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Hull, William

  • 1 Buckle, William

    [br]
    b. 29 July 1794 Alnwick, Northumberland, England
    d. 30 September 1863 London, England
    [br]
    English mechanical engineer who introduced the first large screw-cutting lathe to Boulton, Watt \& Co.
    [br]
    William Buckle was the son of Thomas Buckle (1759–1849), a millwright who later assisted the 9th Earl of Dundonald (1749–1831) in his various inventions, principally machines for the manufacture of rope. Soon after the birth of William, the family moved from Alnwick to Hull, Yorkshire, where he received his education. The family again moved c.1808 to London, and William was apprenticed to Messrs Woolf \& Edwards, millwrights and engineers of Lambeth. During his apprenticeship he attended evening classes at a mechanical drawing school in Finsbury, which was then the only place of its kind in London.
    After completing his apprenticeship, he was sent by Messrs Humphrys to Memel in Prussia to establish steamboats on the rivers and lakes there under the patronage of the Prince of Hardenburg. After about four years he returned to Britain and was employed by Boulton, Watt \& Co. to install the engines in the first steam mail packet for the service between Dublin and Holyhead. He was responsible for the engines of the steamship Lightning when it was used on the visit of George IV to Ireland.
    About 1824 Buckle was engaged by Boulton, Watt \& Co. as Manager of the Soho Foundry, where he is credited with introducing the first large screw-cutting lathe. At Soho about 700 or 800 men were employed on a wide variety of engineering manufacture, including coining machinery for mints in many parts of the world, with some in 1826 for the Mint at the Soho Manufactory. In 1851, following the recommendations of a Royal Commission, the Royal Mint in London was reorganized and Buckle was asked to take the post of Assistant Coiner, the senior executive officer under the Deputy Master. This he accepted, retaining the post until the end of his life.
    At Soho, Buckle helped to establish a literary and scientific institution to provide evening classes for the apprentices and took part in the teaching. He was an original member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, which was founded in Birmingham in January 1847, and a member of their Council from then until 1855. He contributed a number of papers in the early years, including a memoir of William Murdock whom he had known at Soho; he resigned from the Institution in 1856 after his move to London. He was an honorary member of the London Association of Foreman Engineers.
    [br]
    Bibliography
    1850, "Inventions and life of William Murdock", Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers 2 (October): 16–26.
    RTS

    Biographical history of technology > Buckle, William

  • 2 Fife, William

    SUBJECT AREA: Ports and shipping
    [br]
    b. 15 June 1857 Fairlie, Scotland
    d. 11 August 1944 Fairlie, Scotland
    [br]
    Scottish naval architect and designer of sailing yachts of legendary beauty and performance.
    [br]
    Following his education at Brisbane Academy in Largs, William Fife (the third generation of the name) became apprenticed at the age of 14 to the already famous yacht-building yard owned by his family at Fairlie in Ayrshire. On completion of his apprenticeship, he joined the Paisley shipbuilders John Fullerton \& Co. to gain experience in iron shipbuilding before going on as Manager to the Marquis of Ailsa's Culzean Steam Launch and Yacht Works. Initially the works was sited below the famous castle at Culzean, but some years later it moved a few miles along the Ayrshire Coast to Maidens. The Culzean Company was wound up in 1887 and Fife then returned to the family yard, where he remained for the rest of his working life. Many outstanding yachts were the product of his hours on the drawing board, including auxiliary sailing cruisers, motor yachts and well-known racing craft. The most outstanding designs were for two of Sir Thomas Lipton's challengers for the America's Cup: Shamrock I and Shamrock III. The latter yacht was tested at the Ship Model Experiment Tank owned by Denny of Dumbarton before being built at their Leven Shipyard in 1903. Shamrock III may have been one of the earliest America's Cup yachts to have been designed with a high level of scientific input. The hull construction was unusual for the early years of the twentieth century, being of alloy steel with decks of aluminium.
    William Fife was decorated for his service to shipbuilding during the First World War. With the onset of the Great Depression the shipyard's output slowed, and in the 1930s it was sold to other interests; this was the end of the 120-year Fife dynasty.
    [br]
    Principal Honours and Distinctions
    OBE c.1919.
    FMW

