebat, Cs.: ad speciem ornatus, ad sensum acerbus: mentis ad omnia caecitas: ad cetera paene gemelli, H.: facultas ad dicendum.—With words denoting measure, weight, manner, model, rule, etc., according to, agreeably to, after: taleis ad certum pondus examinatis, Cs.: ad cursūs lunae describit annum, L.: canere ad tibiam: carmen castigare ad unguem, to perfection (see unguis), H.: ad istorum normam sapientes: ad specus angustiae vallium (i. e. ad specuum similitudinem angustae valles), Cs. — With the cause or reason, according to, at, on, in consequence of, for, in order to: ad horum proces in Boeotiam duxit, on their entreaty, L.: dictis ad fallendum instructis, L.: causae ad discordiam, to produce dissension, T.: ad facinora incendere, S.: ad speciem tabernaculis relictis, for appearance, Cs.: ad id, for this use, as a means to that end, L.: ad id ipsum, for that my purpose, L.: delecto milite ad navīs, marines, L.: puer ad cyathum statuetur, H.: biiugi ad frena leones, yoked in pairs with bits, V.: res quae sunt ad incendia, Cs.: ad communem salutem utilius.—In comparison, to, compared with, in comparison with: terra ad universi caeli complexum: nihil ad tuum equitatum, Caesar.—    V. In adverbial phrases, ad omnia, withal, to crown all: ad omnia tantum advehi auri, etc., L.—Ad hoc and ad haec, moreover, besides, in addition: ad hoc, quos... postremo omnes, quos, etc., S. — Ad id quod, beside that (rare): ad id quod... indignitate etiam Romani accendebantur, L. — Ad tempus, at a definite, fixed time, C., L.; at a fit, appropriate time, L.; for some time, for a short time, L.; according to circumstances. — Ad praesens, for the moment, for a short time.—Ad locum, on the spot: ut ad locum miles esset paratus, L.—Ad verbum, word for word, literally. — Ad summam, on the whole, generally, in general; in a word, in short, C., H.—Ad extremum, ad ultimum, ad postremum, at the end, finally, at last; of place, at the extremity, at the top, at the end: ad extremum (teli) unde ferrum exstabat, L.; of time, at last, finally: ad extremum incipit philosophari; of order, finally, lastly; to the last degree, quite, L. — Quem ad finem? to what limit? how far? how long? Note.—a. Ad rarely follows its acc: quam ad, T.: quos ad, C.: ripam ad Araxis, Ta.—b. In composition, ad- stands before vowels, b, d, f, h, i consonant, m, n, q, v, and mostly before l, r, s; acbefore c; but very often ad- before cl-, cr-, and cu-; ag- or ad- before g; ap- or ad- before p; atbefore t; but a- or ad- before gn, sp, sc, st.
    * * *
    I II
    to, up to, towards; near, at; until, on, by; almost; according to; about w/NUM

    Latin-English dictionary > ad

  • 18 aedīlis

        aedīlis is, m    [aedes], a commissioner of buildings, aedile, magistrate for public works.
    * * *
    aedile - commissioner (magistrate) of police/fire/markets/games; sacristan

    Latin-English dictionary > aedīlis

  • 19 apex

        apex icis, m    [1 AP-], the extreme end, point, summit, top: lauri, V.: montis, O.: sublimis (of a headland), Iu.: levis, a tongue of flame, V.—A hat, helmet, crown: regum apices, H.: summus, the top of the helmet, V.: hinc apicem Fortuna Sustulit, the crown, H.: dialis, the flamen's hat, i. e. the priestly office, L. — Fig., the highest ornament: apex est senectutis auctoritas.
    * * *
    point, top, summit; cap, crown; conical priest cap; highest honor; long mark over vowel; outlines of letters, letter; least particle, speck

    Latin-English dictionary > apex

  • 20 apium

        apium ī, n    [apis], parsley, with the fragrant leaves, V.: vivax, that long remains green, H.—A parsley wreath was the prize in the Isthmian and Nemean games, Iu.
    * * *
    I
    wild celery; parsley; (garlands); (GEN apii OLD); like plants; (liked by bees)
    II

    Latin-English dictionary > apium

См. также в других словарях:

  • Italy — /it l ee/, n. a republic in S Europe, comprising a peninsula S of the Alps, and Sicily, Sardinia, Elba, and other smaller islands: a kingdom 1870 1946. 57,534,088; 116,294 sq. mi. (301,200 sq. km). Cap.: Rome. Italian, Italia. * * * Italy… …   Universalium


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