Перевод: с испанского

Heschel, Abraham Joshua

  • 1 Abraham SM

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 2 Abraham Lincoln

    m.
    Abraham Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 3 Abraham

    Abraham

    Vocabulario Castellano-Catalán

  • 4 Josué

    m.
    Joshua.
    * * *
    * * *
    = Joshua.
    Ex. A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    * * *

    Ex: A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.

    * * *
    Josué n pr
    Joshua

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 5 boscaje

    m.
    1 boscage, cluster of trees, grove.
    2 boscage, landscape. (Picture)
    * * *
    1 thicket
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=bosque) thicket, grove
    2) (Arte) woodland scene
    * * *
    masculino thicket
    * * *
    Ex. Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    * * *
    masculino thicket
    * * *

    Ex: Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.

    * * *
    thicket
    * * *
    [bosque] thicket, copse
    * * *
    m thicket

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 6 cabaña de madera

    (n.) = log cabin, wood cabin
    Ex. Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.
    Ex. The tent looked even more suited to the countryside than those wood cabins.
    * * *
    (n.) = log cabin, wood cabin

    Ex: Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.

    Ex: The tent looked even more suited to the countryside than those wood cabins.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 7 cabaña de troncos de madera

    (n.) = log cabin, wood cabin
    Ex. Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.
    Ex. The tent looked even more suited to the countryside than those wood cabins.
    * * *
    (n.) = log cabin, wood cabin

    Ex: Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.

    Ex: The tent looked even more suited to the countryside than those wood cabins.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 8 chaparral

    m.
    1 plantation of evergreen oaks.
    2 thick bramble-bushes entangled with thorny shrubs in clumps. (America)
    3 chaparral, bushes, dense growth of shrubs, place overgrown with brambles.
    4 creosote bush.
    * * *
    1 thicket, chaparral
    * * *
    SM thicket ( of kermes oaks), chaparral
    * * *
    masculino chaparral, thicket
    * * *
    = chaparral, thicket.
    Ex. Chaparrals occur in Mediterranean climates - climates with low rainfall that is concentrated in the cool season.
    Ex. Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    * * *
    masculino chaparral, thicket
    * * *
    = chaparral, thicket.

    Ex: Chaparrals occur in Mediterranean climates - climates with low rainfall that is concentrated in the cool season.

    Ex: Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.

    * * *
    chaparral, thicket
    * * *
    chaparral, = thicket of kermes oaks

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 9 chistera

    f.
    1 top hat (sombrero).
    2 fish basket.
    * * *
    1 (de pescador) fish basket, angler's basket
    3 DEPORTE pelota basket
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=sombrero) top hat
    2) (Pesca) fish basket
    * * *
    femenino top hat
    * * *
    Ex. From their stovepipe hats to platform shoes, dozens of impersonators made an honest effort to copy Abraham Lincoln.
    * * *
    femenino top hat
    * * *

    Ex: From their stovepipe hats to platform shoes, dozens of impersonators made an honest effort to copy Abraham Lincoln.

    * * *
    (Esp)
    top hat
    * * *

    chistera sustantivo femenino
    top hat
    chistera sustantivo femenino top hat
    * * *
    [sombrero] top hat
    * * *
    f top hat
    * * *
    chistera n top hat

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 10 coartar

    v.
    1 to limit, to restrict.
    2 to coarct.
    * * *
    1 to limit, restrict
    * * *
    VT to limit, restrict
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <persona> to inhibit; <libertad/voluntad> to restrict
    * * *
    = anchor, restrict, tie down, cripple, frustrate, dam (up), shackle, box in, hamstring, fetter, hem + Nombre + in, chill, cramp.
    Ex. One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory, his hands are free, he is not anchored.
    Ex. This is an example of a classification which is restricted to a specific physical form, as it is used to classify maps and atlases.
    Ex. There are many able people still tied down with the routine 'running' of their libraries.
    Ex. The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
    Ex. The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
    Ex. But to prevent any meandering at all, or to dam the flow of talk too soon and too often by intruding, generally only frustrates spontaneity = Aunque evitar cualquier divagación o cortar el flujo de la conversación demasiado pronto y con demasiada frecuencia con interrupciones generalmente sólo coarta la espontaneidad.
    Ex. Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex. What is important is that agencies face few barriers to disseminating information on the Web quickly rather than being boxed in by standardization requirements = Lo que es importante es que las agencias se encuentran pocas trabas para diseminar información en la web de una forma rápida más que verse restringidas por cuestiones de normalización.
    Ex. Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex. Faculty tenure is designed to allow the scholar to proceed with his investigation without being fettered with concerns arising from loss of job and salary.
    Ex. The world of work is no longer constrained by the four physical dimensions of space and time that have hemmed us in for most of recorded history.
    Ex. This would chill the freedom of inquiry that is central to the academic process and that is, moreover, privileged by the First Amendment.
    Ex. They used schools as a buttress of a caste system designed to subordinate blacks socially, to cramp them economically under a rigid job ceiling.
    ----
    * coartar el avance de Algo = hinder + progress.
    * coartar el progreso de Algo = hinder + progress.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <persona> to inhibit; <libertad/voluntad> to restrict
    * * *
    = anchor, restrict, tie down, cripple, frustrate, dam (up), shackle, box in, hamstring, fetter, hem + Nombre + in, chill, cramp.