    Biographical history of technology > Fife, William

  • 3 Jessop, William

    [br]
    b. 23 January 1745 Plymouth, England
    d. 18 November 1814
    [br]
    English engineer engaged in river, canal and dock construction.
    [br]
    William Jessop inherited from his father a natural ability in engineering, and because of his father's association with John Smeaton in the construction of Eddystone Lighthouse he was accepted by Smeaton as a pupil in 1759 at the age of 14. Smeaton was so impressed with his ability that Jessop was retained as an assistant after completion of his pupilage in 1767. As such he carried out field-work, making surveys on his own, but in 1772 he was recommended to the Aire and Calder Committee as an independent engineer and his first personally prepared report was made on the Haddlesey Cut, Selby Canal. It was in this report that he gave his first evidence before a Parliamentary Committee. He later became Resident Engineer on the Selby Canal, and soon after he was elected to the Smeatonian Society of Engineers, of which he later became Secretary for twenty years. Meanwhile he accompanied Smeaton to Ireland to advise on the Grand Canal, ultimately becoming Consulting Engineer until 1802, and was responsible for Ringsend Docks, which connected the canal to the Liffey and were opened in 1796. From 1783 to 1787 he advised on improvements to the River Trent, and his ability was so recognized that it made his reputation. From then on he was consulted on the Cromford Canal (1789–93), the Leicester Navigation (1791–4) and the Grantham Canal (1793–7); at the same time he was Chief Engineer of the Grand Junction Canal from 1793 to 1797 and then Consulting Engineer until 1805. He also engineered the Barnsley and Rochdale Canals. In fact, there were few canals during this period on which he was not consulted. It has now been established that Jessop carried the responsibility for the Pont-Cysyllte Aqueduct in Wales and also prepared the estimates for the Caledonian Canal in 1804. In 1792 he became a partner in the Butterley ironworks and thus became interested in railways. He proposed the Surrey Iron Railway in 1799 and prepared for the estimates; the line was built and opened in 1805. He was also the Engineer for the 10 mile (16 km) long Kilmarnock \& Troon Railway, the Act for which was obtained in 1808 and was the first Act for a public railway in Scotland. Jessop's advice was sought on drainage works between 1785 and 1802 in the lowlands of the Isle of Axholme, Holderness, the Norfolk Marshlands, and the Axe and Brue area of the Somerset Levels. He was also consulted on harbour and dock improvements. These included Hull (1793), Portsmouth (1796), Folkestone (1806) and Sunderland (1807), but his greatest dock works were the West India Docks in London and the Floating Harbour at Bristol. He was Consulting Engineer to the City of London Corporation from 1796to 1799, drawing up plans for docks on the Isle of Dogs in 1796; in February 1800 he was appointed Engineer, and three years later, in September 1803, he was appointed Engineer to the Bristol Floating Harbour. Jessop was regarded as the leading civil engineer in the country from 1785 until 1806. He died following a stroke in 1814.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    C.Hadfield and A.W.Skempton, 1979, William Jessop. Engineer, Newton Abbot: David \& Charles.
    JHB