    Ex: One can now picture a future investigator in his laboratory, his hands are free, he is not anchored.

    Ex: This is an example of a classification which is restricted to a specific physical form, as it is used to classify maps and atlases.
    Ex: There are many able people still tied down with the routine 'running' of their libraries.
    Ex: The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
    Ex: The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
    Ex: But to prevent any meandering at all, or to dam the flow of talk too soon and too often by intruding, generally only frustrates spontaneity = Aunque evitar cualquier divagación o cortar el flujo de la conversación demasiado pronto y con demasiada frecuencia con interrupciones generalmente sólo coarta la espontaneidad.
    Ex: Tom Sutherland, a professor at the American University of Beirut, was kidnapped in 1985 and held prisoner for six and a half years, for much of the time shackled to his prisoner Terry Anderson.
    Ex: What is important is that agencies face few barriers to disseminating information on the Web quickly rather than being boxed in by standardization requirements = Lo que es importante es que las agencias se encuentran pocas trabas para diseminar información en la web de una forma rápida más que verse restringidas por cuestiones de normalización.
    Ex: Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex: Faculty tenure is designed to allow the scholar to proceed with his investigation without being fettered with concerns arising from loss of job and salary.
    Ex: The world of work is no longer constrained by the four physical dimensions of space and time that have hemmed us in for most of recorded history.
    Ex: This would chill the freedom of inquiry that is central to the academic process and that is, moreover, privileged by the First Amendment.
    Ex: They used schools as a buttress of a caste system designed to subordinate blacks socially, to cramp them economically under a rigid job ceiling.
    * coartar el avance de Algo = hinder + progress.
    * coartar el progreso de Algo = hinder + progress.

    * * *
    coartar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to inhibit
    su presencia lo coartaba he found her presence inhibiting, her presence inhibited him
    2 ‹libertad/voluntad› to restrict
    * * *

    coartar (conjugate coartar) verbo transitivopersonato inhibit;
    libertad/voluntadto restrict
    coartar verbo transitivo to restrict
    'coartar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    constrict
    * * *
    to limit, to restrict
    * * *
    v/t restrict
    * * *
    : to restrict, to limit

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 11 criticar

    v.
    1 to criticize.
    Su padre criticó su vestimenta Her father criticized her clothes.
    María critica cuando siente envidia Mary criticizes when she feels envy.
    El profesor criticó su proceder The teacher criticized his behavior.
    2 to review (enjuiciar) (literatura, arte).
    3 to gossip.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [SACAR], like link=sacarsacar
    1 to criticize
    1 (murmurar) to gossip
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=censurar) to criticize

    la actuación de la policía fue criticada por la oposición — the police behaviour was criticized by the opposition

    2) (=hablar mal)

    siempre está criticando a la gente — he's always criticizing people, he's always finding fault with people

    3) (Arte, Literat, Teat) [+ libro, obra] to review
    2.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (atacar, censurar) to criticize
    b) (Art, Espec, Lit) <libro/película> to review
    2.
    criticar vi to gossip, backbite
    * * *
    = come under + criticism, condemn, criticise [criticize, -USA], decry, find + fault with, put down, take + Nombre + to task, deprecate, castigate, speak against, chide, censure, berate, critique, bash, raise + criticism, come under + attack, pick on, go to + bat against, chastise, carp, damn, recreminate, reprove, reproach, single out for + criticism, slam, take + a swat at, chew + Nombre + up, roast, give + Nombre + a good roasting.
    Ex. In the 2nd period, 1912-1933, the methods and direction of the movement came under criticism from socialists and educationalists, and a heated debate ensued.
    Ex. It must, however, also be considered as a major source of the 'subject index illusion' so trenchantly condemned by Bliss, as mentioned below.
    Ex. AACR2 has been criticised on the grounds that it does not identify the cataloguing unit to which the rules refer.
    Ex. Dick decried the feeling among some scholarly publishers that there is no link between scholarly researchers, publishers, and the library.
    Ex. I will add that since I have been working with the access LC provides to materials on women, a basic fault that I have found with LC subject cataloging is the absence of specificity.
    Ex. 'Specifically, I'm told you delight in putting down the professional'.
    Ex. I am frequently taken to task as someone who would try to destroy the integrity of certain catalogs on the West Coast.
    Ex. In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex. In his report, one of the few really inspiring documents to have come out of librarianship, McColvin castigated the standards of cataloguing and classification he found.
    Ex. As a result public libraries came into disrepute and even today authorities speak against them.
    Ex. Some authors of papers lament the lack of a philosophy and gently chide librarians for the 'simplicity of their pragmatism'.
    Ex. This agreement must build in incentives to participating libraries as well as methods of censuring those participants which do not fulfil their obligations to the other participating libraries in the network = Este acuerdo debe incorporar incentivos para las bibliotecas participantes así cómo la forma de llamarle la atención a aquellos participantes que no cumplan sus obligaciones con las otras bibliotecas de la red.
    Ex. Unfortunately, many of the writers are simply berating the current situation, holding to rather ancient models of mass culture.
    Ex. This paper critiques the jurisprudential assumptions upon which legal resources are created, materials are collected, and research practices are justified.
    Ex. Newspapers took advantage of the accident to attack or 'bash' the nuclear industry or nuclear power in general.
    Ex. The author raises some criticisms of the international standard ISO 2709.
    Ex. This bipartite approach has recently come under heavy attack.
    Ex. By the way, here I have stolen a phrase from the Library of Congress, not to pick on this wonderful institution, but because its mission statement resonates with a number of individuals like me, who work in research libraries.
    Ex. The article has the title 'The minority press goes to bat against segregated baseball'.
    Ex. The profession should cease practising the amateurism for which it chastises employers who have untrained persons trying to function as librarians.
    Ex. You who carped that the 007 films had devolved into a catalog of fresh gadgets and stale puns, eat crow.
    Ex. The play is damned by the critics but packs in the crowds and the producers may be upset by the adverse criticisms but they can, as the saying goes, cry all the way to the bank.
    Ex. Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote: 'Experience informs us that the first defense of weak minds is to recriminate'.
    Ex. The person reproving his friend must understand that before he can reprove someone else, he must first reprove himself.
    Ex. The Governor, it is learnt, sternly reproached the party for putting the public to inconvenience for the last two days.
    Ex. Though what exactly constitutes moral decay is debatable, one group traditionally has been singled out for criticism, namely young people.
    Ex. Britain's top cop was today slammed for leaving three white detectives 'hanging out to dry' after they were wrongly accused of racism.
    Ex. I get pretty tired of ignorant people taking swats at the Catholic religion for 'worshiping statues'.
    Ex. A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    Ex. The critics, however, roasted her for playing a tragic French heroine with a flat Midwestern accent.
    Ex. What impressed me was that the rest of the board gave him a good roasting for wasting peoples time.
    ----
    * criticar a = fulminate about, level + criticism at.
    * criticar a Alguien a sus espaldas = cut + Nombre + up + behind + Posesivo + back.
    * criticar duramente = tear + Nombre + to shreds, slate, flail away at.
    * criticar las ideas de Alguien = trample on + Posesivo + ideas.
    * ser criticado = come under + fire.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) (atacar, censurar) to criticize
    b) (Art, Espec, Lit) <libro/película> to review
    2.
    criticar vi to gossip, backbite
    * * *
    = come under + criticism, condemn, criticise [criticize, -USA], decry, find + fault with, put down, take + Nombre + to task, deprecate, castigate, speak against, chide, censure, berate, critique, bash, raise + criticism, come under + attack, pick on, go to + bat against, chastise, carp, damn, recreminate, reprove, reproach, single out for + criticism, slam, take + a swat at, chew + Nombre + up, roast, give + Nombre + a good roasting.

    Ex: In the 2nd period, 1912-1933, the methods and direction of the movement came under criticism from socialists and educationalists, and a heated debate ensued.