    Biographical history of technology > Jessop, William

  • 4 Priestman, William Dent

    [br]
    b. 23 August 1847 Sutton, Hull, England
    d. 7 September 1936 Hull, England
    [br]
    English oil engine pioneer.
    [br]
    William was the second son and one of eleven children of Samuel Priestman, who had moved to Hull after retiring as a corn miller in Kirkstall, Leeds, and who in retirement had become a director of the North Eastern Railway Company. The family were strict Quakers, so William was sent to the Quaker School in Bootham, York. He left school at the age of 17 to start an engineering apprenticeship at the Humber Iron Works, but this company failed so the apprenticeship was continued with the North Eastern Railway, Gateshead. In 1869 he joined the hydraulics department of Sir William Armstrong \& Company, Newcastle upon Tyne, but after a year there his father financed him in business at a small, run down works, the Holderness Foundry, Hull. He was soon joined by his brother, Samuel, their main business being the manufacture of dredging equipment (grabs), cranes and winches. In the late 1870s William became interested in internal combustion engines. He took a sublicence to manufacture petrol engines to the patents of Eugène Etève of Paris from the British licensees, Moll and Dando. These engines operated in a similar manner to the non-compression gas engines of Lenoir. Failure to make the two-stroke version of this engine work satisfactorily forced him to pay royalties to Crossley Bros, the British licensees of the Otto four-stroke patents.
    Fear of the dangers of petrol as a fuel, reflected by the associated very high insurance premiums, led William to experiment with the use of lamp oil as an engine fuel. His first of many patents was for a vaporizer. This was in 1885, well before Ackroyd Stuart. What distinguished the Priestman engine was the provision of an air pump which pressurized the fuel tank, outlets at the top and bottom of which led to a fuel atomizer injecting continuously into a vaporizing chamber heated by the exhaust gases. A spring-loaded inlet valve connected the chamber to the atmosphere, with the inlet valve proper between the chamber and the working cylinder being camoperated. A plug valve in the fuel line and a butterfly valve at the inlet to the chamber were operated, via a linkage, by the speed governor; this is believed to be the first use of this method of control. It was found that vaporization was only partly achieved, the higher fractions of the fuel condensing on the cylinder walls. A virtue was made of this as it provided vital lubrication. A starting system had to be provided, this comprising a lamp for preheating the vaporizing chamber and a hand pump for pressurizing the fuel tank.
    Engines of 2–10 hp (1.5–7.5 kW) were exhibited to the press in 1886; of these, a vertical engine was installed in a tram car and one of the horizontals in a motor dray. In 1888, engines were shown publicly at the Royal Agricultural Show, while in 1890 two-cylinder vertical marine engines were introduced in sizes from 2 to 10 hp (1.5–7.5 kW), and later double-acting ones up to some 60 hp (45 kW). First, clutch and gearbox reversing was used, but reversing propellers were fitted later (Priestman patent of 1892). In the same year a factory was established in Philadelphia, USA, where engines in the range 5–20 hp (3.7–15 kW) were made. Construction was radically different from that of the previous ones, the bosses of the twin flywheels acting as crank discs with the main bearings on the outside.
    On independent test in 1892, a Priestman engine achieved a full-load brake thermal efficiency of some 14 per cent, a very creditable figure for a compression ratio limited to under 3:1 by detonation problems. However, efficiency at low loads fell off seriously owing to the throttle governing, and the engines were heavy, complex and expensive compared with the competition.
    Decline in sales of dredging equipment and bad debts forced the firm into insolvency in 1895 and receivers took over. A new company was formed, the brothers being excluded. However, they were able to attend board meetings, but to exert no influence. Engine activities ceased in about 1904 after over 1,000 engines had been made. It is probable that the Quaker ethics of the brothers were out of place in a business that was becoming increasingly cut-throat. William spent the rest of his long life serving others.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    C.Lyle Cummins, 1976, Internal Fire, Carnot Press.
    C.Lyle Cummins and J.D.Priestman, 1985, "William Dent Priestman, oil engine pioneer and inventor: his engine patents 1885–1901", Proceedings of the Institution of
    Mechanical Engineers 199:133.
    Anthony Harcombe, 1977, "Priestman's oil engine", Stationary Engine Magazine 42 (August).
    JB