    Ex: It must, however, also be considered as a major source of the 'subject index illusion' so trenchantly condemned by Bliss, as mentioned below.
    Ex: AACR2 has been criticised on the grounds that it does not identify the cataloguing unit to which the rules refer.
    Ex: Dick decried the feeling among some scholarly publishers that there is no link between scholarly researchers, publishers, and the library.
    Ex: I will add that since I have been working with the access LC provides to materials on women, a basic fault that I have found with LC subject cataloging is the absence of specificity.
    Ex: 'Specifically, I'm told you delight in putting down the professional'.
    Ex: I am frequently taken to task as someone who would try to destroy the integrity of certain catalogs on the West Coast.
    Ex: In these instances, it is important to avoid putting one's colleagues in another unit on the defensive or deprecating another unit to a patron.
    Ex: In his report, one of the few really inspiring documents to have come out of librarianship, McColvin castigated the standards of cataloguing and classification he found.
    Ex: As a result public libraries came into disrepute and even today authorities speak against them.
    Ex: Some authors of papers lament the lack of a philosophy and gently chide librarians for the 'simplicity of their pragmatism'.
    Ex: This agreement must build in incentives to participating libraries as well as methods of censuring those participants which do not fulfil their obligations to the other participating libraries in the network = Este acuerdo debe incorporar incentivos para las bibliotecas participantes así cómo la forma de llamarle la atención a aquellos participantes que no cumplan sus obligaciones con las otras bibliotecas de la red.
    Ex: Unfortunately, many of the writers are simply berating the current situation, holding to rather ancient models of mass culture.
    Ex: This paper critiques the jurisprudential assumptions upon which legal resources are created, materials are collected, and research practices are justified.
    Ex: Newspapers took advantage of the accident to attack or 'bash' the nuclear industry or nuclear power in general.
    Ex: The author raises some criticisms of the international standard ISO 2709.
    Ex: This bipartite approach has recently come under heavy attack.
    Ex: By the way, here I have stolen a phrase from the Library of Congress, not to pick on this wonderful institution, but because its mission statement resonates with a number of individuals like me, who work in research libraries.
    Ex: The article has the title 'The minority press goes to bat against segregated baseball'.
    Ex: The profession should cease practising the amateurism for which it chastises employers who have untrained persons trying to function as librarians.
    Ex: You who carped that the 007 films had devolved into a catalog of fresh gadgets and stale puns, eat crow.
    Ex: The play is damned by the critics but packs in the crowds and the producers may be upset by the adverse criticisms but they can, as the saying goes, cry all the way to the bank.
    Ex: Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote: 'Experience informs us that the first defense of weak minds is to recriminate'.
    Ex: The person reproving his friend must understand that before he can reprove someone else, he must first reprove himself.
    Ex: The Governor, it is learnt, sternly reproached the party for putting the public to inconvenience for the last two days.
    Ex: Though what exactly constitutes moral decay is debatable, one group traditionally has been singled out for criticism, namely young people.
    Ex: Britain's top cop was today slammed for leaving three white detectives 'hanging out to dry' after they were wrongly accused of racism.
    Ex: I get pretty tired of ignorant people taking swats at the Catholic religion for 'worshiping statues'.
    Ex: A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    Ex: The critics, however, roasted her for playing a tragic French heroine with a flat Midwestern accent.
    Ex: What impressed me was that the rest of the board gave him a good roasting for wasting peoples time.
    * criticar a = fulminate about, level + criticism at.
    * criticar a Alguien a sus espaldas = cut + Nombre + up + behind + Posesivo + back.
    * criticar duramente = tear + Nombre + to shreds, slate, flail away at.
    * criticar las ideas de Alguien = trample on + Posesivo + ideas.
    * ser criticado = come under + fire.

    * * *
    criticar [A2 ]
    vt
    1 (atacar) to criticize
    una postura que fue muy criticada por los ecologistas a position which came in for fierce criticism from o which was fiercely criticized by ecologists
    criticó duramente a los especuladores he strongly attacked o criticized the speculators
    un proyecto muy criticado a plan which has been heavily criticized o which has come in for a lot of criticism
    2 (hablar mal de) to criticize
    tú no hace falta que la critiques porque eres igual de egoísta que ella you're in no position to criticize o (colloq) you can't talk, you're just as selfish as she is
    3 (Art, Espec, Lit) ‹libro/película› to review
    ■ criticar
    vi
    to gossip, backbite
    * * *



    criticar (conjugate criticar) verbo transitivo

    b) (Art, Espec, Lit) ‹libro/películato review

    verbo intransitivo
    to gossip, backbite
    criticar
    I verbo transitivo to criticize
    II verbo intransitivo (murmurar) to gossip
    'criticar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    censurar
    - dedicarse
    - desollar
    - despellejar
    - tralla
    - vapulear
    - arremeter
    - murmurar
    - rajar
    - sino
    English:
    attack
    - carp
    - critical
    - criticize
    - fault
    - knock
    - pan
    - pick on
    - run down
    - slam
    - slate
    - get
    - run
    * * *
    1. [censurar] to criticize
    2. [enjuiciar] [literatura, arte] to review
    * * *
    v/t criticize
    * * *
    criticar {72} vt
    : to criticize
    * * *
    1.(en general) to criticize
    2.(cotillear) to gossip

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 12 echar un rapapolvo

    (v.) = tell + Nombe + off, give + Nombre + a dressing-down, give + Nombre + a telling-off, chew + Nombre + up
    Ex. Teachers should tackle bad behaviour in class by praising their pupils instead of telling them off, according to research published today.
    Ex. Teachers can reduce a child to tears by picking them out in an assembly and giving her a dressing down in front of the whole school.
    Ex. A ward sister then arrived and gave them a telling off for not getting on with their work.
    Ex. A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    * * *
    (v.) = tell + Nombe + off, give + Nombre + a dressing-down, give + Nombre + a telling-off, chew + Nombre + up

    Ex: Teachers should tackle bad behaviour in class by praising their pupils instead of telling them off, according to research published today.

    Ex: Teachers can reduce a child to tears by picking them out in an assembly and giving her a dressing down in front of the whole school.
    Ex: A ward sister then arrived and gave them a telling off for not getting on with their work.
    Ex: A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 13 echar una bronca

    (v.) = tell + Nombe + off, give + Nombre + a dressing-down, give + Nombre + a telling-off, chew + Nombre + up
    Ex. Teachers should tackle bad behaviour in class by praising their pupils instead of telling them off, according to research published today.
    Ex. Teachers can reduce a child to tears by picking them out in an assembly and giving her a dressing down in front of the whole school.
    Ex. A ward sister then arrived and gave them a telling off for not getting on with their work.
    Ex. A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    * * *
    (v.) = tell + Nombe + off, give + Nombre + a dressing-down, give + Nombre + a telling-off, chew + Nombre + up

    Ex: Teachers should tackle bad behaviour in class by praising their pupils instead of telling them off, according to research published today.

    Ex: Teachers can reduce a child to tears by picking them out in an assembly and giving her a dressing down in front of the whole school.
    Ex: A ward sister then arrived and gave them a telling off for not getting on with their work.
    Ex: A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 14 eliminar de un texto

    (v.) = redact out, redact
    Ex. A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.
    Ex. Identifying information has been redacted to the extent necessary to protect the personal privacy of individuals discussed in the letter.
    * * *
    (v.) = redact out, redact

    Ex: A war of words went up when Jewish zealots redacted out this or that word or phrase in order to deny Joshua, and the Christians chewed them up for it.

    Ex: Identifying information has been redacted to the extent necessary to protect the personal privacy of individuals discussed in the letter
    .

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 15 espíritu fronterizo, el

    (n.) = frontier spirit, the
    Ex. Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 16 frustrar

    v.
    1 to frustrate (person).
    El accidente frustró sus planes The accident frustrated her plans.
    Su actitud frustró al gerente His attitude frustrated the manager.
    2 to thwart, to put paid to (posibilidades, ilusiones).
    * * *
    1 (cosa) to frustrate, thwart
    2 (persona) to disappoint
    1 (proyectos, planes) to fail, come to nothing
    2 (persona) to get frustrated, get disappointed
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ persona] to frustrate; [+ proyecto, aspiración, deseo, sueño] to thwart
    2) (=abortar) [+ atentado, operación] to foil
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <persona> to frustrate; <planes> to thwart; <esperanzas> to dash
    b) <atentado> to foil
    2.
    frustrarse v pron planes to be thwarted, fail; esperanzas to come to nothing
    * * *
    = thwart, scupper, cripple, frustrate, baffle, stymie, foil, defeat, forestall, spoil, hamstring, exasperate, cast + a blight on, blight.
    Ex. A public library's design can go far in either reinforcing or thwarting the intimacy of reading and in determining its success -- functionally, aesthetically and financially.
    Ex. This arrangement could definitely help solve the librarian's problems, unless unexpected events scupper it.
    Ex. The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
    Ex. The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
    Ex. As the domain expands, the problem of rule formalisation may even baffle a human expert.
    Ex. So, in a lot of cases the ability to take advantage of technologically sophisticated younger faculty is stymied by these conflicting interests.
    Ex. The author considers the incidence of arson in US libraries and some ways of foiling arsonists through constant vigilance and observation of library users.
    Ex. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of software programs intended to defeat some of these sabotage actions.
    Ex. In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex. But if set-off did occur and threatened to set back and spoil subsequent impressions of the first forme, the tympan cloth could be rubbed over with lye to clean it.
    Ex. Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex. Radical intellectuals often seem exasperated by what appears as excessive attention paid to conceptualization.
    Ex. Rampant commercialisation of publishing is casting a blight on literature.
    Ex. The global outbreak of swine flu has spread fear through the travel sector, blighting any green shoots of recovery from the financial crisis.
    ----
    * frustrar el esfuerzo = frustrate + effort.
    * frustrar las esperanzas = shatter + Posesivo + hopes, dampen + Posesivo + hopes, dash + Posesivo + hopes.
    * frustrarse = become + frustrated, run into + the sand(s).
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <persona> to frustrate; <planes> to thwart; <esperanzas> to dash
    b) <atentado> to foil
    2.
    frustrarse v pron planes to be thwarted, fail; esperanzas to come to nothing
    * * *
    = thwart, scupper, cripple, frustrate, baffle, stymie, foil, defeat, forestall, spoil, hamstring, exasperate, cast + a blight on, blight.