    Biographical history of technology > Priestman, William Dent

  • 5 Symington, William

    SUBJECT AREA: Ports and shipping
    [br]
    b. 1764 Leadhills, Lanarkshire, Scotland
    d. 22 March 1831 Wapping, London, England
    [br]
    Scottish pioneer of steam navigation.
    [br]
    Symington was the son of the Superintendent of the Mines Company in Lanarkshire, and attended the local school. When he was 22 years old he was sent by Gilbert Meason, Manager of the Wanlockhead mines, to Edinburgh University. In 1779 he was working on the assembly of a Watt engine as an apprentice to his brother, George, and in 1786 he started experiments to modify a Watt engine in order to avoid infringing the separate condenser patent. He sought a patent for his alternative, which was paid for by Meason. He constructed a model steam road carriage which was completed in 1786; it was shown in Edinburgh by Meason, attracting interest but inadequate financial support. It had a horizontal cylinder and was non-condensing. No full-sized engine was ever built but the model secured the interest of Patrick Miller, an Edinburgh banker, who ordered an engine from Symington to drive an experimental boat, 25 ft (7.6 m) long with a dual hull, which performed satisfactorily on Dalswinton Loch in 1788. In the following year Miller ordered a larger engine for a bigger boat which was tried on the Forth \& Clyde Canal in December 1789, the component parts having been made by the Carron Company. The engine worked perfectly but had the effect of breaking the paddle wheels. These were repaired and further trials were successful but Miller lost interest and his experiments lapsed. Symington devoted himself thereafter to building stationary engines. He built other engines for mine pumping at Sanquhar and Leadhills before going further afield. In all, he built over thirty engines, about half of them being rotary. In 1800–1 he designed the engine for a boat for Lord Dundas, the Charlotte Dundas; this was apparently the first boat of that name and sailed on both the Forth and Clyde rivers. A second Charlotte Dundas with a horizontal cylinder was to follow and first sailed in January 1803 for the Forth \& Clyde Canal Company. The speed of the boat was only 2 mph (3 km/h) and much was made by its detractors of the damage said to be caused to the canal banks by its wash. Lord Dundas declined to authorize payment of outstanding accounts; Symington received little reward for his efforts. He died in the house of his son-in-law, Dr Robert Bowie, in Wapping, amidst heated controversy about the true inventor of steam navigation.
    [br]
    Further Reading
    W.S.Harvey and G.Downs-Rose, 1980, William Symington, Inventor and Engine- Builder, London: Mechanical Engineering Publications.
    IMcN

    Biographical history of technology > Symington, William

  • 6 sweet-william

    ˈswi:tˈwɪljəm сущ.;
    бот. турецкая гвоздика n турецкая гвоздика sweet-william бот. турецкая гвоздика

    Большой англо-русский и русско-английский словарь > sweet-william

  • 7 William

    William - Уильям, Вильям; Вильгельм

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > William

  • 8 Hull

    hull [hʌl]
    1. n шелуха́, скорлупа́
    2. v очища́ть от шелухи́, шелуши́ть, лущи́ть
    hull [hʌl]
    1. n
    1) ко́рпус ( корабля, танка);

    hull down с ко́рпусом, скры́тым за горизо́нтом

    ;

    hull out с ко́рпусом, ви́димым над горизо́нтом

    2) о́стов, карка́с
    3) ав. фюзеля́ж
    2. v попа́сть снаря́дом в ко́рпус корабля́

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > Hull

  • 9 hull

    hull [hʌl]
    1. n шелуха́, скорлупа́
    2. v очища́ть от шелухи́, шелуши́ть, лущи́ть
    hull [hʌl]
    1. n
    1) ко́рпус ( корабля, танка);

    hull down с ко́рпусом, скры́тым за горизо́нтом

    ;

    hull out с ко́рпусом, ви́димым над горизо́нтом

    2) о́стов, карка́с
    3) ав. фюзеля́ж
    2. v попа́сть снаря́дом в ко́рпус корабля́

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > hull

  • 10 hull down

    hull down с корпусом, скрытым за горизонтом

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > hull down

  • 11 hull out

    hull out с корпусом, видимым над горизонтом

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > hull out

  • 12 sweet-william

    sweet-william noun bot. турецкая гвоздика

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > sweet-william

  • 13 William

    William noun Уильям, Вильям; Вильгельм

    Англо-русский словарь Мюллера > William

  • 14 hull

    1) мор., возд. корпус
    - floating drilling vessel hull

    Англо-русский словарь технических терминов > hull

  • 15 American Hull Insurance Syndicate

    орг.
    страх., амер. Американский синдикат по страхованию корпусов [по страхованию КАСКО\]* (ассоциация, объединяющая страховые и перестраховочные компании, оказывающие услуги по страхованию корпусов морских судов; создана в 1920 г.)
    See:

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > American Hull Insurance Syndicate

  • 16 Hewlett, William

    перс.
    упр. Хьюллет, Уильям (1913-2001; американский бизнесмен и теоретик менеджмента; получил инженерное образование в Стенфордском университете; в 1939 вместе с Д. Пакардом основал компанию Hewlett-Packard; был президентом компании с 1964 по 1977 г., затем до 1987 г. состоял в совете директоров)
    See:

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > Hewlett, William

  • 17 hull

    сущ.
    общ. корпус (для судна обозначает основной каркас, исключая мачты, паруса, реи, такелаж и другую оснастку; также может обозначать основной корпус наземного транспортного средства); фюзеляж ( самолета)
    See:

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > hull

  • 18 hull and machinery insurance

    сокр. H&M insurance страх. страхование корпуса, машин и оборудования*
    See:

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > hull and machinery insurance

  • 19 hull insurance

    страх. страхование корпуса, страхование КАСКО (страхование, распространяющееся на корпус морского или воздушного судна, его двигатели, другие механизмы и оборудование, постоянно находящееся на судне, но не предусматривающее страховое покрытие для находящегося на судне груза)
    See:
    * * *
    страхование корабля, включая повреждение корпуса
    * * *
    каско (страхование корпуса, машин и оборудования судов)
    . . Словарь экономических терминов .
    * * *

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > hull insurance

  • 20 hull policy

    страх. полис страхования корпуса
    See:
    * * *

    Англо-русский экономический словарь > hull policy

См. также в других словарях:

  • Hull, William — (1753 1825)    Born in Derby, Conn. Educated at Yale University, and called to the bar, 1775. Served with distinction during the Revolutionary War; major general of militia in Massachusetts and a member of the federal Senate; appointed governor… …   The makers of Canada

  • Hull, William — born June 24, 1753, Derby, Conn. died Nov. 29, 1825, Newton, Mass., U.S. U.S. Army officer. He fought in American Revolutionary campaigns in Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. In 1805 he was appointed governor of Michigan Territory. At the… …   Universalium

  • Hull, William — (24 jun. 1753, Derby, Conn., EE.UU.–29 nov. 1825, Newton, Mass.). Oficial de ejército estadounidense. Combatió en las campañas de la independencia de los EE.UU. en Connecticut, Nueva York y Nueva Jersey. En 1805 fue gobernador del Territorio de… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • William Hull — (* 24. Juni 1753 in Derby, Connecticut; † 29. November 1825 in Newton, Massachusetts) war ein amerikanischer Politiker und Offizier des Amerikanischen Unabhängigkeitskrieges sowie des K …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • William Hull — William Hull, vers 1800. William Hull (24 juin 1753–29 novembre 1825) était un soldat et un politicien américain. Il combattit lors de la guerre d indépendance, fut gouverneur du Territoire du Michigan, p …   Wikipédia en Français

  • William Wilberforce — William Wilberforce. Gemalt um 1794 von Karl Anton Hickel William Wilberforce …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • William Hull (artist) — William Hull (1820 1880), a well known watercolour painter, exhibited at the Royal Academy in London.Born in Grafham in Huntingdonshire, England, he painted many excellent watercolours. After suffering a stroke in his thirties, William moved to… …   Wikipedia

  • William Pierrepont — (c. 1607 1678), English politician, was the second son of Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston upon Hull. Returned to the Long Parliament in 1640 as member for Great Wenlock, he threw his influence on the side of peace and took part for the… …   Wikipedia

  • Hull — Hull, Clark Leonard Hull, Cordell (Kingston upon Hull) ► C. de Gran Bretaña, en el E de Inglaterra, condado de Humberside, junto al mar del Norte; 246 700 h. Principal puerto pesquero del país. * * * (as used in expressions) Hull, Bobby Robert… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • William Seymour — may refer to: *William Digby Seymour (1805 1870), MP for Kingston upon Hull *William Digby Seymour, QC, lawyer and poet, MP for Sunderland and Somerset *William H. Seymour (1840 ndash;1913), American politician *William J. Seymour (1870… …   Wikipedia

  • Hull F.C. — This article is about Hull FC, which is a rugby league football club. For the association football Football League Championship team, see Hull City A.F.C.. Hull FC …   Wikipedia

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