    Ex: A public library's design can go far in either reinforcing or thwarting the intimacy of reading and in determining its success -- functionally, aesthetically and financially.

    Ex: This arrangement could definitely help solve the librarian's problems, unless unexpected events scupper it.
    Ex: The objection to it seems to be that by reading rubbish children cripple their own imaginative, linguistic or moral powers.
    Ex: The psychologist Abraham H Maslow has warned of 'true psychopathological effects when the cognitive needs are frustrated'.
    Ex: As the domain expands, the problem of rule formalisation may even baffle a human expert.
    Ex: So, in a lot of cases the ability to take advantage of technologically sophisticated younger faculty is stymied by these conflicting interests.
    Ex: The author considers the incidence of arson in US libraries and some ways of foiling arsonists through constant vigilance and observation of library users.
    Ex: There are hundreds, if not thousands, of software programs intended to defeat some of these sabotage actions.
    Ex: In order to forestall such an event, some libraries in Britain were stung into action by the publication of an Act of Parliament which totally ignored public libraries.
    Ex: But if set-off did occur and threatened to set back and spoil subsequent impressions of the first forme, the tympan cloth could be rubbed over with lye to clean it.
    Ex: Instead, the proposed regulations would hamstring public access.
    Ex: Radical intellectuals often seem exasperated by what appears as excessive attention paid to conceptualization.
    Ex: Rampant commercialisation of publishing is casting a blight on literature.
    Ex: The global outbreak of swine flu has spread fear through the travel sector, blighting any green shoots of recovery from the financial crisis.
    * frustrar el esfuerzo = frustrate + effort.
    * frustrar las esperanzas = shatter + Posesivo + hopes, dampen + Posesivo + hopes, dash + Posesivo + hopes.
    * frustrarse = become + frustrated, run into + the sand(s).

    * * *
    frustrar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹persona› to frustrate; ‹planes› to thwart; ‹esperanzas› to dash
    me frustra que no entiendan I find it frustrating o it frustrates me that they don't understand
    2 ‹atentado› to foil
    «planes» to be thwarted, fail; «esperanzas» to be dashed, come to nothing
    * * *

    frustrar (conjugate frustrar) verbo transitivopersonato frustrate;
    planesto thwart;
    esperanzasto dash;

    frustrarse verbo pronominal [planes] to be thwarted, fail;

    [esperanzas] to come to nothing
    frustrar verbo transitivo to frustrate
    (una esperanza) to disappoint
    'frustrar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    estropear
    - impedir
    - tronchar
    English:
    defeat
    - disappoint
    - foil
    - frustrate
    - thwart
    - baffle
    - confound
    - cross
    * * *
    vt
    1. [persona] to frustrate
    2. [posibilidades, ilusiones] to thwart, Br to put paid to;
    [plan, robo] to thwart;
    el mal tiempo frustró nuestras vacaciones the bad weather ruined our holiday
    * * *
    v/t persona frustrate; plan thwart
    * * *
    : to frustrate, to thwart

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 17 grandeza

    f.
    1 (great) size.
    en toda su grandeza in all its splendor o grandeur
    2 generosity, graciousness.
    3 greatness, grandeur, magnitude, majesty.
    4 largeness, bigness, magnitude.
    * * *
    1 (tamaño) size
    2 (importancia) greatness
    3 (generosidad) generosity
    \
    grandeza de alma magnanimity
    grandeza de ánimo moral courage
    * * *
    noun f.
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=nobleza) nobility

    la grandeza de su acción humanitariathe nobility o greatness of his humanitarian action

    grandeza de alma o espíritu — magnanimity

    2) [de artista etc] greatness
    3) (=esplendidez) grandness, impressiveness; (=ostentación) grandeur, magnificence
    4) (=personas) grandees pl
    5) (=rango) status of grandee
    6) (=tamaño) size; (=gran tamaño) bigness; (=magnitud) magnitude
    * * *
    1) (excelencia, nobleza) nobility
    2)
    a) (dignidad de Grande) rank of grandee
    * * *
    Ex. Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.
    ----
    * antigua grandeza = Posesivo + former glory.
    * darse aires de grandeza = give + Reflexivo + such airs, aggrandise + Reflexivo.
    * recuperar + Posesivo + antigua grandeza = regain + Posesivo + former glory.
    * restituir Algo a su antigua grandeza = restore + Nombre + to + Posesivo + former glory.
    * * *
    1) (excelencia, nobleza) nobility
    2)
    a) (dignidad de Grande) rank of grandee
    * * *

    Ex: Log cabins were considered symbols of democracy and the frontier spirit, and President Abraham Lincoln was viewed as a symbol of unity, hope, and the American dream of rising from a humble background to greatness.

    * antigua grandeza = Posesivo + former glory.
    * darse aires de grandeza = give + Reflexivo + such airs, aggrandise + Reflexivo.
    * recuperar + Posesivo + antigua grandeza = regain + Posesivo + former glory.
    * restituir Algo a su antigua grandeza = restore + Nombre + to + Posesivo + former glory.

    * * *
    A (excelencia, nobleza) nobility
    Compuestos:
    (liter); magnanimity
    (liter); courage, valor* (liter)
    B
    1 (dignidad de Grande) rank of grandee
    2
    (conjunto de Grandes): la grandeza the (Spanish) nobility, the (Spanish) grandees
    * * *

    grandeza sustantivo femenino
    1 (excelencia, nobleza) nobility;

    grandeza de ánimo (liter) valor(conjugate valor) (liter)
    2


    la grandeza the (Spanish) nobility o grandees

    grandeza sustantivo femenino
    1 (altura moral, generosidad) greatness
    2 (majestad y poder) grandeur
    delirios de grandeza, delusions of grandeur
    'grandeza' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    delirio
    - aire
    English:
    delusion
    - grandeur
    - greatness
    * * *
    1. [de tamaño] (great) size
    2. [esplendor] magnificence, grandeur;
    en toda su grandeza in all its splendour o grandeur
    3. [de sentimientos] generosity, graciousness;
    aceptó su derrota con grandeza he accepted defeat graciously, he was gracious in defeat;
    grandeza de espíritu generosity of spirit, magnanimity
    4. Esp [dignidad] rank of grandee
    5. Esp [nobles]
    la grandeza the Spanish nobility
    * * *
    f greatness
    * * *
    1) magnitud: greatness, size
    2) : nobility
    3) : generosity, graciousness
    4) : grandeur, magnificence

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 18 maleza

    f.
    1 undergrowth.
    2 weed, wild grass.
    * * *
    2 (arbustos) undergrowth, scrub
    * * *
    SF
    1) (=malas hierbas) weeds pl
    2) (=espesura) [de matas] undergrowth; [de zarza] thicket; [de broza] brushwood
    3) Cono Sur (=pus) pus
    4) CAm (=enfermedad) sickness, illness
    * * *
    1)
    a) (espesura) undergrowth
    b) (malas hierbas) weeds (pl)
    2) (AmL) (mala hierba) weed
    * * *
    = undergrowth, scrub, brush, foliage, thicket.
    Ex. This clearing of the terminological undergrowth is only half the battle.
    Ex. In order to reducing disease risk to livestock scrubs were fenced to prevent expansion of rabbit burrows into grazing pastures.
    Ex. They hunted and gathered and lived in wigwams constructed of branches, brush, and hides.
    Ex. The effects of precipitation and foliage attenuation and depolarization are considered to have negligible effect on the microwave mobile systems.
    Ex. Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    * * *
    1)
    a) (espesura) undergrowth
    b) (malas hierbas) weeds (pl)
    2) (AmL) (mala hierba) weed
    * * *
    = undergrowth, scrub, brush, foliage, thicket.

    Ex: This clearing of the terminological undergrowth is only half the battle.

    Ex: In order to reducing disease risk to livestock scrubs were fenced to prevent expansion of rabbit burrows into grazing pastures.
    Ex: They hunted and gathered and lived in wigwams constructed of branches, brush, and hides.
    Ex: The effects of precipitation and foliage attenuation and depolarization are considered to have negligible effect on the microwave mobile systems.
    Ex: Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.

    * * *
    1 (espesura) undergrowth
    2 (malas hierbas) weeds (pl)
    * * *

    maleza sustantivo femenino
    1 (espesura) undergrowth;
    (malas hierbas) weeds (pl)
    2 (AmL) (mala hierba) weed
    maleza sustantivo femenino
    1 (matorrales, espesura) undergrowth
    2 (hierbajos, rastrojos) weeds pl
    'maleza' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    agreste
    - paso
    - través
    - monte
    English:
    brush
    - brushwood
    - overgrown
    - scrub
    - struggle on
    - undergrowth
    - over
    - under
    - weed
    - wild
    * * *
    [arbustos] undergrowth; [malas hierbas] weeds
    * * *
    f undergrowth
    * * *
    1) : thicket, underbrush
    2) : weeds pl

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 19 matojo

    m.
    1 tuft (mata).
    2 small bush, shrub.
    * * *
    1 small shrub, bush
    * * *
    = bush, weed, thicket.
    Ex. Most drivers stop at stop signs: Some do under duress -- there may be a policeman concealed in nearby bushes, others as a matter of prudence -- a fast car with the right of way can be injurious.
    Ex. Activities such as gardening or cookery are dealt with in many books in ways which go far beyond the simple keeping down of weeds or just filling empty stomachs.
    Ex. Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    ----
    * lleno de matojos = weedy [weedier -comp., weediest -sup.].
    * * *
    = bush, weed, thicket.

    Ex: Most drivers stop at stop signs: Some do under duress -- there may be a policeman concealed in nearby bushes, others as a matter of prudence -- a fast car with the right of way can be injurious.

    Ex: Activities such as gardening or cookery are dealt with in many books in ways which go far beyond the simple keeping down of weeds or just filling empty stomachs.
    Ex: Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    * lleno de matojos = weedy [weedier -comp., weediest -sup.].

    * * *
    1 (mata) bush
    2 (AmC, Col) (matorral) thicket
    * * *
    [mata] tuft; [arbusto] bush, shrub

    Spanish-English dictionary

  • 20 matorral

    m.
    1 thicket.
    2 scrubland, land covered with underbrush, thicket.
    * * *
    1 (maleza) bushes plural, thicket
    2 (terreno) scrubland
    * * *
    SM (=conjunto de matas) thicket, bushes pl ; (=terreno) scrubland
    * * *
    a) (conjunto de matas) thicket, bushes (pl)
    b) (terreno) scrubland
    * * *
    = bush, undergrowth, scrub, chaparral, thicket.
    Ex. Most drivers stop at stop signs: Some do under duress -- there may be a policeman concealed in nearby bushes, others as a matter of prudence -- a fast car with the right of way can be injurious.
    Ex. This clearing of the terminological undergrowth is only half the battle.
    Ex. In order to reducing disease risk to livestock scrubs were fenced to prevent expansion of rabbit burrows into grazing pastures.
    Ex. Chaparrals occur in Mediterranean climates - climates with low rainfall that is concentrated in the cool season.
    Ex. Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    ----
    * quema de matorrales = bush burning.
    * * *
    a) (conjunto de matas) thicket, bushes (pl)
    b) (terreno) scrubland
    * * *
    = bush, undergrowth, scrub, chaparral, thicket.

    Ex: Most drivers stop at stop signs: Some do under duress -- there may be a policeman concealed in nearby bushes, others as a matter of prudence -- a fast car with the right of way can be injurious.

    Ex: This clearing of the terminological undergrowth is only half the battle.
    Ex: In order to reducing disease risk to livestock scrubs were fenced to prevent expansion of rabbit burrows into grazing pastures.
    Ex: Chaparrals occur in Mediterranean climates - climates with low rainfall that is concentrated in the cool season.
    Ex: Abraham looked up and there in a thicket he saw a ram caught by its horns.
    * quema de matorrales = bush burning.

    * * *
    1 (conjunto de matas) thicket, bushes (pl)
    2 (terreno) scrubland
    * * *

    matorral sustantivo masculino


    matorral sustantivo masculino brushes, thicket
    'matorral' also found in these entries:
    English:
    thicket
    * * *
    1. [conjunto de matas] thicket
    2. [terreno] scrubland, brush
    * * *
    m thicket
    * * *
    1) : thicket
    2) : scrub, scrubland
    * * *
    1.(arbustos) bushes

    Spanish-English dictionary

См. также в других словарях:

  • HESCHEL, ABRAHAM JOSHUA — (1907–1972), U.S. scholar and philosopher, descended on his father s side from and abraham joshua heschel of apta (Opatow); on his mother s side from levi isaac of berdichev . After traditional Jewish studies, he obtained rabbinic ordination… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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